Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ANDREOU PAPI v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 16094/90/2009
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 22/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF ANDREOU PAPI v. TURKEY
(Application no. 16094/90)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
22 September 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Andreou Papi v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Giovanni Bonello,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Işıl Karakaş, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 1 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 16094/90) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the European Commission of Human Rights (“the Commission”) under former Article 25 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Cypriot national, Mrs D. A. P. (“the applicant”), on 16 January 1990.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr L. C. and Mr C. C., two lawyers practising in Nicosia. The Turkish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Z.M. Necatigil.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the Turkish occupation of the northern part of Cyprus had deprived her of her home and properties and that she had been subjected to treatment contrary to the Convention during a demonstration.
4. The application was transmitted to the Court on 1 November 1998, when Protocol No. 11 to the Convention came into force (Article 5 § 2 of Protocol No. 11).
5. By a decision of 26 September 2002 the Court declared the application partly admissible.
6. The applicant and the Government each filed observations on the merits (Rule 59 § 1). In addition, third-party comments were received from the Government of Cyprus, which had exercised its right to intervene (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b)).
THE FACTS
7. The applicant was born in 1933 and lives in Limassol.
I. PROPERTY ISSUES
8. The applicant claimed that in 1952, when she was 19 years' old, she had permanently settled in Famagusta (northern Cyprus), where she got married and had two sons. She had her home and other immovable property there. In order to substantiate her claim to ownership, the applicant produced an “affirmation of ownership of Turkish-occupied immovable property” issued by the Republic of Cyprus, according to which her properties could be described as follows:
- Famagusta, Chrysi Akti, plot no. 778, block C, sheet/plan 33/21.1.IV, description: buildings with house, yard and shop on ground floor and house on the first floor; use: residence; area of the houses: 115 m² each; share: ¾.
9. The applicant submitted that the property described above had been transferred to her by way of gift from her husband, Mr Andreas Papis, on 28 June 2000 (Declaration of transfer no. D-971). The latter had acquired it on 8 July 1994 by way of gift (Declaration of transfer no. D-1044) from his mother, who had become the owner of the whole property in 1971. The applicant produced a copy of the two above-mentioned declarations of transfer.
10. The applicant also claimed to have a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 with regard to the following property:
- Kato Dherynia, provisional no. 19, D/959; description: building site under subdivision; share: whole.
11. In particular, the applicant declared that she had entered into a contract to purchase the site on 24 December 1971 and had paid the purchase price in monthly instalments. The sale price was CYP 2,750 (approximately EUR 4,613) and the applicant had given a lump-sum of CYP 200 (approximately EUR 341) as an advance payment. The remaining sum of CYP 2,550 should have been paid as follows: CYP 500 on 31 January 1972, plus 48 monthly instalments of not less than CYP 45 (approximately EUR 76). All the instalments had been paid off, with the final one being paid on 2 July 1974. In accordance with the contract, the transfer was to be effected on payment of the full sale price. However, the applicant's title to the land was not registered owing to the Turkish intervention. The applicant produced the contract of sale and copies of the receipts of payment.
12. The applicant submitted that since the 1974 Turkish intervention she had been deprived of her property rights, since her property was located in the area that was under the occupation and control of the Turkish military authorities. She had made an attempt to return to her home and property on 19 July 1989, but had not been allowed to do so by the Turkish military authorities. They had prevented her from having access to and using her house and properties.
II. THE DEMONSTRATION OF 19 JULY 1989
13. On 19 July 1989, the applicant joined an anti-Turkish demonstration in the Ayios Kassianos area in Nicosia in which the applicants in the Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou v. Turkey and Loizidou v. Turkey cases (see below) also took part.
A. The applicant's version of events
14. According to an affidavit sworn by the applicant before the Nicosia District Court on 4 August 2000, the demonstration of 19 July 1989 was peaceful and was held on the fifteenth anniversary of the Turkish intervention in Cyprus, in support of the missing persons and to protest against human rights violations.
15. The applicant and other women had gathered in the Ayios Georgios church, where a service was in progress. While she was in the chapel, she heard cries coming from outside and at the same time saw Turkish policemen entering the church, indiscriminately grasping women, beating them and pulling them out.
16. A policeman had seized the applicant by one hand and twisted the other backwards. He started to push her out of the church and to hit her fiercely with a baton and with his knee in the lower part of her head and on the back of her neck as well as on other parts of her body. She felt electricity passing through her body and realised that the baton was electric. The applicant and other women were forcefully dragged into the area controlled by the authorities of the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (the “TRNC”).
17. She was then arrested and taken by bus to the so-called “Pavlides Garage”. During the journey she was subjected to assaults, beatings and gestures of a sexual nature by the officers who had detained her. The crowd outside the garage was swearing, shouting abuse and threats and throwing stones at the garage, some of which came through the roof. Some of the Turkish policemen threatened to open the doors and let the crowd lynch the detainees. At the garage there were also two UN men who merely acted as observers. One of the women detainees (Mrs V. – see application no. 16078/90) was seriously beaten. At about midnight the applicant was interrogated. Her interrogation took place in Greek. The applicant lied when asked for details concerning the members of her family. She was told to sign a statement in Turkish but did not do so as she did not understand Turkish and considered that signing the statement would have been tantamount to recognising the “TRNC”. On the morning of 20 July 1989 she was given some food and water and then taken to court where she was remanded in custody for forty-eight hours. At the hearing, an interpreter explained the procedure to the accused. The applicant understood that she was accused of having violated the borders of the “TRNC”.
18. She was subsequently transferred to a prison outside Nicosia, where she was kept in a cell with another two women. Since there were not enough mattresses she and the other detainees in her cell took turns to lie down; however, she could not sleep due to the severe pain from the blows she had received. During the night the applicant and the other detainees were harassed by the guards and told that the long-term prisoners would rape them. The toilets and showers were filthy and had no doors so the guards could see the detainees bathing. Essential means of hygiene were lacking. At night, the guards continually picked out individual detainees for checks.
19. At around midnight on 21 July 1989, the applicant was taken to court. She had no legal representation and the quality of the interpretation was poor; the applicant felt that the interpreter was not translating all of what was being said. The judge asked whether the accused wanted legal representation; they replied that they would only accept as defence counsel a lawyer registered with the bar association of the Republic of Cyprus. As a result, they were not assisted by a lawyer. One of the accused spoke on behalf of the others.
20. Some prosecution witnesses were interrogated. They lied about the basic facts surrounding the demonstration and the circumstances of the arrest and the accused tried to protest. However, they were told to stay quiet if they did not want to be handed over to the vociferous crowd that had gathered outside the courtroom.
21. At around midnight on 22 July 1989 the court sentenced the applicant to three days' imprisonment and to a fine of 50 Cyprus pounds (CYP) – approximately 85 euros (EUR) – with five additional days in prison in default of payment within 24 hours. She was brought back to prison where she was given some personal hygiene items that had been sent by the Red Cross.
22. On 24 July 1989 the applicant was released. At the time of her release she was examined by UN doctors, who took some notes, and then transferred to southern Cyprus. On 28 July 1989 she made a statement to Limassol police and was also examined by a Government doctor at Limassol Hospital. The applicant produced a medical report issued on that same day by Dr. C. M., a medical officer. This document reads as follows:
“On 28.7.1989 and at approximately 23.00 hours I was requested by the Limassol District Police to examine Mrs D. A. P. from Famagusta and presently living at 16 Chrysanthou Mylona Street in Limassol.
Mrs P. alleges that on 19.7.1989 she was hit (kicks, fists and use of police baton) on various parts of her body by Turkish pseudo-policemen in the area of Ayios Kassianos in Nicosia.
At the examination the following were found:
1. Multiple and extensive bruises on various parts of the body, particularly obvious and serious in the areas of the right buttock and the posterior surface of the left hip.
2. Haematoma and swelling on the left elbow joint.
3. Pain at various parts of the body particularly in the region of the ribs (both sides), the neck, the left elbow, both buttocks, the coccyx and the waist.
X-ray examination was requested.”
23. The applicant alleged that she continued to suffer from the effects of the beatings inflicted on her.
B. The Government's version of events
24. The Government alleged that the applicant had participated in a violent demonstration with the aim of enflaming anti-Turkish sentiment. The demonstrators, supported by the Greek-Cypriot administration, were demanding that the “Green Line” in Nicosia should be dismantled. Some carried Greek flags, clubs, knives and wire-cutters. They were acting in a provocative manner and shouting abuse. The demonstrators were warned in Greek and English that unless they dispersed they would be arrested in accordance with the laws of the “TRNC”. The applicant was arrested by the Turkish-Cypriot police after crossing the UN buffer zone and entering the area under Turkish-Cypriot control. The Turkish-Cypriot police intervened in the face of the manifest inability of the Greek-Cypriot authorities and the UN Force in Cyprus to contain the incursion and its possible consequences.
25. No force was used against demonstrators who did not intrude into the “TRNC” border area and, in the case of demonstrators who were arrested for violating the border, no more force was used than was reasonably necessary in the circumstances in order to arrest and detain the persons concerned. No one was ill-treated. It was possible that some of the demonstrators had hurt themselves in the confusion or in attempting to scale barbed wire or other fencing. Had the Turkish police, or anyone else, assaulted or beaten any of the demonstrators, the UN Secretary General would no doubt have referred to this in his report to the Security Council.
26. The applicant was charged, tried, found guilty and sentenced to a short term of imprisonment. She pleaded not guilty, but did not give evidence and declined to use the available judicial remedies. She was asked if she required assistance from a lawyer registered in the “TRNC”, but refused and did not ask for legal representation. Interpretation services were provided at the trial by qualified interpreters. All the proceedings were translated into Greek.
C. The UN Secretary General's report
27. In his report of 7 December 1989 on the UN operations in Cyprus, the UN Secretary General stated, inter alia:
“A serious situation, however, arose in July as a result of a demonstration by Greek Cypriots in Nicosia. The details are as follows:
(a) In the evening of 19 July, some 1,000 Greek Cypriot demonstrators, mostly women, forced their way into the UN buffer zone in the Ayios Kassianos area of Nicosia. The demonstrators broke through a wire barrier maintained by UNFICYP and destroyed an UNFICYP observation post. They then broke through the line formed by UNFICYP soldiers and entered a former school complex where UNFICYP reinforcements regrouped to prevent them from proceeding further. A short while later, Turkish-Cypriot police and security forces elements forced their way into the area and apprehended 111 persons, 101 of them women;
(b) The Ayios Kassianos school complex is situated in the UN buffer zone. However, the Turkish forces claim it to be on their side of the cease-fire line. Under working arrangements with UNFICYP, the Turkish-Cypriot security forces have patrolled the school grounds for several years within specific restrictions. This patrolling ceased altogether as part of the unmanning agreement implemented last May;
(c) In the afternoon of 21 July, some 300 Greek Cypriots gathered at the main entrance to the UN protected area in Nicosia, in which the UN headquarters is located, to protest the continuing detention by the Turkish-Cypriot authorities of those apprehended at Ayios Kassianos. The demonstrators, whose number fluctuated between 200 and 2,000, blocked all UN traffic through this entrance until 30 July, when the Turkish-Cypriot authorities released the last two detainees;
(d) The events described above created considerable tension in the island and intensive efforts were made, both at the UN headquarters and at Nicosia, to contain and resolve the situation. On 21 July, I expressed my concern at the events that have taken place and stressed that it was vital that all parties keep in mind the purpose of the UN buffer zone as well as their responsibility to ensure that that area was not violated. I also urged the Turkish-Cypriot authorities to release without delay all those who had been detained. On 24 July, the President of the Security Council announced that he had conveyed to the representatives of all the parties, on behalf of the members of the Council, the Council's deep concern at the tense situation created by the incidents of 19 July. He also stressed the need strictly to respect the UN buffer zone and appealed for the immediate release of all persons still detained. He asked all concerned to show maximum restraint and to take urgent steps that would bring about a relaxation of tension and contribute to the creation of an atmosphere favourable to the negotiations.”
D. Photographs of the demonstration
28. The applicant produced 21 photographs taken at different times during the demonstration on 19 July 1989. Photographs 1 to 7 were intended to show that, notwithstanding the deployment of the Turkish-Cypriot police, the demonstration was peaceful. In photographs 8 to 10 members of the Turkish-Cypriot police are seen breaking up the UNFICYP cordon. The final set of photographs shows members of the Turkish-Cypriot police using force to arrest some of the women demonstrators.
III. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Cypriot Criminal Code
29. Section 70 of the Cypriot Criminal Code reads as follows:
“Where five or more persons assemble with intent to commit an offence, or, being assembled with intent to carry out some common purpose, conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause persons in the neighbourhood to fear that the persons so assembled will commit a breach of the peace, or will by such assembly needlessly and without any reasonable occasion provoke other persons to commit a breach of the peace they are an unlawful assembly.
It is immaterial that the original assembly was lawful if, being assembled, they conduct themselves with a common purpose in such a manner as aforesaid.
When an unlawful assembly has begun to execute the purpose, whether of a public or of a private nature, for which it assembled by a breach of the peace and to the terror of the public, the assembly is called a riot, and the persons assembled are said to be riotously assembled.”
30. According to section 71 of the Criminal Code, any person who takes part in an unlawful assembly is guilty of a misdemeanour and liable to imprisonment for one year.
31. Section 80 of the Criminal Code provides:
“Any person who carries in public without lawful occasion any offensive arm or weapon in such a manner as to cause terror to any person is guilty of a misdemeanour, and is liable to imprisonment for two years, and his arms or weapons shall be forfeited.”
32. According to section 82 of the Criminal Code, it is an offence to carry a knife outside the home.
B. Police officers' powers of arrest
33. The relevant part of Chapter 155, section 14 of the Criminal Procedure Law states:
"(1) Any officer may, without warrant, arrest any person -
...
(b) who commits in his presence any offence punishable with imprisonment;
(c) who obstructs a police officer, while in the execution of his duty ..."
C. Offence of illegal entry into “TRNC” territory
34. Section 9 of Law No. 5/72 states:
"... Any person who enters a prohibited military area without authorisation, or by stealth, or fraudulently, shall be tried by a military court in accordance with the Military Offences Act; those found guilty shall be punished."
35. Subsections 12 (1) and (5) of the Aliens and Immigration Law read as follows:
“1. No person shall enter or leave the Colony except through an approved port.
...
5. Any person who contravenes or fails to observe any of the provisions of subsections (1), (2), (3) or (4) of this section shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to a fine not exceeding one hundred pounds or to both such imprisonment and fine.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
36. The applicant complained that since 1974, Turkey had prevented her from exercising her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions.
She invoked Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
37. The Government disputed this claim.
A. The Government's preliminary objections
38. The Government raised preliminary objections of inadmissibility for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies and lack of victim status. The Court observes that these objections are identical to those raised in the case of Alexandrou v. Turkey (no. 16162/90, §§ 11-22, 20 January 2009), and should be dismissed for the same reasons.
B. The merits
1. Arguments of the parties
(a) The Government
39. The Government submitted that the receipts produced by the applicant showed the payment made for the purchase of building land in Kato Derynia. There was no evidence, however, that the property in question had been transferred to the applicant, and even assuming that it had, there was no evidence that she was still its owner. It would be unlikely that the transfer could have been done after the Turkish intervention, as the applicant would not have been able to access the land in view of the political situation on the island. Moreover, the applicant had acquired the properties described in paragraph 8 above only on 28 June 2000 and could not therefore have an interest in them under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
40. In the Government's view, the aim of the demonstration of 19 July 1989 had been to make political propaganda. The applicant had not genuinely intended to go to her alleged property, which she knew to be inaccessible in the existing political situation. In any event, even assuming that a question could arise under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the control of the use of property by the “TRNC” authorities had been justified in the general interest.
2. The applicant
41. The applicant, who essentially adopted the observations submitted by the Government of Cyprus (see below), stressed that she was the rightful owner of the properties at issue. She had been the “possessor” of the building land described in paragraph 10 above since the date she made the advance payment of CYP 200 and had been the beneficial owner since the payment of the last instalment on 2 July 1974 (see paragraph 11 above). As from that date she had had a claim against the company which had sold the building land to her and had been entitled to possession as the purchaser of the land. She argued that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 did not only protect registered rights but all types of property rights.
B. The third-party intervener
42. According to the Government of Cyprus, purchase of property was sufficient to give rise to a “claim” that would constitute a “possession” under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and others v. Belgium, 20 November 1995, §§ 31-32, Series A no. 332). In any event, it was the duty of the respondent Government to prove that the applicant did not own the relevant land and buildings.
C. The Court's assessment
43. The Court first observes that the Government did not contest the applicant's statement that in 1974 her husband's mother was the owner of the property described in paragraph 8 above. They stressed, however, that the property had been acquired by the applicant only in 2000, that is, after the Turkish intervention of 1974.
44. The Court notes that the applicant has produced written proof that her husband acquired the property at issue from his mother and that he subsequently transferred it to her by way of gift on 28 June 2000 (see paragraph 9 above). Together with the other documents submitted by the applicant (see paragraph 8 above), this material provides prima facie evidence that, from June 2000 onwards, she had title to the property in question, which had previously belonged to her husband's family. As held by the Court in the Loizidou v. Turkey case ((merits), 18 December 1996, §§ 44 and 46, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI), the latter could not be deemed to have lost title to his property by virtue of subsequent acts of expropriation of the “TRNC” authorities.
45. As to the building land described in paragraph 10 above, the applicant has produced written proof that she had entered into a contract to purchase it and that, by 2 July 1974, she had paid the whole price agreed with the seller. She had therefore had a legitimate and lawful expectation of becoming the registered owner of the land.
46. In view of the above, and having regard to the fact that the respondent Government have failed to produce convincing evidence in rebuttal, the Court considers that the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in relation to the properties described in paragraphs 8 and 10 above.
47. The Court further observes that in the case of Loizidou ((merits), cited above, §§ 63-64), it reasoned as follows:
