Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF CHRISTODOULIDOU v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 16085/90/2009
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 22/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF CHRISTODOULIDOU v. TURKEY
(Application no. 16085/90)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
22 September 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Christodoulidou v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Giovanni Bonello,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Işıl Karakaş, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 1 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 16085/90) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the European Commission of Human Rights (“the Commission”) under former Article 25 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Cypriot national, Mrs L. C. (“the applicant”), on 12 January 1990.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr L. C. and Mr C. C., two lawyers practising in Nicosia. The Turkish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Z.M. Necatigil.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the Turkish occupation of the northern part of Cyprus had deprived her of her properties and that she had been subjected to treatment contrary to the Convention during a demonstration.
4. The application was transmitted to the Court on 1 November 1998, when Protocol No. 11 to the Convention came into force (Article 5 § 2 of Protocol No. 11).
5. By a decision of 7 December 1999 the Court declared the application partly admissible.
6. The applicant and the Government each filed observations on the merits (Rule 59 § 1). In addition, third-party comments were received from the Government of Cyprus, which had exercised its right to intervene (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b)).
THE FACTS
7. The applicant was born in 1927 and lives in Nicosia.
I. THE APPLICANT'S HOUSE AND PROPERTIES
8. The applicant claimed that until 1974 she had been permanently residing in a house she owned at 33, 28th October Street, Kyrenia (northern Cyprus). She also owned a garden at Kazafani and three fields with trees at Karmi (in the locality known as “Horteri Chomatovounos”), all in the District of Kyrenia.
9. According to the applicant, her house had a surface-area of 190 square metres, with three large drawing rooms, a spacious dining room and kitchen, four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a storeroom and verandas. It was surrounded by a 753 sq. m garden and furnished mainly with period antiques and luxury items.
10. In support of her claim to ownership, the applicant produced copies of the relevant certificates of ownership of Turkish-occupied immovable properties issued by the Republic of Cyprus. According to these documents, the applicant's properties were registered as follows:
(a) Kyrenia/Pano Kyrenia, plot no. 45, sheet/plan 12/21.1.12, registration no. C1703, house with garden;
(b) Kyrenia/Kazafani, plot no. 95/1/1, sheet/plan 12/22W2, garden/orchard; area: 2,351 sq. m;
(c) Kyrenia/Karmi, plot no. 222, sheet/plan 12/27E2, field; area: 3,138 sq. m;
(d) Kyrenia/Karmi, plot no. 282, sheet/plan 12/27E2, field; area: 1,650 sq. m;
(e) Kyrenia/Karmi, plot no. 291/1, sheet/plan 12/27E2, field; area: 2,264 sq. m.
11. Since the 1974 Turkish intervention, the applicant has been deprived of her properties, which were located in the area under the occupation and control of the Turkish military authorities, who prevented her from having access to and using her properties.
II. THE DEMONSTRATION OF 19 JULY 1989
12. On 19 July 1989, the applicant joined an anti-Turkish demonstration in the Ayios Kassianos area in Nicosia in which the applicants in the Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou v. Turkey and Loizidou v. Turkey cases (see below) also took part.
A. The applicant's version of events
13. According to an affidavit sworn by the applicant at Nicosia District Court on 10 April 2000, the demonstration of 19 July 1989 was peaceful and was held on the fifteenth anniversary of the Turkish intervention in Cyprus, in support of the missing persons and to protest against human- rights violations. The applicant and other women had planned to gather in the grounds of the Ayios Kassianos School and to stage a sit-in in protest against the occupation of the northern part of the island. They also asked the Bishop of Kitium to conduct a service in the St. George's Chapel, which was located near the school.
14. When the applicant arrived, the school grounds were filled with a group of mostly young women, who were singing. The applicant stood near a water tank. She noticed the presence of UN soldiers and Turkish policemen armed with batons.
15. The UN officers invited the demonstrators to leave the premises. However, within a matter of seconds, the Turkish policemen had rushed towards them. Some of the women were grabbed by their clothes and hit with guns and batons. The applicant herself was hit and pushed. She received what she described as a “terrible blow in the right leg beneath the tibia”. She realised she had been hit with a sharp object, namely a bayonet wielded by a Turkish soldier. Her leg started to bleed profusely and she felt herself drifting into unconsciousness. She shouted: “Help, help, please, I am losing my leg”. Some demonstrators put her on a stretcher and she was taken by ambulance to Nicosia General Hospital.
16. At the hospital, her wound was stitched internally and externally. She was told to take ten days' absolute rest. For the next six months, the applicant suffered considerable pain in her leg. She could not walk or even put weight on the leg and was forced to use crutches. She experienced pain with changes in the weather. She continued to have problems climbing stairs and the scar on her leg remained visible.
17. As many years had passed since the demonstration, three of the witnesses who saw the wound being inflicted (two friends and the editor of a local newspaper) had already died. However, an affidavit sworn by a witness, Mrs O. N., corroborated her version of events.
18. In support of her claim of ill-treatment, the applicant produced a medical certificate issued on 27 March 2000 by Doctor S. G., a specialist orthopaedic surgeon practising in Nicosia, which reads as follows:
“The [applicant] was injured on 19.7.1989 by Turks following an attack on women near Ayios Kassianos in Nicosia in the Ayios Kassianos Primary School. The findings of the examination were:
Injury to the right lower limb of the upper third of the tibia with an open wound about 9cm long. The wound was caused with a sharp object.
Treatment of the patient and its course:
1. Surgical cleaning of the wound;
2. Stitching up of the wound;
3. Pharmaceutical treatment;
4. Regular dressing of the wound;
5. Complete rest in bed for ten days with leg supported by pillows;
6. The stitches removed ten days later;
7. The patient [should walk] with crutches for 1 month;
Present condition:
1. Evident ugly scar, about 9cm in the upper third of the tibia, transversal;
2. Loss of feeling in the area of the wound.”
B. The Government's version of events
19. The Government alleged that the applicant had participated in a violent demonstration with the aim of inflaming anti-Turkish sentiment. The demonstrators, supported by the Greek-Cypriot administration, were demanding that the “Green Line” in Nicosia should be dismantled. Some carried Greek flags, clubs, knives and wire-cutters. They were acting in a provocative manner and shouting abuse. The demonstrators were warned in Greek and English that unless they dispersed they would be arrested in accordance with the laws of the “TRNC”. The applicant was arrested by the Turkish-Cypriot police after crossing the UN buffer zone and entering the area under Turkish-Cypriot control. The Turkish-Cypriot police intervened in the face of the manifest inability of the Greek-Cypriot authorities and the UN Force in Cyprus to contain the incursion and its possible consequences.
20. No force was used against demonstrators who did not intrude into the “TRNC” border area and, in the case of demonstrators who were arrested for violating the border, no more force was used than was reasonably necessary in the circumstances in order to arrest and detain the persons concerned. No one was ill-treated. It was possible that some of the demonstrators had hurt themselves in the confusion or in attempting to scale barbed wire or other fencing. Had the Turkish police, or anyone else, assaulted or beaten any of the demonstrators, the UN Secretary General would no doubt have referred to this in his report to the Security Council.
C. The UN Secretary General's report
21. In his report of 7 December 1989 on the UN operations in Cyprus, the UN Secretary General stated, inter alia:
“A serious situation, however, arose in July as a result of a demonstration by Greek Cypriots in Nicosia. The details are as follows:
(a) In the evening of 19 July, some 1,000 Greek Cypriot demonstrators, mostly women, forced their way into the UN buffer zone in the Ayios Kassianos area of Nicosia. The demonstrators broke through a wire barrier maintained by UNFICYP and destroyed an UNFICYP observation post. They then broke through the line formed by UNFICYP soldiers and entered a former school complex where UNFICYP reinforcements regrouped to prevent them from proceeding further. A short while later, Turkish-Cypriot police and security forces elements forced their way into the area and apprehended 111 persons, 101 of them women;
(b) The Ayios Kassianos school complex is situated in the UN buffer zone. However, the Turkish forces claim it to be on their side of the cease-fire line. Under working arrangements with UNFICYP, the Turkish-Cypriot security forces have patrolled the school grounds for several years within specific restrictions. This patrolling ceased altogether as part of the unmanning agreement implemented last May;
(c) In the afternoon of 21 July, some 300 Greek Cypriots gathered at the main entrance to the UN protected area in Nicosia, in which the UN headquarters is located, to protest the continuing detention by the Turkish-Cypriot authorities of those apprehended at Ayios Kassianos. The demonstrators, whose number fluctuated between 200 and 2,000, blocked all UN traffic through this entrance until 30 July, when the Turkish-Cypriot authorities released the last two detainees;
(d) The events described above created considerable tension in the island and intensive efforts were made, both at the UN headquarters and at Nicosia, to contain and resolve the situation. On 21 July, I expressed my concern at the events that have taken place and stressed that it was vital that all parties keep in mind the purpose of the UN buffer zone as well as their responsibility to ensure that that area was not violated. I also urged the Turkish-Cypriot authorities to release without delay all those who had been detained. On 24 July, the President of the Security Council announced that he had conveyed to the representatives of all the parties, on behalf of the members of the Council, the Council's deep concern at the tense situation created by the incidents of 19 July. He also stressed the need strictly to respect the UN buffer zone and appealed for the immediate release of all persons still detained. He asked all concerned to show maximum restraint and to take urgent steps that would bring about a relaxation of tension and contribute to the creation of an atmosphere favourable to the negotiations.”
III. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Cypriot Criminal Code
22. Section 70 of the Cypriot Criminal Code reads as follows:
“Where five or more persons assemble with intent to commit an offence, or, being assembled with intent to carry out some common purpose, conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause persons in the neighbourhood to fear that the persons so assembled will commit a breach of the peace, or will by such assembly needlessly and without any reasonable occasion provoke other persons to commit a breach of the peace they are an unlawful assembly.
It is immaterial that the original assembly was lawful if, being assembled, they conduct themselves with a common purpose in such a manner as aforesaid.
When an unlawful assembly has begun to execute the purpose, whether of a public or of a private nature, for which it assembled by a breach of the peace and to the terror of the public, the assembly is called a riot, and the persons assembled are said to be riotously assembled.”
23. According to section 71 of the Criminal Code, any person who takes part in an unlawful assembly is guilty of a misdemeanour and liable to imprisonment for one year.
24. Section 80 of the Criminal Code provides:
“Any person who carries in public without lawful occasion any offensive arm or weapon in such a manner as to cause terror to any person is guilty of a misdemeanour, and is liable to imprisonment for two years, and his arms or weapons shall be forfeited.”
25. According to section 82 of the Criminal Code, it is an offence to carry a knife outside the home.
B. Police officers' powers of arrest
26. The relevant part of Chapter 155, section 14 of the Criminal Procedure Law states:
“(1) Any officer may, without warrant, arrest any person -
...
(b) who commits in his presence any offence punishable with imprisonment;
(c) who obstructs a police officer, while in the execution of his duty...”
C. Offence of illegal entry into “TRNC” territory
27. Section 9 of Law No. 5/72 states:
“... Any person who enters a prohibited military area without authorization, or by stealth, or fraudulently, shall be tried by a military court in accordance with the Military Offences Act; those found guilty shall be punished.”
