Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF YILDIRIR v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 21482/03/2009
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 24/11/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

SECOND SECTION
CASE OF YILDIRIR v. TURKEY
(Application no. 21482/03)
JUDGMENT
(Merits)
STRASBOURG
24 November 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Yıldırır v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Ireneu Cabral Barreto,
Danutė Jočienė,
András Sajó,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Işıl Karakaş,
Kristina Pardalos, judges,
and Sally Dollé, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 November 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 21482/03) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Turkish national, Mr Z. Y. (“the applicant”), on 21 May 2003.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr E. Y., a lawyer practising in Ankara. The Turkish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the demolition of his house constituted a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 3 June 2006 the President of the Second Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1939 and lives in Ankara.
6. On the basis of a construction permit obtained on 10 August 1976, Mr M.A. built a house in BoÄŸazkurt, Ankara. The construction of the house and its annexes was completed in 1978. Mr M.A. planted trees around the house and regularly paid property tax to the authorities. The property in question was subsequently purchased by the applicant in 1996 (see paragraph 11 below).
7. In the meantime, on 21 January 1981 the Ministry of Public Works and Settlement notified Mr M.A. that his construction permit had expired on 10 August 1980 and that he had not yet applied for a property utilisation permit. In this context, he was requested to provide a report proving that the utilisation of the property did not pose any threat to public health or to the environment.
8. On 30 January 1981 the Kızılcahamam district government doctor issued a report stating that the utilisation of the property in question did not pose any threat to public health and that its construction had been completed in compliance with the environmental regulations.
9. On 11 February 1981 that report was submitted to the Ministry.
10. On 10 May 1981 Mr M.A. filed an application with the Ankara Provincial Construction Directorate for the renewal of the construction permit. In response, the administration notified him on 21 May 1982 that his application was currently being dealt with.
11. On 18 July 1996 the applicant bought the property from Mr M.A. On the same day, the land registry office issued him a title deed attesting his ownership of the property. Furthermore, the village mayor (muhtar) certified in writing that the previous owner had been residing in the property in question since 11 August 1976.
12. On 11 November 1998 the Directorate of Public Works and Settlement of the Ankara Governorship notified the applicant that the construction on his land must be demolished as it had been completed in the absence of the required construction permit.
13. On 20 November 1998 the same directorate notified the following to the applicant:
“The construction permit for the property was issued on 10 August 1976 and expired on 10 August 1980. An application for the renewal of the construction permit was not filed in time. The required property utilisation permit was not obtained either. The property is located in the absolute protection zone, which is the immediate zone within 300 metres of sources of drinkable water. According to the Law on Hygiene and the Regulation on the Prevention of Water Pollution, construction within 300 metres of sources of drinking water and their basin is prohibited. On 11 November 1998, for these reasons, an order for the cessation of construction was issued regarding the house. As the issue of a new construction permit is not legally possible in these circumstances, it is requested that the construction on your land be demolished; otherwise it shall be demolished following the adoption of a decision by the Ankara Administrative Council.”
14. On 5 January 1999 the Ankara Administrative Council issued a demolition order based on the reasons specified in the notification of the Directorate of Public Works and Settlement of the Ankara Governorship.
15. On 26 February 1999 the applicant sought the annulment of the demolition order, stating that the construction had been completed within two years after the required permit had been obtained, so that the issue of a new construction permit was never required. He further maintained that the previous owner had also applied for a property utilisation permit on 11 February 1981, attaching the requested documents to his application, but that the administration had never responded.
16. In February 1999 the applicant brought an action before the Kızılcahamam Civil Court to have the legal status of his property determined.
17. On 16 February 1999 a committee of experts appointed by the court visited the location and subsequently issued a report stating that the house on the applicant's land had been constructed twenty years earlier.
18. On 22 September 1999 the Ankara Administrative Court decided that the demolition order issued by the administrative council had to be annulled, stating as follows:
“The administration failed to prove the exact date of the beginning and completion of the construction in question. As it was not definite that the construction of the property still continued after the expiry of the relevant construction permit, it was not possible to decide on the legal status of the construction. In the action brought by the applicant for the determination of the legal status of the property, it was held that the house was constructed twenty years ago. Furthermore, in a notification issued by the Ankara Provincial Directorate it was stated that the applicant had applied for the renewal of the construction permit on 5 May 1981. Finally, the Law on Hygiene and Regulation on the Prevention of Water Pollution provides that constructions that are not in compliance with its provisions shall be discontinued, not demolished.”