“63. ... as a consequence of the fact that the applicant has been refused access to the land since 1974, she has effectively lost all control over, as well as all possibilities to use and enjoy, her property. The continuous denial of access must therefore be regarded as an interference with her rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such an interference cannot, in the exceptional circumstances of the present case to which the applicant and the Cypriot Government have referred, be regarded as either a deprivation of property or a control of use within the meaning of the first and second paragraphs of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, it clearly falls within the meaning of the first sentence of that provision as an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. In this respect the Court observes that hindrance can amount to a violation of the Convention just like a legal impediment.
64. Apart from a passing reference to the doctrine of necessity as a justification for the acts of the 'TRNC' and to the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks, the Turkish Government have not sought to make submissions justifying the above interference with the applicant's property rights which is imputable to Turkey.
It has not, however, been explained how the need to rehouse displaced Turkish Cypriot refugees in the years following the Turkish intervention in the island in 1974 could justify the complete negation of the applicant's property rights in the form of a total and continuous denial of access and a purported expropriation without compensation.
Nor can the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks involving both communities in Cyprus provide a justification for this situation under the Convention. In such circumstances, the Court concludes that there has been and continues to be a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.”
48. In the case of Cyprus v. Turkey ([GC], no. 25781/94, ECHR 2001-IV) the Court confirmed the above conclusions (§§ 187 and 189):
“187. The Court is persuaded that both its reasoning and its conclusion in the Loizidou judgment (merits) apply with equal force to displaced Greek Cypriots who, like Mrs Loizidou, are unable to have access to their property in northern Cyprus by reason of the restrictions placed by the 'TRNC' authorities on their physical access to that property. The continuing and total denial of access to their property is a clear interference with the right of the displaced Greek Cypriots to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
...
189. .. there has been a continuing violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by virtue of the fact that Greek-Cypriot owners of property in northern Cyprus are being denied access to and control, use and enjoyment of their property as well as any compensation for the interference with their property rights.”
49. The Court sees no reason in the instant case to depart from the conclusions which it reached in the Loizidou and Cyprus v. Turkey cases (op. cit.; see also Demades v. Turkey (merits), no. 16219/90, § 46, 31 July 2003).
50. Accordingly, it concludes that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by virtue of the fact that from the dates referred to in paragraphs 44 and 45 above the applicant was denied access to and the control, use and enjoyment of her properties as well as any compensation for the interference with her property rights.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
51. The applicant submitted that in 1974 she had her home in Famagusta. As she had been unable to return there, she was the victim of a violation of Article 8 of the Convention.
This provision reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
52. The Government disputed this claim.
53. The Government of Cyprus submitted that the applicant had been driven from her home by the Turkish invasion and had been consistently refused the right to return ever since, in violation of Article 8 of the Convention. This interference could not be justified under the second paragraph of this provision.
54. The Court observes that the applicant was not the owner of the house where she was allegedly residing at the time of the Turkish invasion. This house was belonging to her husband's mother and was transferred to the applicant only on 28 June 2000, which is approximately twenty-six years after the Turkish invasion (see paragraph 9 above). Under these circumstances, the Court is not convinced that a separate issue may arise under Article 8 of the Convention. It therefore considers that it is not necessary to examine whether there has been a continuing violation of this provision.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION, READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
55. The applicant complained of a violation under Article 14 of the Convention on account of discriminatory treatment against her in the enjoyment of her rights under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. She alleged that this discrimination had been based on her national origin.
Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
56. The Court recalls that in the Alexandrou case (cited above, §§ 38-39) it found that it was not necessary to carry out a separate examination of the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention. The Court does not see any reason to depart from that approach in the present case (see also, mutatis mutandis, Eugenia Michaelidou Ltd and Michael Tymvios v. Turkey, no. 16163/90, §§ 37-38, 31 July 2003).
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 3 OF THE CONVENTION
57. The applicant complained about the treatment administered to her during both the demonstration of 19 July 1989 and the proceedings against her in the “TRNC”.
She invoked Article 3 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”
58. The Government disputed her claim.
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The Government
59. Relying on their version of the events (see paragraphs 24-26 above), the Government submitted that this part of the application should be determined on the basis of the Commission's findings in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou v. Turkey (applications nos. 15299/89 and 15300/89, Commission's report of 8 June 1993, Decisions and Reports (DR) 86, p. 4), as the factual and legal bases of the present application were the same as in that pilot case. They argued that the third-party intervener should be considered estopped from challenging the Commission's findings.
2. The applicant
60. The applicant essentially adopted the observations submitted by the Government of Cyprus (see below).
B. The third-party intervener's arguments
61. The Government of Cyprus submitted that the findings of the Commission in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou (cited above) were not applicable to the present case. Whether the treatment suffered by the applicant violated Article 3 had to be examined and determined in light of the facts of the case and on the basis of the evidence provided.
62. The treatment endured by the applicant during her arrest and subsequent imprisonment and trial had been of a very severe nature, including inter alia physical violence and punishment, exposure to violent and abusive crowds, inhuman and degrading conditions of detention (including solitary confinement and sleep deprivation) and humiliating and frightening treatment in court. Whether such treatment was viewed cumulatively or separately, it had caused severe physical and psychological suffering amounting to inhuman and degrading treatment within the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention.
C. The Court's assessment
63. The general principles concerning the prohibition of torture and of inhuman or degrading treatment are set out in Protopapa v. Turkey, no. 16084/90, §§ 39-45, 24 February 2009.
64. As to the application of these principles to the present case, the Court observes that it is undisputed that the applicant was arrested during a demonstration which gave rise to an extremely tense situation. It will be recalled that in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou, the Commission found that a number of demonstrators had resisted arrest, that the police forces had broken their resistance and that in that context there was a high risk that the demonstrators would be treated roughly, and even suffer injuries, in the course of the arrest operation (see the Commission's report, cited above, §§ 113-15). The Court does not see any reason to depart from these findings and will take due account of the state of heightened tension at the time of the applicant's arrest.
65. It further observes that the applicant submitted that in the course of her arrest she was seized by one hand, pushed and beaten all over her body (in particular on the lower part of her head and on the back of her neck) with an electric baton. She moreover alleged that her hand had been twisted forcefully (see paragraph 16 above). However, the Court has at its disposal little evidence to corroborate the applicant's version of events. According to the medical certificate issued on 28 July 1989, four days after the applicant's release, medical examination disclosed “multiple and extensive bruises on various parts of the body” and “haematoma and swelling on the left elbow joint”. The patient declared she was suffering pain in different regions of her body (see paragraph 22 above). X-rays were requested, but their result is not known by the Court.
66. The Court considers that it has not been established that the applicant's injuries were deliberately caused by the Turkish or Turkish-Cypriot police. In any event, having regard to the fact that no evidence of a serious traumatic episode has been produced by the applicant, it cannot be ruled out that the bruises and the haematoma described in the certificate of 28 July 1989 are consistent with a minor physical confrontation between her and the police officers. There is nothing to show that the police used excessive force when, as they alleged, they were confronted in the course of their duties with resistance to arrest by the demonstrators, including the applicant (see, mutatis mutandis, Protopapa, cited above, §§ 47-48).
67. The applicant's remaining allegations, concerning the conditions of her detention at the “Pavlides garage” and at the prison outside Nicosia, are unsubstantiated. Nor has it been proved that the applicant's injuries required immediate medical assistance. The Court considers, moreover, that the degree of intimidation which the applicant might have felt while being deprived of her liberty did not attain the minimum level of severity required to come within the scope of Article 3 (see Protopapa, cited above, § 49).
68. Under these circumstances, the Court cannot consider it established beyond reasonable doubt that the applicant was subjected to treatment contrary to Article 3 or that the authorities had recourse to physical force which had not been rendered strictly necessary by the applicant's own behaviour (see, mutatis mutandis, Foka v. Turkey, no. 28940/95, § 62, 24 June 2008).
69. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 3 of the Convention.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 5 OF THE CONVENTION
70. The applicant alleged that her deprivation of liberty had been contrary to Article 5 of the Convention which, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be deprived of his liberty save in the following cases and in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law:
(a) the lawful detention of a person after conviction by a competent court;
...
(c) the lawful arrest or detention of a person effected for the purpose of bringing him before the competent legal authority on reasonable suspicion of having committed an offence or when it is reasonably considered necessary to prevent his committing an offence or fleeing after having done so;
...
2. Everyone who is arrested shall be informed promptly, in a language which he understands, of the reasons for his arrest and of any charge against him.
...”
71. The Government disputed this claim.
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The Government
72. The Government submitted that, given its violent character, the demonstration constituted an unlawful assembly. The Government referred, on this point, to sections 70, 71, 80 and 82 of the Cypriot Criminal Code, which was applicable in the “TRNC” (see paragraphs 29-32 above) and noted that under Chapter 155 of the Criminal Procedure Law (see paragraph 33 above), the police had power to arrest persons involved in violent demonstrations.
2. The applicant
73. The applicant essentially adopted the observations submitted by the Government of Cyprus (see below).
B. The third-party intervener's arguments
74. The Government of Cyprus observed that during the applicant's initial arrest, subsequent detention and prison sentence following the court conviction, the applicant was denied her liberty in circumstances which did not follow a procedure prescribed by law and which were not lawful under Article 5 § 1 (a) and (c) of the Convention. Moreover, the authorities' failure to inform the applicant of all the reasons for her arrest constituted a violation of Article 5 § 2.
C. The Court's assessment
75. It is not disputed that the applicant, who was arrested and remanded in custody by the “TRNC” Nicosia District Court, was deprived of her liberty within the meaning of Article 5 § 1 of the Convention.
76. As to the question of compliance with the requirements of Article 5 § 1, the Court reiterates that this provision requires in the first place that the detention be “lawful”, which includes the condition of compliance with a procedure prescribed by law. The Convention here essentially refers back to national law and states the obligation to conform to the substantive and procedural rules thereof, but it requires in addition that any deprivation of liberty should be consistent with the purpose of Article 5, namely to protect individuals from arbitrariness (see Benham v. the United Kingdom, 10 June 1996, §§ 40 and 42, Reports 1996-III).
77. The Court further notes that in the case of Foka v. Turkey (cited above, §§ 82-84) it held that the “TRNC” was exercising de facto authority over northern Cyprus and that the responsibility of Turkey for the acts of the “TRNC” was inconsistent with the applicant's view that the measures adopted by it should always be regarded as lacking a “lawful” basis in terms of the Convention. The Court therefore concluded that when, as in the Foka case, an act of the “TRNC” authorities was in compliance with laws in force within the territory of northern Cyprus, it should in principle be regarded as having a legal basis in domestic law for the purposes of the Convention. It does not see any reason to depart, in the instant case, from that finding, which is not in any way inconsistent with the view adopted by the international community regarding the establishment of the “TRNC” or the fact that the Government of the Republic of Cyprus remains the sole legitimate government of Cyprus (see Cyprus v. Turkey [GC], no. 25781/94, §§ 14, 61 and 90, ECHR 2001–IV).
78. In the present case, it is not disputed that the applicant took part in a demonstration which the authorities of the “TRNC” regarded as potentially an “unlawful assembly” within the meaning of section 70 of the Cyprus Criminal Code (see paragraph 29 above). Taking part in an unlawful assembly is an offence under section 71 of the Cypriot Criminal Code and is punishable by up to one year's imprisonment (see paragraph 30 above). It is also an offence under the “TRNC” laws to enter “TRNC” territory without permission and/or other than through an approved port (see paragraphs 34-35 above). The Court further notes that according to Chapter 155, section 14 of the Criminal Procedure Law, a police officer may, without warrant, arrest any person who commits in his presence any offence punishable with imprisonment or who obstructs a police officer while in the execution of his duty (see paragraph 33 above – see also Protopapa, cited above, § 61, and Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou, Commission's report, cited above, § 147).
79. As the police officers who effected the arrest had grounds for believing that the applicant was committing offences punishable by imprisonment, the Court is of the opinion that she was deprived of her liberty in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law “for the purpose of bringing [her] before the competent legal authority on reasonable suspicion of having committed an offence”, within the meaning of Article 5 § 1 (c) of the Convention (see Protopapa, cited above, § 62).
80. Moreover, there is no evidence that the deprivation of liberty served any other illegitimate aim or was arbitrary. Indeed, on 20 July 1989, the day after her arrest, the applicant was brought before the “TRNC” Nicosia District Court and remanded for trial in relation to the offence of illegal entry into “TRNC” territory (see paragraph 17 above).
81. After 22 July 1989, the date on which the “TRNC” Nicosia District Court delivered its judgment (see paragraph 21 above), the applicant's deprivation of liberty should be regarded as the “lawful detention of a person after conviction by a competent court”, within the meaning of Article 5 § 1 (a) of the Convention.
82. Finally, it is to be observed that the applicant was interrogated on the day of her arrest by an official who spoke Greek (see paragraph 17 above). In the Court's view, it should have been apparent to the applicant that she was being questioned about trespassing in the UN buffer zone and her allegedly illegal entry into the territory of the “TRNC” (see, mutatis mutandis, Murray and Others v. the United Kingdom, Series A no. 300-A, § 77, 28 October 1994). Moreover, during the court hearing on the following morning an interpreter explained in Greek that the suspects were accused of having violated the borders of the “TRNC” (see paragraph 17 above). The Court therefore finds that the reasons for her arrest were sufficiently brought to her attention during her interview and during the court's hearing of 20 July 1989 (see, mutatis mutandis, Protopapa, cited above, § 65).
83. Accordingly, there has been no violation of Article 5 §§ 1 and 2 of the Convention.
VI. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
84. The applicant complained of a lack of fairness at her trial by the “TRNC” Nicosia District Court.
She invoked Article 6 of the Convention, which, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“1. In the determination ... of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing ... by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law. ...
2. Everyone charged with a criminal offence shall be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law.
3. Everyone charged with a criminal offence has the following minimum rights:
(a) to be informed promptly, in a language which he understands and in detail, of the nature and cause of the accusation against him;
(b) to have adequate time and facilities for the preparation of his defence;
(c) to defend himself in person or through legal assistance of his own choosing or, if he has not sufficient means to pay for legal assistance, to be given it free when the interests of justice so require;
(d) to examine or have examined witnesses against him and to obtain the attendance and examination of witnesses on his behalf under the same conditions as witnesses against him;
(e) to have the free assistance of an interpreter if he cannot understand or speak the language used in court.”
85. The Government disputed this claim.
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The Government
86. The Government stated that:
(i) the applicant had been tried by an impartial and independent court;
(ii) all the cases before the court, including the applicant's, were divided into groups so as to ensure a speedy trial and help the accused in their defence;
(iii) the applicant had not asked for more time to prepare her defence, and had declined legal representation;
(iv) the court had advised the applicant and helped her to understand her rights and the procedure;
(v) everything at the trial had been interpreted during the proceedings by qualified translators and interpreters in order to ensure that the defence was not prejudiced and the accused were fully informed of the charges against them; the trial judge replaced a translator when the latter started to have a conversation with the accused;
(vi) the judge, an English-educated lawyer, was only involved in the judicial proceedings and not in the decision to prosecute or in the acts relating to the applicant's arrest;
(vii) in passing sentence the court had taken all the circumstances of the case into consideration; in particular, being fair and understanding the mental state of the accused, the judge had not punished them for contempt of court when they behaved in a disrespectful manner and one of them said that the trial was a “circus”.
87. The Government challenged the third-party intervener's arguments as being of a political nature. They considered that the allegations of a lack of fairness, independence and impartiality of the judiciary in the “TRNC” were without any foundation whatsoever. On the contrary, previous cases decided by the “TRNC” courts showed that they respected human rights and the Convention principles.
2. The applicant
88. The applicant essentially adopted the observations submitted by the Government of Cyprus (see below).
B. The third-party intervener's arguments
89. The Government of Cyprus submitted that the instant application was an exceptional case in which the applicant had been denied each and all of the basic fair-trial guarantees provided for in Article 6 of the Convention. The violations of her rights included inter alia a failure to inform the applicant promptly, in a language that she understood, of the nature and cause of the accusation against her, to provide her with adequate time and facilities to find a lawyer of her own choosing and to prepare her defence, to allow the cross-examination of witnesses and to provide the applicant with proper interpretation and a transcript of the trial. Lastly, there was proof beyond reasonable doubt that the “court” which tried the applicant was neither impartial nor fair.
C. The Court's assessment
90. The relevant general principles enshrined in Article 6 of the Convention are set out in Protopapa, cited above, §§ 77-82.
91. As to the application of these principles to the present case, the Court observes that the applicant was remanded for trial before the “TRNC” Nicosia District Court. An interpreter was present at the hearings on 20 and 21 July 1989. Even if the Court has no information on which to assess the quality of the interpretation provided, it observes that it is apparent from the applicant's own version of the events that she understood the charges against her and the statements made by the witnesses at the trial. In any event, it does not appear that she challenged the quality of the interpretation before the trial judge, requested the replacement of the interpreter or asked for clarification concerning the nature and cause of the accusation.
92. The Court furthermore notes that the accused were offered the opportunity of using the services of a member of the local Bar Association. However, they chose not to avail themselves of this right.
93. The Court considers that the applicant was undoubtedly capable of realising the consequences of her decision not to make use of the procedural rights which were offered to her. Furthermore, it does not appear that the dispute raised any questions of public interest preventing the aforementioned procedural guarantees from being waived (see, mutatis mutandis, Hermi v. Italy [GC], no. 18114/02, § 79, 10 October 2006, and Kwiatkowska v. Italy (dec.), no. 52868/99, 30 November 2000).