28. Subsections 12 (1) and (5) of the Aliens and Immigration Law read as follows:
“1. No person shall enter or leave the Colony except through an approved port.
...
5. Any person who contravenes or fails to observe any of the provisions of subsections (1), (2), (3) or (4) of this section shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to a fine not exceeding one hundred pounds or to both such imprisonment and fine.”
THE LAW
I. PRELIMINARY ISSUE
29. In its decision on the admissibility of the application, the Court stated that in the light of its findings in the case of Loizidou v. Turkey ((merits), 18 December 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI), the alleged violations of Articles 3, 11 and 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 were imputable to Turkey. As a result, the application could not be rejected as incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention or of its Protocols.
30. The Court sees no reasons to depart from this finding. It will therefore proceed on the assumption that Turkey is responsible for the acts complained of, even if performed by the authorities of the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (the “TRNC”).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
31. The applicant complained that since 1974, Turkey had prevented her from exercising her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions.
She invoked Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
32. The Government disputed this claim.
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The Government
33. The Government pointed out that the “TRNC” had in fact taken action to expropriate the properties claimed by the applicant. It would be unrealistic not to give any effect to the “TRNC's” acts, which had to be assumed to have been legally valid under the Convention.
34. Challenging the conclusions reached by the Court in the Loizidou v. Turkey judgment ((merits), cited above), the Government asserted that the applicant's inability to gain access to her property had depended on a number of factors, such as the cease-fire arrangements, the agreement for the relocation of the populations, the unmanning agreement, the status of the UN buffer zone and the agreed principles of bi-communality and bi-zonality for an eventual settlement of the Cyprus problem. Moreover, the aim of the demonstration of 19 July 1989 had been to make political propaganda and the applicant had not genuinely intended to go to the property.
35. Even assuming that a question could arise under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Government argued that the interference with the applicant's property rights had been justified under this provision. In particular, owing to the relocation of the populations, it had been necessary to facilitate the rehabilitation of Turkish-Cypriot refugees and to renovate and put to better use abandoned Greek-Cypriot property. The exercise of the right of property had had to be restricted or limited, as there was a public interest in not undermining the inter-communal talks. The status of the UN buffer zone had also rendered it necessary to regulate the right of access to possessions until a settlement of the political problem was achieved.
36. In the light of all the above, the Government submitted that it would have been unrealistic to grant individual applicants a right of access to property and consequent property rights in isolation from the political situation. The issues of property and compensation could only be settled through negotiations.
2. The applicant
37. The applicant stressed that she was the owner of the properties described in paragraph 10 above, as evidenced by the relevant certificates of ownership that had been issued by the Republic of Cyprus. The respondent Government had failed to produce the full, original records from the Land Office, which they had illegally detained since 1974.
38. The applicant argued that the interference with her property rights could not be justified under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as it had not been in accordance with the law or with the principle of proportionality. She relied on the findings of the Court in the case of Loizidou ((merits), cited above).
3. The third-party intervener
39. The Government of Cyprus submitted that Turkey should be held responsible for the acts complained of by the applicant, as it had overall control over northern Cyprus. The inter-communal talks could not provide a justification for a continuing violation of the right of property. The aims invoked by the respondent Government could not be comprised in the notion of “general interest” and in any event the means employed were wholly disproportionate.
B. The Court's assessment
40. The Court notes, firstly, that the documents submitted by the applicant (see paragraph 10 above) provide prima facie evidence that she had title to the properties at issue. As the respondent Government have failed to produce convincing evidence to rebut this, the Court considers that these properties were “possessions” of the applicant within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
41. The Court observes that in the case of Loizidou v. Turkey ((merits), cited above, §§ 63-64), it reasoned as follows:
“63. ... as a consequence of the fact that the applicant has been refused access to the land since 1974, she has effectively lost all control over, as well as all possibilities to use and enjoy, her property. The continuous denial of access must therefore be regarded as an interference with her rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such an interference cannot, in the exceptional circumstances of the present case to which the applicant and the Cypriot Government have referred, be regarded as either a deprivation of property or a control of use within the meaning of the first and second paragraphs of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, it clearly falls within the meaning of the first sentence of that provision as an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. In this respect the Court observes that hindrance can amount to a violation of the Convention just like a legal impediment.
64. Apart from a passing reference to the doctrine of necessity as a justification for the acts of the 'TRNC' and to the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks, the Turkish Government have not sought to make submissions justifying the above interference with the applicant's property rights which is imputable to Turkey.
It has not, however, been explained how the need to rehouse displaced Turkish Cypriot refugees in the years following the Turkish intervention in the island in 1974 could justify the complete negation of the applicant's property rights in the form of a total and continuous denial of access and a purported expropriation without compensation.
Nor can the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks involving both communities in Cyprus provide a justification for this situation under the Convention. In such circumstances, the Court concludes that there has been and continues to be a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.”
42. In the case of Cyprus v. Turkey ([GC], no. 25781/94, ECHR 2001-IV) the Court confirmed the above conclusions (§§ 187 and 189):
“187. The Court is persuaded that both its reasoning and its conclusion in the Loizidou judgment (merits) apply with equal force to displaced Greek Cypriots who, like Mrs Loizidou, are unable to have access to their property in northern Cyprus by reason of the restrictions placed by the 'TRNC' authorities on their physical access to that property. The continuing and total denial of access to their property is a clear interference with the right of the displaced Greek Cypriots to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
...
189. .. there has been a continuing violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by virtue of the fact that Greek-Cypriot owners of property in northern Cyprus are being denied access to and control, use and enjoyment of their property as well as any compensation for the interference with their property rights.”
43. The Court sees no reason in the instant case to depart from the conclusions which it reached in the Loizidou and Cyprus v. Turkey cases (op. cit.; see also Demades v. Turkey (merits), no. 16219/90, § 46, 31 July 2003).
44. Accordingly, it concludes that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by virtue of the fact that the applicant was denied access to and the control, use and enjoyment of her properties as well as any compensation for the interference with her property rights.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION, READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
45. The applicant complained of a violation under Article 14 of the Convention on account of discriminatory treatment against her in the enjoyment of her rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. She alleged that this discrimination had been based on her national origin and religious beliefs.
Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
46. The Court recalls that in the case of Alexandrou v. Turkey (no. 16162/90, §§ 38-39, 20 January 2009) it found that it was not necessary to carry out a separate examination of the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention. The Court does not see any reason to depart from that approach in the present case (see also, mutatis mutandis, Eugenia Michaelidou Ltd and Michael Tymvios v. Turkey, no. 16163/90, §§ 37-38, 31 July 2003).
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 3 OF THE CONVENTION
47. The applicant complained about the treatment administered to her during the demonstration of 19 July 1989.
She invoked Article 3 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
48. The Government disputed her claim.
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The Government
49. Relying on their version of the events (see paragraphs 19-20 above), the Government submitted that this part of the application should be determined on the basis of the Commission's findings in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou v. Turkey (applications nos. 15299/89 and 15300/89, Commission's report of 8 June 1993, Decisions and Reports (DR) 86, p. 4), as the factual and legal bases of the present application were the same as in that pilot case.
50. In any event, the applicant's allegation that she had been “assaulted and severely beaten up by Turkish military personnel” lacked any factual basis. The applicant's version of events was not credible and was self-contradictory: she had never been arrested and the alleged bruises on her leg could not have been inflicted by blows from a blunt instrument, such as a club or a stick, but were consistent with a wound caused by a sharp object, such as barbed wire.
51. Given the importance of preserving the integrity of the UN buffer zone from unauthorised entry or activities by civilians, the fact that the applicant was prevented from violating the zone and the cease-fire line could not, in itself, constitute a breach of Article 3 of the Convention.
2. The applicant
52. The applicant considered that her case had been proven beyond reasonable doubt and that the treatment administered to her was entirely unjustified. Having regard to its physical and mental effects, as well as to her sex and age, it could be described as degrading and grossly humiliating.
53. The demonstration had been peaceful and the demonstrators were women. The applicant had been attacked and brutally beaten without justification. Not only had the use of force been unnecessary, she had not been given any assistance and had been left helpless. It had only been with the help of a journalist and other demonstrators that she had been taken to Nicosia General Hospital.
3. The third-party intervener
54. The Government of Cyprus alleged that the findings of the Commission in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou (cited above) could not survive in the light of the Loizidou judgment (cited above). Turkey was responsible for the acts of the “TRNC” police when they made an incursion into the buffer zone.
55. The attack on the applicant by a Turkish soldier with a fixed bayonet had been made without justification and had reached the minimum level of severity to come within the notion of “degrading treatment”. This treatment could also be qualified as “torture”, having regard to the intensity of the suffering inflicted and to the intention to punish a demonstrator and/or to intimidate other demonstrators.
B. The Court's assessment
56. The general principles concerning the prohibition of torture and of inhuman or degrading treatment are exposed in Protopapa v. Turkey, no. 16084/90, §§ 39-45, 24 February 2009.
57. As to the application of these principles to the present case, the Court observes that it is undisputed that the applicant was involved in a physical confrontation with the Turkish or Turkish-Cypriot forces during a demonstration which gave rise to an extremely tense situation. It will be recalled that in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou, the Commission found that a number of demonstrators had resisted arrest, that the police forces had broken their resistance and that in that context there was a high risk that the demonstrators would be treated roughly, and even suffer injuries, in the course of the arrest operation (see the Commission's report, cited above, §§ 113-115). The Court does not see any reason to depart from these findings and will take due account of the state of heightened tension at the time the acts complained of took place.
58. It further observes that the applicant submitted that she was hit and pushed. She also alleged that a Turkish soldier hit her on the leg with a bayonet, causing a deep wound in her upper tibia (see paragraph 15 above). The applicant's version of events is corroborated by a sworn affidavit of an eye-witness (see paragraph 17 above) and by the medical certificate signed by Dr S. G. (see paragraph 18 above). Even though issued in March 2000, which is more than ten years after the events of 19 July 1989, this certificate reconstructs the history of the treatment administered to the applicant at Nicosia General Hospital after the demonstration. It states that she had suffered an open wound about 9 cm long on the upper third of her tibia and that this injury was likely to have been caused by a sharp object. Stitches were applied and she had had to use crutches for one month. In 2000 the patient still had a scar and had lost feeling in the area of the wound.
59. The Court considers that it has been established that the applicant's injury was caused by the Turkish or Turkish-Cypriot police. Moreover, a serious traumatic episode such as the wound suffered by the applicant is not consistent with a minor physical confrontation between her and the police officers. There is nothing to show that the applicant, who was not arrested, had offered resistance to the police in the execution of their duties to the extent that it had been necessary to inflict a wound with a sharp object. It follows that the respondent State's agents used excessive force against the applicant, which had not been rendered strictly necessary by the state of heightened tension surrounding the demonstration of 19 July 1989 and/or by the applicant's own behaviour.
60. Having regard to its physical and mental effects and to the applicant's sex, the Court considers that the treatment inflicted on the applicant by the Turkish police amounted to “inhuman” and “degrading” treatment within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention.
61. It follows that there has been a violation of this provision.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 11 OF THE CONVENTION
62. The applicant complained of a violation of her right to freedom of peaceful assembly.
She invoked Article 11 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and to freedom of association with others, including the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.