19. On 29 March 2001, upon the administration's appeal, the Supreme Administrative Court quashed that judgment on the grounds that the applicant's house had been constructed after the relevant permit had expired.
20. On 6 March 2003 the Ankara Administrative Court followed the Supreme Administrative Court's decision and dismissed the applicant's action for the annulment of the demolition order.
21. On 21 April 2003 the Directorate of Public Works and Settlement of the Ankara Governorship notified the applicant that, pursuant to the Ankara Administrative Court's judgment of 6 March 2003, he must have his house demolished within thirty days of his receipt of the notification.
22. On 26 May 2004 the applicant's house was demolished by the administration.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
23. Section 10 of the now defunct Zoning Law No. 6785 (6785 Sayılı İmar Kanunu, “Zoning Law”) provided that the period for beginning construction was one year from the date on which a permit was issued. In the event that construction had not started or had not been completed within four years, a new permit needed to be obtained.
24. Under section 16 of the Zoning Law the construction owner was required to obtain permission from the Municipality in order to use the building. A further approval was needed from the Medical Department, confirming that there was no obstacle to the building being used. The administration (governorship) was required to issue a permit to use the building within thirty days of the date of the application. The administration was deemed to have authorised the use of the completed or partly completed building in the event that it failed to reply within that time-limit.
25. The Turkish Civil Code contains the following provisions concerning the registration of immovable property and the rights upon it:
Article 1007 § 1
“The State is responsible for any damage resulting from the keeping of land registry records...
Cases involving the responsibility of the State are dealt with by the courts where the [property] was registered.”
Article 1023
“The rights of third persons who acquire a property or right in rem, relying on the records of the land registry log book and in good faith, shall be protected.”
26. Section 12 of the Administrative Procedure Law (Law no. 2577) reads as follows:
“Any person who sustains damage as a result of an administrative act may directly bring an action for a full remedy or a joint action for annulment and full remedy before the Supreme Administrative Court or Administrative and Tax Courts. They may also first bring an action for annulment and then, upon its conclusion, bring an action for a full remedy for the damage resulting from the notification of the judgment or the execution of an act within the required time-limits...”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
27. The applicant complained that he had been deprived of his property in circumstances which were incompatible with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
28. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
29. The Government submitted that the applicant had not exhausted all available domestic remedies as he had failed to bring an action for a full remedy (tam yargı davası) in the Ankara Administrative Court against the Ankara Governorship. A full-remedy action could have secured the annulment of the decision to demolish the building or, alternatively, could have provided the applicant with sufficient compensation for the property in question (see paragraph 26 above).
30. The applicant asserted that, in the absence of any favourable court decision, a full-remedy action would be doomed to failure. He therefore claimed that he had availed himself of all remedies in domestic law.
31. The Court reiterates that under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, recourse should normally be had by an applicant to remedies which are available and sufficient to afford redress in respect of the breaches alleged. The existence of the remedies in question must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but also in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness (see, inter alia, Vernillo v. France, 20 February 1991, § 27, Series A no. 198, and Johnston and Others v. Ireland, 18 December 1986, § 22, Series A no. 112).
32. Furthermore, in the area of the exhaustion of domestic remedies, there is a distribution of the burden of proof. It is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one, available in theory and in practice at the relevant time, that is to say, that it was accessible, was one which was capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant's complaints and offered reasonable prospects of success. However, once this burden of proof has been satisfied it falls to the applicant to establish that the remedy advanced by the Government had in fact been used or was for some reason inadequate and ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case or that there existed special circumstances absolving him or her from the requirement (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 68, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV).
33. On the above understanding, the Court notes that the applicant could have brought an action for a full remedy in the Ankara Administrative Court using the procedure under section 12 of the Administrative Procedure Law. However, it points out that, in a judgment dated 6 March 2003, the same court had already dismissed the applicant's action for the annulment of the decision to demolish his house subsequent to the finding that the construction of the house in question in the area was unlawful (see paragraphs 19 and 20 above). In other words, the Ankara Administrative Court's final judgment paved the way for the demolition of the applicant's house (see paragraph 21 above).