94. The Court also emphasises that the accused did not request an adjournment of the trial or a translation of the written documents pertaining to the procedure in order to acquaint themselves with the case-file and to prepare their defence. There is nothing to suggest that such requests would have been rejected. The same applies to the possibility, which was not taken up by the accused, of lodging an appeal or an appeal on points of law against the “TRNC” Nicosia District Court's judgment.
95. Finally, the Court cannot accept, as such, the allegation that the “TRNC” courts as a whole were not impartial and/or independent or that the applicant's trial and conviction were influenced by political aims (see, mutatis mutandis, Cyprus v. Turkey, cited above, §§ 231-240).
96. In the light of the above, and taking account in particular of the conduct of the accused, the Court considers that the criminal proceedings against the applicant, considered as a whole, were not unfair or otherwise contrary to the provisions of the Convention.
97. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 6 of the Convention.
VII. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 7 OF THE CONVENTION
98. The applicant submitted that she had been convicted in respect of acts which did not constitute a criminal offence.
She invoked Article 7 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“1. No one shall be held guilty of any criminal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a criminal offence under national or international law at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the criminal offence was committed.
2. This Article shall not prejudice the trial and punishment of any person for any act or omission which, at the time when it was committed, was criminal according to the general principles of law recognised by civilised nations.”
99. The Government disputed this claim. They alleged that the applicant had been charged with violating the borders of the “TRNC” and her conviction was based on the evidence of eye-witnesses. She should have known that by violating the UN buffer zone and the cease-fire line she would provoke a response by the UN or Turkish-Cypriot forces.
100. The Government of Cyprus submitted that the applicant had been wrongly tried for acts which did not amount to offences under national or international law, and which in any event failed to meet the standards of foreseeability and accessibility required by the Convention (see G. v. France, 27 September 1995, Series A no. 325-B), in violation of Article 7 of the Convention.
101. The relevant general principles enshrined in Article 7 of the Convention are set out in Protopapa, cited above, §§ 93-95.
102. As to the application of these principles to the present case, the Court notes that the applicant was convicted for having entered the territory of the “TRNC” without permission and other than through an approved port. These offences are defined in Law no. 5/72 and subsections 12(1) and (5) of the Aliens and Immigration Law (see paragraphs 34-35 above).
103. It is not disputed that these texts were in force when the offences were committed and were accessible to the applicant. The Court furthermore finds that they described with sufficient clarity the acts which would have made her criminally liable, thus satisfying the requirement of foreseeability. There is nothing to suggest that they were interpreted extensively or by way of analogy; the penalty imposed (three days' imprisonment and a fine of CYP 50 – see paragraph 21 above) was within the maximum provided for by the law in force at the time the offence was committed.
104. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 7 of the Convention.
VIII. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 11 OF THE CONVENTION
105. The applicant complained of a violation of her right to freedom of peaceful assembly.
She invoked Article 11 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and to freedom of association with others, including the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.
2. No restrictions shall be placed on the exercise of these rights other than such as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others. This Article shall not prevent the imposition of lawful restrictions on the exercise of these rights by members of the armed forces, of the police or of the administration of the State.”
106. The Government disputed this claim, observing that given its violent character, the demonstration was clearly outside the scope of Article 11 of the Convention. They considered that the “TRNC” police had intervened in the interests of national security and/or public safety and for the prevention of disorder and crime.
107. The Government of Cyprus submitted that the applicant's right to demonstrate under Article 11 of the Convention had been interfered with in an aggravated and serious manner. The acts of the respondent Government were a deliberate and provocative attempt to disrupt a lawful demonstration in an area which was subject to UN patrols and not even within the claimed jurisdiction of the “TRNC”. The interference with the applicant's rights was not prescribed by law and was an excessive and disproportionate response to a peaceful and lawful demonstration. The respondent Government had not identified any legitimate aim that they were seeking to serve by assaulting the applicant.
108. The Court notes that the applicant and other women clashed with Turkish-Cypriot police while demonstrating in or in the vicinity of the Ayios Georgios church in Nicosia. The demonstration was dispersed and some of the demonstrators, including the applicant, were arrested. Under these circumstances, the Court considers that there has been an interference with the applicant's right of assembly (see Protopapa, cited above, § 104).
109. This interference had a legal basis, namely sections 70 and 71 of the Cypriot Criminal Code (see paragraphs 29-30 above) and section 14 of the Criminal Procedure Law (see paragraph 33 above), and was thus “prescribed by law” within the meaning of Article 11 § 2 of the Convention. In this respect, the Court recalls its finding that when, as in the Foka case, an act of the “TRNC” authorities was in compliance with laws in force within the territory of northern Cyprus, it should in principle be regarded as having a legal basis in domestic law for the purposes of the Convention (see paragraph 77 above). There remain the questions whether the interference pursued a legitimate aim and was necessary in a democratic society.
110. The Government submitted that the interference pursued legitimate aims, including the protection of national security and/or public safety and the prevention of disorder and crime.
111. The Court notes that in the case of Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou, the Commission found that the demonstration on 19 July 1989 was violent, that it had broken through the UN defence lines and constituted a serious threat to peace and public order on the demarcation line in Cyprus (see Commission's report, cited above, §§ 109-10). The Court sees no reason to depart from these findings, which were based on the UN Secretary General's report, on a video film and on photographs submitted by the respondent Government before the Commission. It emphasises that in his report, the UN Secretary General stated that the demonstrators had “forced their way into the UN buffer zone in the Ayios Kassianos area of Nicosia”, that they had broken “through a wire barrier maintained by UNFICYP and destroyed an UNFICYP observation post” before breaking “through the line formed by UNFICYP soldiers” and entering “a former school complex” (see paragraph 27 above).
112. The Court refers, firstly, to the fundamental principles underlying its judgments relating to Article 11 (see Djavit An v. Turkey, no. 20652/92, §§ 56-57, ECHR 2003-III; Piermont v. France, 27 April 1995, §§ 76-77, Series A no. 314; and Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben” v. Austria, 21 June 1988, § 32, Series A no. 139). It is clear from this case-law that the authorities have a duty to take appropriate measures with regard to demonstrations in order to ensure their peaceful conduct and the safety of all citizens (see Oya Ataman v. Turkey, no. 74552/01, § 35, 5 December 2006). However, they cannot guarantee this absolutely and they have a wide discretion in the choice of the means to be used (see Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben”, cited above, § 34).
113. While an unlawful situation does not, in itself, justify an infringement of freedom of assembly (see Cisse v. France, no. 51346/99, § 50, ECHR 2002-III (extracts)), interferences with the right guaranteed by Article 11 of the Convention are in principle justified for the prevention of disorder or crime and for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others where, as in the instant case, demonstrators engage in acts of violence (see, a contrario, Bukta and Others v. Hungary, no. 25691/04, § 37, 17 July 2007, and Oya Ataman, cited above, §§ 41-42).
114. The Court further observes that, as stated in the UN Secretary General's report of 7 December 1989 (see paragraph 27 above), the demonstrators had forced their way into the UN buffer zone. According to the “TRNC” authorities, they also entered into “TRNC” territory, thus committing offences punishable under the “TRNC” laws (see paragraphs 34-35 and 78 above). In this respect, the Court notes that it does not have at its disposal any element capable of casting doubt upon the “TRNC” authorities' finding that the area where the accused had entered was “TRNC” territory. In the Court's view, the intervention of the Turkish and/or Turkish-Cypriot forces was not due to the political nature of the demonstration but was provoked by its violent character and by the violation of the “TRNC” borders by some of the demonstrators (see Protopapa, cited above, § 110).
115. In these conditions and having regard to the wide margin of appreciation left to the States in this sphere (see Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben”, cited above, § 34), the Court holds that the interference with the applicant's right to freedom of assembly was not, in the light of all the circumstances of the case, disproportionate for the purposes of Article 11 § 2.
116. Consequently, there has been no violation of Article 11 of the Convention.
IX. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
117. The applicant alleged that she had not had at her disposal a domestic effective remedy to redress the violations of her fundamental rights.
She invoked Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
118. The Government disputed this claim. In their observations of 10 January 2003, they noted that the applicant, who had failed to use the domestic remedies available within the legal system of the “TRNC”, could not complain of a violation of Article 13 of the Convention.
119. The Government of Cyprus submitted that, contrary to Article 13 of the Convention, no effective remedies had at any time been available to the applicant in respect of any of her complaints. Alternatively, the institutions established by the “TRNC” were incapable of constituting effective domestic remedies within the national legal system of Turkey.
120. Article 13 of the Convention guarantees the availability at the national level of a remedy to enforce the substance of the Convention rights and freedoms in whatever form they may happen to be secured in the domestic legal order. The effect of Article 13 is thus to require the provision of a domestic remedy to deal with the substance of an “arguable complaint” under the Convention and to grant appropriate relief (see, among many other authorities, Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 157, ECHR 2000-XI).
121. The scope of the Contracting States' obligations under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant's complaint; however, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law (see, for example, İlhan v. Turkey [GC], no. 22277/93, § 97, ECHR 2000-VII). The term “effective” is also considered to mean that the remedy must be adequate and accessible (see Vidas v. Croatia, no. 40383/04, § 34, 3 July 2008, and Paulino Tomás v. Portugal (dec.), no. 58698/00, ECHR 2003-VIII).
122. It is also to be recalled that in its judgment in the case of Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above, §§ 14, 16, 90 and 102) the Court held that for the purposes of Article 35 § 1, with which Article 13 has a close affinity (see Kudla, cited above, § 152), remedies available in the “TRNC” may be regarded as “domestic remedies” of the respondent State and that the question of their effectiveness is to be considered in the specific circumstances where it arises.
123. In the present case, it does not appear that the applicant attempted to make use of the remedies which might have been available to her in the “TRNC” with regard to the circumstances of her arrest, her subsequent detention and her trial (see Protopapa, cited above, § 121, mutatis mutandis, Chrysostomos and Papachrysostomou, Commission's report cited above, § 174). In particular, she refused the services of a lawyer practising in the “TRNC”, made little or no use of the procedural safeguards provided by the “TRNC” Nicosia District Court, did not lodge an appeal against her conviction and did not file with the local authorities a formal complaint about the ill-treatment she allegedly suffered at the hands of the Turkish-Cypriot police. In the Court's view, there is no evidence that, had the applicant made use of all or part of them, these domestic remedies would have been ineffective.
124. Under these circumstances, no breach of Article 13 of the Convention can be found.
X. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLES 5, 6 AND 7
125. The applicant alleged that she had been discriminated against on the grounds of her ethnic origin and religious beliefs in the enjoyment of the rights guaranteed by Articles 5, 6 and 7 of the Convention.
She invoked Article 14 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
126. The Government disputed this claim.
127. The Government of Cyprus submitted that the applicant had been arrested, beaten and prosecuted by the authorities solely because of her nationality and ethnic origin. That differential treatment was a clear violation of Article 14 of the Convention.
128. The Court's case-law establishes that discrimination means treating differently, without an objective and reasonable justification, persons in relevantly similar situations (see Willis v. the United Kingdom, no. 36042/97, § 48, ECHR 2002-IV). However, not every difference in treatment will amount to a violation of Article 14. It must be established that other persons in an analogous or relevantly similar situation enjoy preferential treatment and that this distinction is discriminatory (see Unal Tekeli v. Turkey, no. 29865/96, § 49, 16 November 2004).
129. In the present case the applicant failed to prove that she had been treated differently from other persons – namely, from Cypriots of Turkish origin – who were in a comparable situation. The Court also refers to its conclusion that the applicant's fundamental rights under Articles 3, 5, 6, 7, 11 and 13 of the Convention have not been infringed (see Protopapa, cited above, § 127, and, mutatis mutandis, Manitaras v. Turkey (dec.), no. 54591/00, 3 June 2008).
130. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Articles 5, 6 and 7 of the Convention.
XI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
131. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage
1. The parties' submissions
(a) The applicant
132. In her just satisfaction claims of December 2002, the applicant requested CYP 81,899 (approximately EUR 139,932) for pecuniary damage. She relied on an expert's report (provided by the Department of Lands and Surveys of the Republic of Cyprus) assessing the value of her losses which included the loss of annual rent collected or expected to be collected from renting out her properties, plus interest from the date on which such rents were due until the day of payment. The rent claimed was for the period dating back to January 1987, when the respondent Government accepted the right of individual petition, until 2000. The applicant did not claim compensation for any purported expropriation since she was still the legal owner of the properties. The valuation contained a description of the town of Famagusta and of the Kato Dherynia village, where the applicant's properties were situated.
133. The starting point of the valuation was the annual rental value of the applicant's share in the properties in 1974 (CYP 357 – approximately EUR 610), calculated on the basis of a percentage (varying between 4% and 6%) of the market value of the properties (CYP 15,685 – approximately EUR 26,799). This sum was subsequently adjusted upwards according to an average annual rental increase of 5.5%. Compound interest for delayed payment was applied at a rate of 8% per annum.
134. In a letter of 28 January 2008 the applicant observed that a long period had passed since her first claims for just satisfaction and that the claim for pecuniary loss needed to be updated according to data concerning the increase of market value of land in Cyprus. The average increase in this respect was 10% to 15% per annum.
135. In her just satisfaction claims of December 2002, the applicant further claimed CYP 80,000 (approximately 136,688 EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage for the violations of her rights under Articles 8 of the Convention and 1 of Protocol No. 1. She further claimed CYP 60,000 (approximately EUR 102,516) in respect of the moral damage suffered for the other violations.
(b) The Government
136. In reply to the applicant's just satisfaction claims of December 2002, the Government submitted that the issue of reciprocal compensation for Greek-Cypriot property left in the north of the island and Turkish-Cypriot property left in the south was very complex and should be settled through negotiations between the two sides under the auspices of the UN, rather than by adjudication by the European Court of Human Rights, acting as a first-instance tribunal and relying on the reports produced by the applicant side only. They referred, on this point, to the UN plan entitled “Basis for agreement on a comprehensive settlement of the Cyprus problem”, in its revised version of 10 December 2002.
137. Challenging the conclusions reached by the Court in the Loizidou case ((just satisfaction), 28 July 1998, Reports 1998-IV), the Government considered that in cases such as the present one, no award should be made by the Court under Article 41 of the Convention. They underlined that the applicant's inability to have access to her properties depended on the political situation in Cyprus and, in particular, on the existence of the UN recognized cease-fire lines. If Greek-Cypriots were allowed to go to the north and claim their properties, chaos would explode on the island; furthermore, any award made by the Court would undermine the negotiations between the two parties.
138. Moreover, Turkey had no access to the lands office records of the “TRNC”, which were outside its jurisdiction and control. It was therefore not in a position to have sufficient knowledge about the possession and/or ownership of the alleged properties in 1974 or to know their market values and reasonable rents at the relevant time. The estimations put forward by the applicant were speculative and hypothetical, as they were not based on real data and did not take into consideration the volatility of the property market and its susceptibility to be influenced by the domestic situation in Cyprus. During the last 28 years, the landscape in Cyprus had considerably changed and so had the status of the applicant's property.
139. It was also to be noted that in the present application the estimations had not been provided by an independent expert, but by the Department of Lands and Surveys of the Republic of Cyprus, that is to say by a branch of an interested party which had intervened in the proceedings before the Court. In any event, Turkey could not be held liable in international law for the acts of the “TRNC” expropriating the applicant's properties, as it could not legislate to make reparation for these acts. The Government invited the Court to examine whether, as stated in Article 41 of the Convention, “the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned” allowed “reparation to be made”.
140. Finally, the Government did not comment on the applicant's submissions under the head of non-pecuniary damage.
3. The Court's assessment
141. The Court first notes that the Government's submission that doubts might rise as to the applicant's title of ownership over the properties at issue (see paragraph 138 above) is, in substance, an objection of incompatibility ratione materiae with the provisions of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such an objection should have been raised before the application was declared admissible or, at the latest, in the context of the parties' observations on the merits. In any event, the Court cannot but confirm its finding that the applicant had a “possession” over the properties claimed in the present application within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 46 above).
142. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage is not ready for decision. It observes, in particular, that the parties have failed to provide reliable and objective data pertaining to the prices of land and real estate in Cyprus at the date of the Turkish intervention. This failure renders it difficult for the Court to assess whether the estimate furnished by the applicant of the 1974 market value of her properties is reasonable. The question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed with due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicant (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
143. In her just satisfaction claims of December 2002, the applicant sought CYP 7,200 (approximately EUR 12,302) for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court.
144. The Government did not comment on this point.
145. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of costs and expenses is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed with due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicant.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Dismisses by six votes to one the Government's preliminary objections;
2. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds unanimously that it is not necessary to examine whether there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention and of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
4. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 3 of the Convention;
5. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 5 of the Convention;
6. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 6 of the Convention;
7. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 7 of the Convention;
8. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 11 of the Convention;
9. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention;
10. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Articles 5, 6 and 7;
11. Holds unanimously that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinions of Judge Bratza and Karakaş are annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
F.A.


CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE BRATZA
In the case of Protopapa v. Turkey (no. 16084/90, 24 February 2009), I voted with the other members of the Chamber in relation to all of the Convention complaints of the applicant save that under Article 13 which, for the reasons explained in my Partly Dissenting Opinion, I found had been violated.
The applicant's complaint under Article 13 in the present case is substantially the same as that of the applicant in the Protopapa case. While I continue to entertain the doubts which I expressed in that case as to whether there were any remedies which could be regarded as practical or effective and which offered the applicant any realistic prospects of success, in deference to the majority opinion in the Protopapa judgment, which has now become final, I have joined the other members of the Chamber in finding no violation of Article 13.


PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE KARAKAÅž
Unlike the majority, I consider that the objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies raised by the Government should not have been rejected. Consequently, I cannot agree with the finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention, for the same reasons as mentioned in my dissenting opinion in the case of Alexandrou v. Turkey (no. 16162/90, 20 January 2009).
I voted with the majority concerning the finding of no violation of Articles 3, 5, 6, 7, 11, 13 and 14 read in conjunction with Articles 5, 6 and 7 of the Convention.


TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA ANDREOU PAPI C. TURCHIA
(Richiesta n. 16094/90)
SENTENZA
(meriti)
STRASBOURG
22 settembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Andreou Papi c. Turchia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente il Giovanni Bonello, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, Ledi Bianku, Işıl Karakaş, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 1 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 16094/90) contro la Repubblica della Turchia depositata presso la Commissione europea dei Diritti umani (“la Commissione”) sotto il precedente Articolo 25 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino cipriota, la Sig.ra D. A. P. (“la richiedente”), 16 gennaio 1990.
2. La richiedente fu rappresentata dal Sig. L. C. e dal Sig. C. C., due avvocati che praticano a Nicosia. Il Governo turco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Z.M. Necatigil.
3. La richiedente addusse, in particolare, che l'occupazione turca della parte settentrionale di Cipro l'aveva spogliata della sua casa e della sua proprietà e che lei era stata sottoposta a trattamento contrario alla Convenzione durante una dimostrazione.
4. La richiesta fu trasmessa alla Corte il 1 novembre 1998, quando il Protocollo N.ro 11 alla Convenzione entrò in vigore (Articolo 5 § 2 del Protocollo N.ro 11).
5. Con una decisione del 26 settembre 2002 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente ammissibile.
6. La richiedente ed il Governo entrambi registrarono osservazioni sui meriti (Articolo 59 § 1). Inoltre, commenti di una terza parte intervenuta furono ricevuti dal Governo di Cipro che aveva esercitato il suo diritto ad intervenire (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 § 1 (b)).
I FATTI
7. La richiedente nacque nel 1933 e vive a Limassol.
I. QUESTIONI DI PROPRIETA’
8. La richiedente sostenne che nel 1952, quando aveva 19 anni, si era stabilita permanentemente a Famagusta (Cipro settentrionale), dove si sposò ed ebbe due figli. Là aveva la sua casa e altro patrimoni immobiliare. Per provare la sua rivendicazione alla proprietà la richiedente produsse un’“affermazione di proprietà di patrimonio immobiliare occupati dai Turchi” emesso dalla Repubblica di Cipro secondo la quale le sue proprietà potrebbero essere descritte come segue:
- Famagusta, Chrysi Akti area n. 778, blocco C, foglio mappale 33/21.1.IV, descrizione: edifici con alloggio, recinto e negozio al pianterreno ed alloggio al primo piano; uso: residenza; area degli alloggi: 115 m² ognuno; quota: ¾.
9. La richiedente presentò che la proprietà descritta sopra era stata trasferitale come regalo da suo marito, il Sig. A. P. il 28 giugno 2000 (Dichiarazione di trasferimento n. D-971). Quest’ultimo l'aveva acquisito l’8 luglio 1994 come regalo (Dichiarazione di trasferimento n. D-1044) da sua madre che era divenuta la proprietaria dell’intera proprietà nel 1971. La richiedente produsse una copia delle due dichiarazioni summenzionate di trasferimento.
10. La richiedente sostenne anche di avere una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo della seguente proprietà:
- Kato Dherynia, provvisorio n. 19, D/959; descrizione: luogo edificabile sotto suddivisione; quota: intera.
11. In particolare, la richiedente dichiarò di aver stipulato un contratto di acquisto del luogo il 24 dicembre 1971 e di aver pagato il prezzo di acquisto in rate mensili. Il prezzo di vendita era CYP 2,750 (circa EUR 4,613) e la richiedente aveva dato una in un'unica soluzione di CYP 200 (circa EUR 341) come pagamento anticipato. La somma rimanente di CYP 2,550 avrebbe dovuto essere pagata come segue: CYP 500 il 31 gennaio 1972, più 48 rate mensili di non meno di CYP 45 (circa EUR 76). Tutte le rate erano state pagate, avendo pagato quella finale il 2 luglio 1974. In conformità col contratto, il trasferimento sarebbe stato effettuato su pagamento del pieno prezzo di vendita. Comunque, il titolo della richiedente sul terreno non fu registrato a causa dell'intervento turco. La richiedente produsse il contratto di vendita e le copie delle ricevute di pagamento.
12. La richiedente presentò dall’intervento turco del 1974 lei era stata privata dei suoi diritti di proprietà, poiché la sua proprietà era situata nell'area che era sotto l'occupazione e il controllo delle autorità militari turche. Lei aveva fatto un tentativo di ritornare alla sua casa e alla sua proprietà il 19 luglio 1989, ma non le era stato concesso di fare ciò dalle autorità militari turche. Loro le avevano impedito di accedere e di utilizzare il suo alloggio e proprietà.
II. LA MANIFESTAZIONE DEL 19 LUGLIO 1989
13. La richiedente si unì ad una manifestazione anti-turchi nell' area di Ayios di Kassianos il 19 luglio 1989, a Nicosia in cui anche i richiedenti nelle cause Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou c. Turchia e Loizidou c Turchia (vedere sotto) hanno preso parte.

A. La versione della richiedente degli eventi

14. Secondo un affidavit giurato dalla richiedente di fronte alla Corte distrettuale della “TRNC” di Nicosia il 7 agosto 2000, la manifestazione del 19 luglio 1989 era tranquilla e si era tenuta il sul quindicesimo anniversario dell'intervento turco a Cipro, in appoggio delle persone disperse e per protestare contro le violazioni dei diritti umani.
15. La richiedente e altre donne si erano raggruppate nella chiesa Ayios Georgios, dove era in corso una funzione. Mentre era nella cappella, sentì dei lamenti provenire dall’esterno ed allo stesso tempo vide dei poliziotti turchi entrare nella chiesa, indiscriminatamente afferrare delle donne, colpendole e strattonandole.
16. Un poliziotto aveva preso la richiedente con una mano e torto l'altra indietro. Incominciò a spingerla fuori dalla chiesa e a colpirla ferocemente con un bastone e col suo ginocchio nella parte più bassa del suo capo e sulla nuca così come su altre parti del suo corpo. Lei sentì dell’elettricità passare per il suo corpo e comprese che il bastone era elettrico. La richiedente e le altre donne furono trascinate violentemente nell'area controllata dalle autorità della “Repubblica turca di Cipro Settentrionale” (la“TRNC”).
17. Fu arrestata e poi portata in autobus al così definito “Pavlides Garage.” Durante il viaggio fu sottoposta ad aggressioni, bastonate e gesti di natura sessuale da parte deglii ufficiali che l'avevano detenuta. La folla fuori dal garage stava ingiuriava, gridando ingiurie e minacce e gettando pietre al garage alcuni delle quali trapassarono il tetto. Alcuni dei poliziotti turchi minacciarono di aprire le porte e di lasciare entrare la folla per linciare i detenuti. Al garage c’erano anche due uomini dell’ ONU che si comportarono soltanto come osservatori. Uno delle detenute donne (la Sig.ra V. -vedere la richiesta n. 16078/90) fu colpita gravemente. A mezzanotte la richiedente fu interrogata. Il suo interrogatorio ebbe luogo in greco. La richiedente mentì quando chiese dettagli riguardo ai membri della sua famiglia. Le fu detto di firmare una dichiarazione in turco ma non lo fece siccome non capiva il turco e aveva considerato che firmare la dichiarazione sarebbe stato uguale a riconoscere la “TRNC.” Nella mattina del 20 luglio 1989 le fu dato del cibo e dell’ acqua e poi portata presso un tribunale dove fu mandata indietro in custodia per quarantotto ore. All'udienza, un interprete spiegò la procedura all'accusata. La richiedente capì di essere accusata di avere violato i confini della “TRNC.”
18. Lei fu trasferita successivamente in una prigione fuori di Nicosia, dove fu tenuta in una cella con altre due donne. Poiché non c'erano abbastanza materassi lei e le altre detenute nella sua cella fecero dei turni per sdraiarsi; comunque, ì non ha potuto dormire a causa del dolore acuto dovuto ai colpi che aveva ricevuto. Durante la notte la richiedente e le altre detenute furono molestate dalle guardie e disse che i prigionieri a lungo termine le avrebbero stuprate. Le toilette e le docce erano sporche e non avevano porte così le guardie potevano vedere il bagno delle detenute. Essenziale i servizi igienici mancavano. Le guardie prelevarono continuamente dei detenuti durante la notte per dei controlli individuali.
19. Circa a mezzanotte del 21 luglio 1989, la richiedente fu portata presso un tribunale. Lei non aveva nessuna rappresentanza legale e la qualità dell'interpretazione era scarsa; la richiedente percepiva che l'interprete non stava traducendo tutti di ciò che stava dicendo. Il giudice chiese se gli accusati volevano una rappresentanza legale; risposero che avrebbero accettato solamente come consigliere di difesa un avvocato registrato presso l'associazione decaduta della Repubblica di Cipro. Di conseguenza, loro non furono assistiti da un avvocato. Uno degli accusati parlò a favore degli altri.
20. Dei testimoni di accusa furono interrogati. Loro mentirono sui fatti di base riguardanti la dimostrazione e le circostanze dell'arresto e gli accusati tentarono di protestare. Comunque, fu detto loro di rimanere calmi se non volevano essere consegnato alla folla vociferante raggruppata fuori della sala d'udienza.
21. Circa a mezzanotte del 22 luglio 1989 la corte condannò la richiedente alla reclusione di tre giorni ed ad una multa di 50 sterline di Cipro (CYP)-approssimativamente 85 euro (EUR)-con cinque giorni supplementari in prigione in mancanza di pagamento entro 24 ore. Lei fu riportata alla prigione dove le furono dati degli articoli di igiene personale che erano stati spediti dalla Croce Rossa.
22. Il 24 luglio 1989 la richiedente fu rilasciata. Al tempo della sua liberazione è stata esaminata con dottori dell’ ONU che presero alcune note, e poi è stata trasferita nella Cipro meridionale. Il 28 luglio 1989 fece una dichiarazione alla polizia di Limassol e fu esaminata anche da un dottore Statale presso l’Ospedale di Limassol. La richiedente produsse un referto medico emesso questo stesso giorno del Dott. C. M., un ufficiale medico. Questo documento si legge come segue:
“Il 28.7.1989 approssimativamente alle 23.00 mi fu richiesto dal Distretto di Polizia di Limassol di esaminare la Sig.ra D. A. P. di Famagusta e che viveva al momento al 16 di via Chrysanthou Mylona a Limassol.
La Sig.ra P. adduce che il 19.7.1989 fu colpita (calci, pugni ed uso di bastone della polizia) in varie parti del suo corpo da pseudo poliziotti turchi nell'area di Ayios Kassianos a Nicosia.
All'esame fu trovato ciò che segue:
1. Contusioni Multiple ed estese su varie parti del corpo, particolarmente evidenti e gravi nelle aree della natica destra e sulla superficie posteriore dell'anca sinistra.
2. Ematomi e rigonfiamenti sulla giuntura di gomito sinistro.
3. Il dolore in varie parti del corpo particolarmente nella regione delle costole (entrambi i lati), il collo, il gomito sinistro entrambe le natiche, il coccige e la vita.
Fu richiesto un esame ai raggi X.”
23. La richiedente addusse di continuare a soffrire degli effetti delle bastonate inflitti a lei.
B. La versione del Governo degli eventi
24. Il Governo addusse che la richiedente aveva partecipato a una manifestazione violenta allo scopo di infiammare il risentimento anti-turco. I manifestanti, sostenuti dall'amministrazione greco - cipriota richiedevano che la “Linea Verde” a Nicosia venisse smantellata. Alcuni portavano bandiere greche, bastoni, coltelli e pinze tagliafili. Loro stavano agendo in una maniera provocativa e gridando insulti. I dimostratori furono avvertiti in greco e in 'inglese che a meno che loro no si fossero dispersi sarebbero arrestati in conformità con le leggi della “TRNC.” Il richiedente fu arrestato dalla polizia turco-cipriota dopo aver attraversato la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU ed essere entrato nell'area sotto il controllo turco-cipriota. La polizia turco-cipriota è intervenuta di fronte all'incapacità manifesta delle autorità greco - cipriote e delle Forze dell’ONU a Cipro di contenere l'incursione e le sue possibili conseguenze.
25. Nessuna forza è stata usata contro i manifestanti che non si sono introdotti nell’area di confine della “TRNC” e, nella caso dei dimostratori che furono arrestati per aver violato il confine,non fu usata nessuna violenza, se non ragionevolmente necessaria nelle circostanze per arrestare e detenere le persone riguardate. Nessuno fu seviziato. Era possibile che alcuni dei manifestanti si fossero fatti male nella confusione o nel tentare di scalare il filo spinato o altra protezione. Se la polizia turca, o chiunque altro, avesse assalito o colpito uno qualsiasi dei manifestanti , il Segretario Generale dell'ONU senza dubbio si avrebbe fatto riferimento a questo nel suo rapporto al Consiglio di Sicurezza.
26. La richiedente fu accusata, processata, trovata colpevole e condannata ad un breve periodo di reclusione. Si dichiarò innocente, ma non ne diede prova e si rifiutò usare le misure giuridiche disponibili. Gli fu chiesto di chiedere assistenza da parte di un avvocato registrato nella “TRNC”, ma si rifiutò e non richiese una rappresentanza legale. I servizi di traduzioni furono offerti al processo da interpreti qualificati. Tutti i procedimenti furono tradotti in greco.