2. No restrictions shall be placed on the exercise of these rights other than such as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others. This Article shall not prevent the imposition of lawful restrictions on the exercise of these rights by members of the armed forces, of the police or of the administration of the State.”
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The Government
63. The Government disputed this claim, observing that given its violent character, the demonstration was clearly outside the scope of Article 11 of the Convention and constituted an unlawful assembly. Knives and other cutting instruments had been found in the possession of some of the arrested demonstrators. The Government referred on this point to sections 70, 71, 80 and 82 of the Cyprus Criminal Code, which was applicable in the “TRNC” (see paragraphs 22-25 above) and recalled that according to Chapter 155 of the Criminal Procedure Law (see paragraph 26 above), the police had the power to arrest persons involved in violent demonstrations. Moreover, it was an offence under the laws of the “TRNC” to violate the borders of the State.
64. In view of the above, the Government considered that the “TRNC” police had intervened in the interests of national security and/or public safety and for the prevention of disorder and crime. There was no justification for the demonstrators, including the applicant, violating the UN buffer zone.
2. The applicant
65. The applicant alleged that the Turkish-Cypriot police had violently suppressed her right to freedom of peaceful assembly. This interference was not prescribed by the laws of the Republic of Cyprus and a protest sit-in could not have posed a threat to Turkey's national security. In any event, the brutal police intervention was entirely disproportionate.
3. The third-party intervener
66. The Government of Cyprus observed that the interference by the Turkish police with the peaceful assembly which was taking place in the buffer zone had not been prescribed by law, was unnecessary and grossly disproportionate in relation to any conduct by the applicant or any claimed public-order issue which could have arisen. The laws of the Republic of Cyprus, applicable to the area where the demonstration took place, did not permit such an interference. The respondent Government could not alter the legal system in the occupied territory and had not invoked any Turkish law that could have provided a legal basis for its agents' behaviour.
67. The Government of Cyprus finally observed that the UN buffer zone was not within the lawful jurisdiction of the Turkish forces and their incursion into that zone was contrary to the ceasefire arrangements.
B. The Court's assessment
68. The Court notes that the applicant and other women clashed with Turkish-Cypriot police while demonstrating in or in the vicinity of the Ayios Kassianos school in Nicosia. The demonstration was dispersed and some of the demonstrators were arrested. Under these circumstances, the Court considers that there has been an interference with the applicant's right of assembly (see Protopapa, cited above, § 104).
69. This interference had a legal basis, namely sections 70 and 71 of the Cypriot Criminal Code (see paragraphs 22-23 above) and section 14 of the Criminal Procedure Law (see paragraph 26 above), and was thus “prescribed by law” within the meaning of Article 11 § 2 of the Convention. In this respect, the Court recalls that in the case of Foka v. Turkey (no. 28940/95, §§ 82-84, 24 June 2008) it held that the “TRNC” was exercising de facto authority over northern Cyprus and that the responsibility of Turkey for the acts of the “TRNC” was inconsistent with the applicant's view that the measures adopted by it should always be regarded as lacking a “lawful” basis in terms of the Convention. The Court therefore concluded that when, as in the Foka case, an act of the “TRNC” authorities was in compliance with laws in force within the territory of northern Cyprus, it should in principle be regarded as having a legal basis in domestic law for the purposes of the Convention. It does not see any reason to depart, in the instant case, from that finding, which is not in any way inconsistent with the view adopted by the international community regarding the establishment of the “TRNC” or the fact that the Government of the Republic of Cyprus remains the sole legitimate government of Cyprus (see Cyprus v. Turkey, cited above, §§ 14, 61, 90).
70. There remain the questions whether the interference pursued a legitimate aim and was necessary in a democratic society.
71. The Government submitted that the interference pursued legitimate aims, including the protection of national security and/or public safety and the prevention of disorder and crime.
72. The Court notes that in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou, the Commission found that the demonstration on 19 July 1989 was violent, that it had broken through the UN defence lines and constituted a serious threat to peace and public order on the demarcation line in Cyprus (see Commission's report, cited above, §§ 109-110). The Court sees no reason to depart from these findings, which were based on the UN Secretary General's report, on a video film and on photographs submitted by the respondent Government before the Commission. It emphasises that in his report, the UN Secretary General stated that the demonstrators had “forced their way into the UN buffer zone in the Ayios Kassianos area of Nicosia”, that they had broken “through a wire barrier maintained by UNFICYP and destroyed an UNFICYP observation post” before breaking “through the line formed by UNFICYP soldiers” and entering “a former school complex” (see paragraph 21 above).
73. The Court refers, firstly, to the fundamental principles underlying its judgments relating to Article 11 (see Djavit An v. Turkey, no. 20652/92, §§ 56-57, ECHR 2003-III; Piermont v. France, 27 April 1995, §§ 76-77, Series A no. 314; and Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben” v. Austria, 21 June 1988, § 32, Series A no. 139). It is clear from this case-law that the authorities have a duty to take appropriate measures with regard to demonstrations in order to ensure their peaceful conduct and the safety of all citizens (see Oya Ataman v. Turkey, no. 74552/01, § 35, 5 December 2006). However, they cannot guarantee this absolutely and they have a wide discretion in the choice of the means to be used (see Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben”, cited above, § 34).
74. While an unlawful situation does not, in itself, justify an infringement of freedom of assembly (see Cisse v. France, no. 51346/99, § 50, ECHR 2002-III (extracts)), interferences with the right guaranteed by Article 11 of the Convention are in principle justified for the prevention of disorder or crime and for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others where, as in the instant case, demonstrators engage in acts of violence (see, a contrario, Bukta and Others v. Hungary, no. 25691/04, § 37, 17 July 2007, and Oya Ataman, cited above, §§ 41-42).
75. The Court further observes that, as stated in the UN Secretary General's report of 7 December 1989 (see paragraph 21 above), the demonstrators had forced their way into the UN buffer zone. According to the “TRNC” authorities, they also entered “TRNC” territory, thus committing offences punishable under the “TRNC” laws (see paragraphs 27-28 above). In this respect, the Court notes that it does not have at its disposal any element capable of casting doubt upon the respondent Government's statement that the area entered by some of the demonstrators was “TRNC” territory. In the Court's view, the intervention of the Turkish and/or Turkish-Cypriot forces was not due to the political nature of the demonstration but was provoked by its violent character and by the violation of the “TRNC” borders by some of the demonstrators (see Protopapa, cited above, § 110).
76. In these conditions and having regard to the wide margin of appreciation left to the States in this sphere (see Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben”, cited above, § 34), the Court holds that the interference with the applicant's right to freedom of assembly was not, in the light of all the circumstances of the case, disproportionate for the purposes of Article 11 § 2.
77. Consequently, there has been no violation of Article 11 of the Convention.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
78. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage
1. The parties' submissions
(a) The applicant
79. In her just satisfaction claims of April 2000, the applicant requested 289,746 Cypriot pounds (CYP – approximately 495,060 euros (EUR)) for pecuniary damage. She relied on an expert's report assessing the value of her losses which included the loss of annual rent collected or expected to be collected from renting out her properties, plus interest from the date on which such rents were due until the date of payment. The rent claimed was for the period dating back to January 1987, when the respondent Government accepted the right of individual petition, until 2000. The applicant did not claim compensation for any purported expropriation since she was still the legal owner of the properties. The valuation report contained a description of Kyrenia, Kazaphani and Karmi, where the applicant's properties were located.
80. The starting point of the valuation report was the rental value of the applicant's properties in 1974, calculated on the basis of a percentage (varying from 6% to 4%) of their market value. This sum was subsequently adjusted upwards according to an average annual rental increase of 12% (5% for the house described in paragraph 10 (a) above). Compound interest for delayed payment was applied at a rate of 8% per annum.
81. According to the expert, the 1974 values of the applicant's properties were as follows:
- property described in paragraph 10 (a) above: market value CYP 26,500 (approximately EUR 45,277); rental value CYP 1,325 (approximately EUR 2,263);
- property described in paragraph 10 (b) above: market value CYP 9,404 (approximately EUR 16,067); rental value CYP 564 (approximately EUR 963);
- property described in paragraph 10 (c) above: market value CYP 3,138 (approximately EUR 5,361); rental value CYP 188 (approximately EUR 321);
- property described in paragraph 10 (d) above: market value CYP 1,650 (approximately EUR 2,819); rental value CYP 99 (approximately EUR 169);
- property described in paragraph 10 (e) above: market value CYP 2,264 (approximately EUR 3,868); rental value CYP 136 (approximately EUR 232).
82. In a letter of 28 January 2008 the applicant observed that it had been a considerable time since she had presented her claims for just satisfaction and that the claim for pecuniary losses needed to be updated according to the increase in the market value of land in Cyprus (between 10 and 15% per annum).
83. In her just satisfaction claims of April 2000, the applicant also claimed CYP 40,000 (approximately EUR 68,344) in respect of non-pecuniary damage. She stated that this sum had been calculated on the basis of the sum awarded by the Court in the Loizidou case ((just satisfaction), 28 July 1998, Reports 1998-IV) whilst, taking into account, however, the fact that the period for which the damage was claimed in the instant case was longer and there had also been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention. She also claimed CYP 20,000 (approximately EUR 34,172) in respect of the moral damage suffered for the loss of her home and CYP 40,000 (approximately EUR 68,344) for the “violations of Articles 3, 10 and 11” of the Convention.
84. The total sum claimed for non-pecuniary damage was thus CYP 100,000 (approximately EUR 170,860).
(b) The Government
85. Following a request from the Court, on 15 September 2008 the Government filed comments on the applicant's claims for just satisfaction. They observed that the applicant's properties were “fields” and that very little rent could be obtained from fields in Cyprus. In any event, the alleged 1974 market value of the properties was exorbitant, highly excessive and speculative; it was not based on any real data which could be used to make a comparison and made insufficient allowance for the volatility of the property market and its susceptibility to influences both domestic and international. The report submitted by the applicant had instead proceeded on the assumption that the property market would have continued to flourish with sustained growth during the whole period under consideration.
86. As an annual increase in the value of the properties had been applied, it would be unfair to add compound interest for delays in payment. Moreover, the applicant's calculations had made no allowance for outgoings such as tax liabilities, expenses and costs for repairing the properties.
87. Finally, the Government considered that the sum claimed in respect of non-pecuniary damage (CYP 40 000) was highly excessive, as it was the double the amount that had been awarded in the Loizidou case ((just satisfaction), cited above).
(c) The third-party intervener
88. The Government of Cyprus fully supported the applicant's claims for just satisfaction.
2. The Court's assessment
89. The Court observes that it has found a violation of Article 3 of the Convention on account of the treatment inflicted on the applicant by the Turkish police (see paragraphs 56-61 above) and considers that an award should be made under that head, bearing in mind the seriousness of the damage sustained, which cannot be compensated for solely by a finding of a violation. Making an assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards EUR 5,000 to the applicant, plus any tax that may be chargeable on this amount.
90. As far as the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention is concerned, the Court considers that in the circumstances of the case the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage is not ready for decision. It observes, in particular, that the parties have failed to provide reliable and objective data pertaining to the prices of land and real estate in Cyprus at the date of the Turkish intervention. This failure renders it difficult for the Court to assess whether the estimate furnished by the applicant of the 1974 market value of her properties is reasonable. The question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed with due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicant (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
91. In her just satisfaction claims of April 2000, the applicant sought CYP 4,000 (approximately EUR 6,834) for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court. This sum included the cost of the expert report assessing the value of her properties.
92. The Government did not comment on this point.
93. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of costs and expenses is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed with due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicant.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
2. Holds unanimously that it is not necessary to examine whether there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention;
4. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 11 of the Convention;
5. Holds by six votes to one
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of the non-pecuniary damage related to the violation of Article 3 of the Convention;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Holds unanimously that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and of the costs and expenses is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Karakaş is annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
F.A.


PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE KARAKAÅž
In the instant case I disagree with the majority's conclusion that there has been a violation of Article 3 of the Convention. In finding a breach of this provision, the majority found it established that a Turkish or Turkish-Cypriot police officer hit the applicant on the leg with a bayonet, causing a deep wound in her upper tibia, during a violent demonstration that took place on 19 July 1989. It considered that the applicant's version of events was corroborated by:
- an affidavit sworn by a witness, Ms O. N., many years after the demonstration (see paragraph 17) and;
- the medical certificate issued by Dr S. G. on 27 March 2000, almost eleven years after the alleged incident (see paragraph 18).
When the Court is presented with conflicting accounts as to the circumstances of a case it reaches its decision on the basis of the available evidence submitted by the parties (see Kakoulli and Others v. Turkey, no. 38595/97, § 102, 22 November 2005). In assessing the evidence before it, the standard of proof adopted by the Court is that of “beyond reasonable doubt” (see Ireland v. the United Kingdom, 18 January 1978, § 161, Series A no. 25); such proof may follow from the coexistence of sufficiently strong, clear and concordant inferences or of similar unrebutted presumptions of fact.
In this connection I should like to point out that there was no independent and impartial eyewitness to confirm the applicant's version of events. In previous similar cases where the applicants alleged that they had been assaulted by Turkish soldiers or police officers, their allegations were supported by independent reports or eyewitness statements given by United Nations personnel (see in this respect, Kakoulli and Others, cited above, §§ 37-49; Isaak v. Turkey, no. 44587/98, §§ 28-33, 24 June 2008; and Solomou and Others v. Turkey, no. 36832/97, §§ 16-20, 24 June 2008). The only witness statement submitted to the Court was that of Ms N., who allegedly took part in the same demonstration. Moreover, Ms N.'s statements were obtained many years after the demonstration (emphasis added). Bearing in mind that the passage of time takes a toll on witnesses' capacity to recall events in detail and with accuracy (see Ipek v. Turkey, no. 25760/94, § 116, 17 February 2004), it is doubtful whether she would have been able to recollect incidents which occurred many years previously.
Furthermore, the applicant failed to furnish the Court with any other evidence in support of her allegations, such as independent reports, photographs or video footage of the incident. Again, in the above-mentioned cases, the applicants' allegations were backed up by such evidence (see Kakoulli and Others, §§ 51-57; Isaak, §§ 42-58; and Solomou and Others, §§ 28-36, all cited above) and the Court relied on that evidence in the establishment of the facts of those cases.
It is undisputed that the applicant was involved in a demonstration which gave rise to an extremely tense situation. In the case of Chrysostomos and Papachysostomou v. Turkey (nos. 15299/89 and 15300/89, Commission's report of 8 June 1993, DR 86, p. 4), the Commission found that a number of demonstrators had resisted arrest, that the police forces had broken their resistance and that in that context there was a high risk that the demonstrators would be treated roughly, and even suffer injuries, in the course of the arrest operation (see the Commission's report, cited above, §§ 113-115). In the instant case, moreover, the applicant was at no point arrested or detained.
Under these circumstances, it has not been established that the applicant's injury was deliberately caused by the Turkish or Turkish-Cypriot police. Moreover, there is nothing to show that the police used excessive force when they were confronted in the course of their duties with resistance to arrest by the demonstrators (see Protopapa v. Turkey, no. 16084/90, § 48, 6 July 2009).
As regards the medical report submitted by the applicant, I would like to stress that Dr G.'s pathology findings were based on the applicant's allegations and her version of events which had taken place almost eleven years previously. In this connection I would point out that in the case of Mehmet Sahin and Others v. Turkey (no. 5881/02, § 30, 30 September 2008), in which one of the applicants alleged that he had suffered ill-treatment at the hands of the gendarmes and furnished the Court with two reports obtained from the Human Rights Foundation of Diyarbakır almost four months and two years after his release from custody, the Court attached considerable weight to the passage of time and dismissed the applicant's complaints of ill-treatment.
In view of the above, I consider that the evidence before the Court does not enable it to find beyond reasonable doubt that the applicant was subjected to ill-treatment by the Turkish or Turkish-Cypriot police.


TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA CHRISTODOULIDOU C. TURCHIA
(Richiesta n. 16085/90)
SENTENZA
(meriti)
STRASBOURG
22 settembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Christodoulidou c. Turchia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente il Giovanni Bonello, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, Ledi Bianku, Işıl Karakaş, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 1 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 16085/90) contro la Repubblica di Turchia depositata presso la Commissione europea dei Diritti umani (“la Commissione”) sotto il precedente Articolo 25 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino cipriota, la Sig.ra L. C. (“la richiedente”), il 12 gennaio 1990.
2. La richiedente fu rappresentata dal Sig. L. C. e dal Sig. C. C., due avvocati che praticano a Nicosia. Il Governo turco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Z.M. Necatigil.
3. La richiedente addusse, in particolare, che l'occupazione turca della parte settentrionale di Cipro l'aveva spogliata delle sue proprietà e che lei era stata sottoposta a trattamento contrario alla Convenzione durante una dimostrazione.
4. La richiesta fu trasmessa alla Corte il 1 novembre 1998, quando Protocollo il N.ro 11 alla Convenzione entrò in vigore (Articolo 5 § 2 di Protocollo N.ro 11).
5. Con una decisione del 7 dicembre 1999 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente ammissibile.
6. La richiedente ed il Governo ognuno registrarono osservazioni sui meriti (Articolo 59 § 1). Inoltre, commenti di una terza parte intervenuta furono ricevuti dal Governo di Cipro che aveva esercitato il suo diritto ad intervenire (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 § 1 (b)).
I FATTI
7. La richiedente nacque nel 1927 e vive a Nicosia.
I. L'ALLOGGIO DELLA RICHIEDENTE E LE PROPRIETÀ
8. La richiedente affermò che dal 1974 risiedeva permanentemente in un alloggio che possedeva al 33 di via 28 ottobre a Kyrenia (Cipro settentrionale). Lei possedeva anche un giardino a Kazafani e tre campi con alberi a Karmi (nella località nota come “Horteri Chomatovounos”), tutto nel Distretto di Kyrenia.
9. Secondo la richiedente, il suo alloggio aveva un’area della superficie di 190 metri quadrati, con tre grandi stanze adibite a studio, una sala da pranzo spaziosa e una cucina, quattro camere da letto, due bagni, una dispensa e verande. Era circondata da un giardino di 753. Metri quadrati e arredata principalmente con pezzi d'antiquariato ed articoli di lusso.
10. In appoggio alla sua rivendicazione sulla proprietà, la richiedente produsse copie dei certificati attinenti di proprietà dei patrimoni immobiliari occupati dai turchi emesse dalla Repubblica di Cipro. Secondo questi documenti, le proprietà della richiedente erano registrate, come segue:
(a) Kyrenia/Pano Kyrenia, area n. 45, foglio mappale 12/21.1.12 registrazione n. C1703, alloggio con giardino;
(b) Kyrenia/Kazafani, area n. 95/1/1, foglio mappale 12/22W2 giardino/orto; l'area: 2,351 metri quadrati;
(il c) Kyrenia/Karmi, area n. 222, foglio mappale 12/27E2 il campo; l'area: 3,138 metri quadrati;
(d) Kyrenia/Karmi, area n. 282, foglio mappale 12/27E2 campo; l'area: 1,650 metri quadrati;
(e) Kyrenia/Karmi, area n. 291/1, foglio mappale 12/27E2 campo; l'area: 2,264 metri quadrati.
11. Fin dall’intervento turco del 1974, la richiedente è stata privata delle sue proprietà che erano localizzate nell'area sotto l'occupazione e il controllo delle autorità militari turche che le impedirono di accedere e di utilizzare le sue proprietà.
II. La Manifestazione del 19 luglio 1989
12. La richiedente si unì ad una manifestazione anti-turca nell'area di Ayios Kassianos il 19 luglio 1989, a Nicosia in cui anche i richiedenti nelle cause Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou c. Turchia e Loizidou c. Turchia (veda sotto) presero parte.
A. La versione della richiedente degli eventi
13. Secondo un affidavit giurato dalla richiedente presso la Corte distrettuale di Nicosia il 10 aprile 2000, la dimostrazione del 19 luglio 1989 era tranquilla e fu tenuta il quindicesimo anniversario dell'intervento turco a Cipro, in appoggio delle persone disperse e protestare contro le violazione dei diritti umani. La richiedente e altre donne avevano progettato di raggrupparsi nei pressi della Scuola diAyios Kassianos e fare un sit-in di protesta contro l'occupazione della parte settentrionale dell'isola. Loro chiesero anche al Vescovo di Kitium di celebrare un servizio nella Cappella di San Giorgio che era situata vicino alla scuola.
14. Quando la richiedente arrivò, i motivi di scuola furono riempiti con un gruppo di donne quasi sempre giovani che stavano cantando. La richiedente stette in piedi vicino un serbatoio di acqua. Lei osservò la presenza di soldati di ONU ed il turco che poliziotti hanno armato con bastoni.
15. Gli ufficiali dell’ ONU invitarono i dimostratori a lasciare i locali. All'interno di una manciata di secondi, i poliziotti turchi si erano precipitati comunque, circa di loro. Alcune delle donne furono afferrate per i loro vestiti e colpite con pistole e bastoni. La richiedente stessa fu colpita e fu spinta. Lei ricevette come ha lei stessa descritto un “colpo terribile sulla gamba destra sotto la tibia.” Lei comprese di essere stata colpita con un oggetto appuntito, vale a dire una baionetta maneggiata da un soldato turco. La sua gamba cominciò a sanguinare profusamente e lei si sentì mancare i sensi. Lei gridò: “aiuto, aiuto, per favore, io sto perdendo la gamba.” Dei dimostratori la misero su una barella e lei fu portata con l’ambulanza all’ Ospedale Generale a Nicosia.
16. All'ospedale, la sua ferita fu ricucita internamente ed esternamente. Le fu detto rimanere a riposo assoluto per dieci giorni. Per i successivi sei mesi, la richiedente soffrì di un dolore considerevole nella sua gamba. Lei non poteva camminare o anche mettere il peso sulla gamba ed era costretta ad usare le stampelle. Lei sperimentò del dolore con il cambio del tempo. Lei continuò ad avere problemi a salire le scale la cicatrice sulla sua gamba rimase visibile.
17. Siccome molti anni erano passati dalla dimostrazione, tre dei testimoni che videro infliggerle la ferita (due amici ed il redattore di un giornale locale) erano già morti. Comunque, un affidavit giurato da un testimone, la Sig.ra O. N. corroborò la sua versione degli eventi.