C. Il rapporto del Segretario Generale dell’ONU

27 Nel suo rapporto del 7 dicembre 1989 sulle operazioni dell’ ONU a Cipro, Il Segretario Generale dell’ONU ha affermato, inter alia, che :

“Una situazione seria, comunque sorse nel luglio come risultato di una manifestazione da parte di Greco - Ciprioti a Nicosia. I dettagli sono i seguenti:
(a) la sera del 19 luglio, circa 1,000 manifestanti ciprioti greci, soprattutto donne forzarono il loro cammino verso la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU nell’area di 'Ayios Kassianos a Nicosia. I dimostratori penetrarono in una barriera di filo sostenuta dall’ UNFICYP e distrussero una postazione di osservazione dell’UNFICYP. Loro penetrarono poi nella linea formata dai soldati dell’ UNFICYP ed entrarono in un precedente complesso scolastico dove i rinforzi dell’UNFICYP si raggrupparono per impedire loro di procedere oltre. Poco più tardi, la polizia turco-cipriota e la gli elementi della sicurezza fermarono il loro cammino nell'area e presero 111 persone, di cui 101 donne;
(b) Il complesso scolastico di Ayios Kassianos è situato nella zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU. Comunque, le forze turche sostengono sia sul loro lato della linea di tregua. Sotto le disposizioni operative dell’ UNFICYP, le forze di sicurezza turco-cipriote pattugliano il terreno della scuola da molti anni all'interno di specifiche restrizioni. Questo pattugliamento è cessato come parte dell'accordo di disarmo implementato il maggio scorso;
(c) Nel pomeriggio del 21 luglio, circa 300 Greco - Ciprioti si raggrupparono all'ingresso principale dell’area protetta dall'ONU a Nicosia dove è localizzata la sede centrale dell’ ONU, per protestare contro la detenzione continua da parte delle autorità turco-cipriote di coloro presi ad Ayios Kassianos. I manifestanti il cui numero fluttuava fra i 200 ed 2,000, rese impraticabile ogni passaggio dell’ ONU per questo ingresso sino al 30 luglio, quando le autorità turco-cipriote rilasciarono gli ultimi due detenuti;
(d) Gli eventi descritti sopra crearono tensione considerevole nell'isola e furono fatti degli sforzi intensi, sia presso la sede centrale dell’ ONU che a Nicosia, per contenere e chiarire la situazione. Il 21 luglio, espressi la mia preoccupazione circa gli eventi che sono successi e ho sottolineato che era vitale che tutte le parti ricordassero il fine della zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU così come la loro responsabilità per assicurare che quest’ area non venisse violata. Io esortai anche le autorità turco-cipriote a rilasciare senza ritardo tutti coloro che erano stati detenuti. Il 24 luglio il Presidente del Consiglio di Sicurezza annunciò, di aver portato ai rappresentanti di tutte le parti, a nome dei membri del Consiglio la preoccupazione profonda per la tensione creata dagli incidenti del 19 luglio. Lui sottolineò anche severamente il bisogno di rispettare la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU ed ancora fece appello per la liberazione immediata di tutte le persone detenute. Lui chiese a tutti i riguardati di mostrare la massimo limitazione e prendere passi urgenti per provocare un rilasciamento della tensione e contribuire alla creazione di un'atmosfera favorevole alle negoziazioni.”
D. Fotografie della manifestazione
28. La richiedente produsse 21 fotografie fatte in tempi diversi durante la dimostrazione del 19 luglio 1989. Le fotografie dall’1 alla 7 volevano dimostrare che, nonostante lo spiegamento della polizia turco-cipriota, la dimostrazione era tranquilla. Nelle fotografie dall’ 8 al 10 si vedono dei membri della polizia turco-cipriota rompere il cordone dell’ UNFICYP. L’ultima serie di foto mostra dei membri della polizia turco-cipriota che usa la forza per arrestare alcuni dei dimostratori donne.
III. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Il Codice Penale cipriota
29. La Sezione 70 del Codice Penale cipriota si legge come segue:
“Dove cinque o più persone si assemblano con l’ intenzione di commettere un reato, o, essendosi assemblate con l’intenzione di eseguire un fine comune, si comportano i modo tale da provocare il timore nelle persone del vicinato che le persone così assemblate commetteranno una violazione della pace, o che provocheranno superfluamente con simile riunione e senza nessuna occasione ragionevole altre persone a commettere una violazione della pace loro si trovano in una riunione illegale.
È irrilevante che la riunione originale fosse legale se, essendosi assemblate, loro si comportano con un fine comune in tale maniera come detto precedentemente.
Quando una riunione illegale incomincia ad eseguire il fine, sia di natura pubblica che privata per il quale si è assemblata con una violazione della pace ed il terrore del pubblico, la riunione viene chiamata insurrezione, e si dice che le persone assemblate siano assemblate in modo rivoltoso”
30. Secondo la sezione 71 del Codice Penale qualsiasi persona che prende parte a una riunione illegale è colpevole di un reato e passibile di reclusione per un anno.
31. La Sezione 80 del Codice Penale prevede:
“Qualsiasi persona che porta in pubblico senza occasione legittima qualsiasi arma offensiva o pistola in modo tale da come provocare terrore a qualsiasi persona è colpevole di un reato, e è passibile di reclusione per due anni, e le sue armi o pistola saranno confiscate.”
32. Secondo la sezione 82 del Codice Penale, è un reato portare un coltello fuori da casa.
B. I poteri d’arresto degli agenti di polizia
33. La parte attinente del Capitolo 155, sezione 14 della Legge di Procedura Penale dichiara:
“(1) qualsiasi ufficiale può, senza garanzia, arrestare qualsiasi la persona -
...
(b) chi commette in sua presenza qualsiasi reato punibile con la reclusione;
(c) chi ostruisce un agente di polizia, durante l'esecuzione del suo dovere...”
C. Reato di entrata illegale nel territorio della “TRNC”
34. La Sezione 9 della Legge N.ro 5/72 dichiara:
“... Qualsiasi persona che entra in un'area militare proibita senza permesso, sia furtivamente, o disonestamente, sarà processato da un tribunale militare in conformità con l’Atto dei Reati Militari; quelli trovati colpevoli e saranno puniti.”
35. Le Sottosezioni 12 (1) e (5) della Legge sugli Stranieri e l’Immigrazione si legge come segue:
“1. Nessuna persona entrerà o lascerà la Colonia se non attraverso un porto approvato.
...
5. Qualsiasi persona che contravviene o non riesce ad osservare qualsiasi delle disposizioni delle sottosezioni (1), (2), (3) o (4) di questa sezione sarà colpevole di un reato e sarà passibile di reclusione per un termine che non eccede i sei mesi o di una multa che non eccede cento sterline o sia a simile reclusione e multa.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
36. La richiedente si lamentò che dall’ agosto 1974, la Turchia aveva impedito loro di esercitare il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
Loro invocarono l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
37. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
A. Le eccezioni preliminari del Governo
38. Il Governo sollevò obiezioni preliminari d'inammissibilità per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali e mancanza di status di vittima. La Corte osserva che queste obiezioni sono identiche a quelle sollevate nella causa Alexandrou c. Turchia (n. 16162/90, §§ 11-22 20 gennaio 2009), e dovrebbero essere respinte per le stesse ragioni.
.
B. I meriti
1. Argomenti delle parti
(a) Il Governo
39. Il Governo presentò che le ricevute prodotte dalla richiedente mostravano il pagamento fatto per l'acquisto del terreno edificabile a Kato Derynia. Non c'era comunque, prova che la proprietà in oggetto era stata trasferita alla richiedente, e presumendo anche che ci fosse stata, non c'era prova che lei ancora era la sua proprietaria. Sarebbe improbabile che il trasferimento avrebbe potuto essere fatto dopo l'intervento turco, siccome la richiedente non sarebbe stata in grado di accedere al terreno nella prospettiva della situazione politica sull'isola. Inoltre, la richiedente aveva acquisito le proprietà descritte nel paragrafo 8 sopra solamente il 28 giugno 2000 e non poteva avere perciò un interesse in queste sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
40. Nella prospettiva del Governo, lo scopo della dimostrazione del 19 luglio 1989 era stato fare propaganda politica. La richiedente non intendeva sinceramente andare alla sua proprietà addotta che sapeva essere inaccessibile nella situazione politica esistente. In qualsiasi caso, presumendo anche che avesse potuto trarre una questione sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, il controllo dell'uso della proprietà d parte delle autorità della “TRNC” era stato giustificato nell'interesse generale.
2. La richiedente
41. La richiedente che essenzialmente adottò le osservazioni presentate dal Governo di Cipro (vedere sotto), sottolineò che era la legittima proprietaria delle proprietà in questione. Lei era stata il “possessore” del terreno edificabile descritto nel paragrafo 10 sopra fin dalla data in cui fece il pagamento anticipato di CYP 200 ed era stata il proprietario che trae benefici fin dal pagamento della’ultima rata del 2 luglio 1974 (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra). Da questa data lei aveva avuto una rivendicazione contro la società che le aveva venduto il terreno edificabile e le era stata concessa la proprietà come acquirente del terreno. Lei dibatté che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non solo proteggeva dei diritti registrati ma tutti i tipi di diritti di proprietà.
B. La terza parte intervenuta
42. Secondo il Governo di Cipro, l’acquisto di proprietà era sufficiente per dare origine ad una “rivendicazione” che costituirebbe una “proprietà” sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed altri c. Belgio, 20 novembre 1995, §§ 31-32 Serie A n. 332). In qualsiasi caso, era il dovere del Governo rispondente provare che la richiedente non possedeva l’attinente terreno e edifici.
C. La valutazione della Corte
43. La Corte prima osserva che il Governo non contestò la dichiarazione della richiedente che nel 1974 la madre di suo marito era la proprietaria della proprietà descritta nel paragrafo 8 sopra. Comunque, sottolineò che la proprietà era stata acquisita dalla richiedente solamente nel 2000, cioè, dopo l'intervento turco del 1974.
44. La Corte nota che la richiedente ha prodotto prove scritte che suo marito acquisì la proprietà in questione da sua madre e che lui la trasferì successivamente a lei tramite regalo il 28 giugno 2000 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Insieme con gli altri documenti presentati dalla richiedente (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra), questo materiale offre prova prima facie che, dal giugno 2000 in avanti, lei aveva un titolo sulla proprietà in oggetto che prima era appartenuta alla famiglia di suo marito. Come sostenuto dalla Corte nella causa Loizidou c. Turchia ((meriti), 18 dicembre 1996, §§ 44 e 46, Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI), quest’ultima non poteva essere ritenuta di avere perso titolo alla sua proprietà in virtù degli atti susseguenti dell'espropriazione da parte delle autorità della “TRNC”.
45. Riguardo al terreno edificabile descritto nel paragrafo 10 sopra, la richiedente ha prodotto prova scritta di aver stipulato un contratto per acquistarlo e che, il 2 luglio 1974, lei aveva pagato il prezzo intero concordato col venditore. Lei aveva avuto perciò un'aspettativa legittima e legale di divenire la proprietaria registrata del terreno.
46. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, ed avendo riguardo al fatto che il Governo rispondente è andato a vuoto nel produrre una prova convincente in confutazione, la Corte considera che la richiedente aveva una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in relazione alle proprietà descritte nei paragrafi 8 e 10 sopra.
47. La Corte osserva inoltre che nella causa Loizidou ((meriti), citata sopra, §§ 63-64), ragionò come segue:
“63. ... come conseguenza del fatto che alla richiedente è stato rifiutato l’accesso al terreno dal 1974, lei ha perso effettivamente ogni controllo sulla sua proprietà, così come tutte le possibilità di usarla e goderne. Il rifiuto continuo di accesso deve essere considerato perciò un'interferenza coi suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Tale interferenza non può, nelle circostanze eccezionali della presente causa a cui la richiedente ed il Governo cipriota hanno fatto riferimento , essere considerata o una privazione di proprietà o un controllo dell’ uso all'interno del significato dei primo e del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Chiaramente rientra comunque, all'interno del significato della prima frase di questo provvedimento come un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della proprietà. A questo riguardo la Corte osserva che l’ostacolo può corrispondere ad una violazione della Convenzione proprio come un impedimento legale.
64. A parte un riferimento passeggero alla dottrina della necessità come giustificazione per gli atti del 'TRNC' ed al fatto che diritti di proprietà erano la materia di discorsi intercomunali, il Governo turco non ha cercato di fare osservazioni che giustificavano l'interferenza sopra coi diritti di proprietà della richiedente che sono imputabili alla Turchia.
Comunque, non è stato spiegato come il bisogno di ridare una sistemazione ai rifugiati ed espatriati ciprioti turchi negli anni seguenti l'intervento turco nell'isola nel 1974 potrebbe giustificare la negazione completa dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente nella forma di un rifiuto totale e continuo di accesso ed un'espropriazione stabilita senza risarcimento.
Neanche il fatto che i diritti di proprietà erano la materia dei discorsi di intercomunali che coinvolgono ambo le comunità a Cipro non può offrire una giustificazione per questa situazione sotto la Convenzione. In simili circostanze, la Corte conclude, che c'è stato e continua ad esserci una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.”
48. Nella causa di Cipro c. Turchia ([GC], n. 25781/94, ECHR 2001-IV) la Corte confermò le conclusioni sopra (§§ 187 e 189):
“187. La Corte è persuasa che sia il suo ragionamento sia la sua conclusione nella sentenza Loizidou ( meriti) si applica con la stessa forza a Ciprioti greci espatriati che, come la Sig.ra L., non è in grado di avere accesso alla loro proprietà nella Cipro del nord in ragione delle restrizioni attuate dalle autorità 'TRNC' sul loro accesso fisico a quella proprietà. Il rifiuto totale e continuo di accesso alla loro proprietà è un'interferenza chiara col diritto degli espatriati Ciprioti greci al godimento tranquillo della proprietà all'interno del significato della prima frase dl’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
...
189. .. c'è stata una violazione continua dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in virtù del fatto che ai proprietari greco- ciprioti di proprietà nella Cipro settentrionale viene negato l’ accesso ed il controllo, l’ uso e il godimento della loro proprietà così come qualsiasi risarcimento per l'interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà.”
49. La Corte non vede ragione nella causa presente di scostarsi dalle conclusioni alle quali è giunta nelle cause Loizidou e Cipro c. Turchia (op. cit.; vedere anche Demades c. Turchia (meriti), n. 16219/90, § 46 31 luglio 2003).
50. Di conseguenza, conclude che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in virtù del fatto che alla richiedente fu negato l’accesso ed il controllo, l’uso e il godimento della sua proprietà così come qualsiasi risarcimento per l'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
51. La richiedente presentò che nel 1974 lei aveva la sua dimora a Famagusta. Siccome non era stata più in grado di ritornarvi, era vittima di una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
Questa disposizione si legge come segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
52. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
53 Il Governo di Cipro presentò che la richiedente era stata sradicata dalla sua dimora dall'invasione turca e che gli era stato rifiutato costantemente il diritto a ritornarvi sin da allora, in violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Questa interferenza non poteva essere giustificata sotto il secondo paragrafo di quella disposizione.
54. La Corte osserva che la richiedente non era la proprietaria dell'alloggio dove risiedeva presumibilmente al tempo dell'invasione turca. Questo alloggio apparteneva alla madre di suo marito e fu trasferito alla richiedente solamente il 28 giugno 2000 cioè approssimativamente ventisei anni dopo l'invasione turca (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte non si convince che un problema separato può derivare sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione . Considera perciò che non è necessario esaminare se c'è stata una violazione continua di questa disposizione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE, LETTO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE E L’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
55. La richiedente si lamentò si lamentò di una violazione sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione a causa di trattamento discriminatorio contro di lui nel godimento dei suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Lui addusse che questa discriminazione era fondata sulla sua origine nazionale.
L’Articolo 14 della Convenzione legge come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
56. La Corte richiama che nella causa Alexandrou (citata sopra, §§ 38-39) ha trovato che non era necessario eseguire un esame separato dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione. La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare questo approccio nella presente causa (vedere anche, mutatis mutandis, Eugenia Michaelidou Ltd e Michael Tymvios c. Turchia, n. 16163/90, §§ 37-38 31 luglio 2003).

IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 3 DELLA CONVENZIONE

57. La richiedente si lamentò del trattamento riservatogli durante sia la manifestazione del 19 luglio 1989 che i procedimenti contro di lui nella “TRNC.”
Lui invocò l’Articolo 3 della Convenzione che legge come segue:
“Nessuno sarà sottoposto a torture o a trattamenti o punizioni inumani o degradanti.”
58. Il Governo contestò la sua rivendicazione.
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
59. Appellandosi alla loro versione degli eventi (vedere paragrafi 28-30 sopra), il Governo presentò che questa parte della richiesta avrebbe dovuto essere determinata sulla base dei giudizi della Commissione nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou c. Turchia (richieste N. 15299/89 e 15300/89, rapporto della Commissione dell’ 8 giugno 1993, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 86, p. 4), siccome le basi legali e riguardanti i fatti della presente richiesta erano gli stessi di quelli nella causa pilota. Dibatté che si dovrebbe considerare la terza parte intervenuta preclusa dall'impugnare le costatazioni della Commissione.

2. La richiedente

60. La richiedente essenzialmente adottò le osservazioni presentate dal Governo della Cipro (vedere sotto).
B. Gli argomenti della terza parte intervenuta
61. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che le costatazioni della Commissione nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou (citata sopra) non fossero applicabili alla presente causa . Se il trattamento subito dal richiedente violava l’ Articolo 3 doveva essere esaminato e determinato alla luce dei fatti della causa e sulla base delle prove fornite.
62. Il trattamento sopportato dalla richiedente durante il suo arresto e la susseguente reclusione e processo erano stati di natura molto grave, incluso inter alia violenza e punizione fisica, esposizione a folle violente ed insultanti le condizioni inumane e degradanti della detenzione (incluso segregazione in isolamento e privazione di sonno) e trattamenti umilianti ed intimidatori in tribunale. Sia che simile trattamento fosse visto cumulativamente o separatamente, aveva provocato sofferenza fisica e psicologica grave corrispondente a trattamento inumano e degradante all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 3 della Convenzione.

C. La valutazione della Corte

63. I principi generali riguardo alla proibizione della tortura e dei trattamenti inumani o degradanti sono esposti in Protopapa c. Turchia, n. 16084/90, §§ 39-45, 24 febbraio 2009.
64. Riguardo all’applicazione di questi principi alla presente causa, la Corte osserva, che è incontrastato che il richiedente aveva avuto un confronto fisico con le forze turche o turco-cipriote durante una manifestazione che generò una situazione estremamente tesa. Si ricorderà che nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou, la Commissione ha trovato, che un numero di manifestanti aveva fatto resistenza all’ arresto, che le forze di polizia avevano rotto la loro resistenza e che in questo contesto c'era un rischio alto che i manifestanti venissero trattati rudemente, ed anche soffrissero di ferite, nel corso dell'operazione di arresto (vedere il rapporto della Commissione, citato sopra, §§ 113-115). La Corte non vede qualsiasi ragione di abbandonare queste costatazioni e prenderà conto dovuto dello stato di tensione elevato al tempo dell'arresto della richiedente.
65. Osserva inoltre che la richiedente presentò che nel corso del suo arresto fu presa per una mano, fu spinta e fu colpita su tutto il corpo (in particolare sulla parte più bassa del suo capo e sulla nuca) con un bastone elettrico. Lei addusse inoltre che la sua mano era stata torta fortemente (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra). Comunque, la Corte ha a sua disposizione poche prove per corroborare la versione della richiedente degli eventi. Secondo il certificato medico emesso il 28 luglio 1989, quattro giorni dopo la liberazione della richiedente l’esame medico rivelò “contusioni multiple ed estese su varie parti del corpo” e “ematomi e rigonfiamenti sulla giuntura del gomito sinistra.” Il paziente dichiarò che stava soffrendo per il dolore in regioni diverse del suo corpo (vedere paragrafo 22 sopra). Dei raggi X furono richiesti, ma il loro risultato non è conosciuto dalla Corte.
66. La Corte considera che non è stato stabilito che i danni della richiedente furono causati intenzionalmente dalla polizia turca o turco-cipriota. In qualsiasi caso, avendo riguardo al fatto che nessuna prova di un episodio traumatico grave è stata prodotta dalla richiedente, non può essere deciso che le contusioni e gli ematomi descritti nel certificato del 28 luglio 1989 siano coerente con un confronto fisico minore fra lei e gli agenti di polizia. Non c'è niente che mostri che la polizia usò una forza eccessiva quando, come addussero, furono messi a confronto nel corso dei loro doveri con la resistenza nell’arresto dei dimostratori, inclusa la richiedente (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Protopapa citata sopra, §§ 47-48).
67. Le rimanenti dichiarazioni della richiedente, riguardo alle condizioni della sua detenzione al “Pavlides garage” ed alla prigione fuori Nicosia, non sono comprovate. Né è stato provato che i danni della richiedente hanno richiesto assistenza medica immediata. La Corte considera, inoltre, che il grado di intimidazione che è probabile che la richiedente abbia sentito essendo privata della sua libertà non raggiunse il minimo livello di gravità richiesto per rientrare all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 3 (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 49).
68. Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte non può considerare stabilito oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio che la richiedente fosse stata sottoposta a trattamento contrario all’ Articolo 3 o che le autorità fossero ricorse a violenza fisica che non era stata resa seriamente necessaria dallo stesso comportamento della richiedente (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Foka c. Turchia, n. 28940/95, § 62 24 giugno 2008).
69. Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione.
C. ADDOTTA VIOLAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 5 DELLA CONVENZIONE
70. La richiedente addusse che la sua privazione della libertà era contraria all’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, si legge come segue:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà e alla sicurezza personale. Nessuno sarà privato della sua libertà salvo nei seguenti casi e in conformità con una procedura prescritta dalla legge:
(a) la detenzione legale di una persona dopo la condanna da parte di un tribunale competente;
...
(c) l'arresto legale o la detenzione di una persona effettuata al fine di portarlo di fronte all'autorità legale competente su ragionevole sospetto di avere commesso un reato o quando è considerato ragionevolmente necessario ostacolare la perpetrazione di un reato o la fuga dopo avere agito così;
...
2. Tutti coloro che vengono arrestati saranno prontamente informati, in una lingua che comprendono, delle ragioni del loro arresto e di qualsiasi accusa contro loro.
...”
71. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
72. Il Governo presentò che dato il suo carattere violento, la dimostrazione costituivano una riunione illegale. Fece riferimento, su questo punto, alle sezioni 70 71, 80 e 82 del Codice Penale cipriota che era applicabile nella “TRNC” (vedere paragrafi 35-38 sopra) e notò che sotto il Capitolo 155 della Legge di Procedura penale (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra), la polizia aveva il potere di arrestare persone coinvolte nelle dimostrazioni violente.
2. La richiedente
73. La richiedente essenzialmente adottò le osservazioni presentate dal Governo di Cipro (vedere sotto).
B. Gli argomenti della terza parte intervenuta
74. Il Governo di Cipro osservò che durante l'arresto iniziale del richiedente, e in seguito durante la detenzione e la pena detentiva seguente la condanna del tribunale, al richiedente fu negata la sua libertà in circostanze che non seguirono una procedura prevista dalla legge e che non era legale sotto l’Articolo 5 § 1 (a) e (c) della Convenzione. Inoltre, l'insuccesso delle autorità nell’ informare il richiedente di tutte le ragioni del suo arresto costituì una violazione dell’ Articolo 5 § 2.
C. La valutazione della Corte
75. Non è contestato che la richiedente che fu arrestato e rimandata in dietro in custodia dalla Corte distrettuale di Nicosia della “TRNC”, fu privata della sua libertà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 5 § 1 della Convenzione.
76. Riguardo alla questione di ottemperanza coi requisiti dell’ Articolo 5 § 1, la Corte reitera che questa disposizione richiede al primo posto che la detenzione sia “legale” che include la condizione di ottemperanza con una procedura prescritta dalla legge. La Convenzione qui si riferisce essenzialmente di nuovo alla legge nazionale ed enuncia l'obbligo di conformarsi a riguardo alle norme effettive e procedurali, ma richiede inoltre che qualsiasi privazione della libertà debba essere coerente col fine dell’ Articolo 5, vale a dire proteggere gli individui dall'arbitrarietà (vedere Benham c. Regno Unito, 10 giugno 1996 §§ 40 e 42, Relazioni 1996-III).
77. La Corte nota inoltre che nella causa Foka c. Turchia (citata sopra, §§ 82-84) sostenne che la “TRNC” stava esercitando un’autorità de facto su Cipro settentrionale e che la responsabilità della Turchia per gli atti della “TRNC” era incoerente con la prospettiva del richiedente per la quale le misure adottate con lui avrebbero dovuto essere riguardate sempre come mancanti di una base “legale” ai termini della Convenzione. La Corte concluse perciò che quando, come nella causa Foka, un atto delle autorità della “TRNC” era in ottemperanza con leggi in vigore all'interno del territorio della Cipro settentrionale, si devono in principio essere considerate come aventi una base legale in diritto nazionale ai fini della Convenzione. Non vede qualsiasi ragione di scostarsi, nella presente causa da questa costatazione che non è in qualsiasi il modo incoerente con la prospettiva adottata dalla comunità internazionale riguardo alla costituzione della “TRNC” o al fatto che il Governo della Repubblica di Cipro resti il solo governo legittimo di Cipro (vedere Cipro c. Turchia, citata sopra, §§ 14, 61 e 90).
78. Nella presente causa, non si contesta che il richiedente prese parte ad una dimostrazione che le autorità della “TRNC” consideravano potenzialmente una “riunione illegale” all'interno del significato della sezione 70 del Criminale Codice di Cipro (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra). Prendere parte ad una riunione illegale è un reato sotto la sezione 71 del Codice Penale cipriota ed è punibile con la reclusione fino ad un anno (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra). È anche un reato sotto le leggi della “TRNC” entrare nel territorio della “TRNC” senza il permesso e/o altro tramite un porto approvato (vedere paragrafi 34-35 sopra). La Corte nota inoltre che secondo il Capitolo 155, sezione 14 della Legge di Procedura Penale, un agente di polizia può, senza garanzia, arrestare qualsiasi persona che commette in sua presenza qualsiasi reato punibile con la reclusione o che ostacola un agente di polizia durante l'esecuzione del suo dovere (vedere paragrafo 33 sopra-vedere anche Protopapa, citata sopra, § 61, e Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou, rapporto della Commissione citata sopra, § 147).
79. Siccome gli agenti di polizia che effettuarono l'arresto avevano motivo per credere che il richiedente stava commettendo reati punibili con la reclusione, la Corte è dell'opinione che lui è stato privato della sua libertà in conformità con una procedura prescritta dalla legge “al fine di portarlo di fronte all'autorità legale competente contro un ragionevole sospetto di avere commesso un reato”, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 5 § 1 (c) della Convenzione (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 62).
80. Non c'è inoltre, nessuna prova che la privazione della libertà avesse servito qualsiasi altro scopo illegittimo o fosse arbitraria. Il 20 luglio 1989, il giorno dopo il suo arresto il richiedente fu portato effettivamente, di fronte alla Corte distrettuale di Nicosia della “TRNC” e rimandato indietro per processo in relazione al reato di entrata illegale nel territorio della “TRNC” (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra).
81. Dopo il 22 luglio 1989, la data in cui la Corte distrettuale di Nicosia della“TRNC” consegnò la sua sentenza (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra), la privazione della libertà del richiedente dovrebbe essere riguardata come “una detenzione legale di una persona dopo la condanna da parte di un tribunale competente”, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 5 § 1 (a) della Convenzione.
82. . Infine, si osserverà che il richiedente è stato interrogato il giorno dopo il suo arresto da un ufficiale che parlava greco (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte, avrebbe dovuto essere evidente al richiedente di essere interrogato circa l’aver oltrepassato i limiti leciti nella zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU e circa la sua entrata presumibilmente illegale nel territorio della “TRNC” (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Murray ed Altri c. Regno Unito, Serie A n. 300-un, § 77, 28 ottobre 1994). Lo stesso giorno, durante l'udienza di corte un interprete spiegò inoltre, le accuse all'accusato (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). La Corte perciò costata che le ragioni per il suo arresto sono state sufficientemente portate alla sua attenzione durante il suo colloquio e durante l’udienza del tribunale del 20 luglio 1989 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Protopapa citata sopra, § 65).
83. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 5 §§ 1 e 2 della Convenzione.
VI. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
84. La richiedente si lamentò di una mancanza d'equità al suo processo da parte della Corte distrettuale di Nicosia della “TRNC”.
Invocò l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, si legge come segue:
“1. Nella determinazione... di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro lui, ad ognuno viene concesso un’udienza giusta e pubblica... da parte di un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge. ...
2. Ognuno accusato di un reato penale sarà presunto innocente sino a quando verrà dimostrato colpevole secondo la legge.
3. Ognuno accusato di un reato penale ha i seguenti minimi diritti:
(a) essere informato prontamente, in una lingua che lui capisce ed in dettaglio, della natura e della causa dell'accusa contro lui;
(b) avere tempo adeguato e i mezzi per la preparazione della sua difesa;
(c) difendersi in persona o tramite assistenza legale di sua propria scelta o, se lui non ha sufficiente mezzi per pagare l’assistenza legale, di riceverne una gratuita quando gli interessi della giustizia richiedono così;
(d) esaminare o far esaminare testimoni contro lui ed ottenere la presenza e l’ esame di testimoni a suo favore sotto le stesse condizioni dei testimoni contro di lui;
(e) avere l'assistenza gratis di un interprete se lui non può capire o non può parlare la lingua usata in tribunale.”
85. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
86. Il Governo affermò che:
(i) la richiedente era stata processata da un tribunale imparziale ed indipendente;
(ii) tutte gli accusati di fronte alla corte, inclusa la richiedente erano stati divisi in gruppi così da assicurare un rapido processo ed aiutare gli accusato nella loro difesa;
(iii) la richiedente non aveva chiesto più tempo per preparare la sua difesa, ed aveva declinato la rappresentanza legale;
(iv) la corte aveva informato la richiedente e l'avrebbe aiutata a capire i suoi diritti e la procedura
(v) tutto al processo era stato tradotto durante i procedimenti da traduttori qualificati ed interpreti per assicurare che la difesa non venisse pregiudicata e gli accusati venissero informati pienamente delle accuse contro di loro; il giudice del processo sostituì un traduttore quando quest’ultimo incominciò una conversazione con gli accusati;
(vi) il giudice, un avvocato colto inglese fu coinvolto solamente nei procedimenti giudiziali e non nella decisione di perseguire o negli atti relativi all'arresto della richiedente;
(vii) nell’emettere la sentenza il tribunale aveva preso in esame tutte le circostanze della causa; in particolare, essendo equo e capendo lo stato mentale degli accusati, il giudice non li aveva castigati per vilipendio alla corte quando loro si comportarono in modo scortese ed uno di loro disse che il processo era un “circo.”
87. Il Governo impugnò gli argomenti della terza parte intervenuta come essendo di una natura politica. Considerò che le dichiarazioni di una mancanza d'equità, d'indipendenza e d'imparzialità dell'ordinamento giudiziario nella “TRNC” era senza qualsiasi fondamento preciso. Al contrario, cause precedenti decise dai tribunali della “TRNC” mostrarono che loro rispettavano i diritti umani ed i principi della Convenzione.