18. In appoggio alla sua rivendicazione di mal-trattamento, la richiedente produsse un certificato medico emesso il 27 marzo 2000 dal Dottore S. G., un chirurgo specialista ortopedico che pratica a Nicosia che si legge come segue:
“[la richiedente] fu ferita il 19.7.1989 dai turchi in seguito ad un attacco su donne vicino ad Ayios Kassianos nella scuola elementare di Ayios Kassianos a Nicosia. Le costatazioni dell'esame erano:
Danno all’arto inferiore destro del terzo superiore della tibia con una ferita aperta approssimativamente lunga 9cm. La ferita fu causata da un oggetto appuntito.
Trattamento del paziente ed il suo corso:
1. La pulizia chirurgica della ferita;
2. Sutura della ferita;
3. Trattamento farmaceutico;
4. Medicazione regolare della ferita;
5. Riposo completo a letto per dieci giorni con gamba sostenuta da cuscini;
6. I punti rimossi dieci giorni più tardi;
7. Il paziente [dovrebbe camminare] con stampelle per 1 mese;
Condizione presente:
1. Brutta cicatrice evidente, approssimativamente di 9cm nel terzo superiore della tibia, trasversale;
2. Perdita di sensibilità nell'area della ferita.”
B. La versione del Governo degli eventi
19. Il Governo addusse che la richiedente aveva partecipato ad una manifestazione violenta con lo scopo di infiammare il sentimento anti-turco. I dimostratori, sostenuti dall'amministrazione greco -cipriota stavano richiedendo che la “Linea Verde” a Nicosia avrebbe dovuto essere smantellata. Alcuni portavano bandiere greche, bastoni, coltelli e pinze tagliafili. Loro stavano agendo in modo provocativo e gridando ingiurie. I dimostratori furono avvertiti in greco e in inglese che a meno che loro non si disperdessero loro sarebbero stati arrestati in conformità con le leggi della “TRNC.” La richiedente fu arrestata dalla polizia turco-cipriota dopo ave attraversato la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU ed essere entrata nell'area sotto controllo turco-cipriota. La polizia turco-cipriota è intervenuta di fronte all'incapacità manifesta delle autorità greco- cipriote e le forze dell’ONU a Cipro di contenere l'incursione e le sue possibili conseguenze.
20. Nessuna forza fu usata contro i dimostratori che non si introdussero nell’area di confine della “TRNC” e, nel caso di dimostratori che furono arrestati per aver violato il confine, non fu usata nessuna forza che non fosse ragionevolmente necessaria nelle circostanze per arrestare e detenere le persone riguardate. Nessuno fu seviziato. Era possibile che alcuni dei dimostratori si fossero fatti male nella confusione o nel tentare di scalare il filo spinato o altra difesa. Se la polizia turca, o chiunque altro, avesse assaltato o colpito qualsiasi dei dimostratori, il Segretario Generale dell’ONU senza dubbio avrebbe riferito questo nel suo rapporto al Consiglio di Sicurezza.
C. Il rapporto del Segretario Generale dell'ONU
21. Nel suo rapporto del 7 dicembre 1989 sulle operazioni dell’ ONU a Cipro, il Segretario Generale dell'ONU ha affermato, inter alia:
“Una situazione seria, comunque sorse nel luglio come risultato di una manifestazione da parte di Greco - Ciprioti a Nicosia. I dettagli sono i seguenti:
(a) la sera del 19 luglio, circa 1,000 manifestanti ciprioti greci, soprattutto donne forzarono il loro cammino circa la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU nell’area di 'Ayios Kassianos a Nicosia. I dimostratori penetrarono in una barriera di filo sostenuta dall’ UNFICYP e distrussero una postazione di osservazione dell’UNFICYP. Loro penetrarono poi nella linea formata dai soldati dell’ UNFICYP ed entrarono in un precedente complesso scolastico dove i rinforzi dell’UNFICYP si raggrupparono per impedire loro di procedere oltre. Poco più tardi, la polizia turco-cipriota e la gli elementi della sicurezza fermarono il loro cammino nell'area e presero 111 persone, di cui 101 donne;
(b) Il complesso scolastico di Ayios Kassianos è situato nella zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU. Comunque, le forze turche sostengono sia sul loro lato della linea di tregua. Sotto le disposizioni operative dell’ UNFICYP, le forze di sicurezza turco-cipriote pattugliano il terreno della scuola da molti anni all'interno di specifiche restrizioni. Questo pattugliamento è cessato come parte dell'accordo di disarmo implementato il maggio scorso;
(c) Nel pomeriggio del 21 luglio, circa 300 Greco - Ciprioti si raggrupparono all'ingresso principale dell’area protetta dall'ONU a Nicosia dove è localizzata la sede centrale dell’ ONU, per protestare contro la detenzione continua da parte delle autorità turco-cipriote di coloro presi ad Ayios Kassianos. I manifestanti il cui numero fluttuava fra i 200 ed 2,000, rese impraticabile ogni passaggio dell’ ONU per questo ingresso sino al 30 luglio, quando le autorità turco-cipriote rilasciarono gli ultimi due detenuti;
(d) Gli eventi descritti sopra crearono tensione considerevole nell'isola e furono fatti degli sforzi intensi, sia presso la sede centrale dell’ ONU che a Nicosia, per contenere e chiarire la situazione. Il 21 luglio, espressi la mia preoccupazione circa gli eventi che sono successi e ho sottolineato che era vitale che tutte le parti ricordassero il fine della zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU così come la loro responsabilità per assicurare che quest’ area non venisse violata. Io esortai anche le autorità turco-cipriote a rilasciare senza ritardo tutti coloro che erano stati detenuti. Il 24 luglio il Presidente del Consiglio di Sicurezza annunciò, di aver portato ai rappresentanti di tutte le parti, a nome dei membri del Consiglio la preoccupazione profonda per la tensione creata dagli incidenti del 19 luglio. Lui sottolineò anche severamente il bisogno di rispettare la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU ed ancora fece appello per la liberazione immediata di tutte le persone detenute. Lui chiese a tutti i riguardati di mostrare la massimo limitazione e prendere passi urgenti per provocare un rilasciamento della tensione e contribuire alla creazione di un'atmosfera favorevole alle negoziazioni.”
III. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Il Codice Penale cipriota
22. La Sezione 70 del Codice Penale cipriota si legge come segue:
“Dove cinque o più persone si assemblano con l’ intenzione di commettere un reato, o, essendosi assemblate con l’intenzione di eseguire un fine comune, si comportano i modo tale da provocare il timore nelle persone del vicinato che le persone così assemblate commetteranno una violazione della pace, o che provocheranno superfluamente con simile riunione e senza nessuna occasione ragionevole altre persone a commettere una violazione della pace loro si trovano in una riunione illegale.
È irrilevante che la riunione originale fosse legale se, essendosi assemblate, loro si comportano con un fine comune in tale maniera come detto precedentemente.
Quando una riunione illegale incomincia ad eseguire il fine, sia di natura pubblica che privata per il quale si è assemblata con una violazione della pace ed il terrore del pubblico, la riunione viene chiamata insurrezione, e si dice che le persone assemblate siano assemblate in modo rivoltoso”
23. Secondo la sezione 71 del Codice Penale qualsiasi persona che prende parte a una riunione illegale è colpevole di un reato e passibile di reclusione per un anno.

24. La Sezione 80 del Codice Penale prevede:
“Qualsiasi persona che porta in pubblico senza occasione legittima qualsiasi arma offensiva o pistola in modo tale da come provocare terrore a qualsiasi persona è colpevole di un reato, e è passibile di reclusione per due anni, e le sue armi o pistola saranno confiscate.”
25. Secondo la sezione 82 del Codice Penale, è un reato portare un coltello fuori casa.
B. I poteri d’arresto degli agenti di polizia
26. La parte attinente del Capitolo 155, sezione 14 della Legge di Procedura Penale dichiara:
“(1) qualsiasi ufficiale può, senza garanzia, arrestare qualsiasi la persona -
...
(b) chi commette in sua presenza qualsiasi reato punibile con la reclusione;
(c) chi ostruisce un agente di polizia, durante l'esecuzione del suo dovere...”

C. Reato di entrata illegale nel territorio della “TRNC”

27. La Sezione 9 della Legge N.ro 5/72 dichiara:
“... Qualsiasi persona che entra in un'area militare proibita senza permesso, sia furtivamente, o disonestamente, sarà processato da un tribunale militare in conformità con l’Atto dei Reati Militari; quelli trovati colpevoli e saranno puniti.”
28. Le Sottosezioni 12 (1) e (5) della Legge sugli Stranieri e l’Immigrazione si legge come segue:
“1. Nessuna persona entrerà o lascerà la Colonia se non attracirca un porto approvato.
...
5. Qualsiasi persona che contravviene o non riesce ad osservare qualsiasi delle disposizioni delle sottosezioni (1), (2), (3) o (4) di questa sezione sarà colpevole di un reato e sarà passibile di reclusione per un termine che non eccede i sei mesi o di una multa che non eccede cento sterline o sia a simile reclusione e multa.”
LA LEGGE
I. QUESTIONE PREGIUDIZIALE
29. Nella sua decisione sull'ammissibilità della richiesta, la Corte affermò, che Alla luce delle sue costatazioni nella causa di Loizidou c. Turchia ((meriti), 18 dicembre 1996, Relazioni delle Sentenze e delle Decisioni 1996-VI), le violazioni addotte degli Articoli 3, 11 e 14 della Convenzione e dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sono imputabili alla Turchia. Di conseguenza, la richiesta non poteva essere respinta come incompatibile ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli.
30. La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di abbandonare questa sentenza. Procederà perciò alla presunzione che la Turchia sia responsabile per gli atti di cui ci si lamenta, anche se compiuti dalle autorità della “Repubblica turca della Cipro Settentrionale” (la “TRNC”).
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
31. La richiedente si lamentò che dal 1974, la Turchia le aveva impedito di esercitare il suo diritto al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà.
Lei invocò l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
32. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
33. Il Governo indicò che la “TRNC” aveva infatti intrapreso azioni per espropriare le proprietà rivendicate dalla richiedente. Sarebbe irreale non dare qualsiasi effetto agli atti della “TRNC” atti che si doveva presumere fossero stati giuridicamente validi sotto la Convenzione.
34. Impugnando le conclusioni a cui è giunta la Corte nella sentenza Loizidou c. Turchia ((meriti), citata sopra), il Governo asserì che l'incapacità della richiedente a guadagnare accesso alla sua proprietà era dipesa da un numero di fattori, come gli accordi di cessare il fuoco per il dislocamento delle popolazioni, l'accordo che abbatte, lo status della zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU ed i principi convenuti di bi- comunalità e bi -zonalità per un eventuale accordo del problema di Cipro. Inoltre, lo scopo della dimostrazione del 19 luglio 1989 era stato fare propaganda politica e la richiedente non aveva inteso sinceramente andare alle sue proprietà.