2. La richiedente

88. La richiedente essenzialmente adottò le osservazioni presentate dal Governo di Cipro (vedere sotto).
B. Gli argomenti di della terza parte intervenuta
89. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che la presente richiesta era una causa eccezionale nella quale al richiedente era stato negato ciascuna e tutte le garanzie di processo equo di base previste dall’Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Le violazioni dei suoi diritti includevano inter alia un insuccesso nell’ informare prontamente il richiedente, in una lingua che lui capiva, della natura e del motivo dell'accusa contro lui per offrirgli un tempo adeguato e i mezzi per trovare un avvocato di sua propria scelta e preparare la sua difesa, concedere l'interrogatorio di testimoni e fornire alla richiedente un’interpretazione corretta ed una trascrizione del processo. C'era infine, prova oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio che “il tribunale” che ha processato il richiedente non era né imparziale né equo.

C. La valutazione della Corte

90. I principi generali attinenti custoditi nell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione sono esposti in Protopapa, citata sopra, §§ 77-82.
91. Riguardo all’applicazione di questi principi alla presente causa, la Corte osserva, che il richiedente fu rimandato indietro per processo di fronte alla Corte distrettuale di Nicosia della “TRNC”. Un interprete era presente alle udienze del 20 e del 21 luglio 1989. Anche se la Corte non ha nessuna informazioni su cui valutare la qualità dell'interpretazione, osserva che è evidente dalla stessa versione del richiedente degli eventi che lui capì le accuse contro di lui e le dichiarazioni fatte dai testimoni al processo. In qualsiasi caso, non sembra che lui impugnò la qualità dell'interpretazione di fronte al giudice del processo, richiese la sostituzione dell'interprete o chiese il chiarimento riguardo alla natura e la causa dell'accusa.
92. La Corte nota inoltre che agli 'accusati fu offerta l'opportunità di usare i servizi di un membro dell'Associazione Decaduta locale. Comunque, loro scelsero di non giovarsi di questo diritto.
93. La Corte considera che la richiedente era indubbiamente capace di realizzare le conseguenze della sua decisione di non avvalersi dei diritti procedurali che le furono proposti. Inoltre, non sembra che la controversia sollevava qualsiasi questione di interesse pubblico che impediva di rinunciare alle garanzie procedurali summenzionate (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Hermi c. Italia [GC], n. 18114/02, § 79, 10 ottobre 2006, e Kwiatkowska c. Italia (dec.), n. 52868/99, 30 novembre 2000).
94. La Corte enfatizza anche che l'accusata non richiese un aggiornamento del processo o una traduzione dei documenti scritti concernenti la procedura per informarsi dell’archivio della causa e preparare la loro difesa. Non c'è niente che suggerisce che simili richieste sarebbero state respinte. Lo stesso si applica alla possibilità che non fu colta dall'accusato di introdurre un ricorso o un ricorso su questioni di diritto contro la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Nicosia della “TRNC”.
95. Infine, la Corte non può accettare, in questo modo, la dichiarazione che i tribunali della “TRNC” nell'insieme non erano né imparziali né indipendenti o che il processo del richiedente e la condanna furono influenzati da scopi politici (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Cipro c. Turchia, citata sopra, §§ 231-240).
96. Alla luce di quanto sopra, e prendendo conto in particolare della condotta dell'accusato, la Corte considera che i procedimenti penali contro il richiedente, considerato nell'insieme, non era ingiusto o altrimenti contrario alle disposizioni della Convenzione.
97. Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione.

VII. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 7 DELLA CONVENZIONE

98. La richiedente presentò di essere stata dichiarata colpevole a riguardo di atti che non costituivano un reato penale.
Invocò l’Articolo 7 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“1. Nessuno sarà ritenuto colpevole di qualsiasi reato penale a causa di qualsiasi atto od omissione che non costituivano un reato penale sotto il diritto nazionale o internazionale al tempo in cui fu commesso. Né può una sanzione penale più pesante essere imposta al posto di quella che era applicabile al tempo in cui il reato penale fu commesso.
2. Questo Articolo non può pregiudicare il processo e la punizione di qualsiasi persona per un qualsiasi atto od omissione che, al tempo in cui sono stati commessi, era penale secondo i principi generali della legge riconosciuti dalle nazioni civilizzate.”
99. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione. Addusse che la richiedente era stata accusata di aver violato i confini della “TRNC” e la sua condanna fu basata sulla prova di testimoni oculari. Lei avrebbe dovuto sapere che violando la zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU e la linea di tregua avrebbe provocato una risposta da parte dell'ONU o delle forze turco-cipriote.
100. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che la richiedente era stata processata erroneamente per atti che non corrispondevano a reati sotto diritto nazionale o internazionale, e che in qualsiasi caso andò a vuoto nel soddisfare gli standard di prevedibilità e l'accessibilità richieste dalla Convenzione (vedere G. c. Francia, 27 settembre 1995 Serie A n. 325-B), in violazione dell’ Articolo 7 della Convenzione.
101. I principi generali attinenti custoditi nell’ Articolo 7 della Convenzione sono esposti in Protopapa, citata sopra, §§ 93-95.
102. Riguardo all’applicazione di questi principi alla presente causa, la Corte nota, che la richiedente fu dichiarata colpevole di essere entrata nel territorio della “TRNC” senza permesso ed altro tramite un porto approvato. Questi reati sono definiti nella Legge n. 5/72 e nelle sottosezioni 12(1) e (5) della Legge dell’ Immigrazione e degli Stranieri (vedere paragrafi 34-35 sopra).
103. Non si contesta che questi testi erano in vigore quando i reati furono commessi ed erano accessibili alla richiedente. La Corte inoltre costata che hanno descritto con chiarezza sufficiente gli atti che l'avrebbero reso criminalmente responsabile, soddisfacendo così il requisito di prevedibilità. Non c'è niente che suggerisca che furono interpretati estensivamente o per mezzo di analogia; la sanzione penale imposta (la reclusione dei tre giorni ed una multa di CYP 50-vedere paragrafo 21 sopra) era all'interno del massimo previsto dal diritto vigente al tempo in cui il reato era stato commesso.
104. Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 7 della Convenzione.
VIII. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 11 DELLA CONVENZIONE
105. La richiedente si lamentò di una violazione del suo diritto alla libertà di riunione pacifica.
Lui invocò l’Articolo 11 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“1. Ognuno ha il diritto alla libertà di riunione pacifica ed alla libertà dell'associazione con altri, incluso il diritto di formare e congiungere sindacati per la protezione dei suoi interessi.
2. Nessuna restrizione sarà messa sull'esercizio di questi diritti se non prescritta dalla legge e se necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale o sicurezza pubblica, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui. Questo Articolo non ostacolerà l'imposizione di restrizioni legali sull'esercizio di questi diritti da parte di membri delle forze armate, della polizia o dell'amministrazione dello Stato.”
106. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione, osservando che dato il suo carattere violento, la dimostrazione chiaramente era fuori dalla sfera dell’ Articolo 11 della Convenzione. Loro considerarono che la polizia della “TRNC” era intervenuta negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale e/o della sicurezza pubblica e per la prevenzione del disturbo e del crimine.
107. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che il diritto del richiedente per dimostrare sotto l’Articolo 11 della Convenzione era stato interferito in un modo grave e serio. Gli atti del Governo rispondente erano un tentativo deliberato e provocativo di disperdere una dimostrazione legale in un'area che era soggetta a perlustrazioni dell’ ONU e neanche all'interno della rivendicata giurisdizione della “TRNC.” L'interferenza coi diritti della richiedente non era prevista dalla legge ed era una risposta eccessiva e sproporzionata ad una dimostrazione tranquilla e legale. Il Governo rispondente non aveva identificato nessuno scopo legittimo che aveva cercato di servire assaltando la richiedente.
108. La Corte nota che la richiedente e le altre donne si scontrarono con la polizia turco-cipriota mentre dimostravano dentro o nelle vicinanze della chiesa di Ayios Georgios a Nicosia. La dimostrazione fu dispersa ed alcuni dei dimostratori, inclusa la richiedente furono arrestati. Sotto queste circostanze, la Corte considera che c'è stata un'interferenza col diritto della richiedente di riunione (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 104).
109. Questa interferenza aveva una base legale, vale a dire le sezioni 70 e 71 del Codice Penale cipriota (vedere paragrafi 29-30 sopra) e sezione 14 della Legge di Procedura Penale (veda paragrafo 33 sopra), ed era così “prevista dalla legge” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 11 § 2 della Convenzione. A questo riguardo, la Corte richiama la sua costatazione che quando, come nella causa di Foka, un atto delle autorità della “TRNC” era in ottemperanza con leggi in vigore all'interno del territorio della Cipro settentrionale, deve in principio essere riguardato come avente una base legale in diritto nazionale ai fini della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 77 sopra). Rimangono le questioni se l'interferenza perseguiva uno scopo legittimo ed era necessaria in una società democratica.
110. Il Governo presentò che l'interferenza inseguiva scopi legittimi, incluso la protezione della sicurezza nazionale e/o della sicurezza pubblica e la prevenzione del disturbo e del crimine.
111. La Corte nota che nella causa Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou, la Commissione ha trovato che la dimostrazione del 19 luglio 1989 era violenta, che era penetrata attraverso le linee difensive dell’ONU fiancheggia e costituiva una minaccia seria alla pace e all’ ordine pubblico sulla linea di demarcazione a Cipro (vedere il rapporto della Commissione, citato sopra, §§ 109-10). La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di discostarsi da queste costatazioni che furono basate sul rapporto del Segretario Generale dell’ONU su un filmato video e su fotografie presentate dal Governo rispondente di fronte alla Commissione. Enfatizza che nel suo rapporto, il Segretario Generala dell'ONU ha affermato che i dimostratori avevano “forzato il loro passaggio nella zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU nell'area di Ayios Kassianos di Nicosia”, che loro avevano rotto “una barriera di filo sostenuta dall’ UNFICYP e distrutto un posto di osservazione dell’ UNFICYP” prima di rompere “la linea formata dai soldati dell’UNFICYP” ed entrare in “una precedente complesso scolastico” (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra).
112. La Corte fa riferimento, in primo luogo, ai principi fondamentali che sono posto sotto le sue sentenze relative all’ Articolo 11 (vedere Djavit Un c. Turchia, n. 20652/92, §§ 56-57 ECHR 2003-III; Piermont c. Francia, 27 aprile 1995, §§ 76-77 Serie A n. 314; e Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben” c. Austria, 21 giugno 1988, § 32 Serie A n. 139). È chiaro da questa giurisprudenza che le autorità hanno un dovere di prendere misure appropriate a riguardo di dimostrazioni per assicurare la loro condotta tranquilla e la sicurezza di tutti i cittadini (vedere Oya Ataman c. Turchia, n. 74552/01, § 35 5 dicembre 2006). Loro comunque non possono garantire completamente questo e hanno una ampia discrezione nella scelta dei mezzi da utilizzare (veda Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben”, citato sopra, § 34).
113. Mentre una situazione illegale non è di per sé , una giustificazione di una violazione del diritto di riunione (vedere Cisse c. la Francia, n. 51346/99, § 50 ECHR 2002-III (gli estratti)), interferenze col diritto garantito dall’Articolo 11 della Convenzione sono in principio giustificate per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine e per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui dove, come nella presente causa, i dimostratori prendono parte ad atti di violenza (vedere, a contrario, Bukta ed Altri c. Ungheria, n. 25691/04, § 37, 17 luglio 2007, ed Oya Ataman citata sopra, §§ 41-42).
114. La Corte osserva inoltre che, come affermato nel rapporto del Segretario Generale dell’ONU del 7 dicembre 1989 (vedere paragrafo 27 sopra), i dimostratori avevano forzato il loro passaggio nella zona cuscinetto dell’ ONU. Secondo le autorità della “TRNC”, loro entrarono anche nel territorio della “TRNC”, commettendo così punibile dei reati sotto le leggi della “TRNC” (vedere paragrafi 34-35 e 78 sopra). A questo riguardo, la Corte nota, che non ha a sua disposizione qualsiasi l'elemento capace di gettare dubbio sulle dichiarazioni date dai testimoni al processo secondo cui l'area dove l'accusato era entrato era il territorio della “TRNC” (vedere paragrafo 34 (iii) sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte, l'intervento delle forze turche e/o turco-ciprioti non erano a causa della natura politica della dimostrazione ma fu provocato dal suo carattere violento e dalla violazione dei confini della “TRNC” da parte di alcuni dei dimostratori (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 110).
115. In queste condizioni ed avendo riguardo al margine ampio di valutazione lasciato agli Stati in questa sfera (vedere Plattform “Ärzte für das Leben” citata sopra, § 34), la Corte sostiene che l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al diritto di riunione non era, alla luce di tutte le circostanze della causa, sproporzionato ai fini dell’ Articolo 11 § 2.
116. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 11 della Convenzione.

IX. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE

117. La richiedente addusse di non aver avuto a sua disposizione una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva per compensare le violazioni dei suoi diritti essenziali.
Lui invocò l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
118. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione. Nelle sue osservazioni del 10 gennaio 2003, notò, che il richiedente che non era riuscito ad usare le vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili all'interno dell'ordinamento giuridico della “TRNC”, non poteva lamentarsi di una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
119. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che, contrariamente all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione, nessuna via di ricorso effettiva erano disponibile al richiedente in nessun momento a riguardo di una qualsiasi delle sue azioni di reclamo. Alternativamente, le istituzioni stabilite dalla “TRNC” non erano state in grado di costituire delle vie di ricorso nazionali effettive all'interno dell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale della Turchia.
120. L’Articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce la disponibilità a livello nazionale di una via di ricorso per rendere esecutiva la sostanza dei diritti della Convenzione e delle libertà in qualsiasi forma possa accadere di essere garantiti nell'ordine legale e nazionale. L'effetto dell’ Articolo 13 deve costringere così la disposizione di una via di ricorso nazionale a trattare con la sostanza di un “azione di reclamo difendibile” sotto la Convenzione ed accordare il sollievo appropriato (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Kudła c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 157 ECHR 2000-XI).
121. La sfera degli obblighi degli Stati Contraenti sotto l’Articolo 13 varia a seconda della natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente; comunque, la via di ricorso richiesta dall’ Articolo 13 deve essere “effettiva” in pratica così come in diritto (vedere, per esempio, İlhan c. Turchia [GC], n. 22277/93, § 97 ECHR 2000-VII). Il termine “effettiva” si considera anche che voglia dire, che la via di ricorso deve essere adeguata ed accessibile (vedere Vidas c. Croatia, n. 40383/04, § 34, 3 luglio 2008, e Paulino Tomás c. Portogallo (dec.), n. 58698/00, ECHR 2003-VIII).
122. Bisogna anche ricordare che nella sua sentenza nella causa Cipro c. Turchia (citata sopra, §§ 14, 16 90 e 102) la Corte sostenne che ai fini dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 col quale l’ Articolo 13 ha un'affinità vicina (vedere Kudla, citata sopra, § 152), la via di ricorso disponibile nella “TRNC” può essere considerata come “via di ricorso nazionale” dello Stato rispondente e che la questione della loro efficacia sarà considerata nelle specifiche circostanze in cui sorge.
123. Nella presente causa, non sembra che la richiedente tentò di avvalersi delle vie di ricorso che gli sarebbero state disponibili nella “TRNC” con riguardo alle circostanze del suo arresto, la sua susseguente detenzione ed il suo processo (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 121, mutatis mutandis, Chrysostomos e Papachrysostomou dei quali il rapporto della Commissione è citato, § 174 sopra). In particolare, rifiutò i servizi di un avvocato che praticava nella “TRNC”, fece poco o nessun uso delle salvaguardie procedurali previste dalla Corte distrettuale di Nicosia della“TRNC”, non depositò un ricorso contro la sua condanna e non introdusse presso le autorità locali un'azione di reclamo formale di maltrattamento che aveva presumibilmente subito a causa della polizia turco-cipriota. Nella prospettiva della Corte, non c’è prova che se la richiedente si fosse avvalsa di tutte o parte di questi, queste vie di ricorso nazionali sarebbero state inefficaci.
124. Sotto queste circostanze, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione può essere trovata.

X. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE LETTO IN CONCOMITANZA CON GLI ARTICOLI 5, 6 E 7
125. La richiedente addusse di essere stata discriminata a causa della sua origine etnica e delle credenze religiose nel godimento dei diritti garantiti dagli Articoli 5, 6 e 7 della Convenzione.
Lui invocò l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
126. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
127. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che la richiedente era stata arrestata, picchiata e perseguita dalle autorità solamente a causa della sua nazionalità ed origine etnica. Questo trattamento differenziale era una chiara violazione dell’Articolo 14 della Convenzione.
128. La giurisprudenza della Corte stabilisce che discriminazione significa differente trattamento, senza una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole di persone in situazioni relativamente simili (vedere Willis c. Regno Unito, n. 36042/97, § 48 ECHR 2002-IV). Ogni differenza nel trattamento non corrisponderà comunque, ad una violazione dell’ Articolo 14. Deve essere stabilito che altre persone in una situazione analoga o relativamente simile godono di un trattamento preferenziale e che questa distinzione è discriminatoria (vedere Unal Tekeli c. Turchia, n. 29865/96, § 49 16 novembre 2004).
129. Al giorno d'oggi causa che la richiedente non è riuscito a provare che lei era stata trattata Nella presente causa il richiedente non è riuscito a provare di essere stato trattato differentemente da altre persone-vale a dire, dai Ciprioti di origine turca-che erano in una situazione comparabile. La Corte si riferisce anche alla sua conclusione che i diritti essenziali del richiedente sotto gli Articoli 3, 5, 6, 7 11 e 13 della Convenzione non sono stati infranti (vedere Protopapa, citata sopra, § 127, e, mutatis mutandis, Manitaras c. Turchia (dec.), n. 54591/00, 3 giugno 2008).
130. Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con gli Articoli 5, 6 e 7 della Convenzione.
XI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
131. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno materiale e morale
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) La richiedente
132. Nelle sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa del dicembre 2002, la richiedente richiese CYP 81,899 (circa EUR 139,932) per danno materiale. Lei si appellò al rapporto di un esperto (fornito dal Dipartimento dei Terreni e delle Indagini della Repubblica di Cipro) che valutava il valore delle sue perdite che includevano la perdita di affitto annuale percepito o che ci si aspettava di percepire dall'affitto delle sue proprietà, più interesse dalla data in cui simili affitti erano dovuti sino al giorno del pagamento. L'affitto chiesto era per il periodo risalente al gennaio 1987, quando il Governo rispondente accettò il diritto di ricorso individuale, sino al 2000. La richiedente non chiese il risarcimento per qualsiasi espropriazione stabilita poiché lei ancora era la proprietaria legittima delle proprietà. La valutazione conteneva una descrizione della città di Famagusta e del villaggio di Kato Dherynia, dove le proprietà della richiedente erano situate.
133. Il punto iniziale della valutazione era il valore di affitto annuale della quota della richiedente nelle proprietà nel 1974 (CYP 357-circa EUR 610), calcolato sulla base di una percentuale (che variava fra il 4% ed il 6%) del valore di mercato delle proprietà (CYP 15,685-circa EUR 26,799). Questa somma fu aggiustata successivamente verso il rialzo secondo un aumento dell’affitto annuale medio del 5.5%. Un interesse composto per pagamento ritardato fu applicato ad un tasso dell’ 8% all'anno.
134. In una lettera del 28 gennaio 2008 la richiedente osservò che un lungo periodo era passato dalle sue rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa prima e che la rivendicazione per la perdita materiale aveva bisogno di essere aggiornata secondo i dati riguardo all'aumento del valore di mercato del terreno a Cipro. L'aumento medio a questo riguardo era tra il 10% e il 15% all'anno.
135. Nelle sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa del dicembre 2002, la richiedente chiese inoltre CYP 80,000 (approssimativamente 136,688 EUR) a riguardo del danno morale per le violazioni dei suoi diritti sotto gli Articoli 8 della Convenzione e 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Lei chiese inoltre CYP 60,000 (circa EUR 102,516) riguardo al danno morale subito per le altre violazioni.
(b) Il Governo
136. In replica alla richiesta di soddisfazione equa della richiedente del dicembre 2002, il Governo presentò che la questione del risarcimento reciproco per le proprietà greco -cipriote lasciate nel nord dell'isola e le proprietà turco-cipriote lasciate nel sud era molto complessa e avrebbe dovuto essere stabilita tramite negoziazioni fra le due parti sotto gli auspici dell'ONU, piuttosto che tramite aggiudicazione della Corte europea dei Diritti umani, comportandosi come un tribunale di prima -istanza ed appellandosi ai rapporti prodotti solamente da parte del richiedente. Fece riferimento, su questo punto, al piano dell’ONU intitolato “Base per l’ accordo su un ordinamento comprensivo della questione di Cipro”, nella sua versione riveduta del 10 dicembre 2002.
137. Impugnando le conclusioni a cui è giunta la Corte nella sentenza Loizidou ((soddisfazione equa), 28 luglio 1998, Relazioni 1998-IV), il Governo considerò che in cause come la presente, nessuna assegnazione dovrebbe essere fatta dalla Corte sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione. Sottolineò che l'incapacità del richiedente di accedere alle sue proprietà è dipesa dalla situazione politica a Cipro e, in particolare, all'esistenza delle linee di tregua riconosciute dall’ ONU. Se ai Greco- Ciprioti venisse permesso di andare al nord e rivendicare le loro proprietà, esploderebbe il caos sull'isola; inoltre qualsiasi assegnazione fatta dalla Corte minerebbe le negoziazioni fra le due parti.
138. Inoltre, la Turchia non aveva accesso ai documenti dell’ ufficio fondiario della “TRNC” che era fuori dalla sua giurisdizione e dal suo controllo. Non era perciò in una posizione tale da avere conoscenza sufficiente del possesso e/o della proprietà delle proprietà addotte nel 1974 o sapere i loro valori di mercato e di affitto ragionevole al tempo attinente. I preventivi esposti dal richiedente erano speculativi ed ipotetici, siccome non erano basati su veri dati e non prendevano in esame la volatilità del mercato della proprietà e la sua suscettibilità ad essere influenzato dalla situazione nazionale a Cipro. Durante gli ultimi 28 anni, il panorama a Cipro era notevolmente cambiato, e così aveva fatto lo status della proprietà della richiedente.
139. Si noterebbe anche che nella presente richiesta i preventivi non furono forniti da un esperto indipendente, ma dal Settore dei Terreno e delle Indagini della Repubblica di Cipro cioè da un ramo di una parte interessata che era intervenuta nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte. In qualsiasi caso, la Turchia non poteva essere ritenuta responsabile in diritto internazionale per gli atti di espropriazione da parte della “TRNC” delle proprietà del richiedente, siccome non poteva legiferare costituire riparazione per questi atti. Il Governo invitò la Corte ad esaminare se, come affermato nell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, “la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata” permetteva “di fare riparazione.”
140. Infine, il Governo non fece commenti sulle osservazioni del richiedente sotto il capo di danno morale.
3. La valutazione della Corte
141. La Corte prima nota che l'osservazione del Governo per cui è probabile che sorgano dei dubbi riguardo al titolo di proprietà della richiedente sulle proprietà in questione (vedere paragrafo 138 sopra) è, in sostanza, un'eccezione di incompatibilità ratione materiae con le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Tale eccezione avrebbe dovuta essere sollevata prima che la richiesta venisse dichiarata ammissibile o, all'ultimo, nel contesto delle osservazioni delle parti sui meriti. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte non può se non confermare la sua costatazione che la richiedente aveva una “ proprietà” sulle proprietà rivendicate nella presente richiesta all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 46 sopra).
142. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 riguardo al danno materiale e morale non è pronta per una decisione. Osserva, in particolare, che le parti non sono riuscite ad offrire dati affidabili ed obiettivi concernenti ai prezzi dei terreni e dei beni immobili a Cipro in data dell'intervento turco. Questo insuccesso rende difficile per la Corte valutare se la stima fornita dalla richiedente del valore di mercato del 1974 delle sue proprietà sia ragionevole. La questione deve essere di conseguenza riservata e la susseguente procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo ad un qualsiasi accordo a cui i Governo rispondente ed il richiedente potrebbero giungere (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).

B. Costi e spese

143. Nelle sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa del dicembre 2002, la richiedente chiese CYP 7,200 (circa EUR 12,302) per i costi e le spese incorsi di fronte alla Corte.
144. Il Governo non fece commenti su questo punto.
145. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 a riguardo dei costi e delle spese non è pronta per decisione. La questione deve essere di conseguenza riservata e la susseguente procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo a qualsiasi accordo a cui il Governo rispondente ed il richiedente potrebbero giungere.

PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Respinge per sei voti ad uno le eccezioni preliminari del Governo;
2. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene all’unanimità che non è necessario per esaminare se c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 8 della Convenzione e di Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con Articolo 8 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;
4. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 3 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 5 della Convenzione;
6. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione;
7. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 7 della Convenzione;
8. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’Articolo 11 della Convenzione;
9. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
10. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con gli Articoli 5, 6 e 7;
11. Sostiene all’unanimità che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione per intero;
(b) invita il Governo ed la richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 22 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, le opinioni separate del Giudice Bratza e Karakaş sono annesse a questa sentenza.
N.B.
F.A.


OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE BRATZA
Nella causa Protopapa c. Turchia (n. 16084/90, 24 febbraio 2009), io votai con gli altri membri della Camera in relazione a tutte le azioni di reclamo della Convenzione di richiedente ad accezione di quella sotto l’Articolo 13 che, per le ragioni spiegate nella mia Opinione In parte Dissentente trovai era stato violato.
L'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 nella presente causa è sostanzialmente la stessa di quella del richiedente nella causa Protopapa. Mentre continuo a nutrire dei dubbi che ho espresso in quel caso espressi riguardo a se c'era una qualsiasi via di ricorso che avrebbe potuto essere considerata come pratica o effettivo e che offriva al richiedente una qualsiasi prospettiva realistica di successo, a riguardo all'opinione di maggioranza nella sentenza Protopapa che ora è divenuta definitiva io mi sono unito agli altri membri della Camera nel non trovare nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 13.


OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENDO DI GIUDICE KARAKAÅž
Diversamente dalla maggioranza, considero, che l'eccezione del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sollevata dal Governo non avrebbe dovuto essere respinta. Di conseguenza, non posso concordare con la costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 della Convenzione, per le stesse ragioni di quelle menzionate nella mia opinione dissidente nella causa Alexandrou c. Turchia (n. 16162/90, 20 gennaio 2009).
Votai con la maggioranza riguardo alla costatazione di nessuna violazione degli Articoli 3, 5, 6 7, 11 13 e 14 letti in concomitanza con gli Articoli 5, 6 e 7 della Convenzione.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.