35. Presumendo anche che una questione potesse derivare sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, il Governo dibatté che l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà della richiedente era stata giustificata sotto questa disposizione. In particolare, a causa del dislocamento delle popolazioni, era stato necessario facilitare la riabilitazione dei rifugiati turco-ciprioti e rinnovare e fissare usare meglio le proprietà greco- cipriote abbandonate. L'esercizio del diritto di proprietà aveva dovuto essere restretto o limitato, siccome vi era un interesse pubblico nel non minare i colloqui inter-comunali. Lo status della zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU aveva reso anche necessario regolare il diritto di accesso alla proprietà sino a che non venisse realizzato un accordo del problema.
36. Alla luce di quanto sopra, il Governo presentò, che sarebbe stato irreale accordare ai richiedenti individuali un diritto di accesso alla proprietà e i diritti di proprietà conseguenti senza tener conto della situazione politica. I problemi della proprietà e del risarcimento potrebbero essere stabiliti solamente tramite negoziazioni.
2. La richiedente
37. La richiedente sottolineò che lei era la proprietaria delle proprietà descritte nel paragrafo 10 sopra, come attestato dai certificati attinenti di proprietà che erano stati emessi dalla Repubblica di Cipro. Il Governo rispondente era andato a vuoto nel produrre i completi documenti originali dell’Ufficio fondiario che loro detenevano illegalmente dal 1974.
38. La richiedente dibatté che l'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà non poteva essere giustificata sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, siccome non era stata in conformità con la legge o col principio di proporzionalità. Lei si appellò alle costatazioni della Corte nella causa Loizidou ((meriti), citata sopra).
3. La terza parte intervenuta
39. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che Turchia dovrebbe essere ritenuta responsabile per gli atti di cui si lamenta la richiedente, siccome aveva il controllo complessivo sulla Cipro settentrionale. I discorsi inter-comunali non potevano offrire una giustificazione per una violazione continua del diritto di proprietà. Gli scopi invocati dal Governo rispondente non potevano essere compresi nella nozione di “interesse generale” ed in qualsiasi caso i mezzi assunti erano completamente sproporzionati.
B. La valutazione della Corte
40. La Corte nota, in primo luogo, che i documenti presentati dalla richiedente (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra) offrono prova prima facie che lei aveva titolo sulle proprietà in questione. Siccome il Governo rispondente è andato a vuoto nel produrre una prova convincente per confutare questo, la Corte considera che queste proprietà erano “proprietà” della richiedente all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
41. La Corte osserva che nella causa Loizidou c. Turchia (meriti), citata sopra, §§ 63-64), ragionò come segue:
“63. ... come conseguenza del fatto che alla richiedente è stato rifiutato l’accesso al terreno dal 1974, lei ha perso effettivamente ogni controllo sulla sua proprietà, così come tutte le possibilità di usarla e goderne. Il rifiuto continuo di accesso deve essere considerato perciò un'interferenza coi suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Tale interferenza non può, nelle circostanze eccezionali della presente causa a cui la richiedente ed il Governo cipriota hanno fatto riferimento , essere considerata o una privazione di proprietà o un controllo dell’ uso all'interno del significato dei primo e del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Chiaramente rientra comunque, all'interno del significato della prima frase di questo provvedimento come un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della proprietà. A questo riguardo la Corte osserva che l’ostacolo può corrispondere ad una violazione della Convenzione proprio come un impedimento legale.
64. A parte un riferimento passeggero alla dottrina della necessità come giustificazione per gli atti del 'TRNC' ed al fatto che diritti di proprietà erano la materia di discorsi intercomunali, il Governo turco non ha cercato di fare osservazioni che giustificavano l'interferenza sopra coi diritti di proprietà della richiedente che sono imputabili alla Turchia.
Comunque, non è stato spiegato come il bisogno di ridare una sistemazione ai rifugiati ed espatriati ciprioti turchi negli anni seguenti l'intervento turco nell'isola nel 1974 potrebbe giustificare la negazione completa dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente nella forma di un rifiuto totale e continuo di accesso ed un'espropriazione stabilita senza risarcimento.
Neanche il fatto che i diritti di proprietà erano la materia dei discorsi di intercomunali che coinvolgono ambo le comunità a Cipro non può offrire una giustificazione per questa situazione sotto la Convenzione. In simili circostanze, la Corte conclude, che c'è stato e continua ad esserci una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.”
42. Nella causa Cipro c. Turchia ([GC], n. 25781/94, ECHR 2001-IV) la Corte confermò le conclusioni sopra (§§ 187 e 189):
“187. La Corte è persuasa che sia il suo ragionamento sia la sua conclusione nella sentenza Loizidou ( meriti) si applica con la stessa forza a Ciprioti greci espatriati che, come la Sig.ra L., non è in grado di avere accesso alla loro proprietà nella Cipro del nord in ragione delle restrizioni attuate dalle autorità 'TRNC' sul loro accesso fisico a quella proprietà. Il rifiuto totale e continuo di accesso alla loro proprietà è un'interferenza chiara col diritto degli espatriati Ciprioti greci al godimento tranquillo della proprietà all'interno del significato della prima frase dl’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
...
189. .. c'è stata una violazione continua dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in virtù del fatto che ai proprietari greco- ciprioti di proprietà nella Cipro settentrionale viene negato l’ accesso ed il controllo, l’ uso e il godimento della loro proprietà così come qualsiasi risarcimento per l'interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà.”
43. La Corte non vede ragione nella causa presente di scostarsi dalle conclusioni alle quali è giunta nelle cause Loizidou e Cipro c. Turchia (op. cit.; vedere anche Demades c. Turchia (meriti), n. 16219/90, § 46 31 luglio 2003).
44. Di conseguenza, conclude che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in virtù del fatto che alla richiedente fu negato l’accesso ed il controllo, l’uso e il godimento della sua proprietà così come qualsiasi risarcimento per l'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà.

III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE, LETTO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1

45. La richiedente si lamentò di una violazione sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione a causa di trattamento discriminatorio contro lei nel godimento dei suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Lei addusse che questa discriminazione era stata basata sulla sua origine nazionale e sulle sue credenze religiose.
L’Articolo 14 della Convenzione si legge come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
46. La Corte richiama che nella causa Alexandrou c. Turchia (n. 16162/90, §§ 38-39 del 20 gennaio 2009) trovò che non era necessario eseguire un esame separato dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione. La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare questo approccio nella presente causa (vedere anche, mutatis mutandis, Eugenia Michaelidou Ltd e Michael Tymvios c. Turchia, n. 16163/90, §§ 37-38 del 31 luglio 2003).
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 3 DELLA CONVENZIONE
47. La richiedente si lamentò del trattamento somministratole durante la manifestazione del 19 luglio 1989.
Lei invocò l’Articolo 3 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Nessuno sarà sottoposto a torture o a trattamenti o punizioni inumani o degradanti.”
48. Il Governo contestò la sua rivendicazione.
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
49. Appellandosi alla sua versione degli eventi (vedere paragrafi 19-20 sopra), il Governo presentò che questa parte della richiesta dovrebbe essere determinata sulla base delle sentenze della Commissione nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou c. Turchia (richieste N. 15299/89 e 15300/89, rapporto di Commissione dell’ 8 giugno 1993, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 86, p. 4), siccome le basi di fatto e legali della presente richiesta sono le stesse di quelle della causa pilota.
50. In qualsiasi caso, la dichiarazione della richiedente che lei era stata “assaltata e picchiata severamente dal personale militare turco” mancava di qualsiasi base riguardante i fatti. La versione della richiedente degli eventi non era credibile ed era anche contraddittoria: lei non era mai stata arrestata e le contusioni addotte sulla sua gamba non potevano essere state inflitte da colpi con uno strumento appuntito, come un bastone o una sbarra ma avrebbero potuto essere state coerenti con una ferita causata da un oggetto appuntito, come il filo spinato.
51. Data l'importanza di preservare l'integrità della zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU da entrate non autorizzate o da attività da parte di civili, il fatto che alla richiedente fosse stato impedito di violare la zona e la linea di tregua non poteva, di per sé , costituire una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
2. La richiedente
52. La richiedente considerò che la sua causa era stata provata oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio e che il trattamento somministratole era completamente ingiustificato. Avendo riguardo ai suoi effetti fisici e mentali, così come al suo sesso e alla sua età, potrebbe essere descritto come grettamente degradante ed umiliante.
53. La manifestazione era stata tranquilla ed i dimostratori erano donne. La richiedente era stata attaccata e brutalmente era stata colpita senza giustificazione. Non solo l'uso della forza non era necessario, non le era stato dato neanche nessuna assistenza ed era stata lasciata indifesa. Era stato solamente con l'aiuto di un giornalista e di altri dimostratori che lei era stata portata all’Ospedale Generale di Nicosia .
3. La terza parte intervenuta
54. Il Governo di Cipro addusse che le costatazioni della Commissione nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou (citata sopra) non potevavo sopravvivere alla luce della sentenza Loizidou (citata sopra). La Turchia era responsabile per gli atti della polizia della “TRNC” quando fecero un'incursione nella zona cuscinetto.
55. L'attacco sulla richiedente da parte di un soldato turco con una baionetta fissa era stato fatto senza giustificazione ed era giunto al minimo livello di gravità per rientrare all'interno della nozione di “trattamento degradante.” Questo trattamento potrebbe essere qualificato anche come “tortura”, avendo riguardo all'intensità della sofferenza inflitta ed all'intenzione di castigare un dimostratore e/o d’intimidire gli altri dimostratori.
B. La valutazione della Corte
56. I principi generali riguardo alla proibizione della tortura e dei trattamenti inumani o degradanti sono esposti in Protopapa c. Turchia, n. 16084/90, §§ 39-45, 24 febbraio 2009.
57. Riguardo all’applicazione di questi principi alla presente causa, la Corte osserva, che è incontrastato che il richiedente aveva avuto un confronto fisico con le forze turche o turco-cipriote durante una manifestazione che generò una situazione estremamente tesa. Si ricorderà che nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou, la Commissione ha trovato, che un numero di manifestanti aveva fatto resistenza all’ arresto, che le forze di polizia avevano rotto la loro resistenza e che in questo contesto c'era un rischio alto che i manifestanti venissero trattati rudemente, ed anche soffrissero di ferite, nel corso dell'operazione di arresto (vedere il rapporto della Commissione, citato sopra, §§ 113-115). La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare queste costatazioni e prenderà conto dovuto dello stato di tensione elevato al tempo in cui si sono verificati gli eventi.
58. Osserva inoltre che la richiedente presentò di essere stata colpita e spintonata. Lei addusse anche che un soldato turco la colpì sulla gamba con una baionetta, provocando una ferita profonda nella sua tibia superiore (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra). La versione della richiedente degli eventi è corroborata da un affidavit giurato di un testimone oculare (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra) e dal certificato medico firmato dal Dr S. G. (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra). Anche se emesso nel marzo 2000 cioè più di dieci anni dopo gli eventi del 19 luglio 1989 questo certificato ricostruisce la storia del trattamento somministrato alla richiedente presso l’ Ospedale Generale di Nicosia dopo la manifestazione. Afferma che lei aveva sofferto di una ferita aperta approssimativamente di 9 cm sul terzo superiore della sua tibia e che questo danno sarebbe stato causato probabilmente da un oggetto appuntito. Dei punti furono applicati e lei aveva dovuto usare le stampelle per un mese. Nel 2000 la paziente aveva ancora una cicatrice ed aveva perso sensibilità nell'area della ferita.
59. La Corte considera che è stato stabilito che il danno della richiedente fu causato dalla polizia turca o turco-cipriota. Inoltre, un grave episodio traumatico come la ferita subita dalla richiedente non è coerente con un confronto fisico minore fra lei e gli agenti di polizia. Non c'è niente che dimostri che la richiedente che non fu arrestata avesse opposto resistenza alla polizia nell'esecuzione dei loro doveri nella misura da non essere necessario infliggere una ferita con un oggetto appuntito. Ne segue che gli agenti dello Stato rispondente usarono una forza eccessiva contro la richiedente che non era stata resa severamente necessaria dallo stato di tensione elevata che circondava la manifestazione del 19 luglio 1989 e/o dallo stesso comportamento della richiedente.
60. Avendo riguardo ai suoi effetti fisici e mentali ed al sesso della richiedente, la Corte considera, che il trattamento inflitto sulla richiedente dalla polizia turca corrispose ad un trattamento “inumano” e “degradante” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
61. Ne segue che c'è stata una violazione di questa disposizione.
V. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 11 DELLA CONVENZIONE
62. La richiedente si lamentò di una violazione del suo diritto alla libertà di riunione tranquilla.
Lei invocò l’Articolo 11 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà di riunione pacifica ed alla libertà dell'associazione con altri, incluso il diritto di formare e congiungere sindacati per la protezione dei suoi interessi.
2. Nessuna restrizione sarà messa sull'esercizio di questi diritti se non prescritta dalla legge e se necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale o sicurezza pubblica, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui. Questo Articolo non ostacolerà l'imposizione di restrizioni legali sull'esercizio di questi diritti da parte di membri delle forze armate, della polizia o dell'amministrazione dello Stato.”
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
63. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione, osservando che dato il suo carattere violento, la dimostrazione chiaramente era fuori dalla sfera dell’ Articolo 11 della Convenzione e costituì una riunione illegale. Coltelli e altri strumenti taglienti erano stati trovati in possesso di alcuni dei dimostratori arrestati. Il Governo si riferì a questo punto alle sezioni 70, 71 80 e 82 del Codice Penale di Cipro che quali erano applicabili nella “TRNC” (vedere paragrafi 22-25 sopra) e richiamò che secondo il Capitolo 155 del Diritto di Procedura Penale (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra), la polizia aveva il potere di arrestare persone coinvolte in manifestazioni violente. Inoltre, era un reato sotto le leggi della “TRNC” violare i confini dello Stato.
64. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, il Governo considerò, che la polizia della “TRNC” era intervenuta negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale e/o della sicurezza pubblica e per la prevenzione del disturbo del crimine. Non c'era giustificazione per i dimostratori, incluso la richiedente per la violazione della zona cuscinetto di ONU.
2. La richiedente
65. La richiedente addusse che la polizia turco-cipriota aveva soppresso violentemente il suo diritto alla libertà di riunione tranquilla. Questa interferenza non era prescritta dalle leggi della Repubblica di Cipro ed un sit-in di protesta non poteva rappresentare una minaccia alla sicurezza di cittadino della Turchia. In qualsiasi caso, il brutale intervento di polizia era completamente sproporzionato.
3. La terza parte interveuta
66. Il Governo di Cipro osservò che l'interferenza da parte della polizia turca con la riunione tranquilla che stava avendo luogo nella zona cuscinetto non era prescritta dalla legge, non era necessaria e nettamente sproporzionata in relazione a qualsiasi condotta da parte della richiedente o a qualsiasi rivendicazione sulla questione di ordine pubblico che avrebbe potuto sorgere. Le leggi della Repubblica di Cipro, applicabile all'area in cui la dimostrazione ebbe luogo, non permette tale interferenza. Il Governo rispondente non poteva alterare l'ordinamento giuridico nel territorio occupato e non aveva invocato qualsiasi legge turca che avrebbe potuto offrire una base legale per il comportamento dei suoi agenti.
67. Il Governo di Cipro infine osservò che la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU non era all'interno della giurisdizione legale delle forze turche e la loro incursione in quella zona era contraria alle disposizioni di tregua.
B. La valutazione della Corte
68. La Corte nota che la richiedente e l'altro gruppo di donne entrarono in conflitto con la polizia turco-cipriota durante la manifestazione nei pressi della scuola di Ayios Kassianos a Nicosia. La dimostrazione fu dispersa ed alcuni dei dimostratori furono arrestati. Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte considera che c'è stata un'interferenza col diritto di riunione della richiedente (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 104).
69. Questa interferenza aveva una base legale, vale a dire le sezioni 70 e 71 del Codice Penale cipriota (vedere paragrafi 22-23 sopra) e la sezione 14 della Diritto di procedura penale (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra), ed era così “prevista dalla legge” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 11 § 2 della Convenzione. A questo riguardo, la Corte richiama che nella causa Foka c. Turchia (n. 28940/95, §§ 82-84 24 giugno 2008) sostenne che la “TRNC” stava esercitando un’autorità de facto sulla Cipro settentrionale e che la responsabilità della Turchia per gli atti della “TRNC” era incoerente con la prospettiva della richiedente per cui le misure adottate da questa dovrebbe essere riguardate sempre come mancanti di una base “legale” in termini della Convenzione. La Corte concluse perciò che quando, come nella causa Foka, un atto delle autorità della “TRNC” era in ottemperanza con leggi in vigore all'interno del territorio della Cipro settentrionale, deve in principio essere riguardato come avente base legale in diritto nazionale ai fini della Convenzione. Non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare, nella presente causa questa costatazione che non è in qualsiasi modo incoerente con la prospettiva adottata dalla comunità internazionale riguardo alla costituzione della “TRNC” o al fatto che il Governo della Repubblica di Cipro resti il solo governo legittimo di Cipro (vedere Cipro c. Turchia, citata sopra, §§ 14, 61 90).
70. Rimangono le questioni se l'interferenza perseguiva uno scopo legittimo ed era necessaria in una società democratica.
71. Il Governo presentò che l'interferenza perseguiva scopi legittimi, incluso la protezione della sicurezza nazionale e/o della sicurezza pubblica e la prevenzione del disturbo e del crimine.
72. La Corte nota che nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou, la Commissione ha trovato che la dimostrazione del 19 luglio 1989 era violenta, che era penetrata attracirca le linee difensive dell’ONU fiancheggia e costituiva una minaccia seria alla pace e all’ ordine pubblico sulla linea di demarcazione a Cipro (vedere il rapporto della Commissione, citato sopra, §§ 109-10). La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di discostarsi da queste costatazioni che furono basate sul rapporto del Segretario Generale dell’ONU su un filmato video e su fotografie presentate dal Governo rispondente di fronte alla Commissione. Enfatizza che nel suo rapporto, il Segretario Generala dell'ONU ha affermato che i dimostratori avevano “forzato il loro passaggio nella zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU nell'area di Ayios Kassianos di Nicosia”, che loro avevano rotto “una barriera di filo sostenuta dall’ UNFICYP e distrutto un posto di osservazione dell’ UNFICYP” prima di rompere “la linea formata dai soldati dell’UNFICYP” ed entrare in “una precedente complesso scolastico” (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra).
73. La Corte fa riferimento, in primo luogo, ai principi fondamentali che sono posto sotto le sue sentenze relative all’ Articolo 11 (vedere Djavit Un c. Turchia, n. 20652/92, §§ 56-57 ECHR 2003-III; Piermont c. Francia, 27 aprile 1995, §§ 76-77 Serie A n. 314; e Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben” c. Austria, 21 giugno 1988, § 32 Serie A n. 139). È chiaro da questa giurisprudenza che le autorità hanno un dovere di prendere misure appropriate a riguardo di dimostrazioni per assicurare la loro condotta tranquilla e la sicurezza di tutti i cittadini (vedere Oya Ataman c. Turchia, n. 74552/01, § 35 5 dicembre 2006). Loro comunque non possono garantire completamente questo e hanno una ampia discrezione nella scelta dei mezzi da utilizzare (veda Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben”, citato sopra, § 34).
74. Mentre una situazione illegale non è di per sé , una giustificazione di una violazione del diritto di riunione (vedere Cisse c. la Francia, n. 51346/99, § 50 ECHR 2002-III (gli estratti)), interferenze col diritto garantito dall’Articolo 11 della Convenzione sono in principio giustificate per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine e per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui dove, come nella presente causa, i dimostratori prendono parte ad atti di violenza (vedere, a contrario, Bukta ed Altri c. Ungheria, n. 25691/04, § 37, 17 luglio 2007, ed Oya Ataman citata sopra, §§ 41-42).
75. La Corte osserva inoltre che, come affermato nel rapporto del Segretario Generale dell’ONU del 7 dicembre 1989 (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra), i dimostratori avevano forzato il loro passaggio nella zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU. Secondo le autorità della “TRNC”, loro entrarono anche nel territorio della “TRNC”, commettendo così punibile dei reati sotto le leggi della “TRNC” (vedere paragrafi 40-41 e 88 sopra). A questo riguardo, la Corte nota, che non ha a sua disposizione qualsiasi l'elemento capace di gettare dubbio sulle dichiarazioni date dai testimoni al processo secondo cui l'area dove l'accusato era entrato era il territorio della “TRNC” (vedere paragrafo 34 (iii) sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte, l'intervento delle forze turche e/o turco-ciprioti non erano a causa della natura politica della dimostrazione ma fu provocato dal suo carattere violento e dalla violazione dei confini della “TRNC” da parte di alcuni dei dimostratori (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 110).
76. In queste condizioni ed avendo riguardo al margine ampio di valutazione lasciato agli Stati in questa sfera (vedere Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben” citata sopra, § 34), la Corte sostiene che l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al diritto di riunione non era, alla luce di tutte le circostanze della causa, sproporzionato ai fini dell’ Articolo 11 § 2.
77. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 11 della Convenzione.
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
78. l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno Patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) La richiedente
79. Nelle sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa dell’ aprile 2000, la richiedente richiese 289,746 sterline cipriote(CYP- approssimativamente 495,060 euro (EUR)) per danno patrimoniale. Lei si appellò al rapporto di un esperto che valutava il valore delle sue perdite che includevano la perdita di affitto annuale percepito o che ci si aspettava di percepire dall’affitto delle sue proprietà, più interesse dalla data in cui simili affitti erano dovuti sino alla data del pagamento. L'affitto chiesto era per il periodo risalente al gennaio 1987, quando il Governo rispondente accettò il diritto di ricorso individuale, sino al 2000. La richiedente non chiese il risarcimento per qualsiasi espropriazione stabilita poiché lei era ancora la proprietaria legittima delle proprietà. Il rapporto di valutazione conteneva una descrizione di Kyrenia, Kazaphani e Karmi, dove le proprietà della richiedente erano localizzate.
80. Il punto iniziale del rapporto di valutazione era il valore di affitto delle proprietà della richiedente nel 1974, calcolato sulla base di una percentuale (che variava dal 6% al 4%) del loro valore di mercato. Questa somma fu aggiustata successivamente circa l'alto secondo un aumento di affitto annuale medio del 12% (5% per l'alloggio descritto nel paragrafo 10 (a) sopra). N interesse composto per pagamento ritardato fu applicato ad un tasso dell’ 8% all'anno.
81. Secondo l'esperto, il valore nel 1974 delle proprietà della richiedente erano, come segue:
- proprietà descritta nel paragrafo 10 (a) sopra: valore di mercato CYP 26,500 (circa EUR 45,277); valore di affitto CYP 1,325 (circa EUR 2,263);
- proprietà descritta nel paragrafo 10 (b) sopra: valore di mercato CYP 9,404 (circa EUR 16,067); valore di affitto CYP 564 (circa EUR 963);
- proprietà descritta nel paragrafo 10 (il c) sopra: valore di mercato CYP 3,138 (circa EUR 5,361); valore di affitto CYP 188 (circa EUR 321);
- proprietà descritta nel paragrafo 10 (d) sopra: valore di mercato CYP 1,650 (circa EUR 2,819); valore di affitto CYP 99 (circa EUR 169);
- proprietà descritta nel paragrafo 10 (e) sopra: valore di mercato CYP 2,264 (circa EUR 3,868); valore di affitto CYP 136 (circa EUR 232).
82. In una lettera del 28 gennaio 2008 la richiedente osservò che era passato un tempo considerevole da quando aveva presentato le sue rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa e che la rivendicazione per le perdite patrimoniali aveva bisogno di essere aggiornata secondo l'aumento del valore di mercato del terreno a Cipro (fra il 10 ed il 15% all'anno).
83. Nelle sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa dell’ aprile 2000, la richiedente chiese anche CYP 40,000 (circa EUR 68,344) a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale. Lei affermò che questa somma era stata calcolata sulla base della somma assegnata dalla Corte nella causa Loizidou ((soddisfazione equa), 28 luglio 1998, Relazioni 1998-IV), prendendo in considerazione, comunque il fatto che il periodo per il quale il danno fu chiesto nella presente causa era più lungo e c'era stata anche una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Lei chiese anche CYP 20,000 (circa EUR 34,172) a riguardo del danno morale subito per la perdita della sua casa e CYP 40,000 (circa EUR 68,344) per le “violazioni diegli Articoli 3, 10 e 11” della Convenzione.
84. La somma totale chiesta per danno non-patrimoniale era così CYP 100,000 (circa EUR 170,860).
(b) Il Governo
85. A seguito di una richiesta dalla Corte, il 15 settembre 2008 il Governo registrò commenti sulle rivendicazioni della richiedente per la soddisfazione equa. Osservò che le proprietà della richiedente erano “campi” e che un affitto molto piccolo avrebbe potuto essere ottenuto dai campi a Cipro. In qualsiasi caso, il valore di mercato addotto del 1974 delle proprietà era esorbitante, estremamente eccessivo e speculativo; non era basato su nessun dato vero che potrebbe essere usato per fare un paragone e prendeva insufficiente in considerazione la volatilità del mercato della proprietà e la sua suscettibilità alle influenze sia nazionali che internazionali. Il rapporto presentato dalla richiedente aveva proceduto invece alla presunzione che il mercato della proprietà avrebbe continuato a fiorire con crescita economica continua durante l’intero periodo sotto considerazione.
86. Siccome era stato applicato un aumento annuale nel valore delle proprietà, sarebbe ingiusto per aggiungere un interesse composto per i ritardi nel pagamento. Inoltre, i calcoli della richiedente non avevano tenuto conto delle uscite come le responsabilità fiscali, le spese e costi per riparare le proprietà.
87. Infine, il Governo considerò che la somma chiesta a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale (CYP 40 000) era estremamente eccessiva, poiché era il doppio dell'importo che era stato assegnato nella causa Loizidou ((soddisfazione equa), citata sopra).
(c) La terza parte intervenuta
88. Il Governo di Cipro sostenne pienamente le rivendicazioni della richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
2. La valutazione della Corte
89. La Corte osserva che ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione a causa del trattamento inflitto sulla richiedente dalla polizia turca (vedere paragrafi 56-61 sopra) e considera che un'assegnazione dovrebbe essere fatta sotto questo capo, tenendo presente che la serietà del danno subito non può essere compensato solamente da una costatazione di violazione. Facendo una valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 5,000 alla richiedente, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questo importo.
90. Per quanto riguarda la violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, la Corte considera che nelle circostanze della causa la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 a riguardo del danno patrimoniale e non-patrimoniale non è pronta per una decisione. Osserva, in particolare, che le parti non sono riuscite ad offrire dati affidabili ed obiettivi concernenti i prezzi del terreno e dei beni immobili a Cipro in data dell'intervento turco. Questo insuccesso rende difficile per la Corte valutare se la stima fornita dalla richiedente del valore di mercato del 1974 delle sue proprietà è ragionevole. La questione di conseguenza deve essere riservata e la susseguente procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo ad un qualsiasi accordo a cui potrebbero giungere il Governo rispondente e la richiedente (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
B. Costi e spese
91. Nelle sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa dell’ aprile 2000, la richiedente chiese CYP 4,000 (circa EUR 6,834) per i costi e le spese incorsi di fronte alla Corte. Questa somma includeva il costo del rapporto competente che valutava il valore delle sue proprietà.
92. Il Governo non fece commenti su questo punto.
93. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 a riguardo dei costi e delle spese non è pronta per una decisione. La questione di conseguenza deve essere riservata e la susseguente procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo a qualsiasi accordo a cui potrebbero giungere il Governo rispondente e la richiedente.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Sostiene all’unanimità che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
2. Sostiene all’unanimità che non è necessario esaminare se c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene per sei voti ad una che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 11 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene per sei voti ad una
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare alla richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno non-patrimoniale riferito alla violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Sostiene all’unanimità che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 a riguardo della violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e dei costi e delle spese non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed la richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza .
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 22 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e all’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione separata del Giudice Karakaş è annessa a questa sentenza.
N.B.
F.A.


OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENTE DEL GIUDICE KARAKAÅž
Nella presente causa io non sono d'accordo con la conclusione della maggioranza che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione. Nel trovare una violazione di questa disposizione, la maggioranza ha trovato stabilito che un agente della polizia turca o turco-cipriota colpì la richiedente sulla gamba con una baionetta, provocando una ferita profonda nella sua tibia superiore, durante una manifestazione violenta che ha avuto luogo il 19 luglio 1989. Considerò che la versione della richiedente degli eventi era stata corroborata da:
- un affidavit giurato da parte di un testimone, la Sig.ra O. N. molti anni dopo la dimostrazione (vedere paragrafo 17) e;
- il certificato medico emesso dal Dr S.G. del 27 marzo 2000, pressoché undici anni dopo l'incidente addotto (vedere paragrafo 18).
Quando alla Corte vengono presentati dei racconti contraddittori riguardo alle circostanze di una causa giunge alla sua decisione sulla base delle prove disponibili presentate dalle parti (vedere Kakoulli ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 38595/97, § 102 22 novembre 2005). Nel valutare le prove di fronte a sé, lo standard di prova adottato dalla Corte è quello “oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio” (vedere Irlanda c. Regno Unito, 18 gennaio 1978, § 161 Serie A n. 25); simile prova può provenire dalla coesistenza di inferenze sufficientemente forti, chiare e concordanti o da presunzioni non confutabili di simili fatti.
In questo collegamento mi piacerebbe indicare che non c'era nessun testimone oculare indipendente ed imparziale per confermare la versione della richiedente degli eventi. In precedenti cause simili dove i richiedenti addussero che di essere stati assaltati dai soldati o dagli agenti della polizia turchi , le loro dichiarazioni furono sostenute da rapporti indipendenti o da dichiarazioni di testimoni oculari fatti dal personale delleNazioni Unite (vedere a questo riguardo, Kakoulli ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 37-49; Isaak c. Turchia, n. 44587/98, §§ 28-33 del 24 giugno 2008; e Solomou ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 36832/97, §§ 16-20 del 24 giugno 2008). La sola dichiarazione del testimone presentata alla Corte era quella della Sig.ra N. che presumibilmente prese parte alla stessa manifestazione. Inoltre, le dichiarazioni della Sig.ra N. furono ottenute molti anni dopo la manifestazione (enfasi aggiunse). Tenendo presente che il passare del tempo pesa sulla capacità dei testimoni di richiamare degli eventi in dettaglio e con accuratezza (vedere Ipek c. Turchia, n. 25760/94, § 116 del 17 febbraio 2004), è in dubbio se lei sia stata in grado di ricordare incidenti che accaddero molti anni prima.
Inoltre, la richiedente non riuscì a fornire alla Corte qualsiasi altra prova in appoggio alle sue dichiarazioni, come dei rapporti indipendenti, fotografie o riprese amatoriali dell'incidente. Nelle cause summenzionate, le dichiarazioni dei richiedenti furono appoggiate di nuovo, da simili prove (vedere Kakoulli ed Altri, §§ 51-57; Isaak, §§ 42-58; e Solomou ed Altri, §§ 28-36 tutti citate sopra) e la Corte si appellò a quelle prove nella ricostruzione dei fatti di quelle cause.
È incontrastato che la richiedente fu coinvolta in una manifestazione che generò una situazione estremamente tesa. Nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachysostomou c. Turchia (N. 15299/89 e 15300/89, rapporto della Commissione dell’ 8 giugno 1993, DR 86, p. 4), la Commissione trovò che un numero di dimostratori aveva posto resistenza ed era stato arrestato, che le forze della polizia avevano rotto la loro resistenza e che in questo contesto c'era stato un rischio elevato che i dimostratori fossero stati trattati rudemente, ed anche avessero sofferto di danni, nel corso dell'operazione di arresto (vedere il rapporto della Commissione, citato sopra, §§ 113-115). Nella presente causa, inoltre la richiedente non era stato affatto arrestata e messa in detenzione.
Sotto queste circostanze, non è stato stabilito che il danno della richiedente fu causato intenzionalmente dalla polizia turca o turco-cipriota. Non c'è inoltre, nulla che dimostri che la polizia usò una forza eccessiva quando fu messa a confronto nel corso dei suoi doveri con la resistenza all’arresto da parte dei dimostratori (vedere Protopapa c. Turchia, n. 16084/90, § 48 6 luglio 2009).
Riguardo al referto medico presentato dal richiedente, gradirei sottolineare che le costatazioni della patologia del Dr G. fossero basate sulle dichiarazioni della richiedente e sulla sua versione degli eventi che avevano avuto luogo pressoché undici anni prima . In questo collegamento indicherei che nella causa Mehmet Sahin ed Altri c. Turchia (n. 5881/02, § 30 del 30 settembre 2008), in cui dei richiedenti addussero di aver sofferto di mal-trattamenti a causa delle guardie e fornì alla Corte due rapporti ottenuti dalla Fondazione dei Diritti umani di Diyarbakır pressoché quattro mesi e due anni dopo la sua liberazione dalla custodia, la Corte diede un peso considerevole al passaggio del tempo e respinse le azioni di reclamo del richiedente di mal-trattamento.
Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, considero, che la prova di fronte alla Corte non l'abilita a trovare oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio che la richiedente fosse stata sottoposta a mal-trattamento da parte della polizia turca o turco-cipriota.


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.