34. In view of the above, the Court does not consider that an action for a full remedy, brought by the applicant in order to claim compensation for the loss sustained as a result of the demolition of his house, would have had any prospect of success in the circumstances of the case. In this connection, the Court notes that the Government have not furnished any administrative court decision demonstrating that one can successfully bring an action for a full remedy subsequent to an unfavourable decision in an action for annulment of an allegedly unlawful administrative act. In the light of the foregoing, the Court dismisses the Government's plea of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
35. The Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
(a) The applicant
36. The applicant contended that the national authorities had unlawfully demolished his house without paying him any compensation. He noted that the land registry did not contain any annotation classifying the house as an illegal construction or preventing it from being sold. He had thus bought the house from its previous owner in good faith and trusting the official records kept by the land registry office. Contrary to the Government's allegations, the previous owner of the house had obtained the construction permit in 1976 and finished building the house in 1978; he had started paying real estate tax after declaring the building to the Keçiören Municipality. He had therefore not exceeded the four-year time-limit for completing the construction. Furthermore, the committee of experts appointed by the Kızılcahamam First-Instance Court had also found in 1999 that the building in question had been constructed 20 years earlier. In view of the foregoing, the applicant claimed that the demolition of his house without payment of any compensation had breached his rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) The Government
37. The Government acknowledged that the demolition of the applicant's house had amounted to an interference with property rights, within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, in their opinion, this interference had been compatible with legal certainty and had aimed at ensuring compliance with the general rules concerning prohibitions on construction. In this connection, they noted that the construction permit for the building in question had been issued on 10 August 1976, in accordance with the Zoning Law. Yet, the permit had not been renewed although its validity had expired on 10 August 1980. The permit to use the building had not been obtained either. Accordingly, the applicant did not have “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 since their acquisition had never been valid. In any event, it was impossible for the authorities to issue a permit for the applicant's house since it was located in the protected zone of the Kurtboğazı Dam, which supplied drinking water to Ankara. The interference in question had thus met the requirement of lawfulness and had not been arbitrary. It had pursued the legitimate aims of preserving the environment, protecting public health and ensuring compliance with building regulations, with a view to guaranteeing the orderly development of residential areas and the countryside.
2. The Court's assessment
38. The summary of the relevant case-law applicable in the present case can be found in the judgment of N.A. and Others v. Turkey (no. 37451/97, §§ 36-37, ECHR 2005-X).
39. The Court notes that it is not in dispute between the parties that the demolition of the applicant's house amounted to a “deprivation” of property within the meaning of the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
40. Before embarking upon the question whether the deprivation concerned was justified in the circumstances of the case, the Court notes at the outset that the applicant purchased the house in question from its previous owner in 1996, relying on the records kept at the land registry office. The latter, which is the sole authority for the registration and transfer of immovable property, issued a title deed to him, attesting his ownership of the property (see paragraph 11 above). According to domestic law and practice, any limitation concerning such property must be entered in the land registry log book. The rights of those who acquire property relying on the records kept by the land registry office are protected and any damage resulting from the keeping of those records engages the responsibility of the State (see paragraph 25 above).
41. That being so, it does not appear that the applicant knew or ought to have known that the house was an illegal construction under the domestic law since the land registry log book did not contain any annotation concerning the illegality of the construction and limiting its transfer. Indeed, the Government did not dispute that. Having thus purchased the house in good faith and obtained a title deed, the applicant paid the appropriate taxes and duties on it. In other words, as holder of a title deed attesting his ownership of the house, the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, without any restriction, until he was deprived of it by the local authorities.
42. However, the applicant's house was demolished by the local authorities subsequent to the decision of the Ankara Administrative Council and the judgment of the national courts on the grounds that it was an illegal construction which posed a threat to public health and the environment (see paragraphs 14 and 20 above).
43. In that connection, the Court notes that, although there is no provision in the Convention affording general protection for the environment, it has recognised that in today's society such protection is an increasingly important consideration (see Fredin v. Sweden (no. 1), judgment of 18 February 1991, Series A no. 192, p. 16, § 48). Furthermore, in a number of cases the Court has dealt with similar questions and stressed the importance of the protection of the environment (see, among many other authorities, Taşkın and Others v. Turkey, no. 46117/99, ECHR 2004-X; Moreno Gómez v. Spain, no. 4143/02, ECHR 2004-X; Fadeyeva v. Russia, no. 55723/00, ECHR 2005-IV). In view of the foregoing, and having regard to the reasons given by the national courts, the Court considers that it is beyond dispute that the applicant was deprived of his property “in the public interest”, namely to protect public health and the environment (see Lazaridi v. Greece, no. 31282/04, § 34, 13 July 2006). It follows that this deprivation of property pursued a legitimate aim.
44. It now needs to be ascertained whether the interference in question struck a fair balance between the interests of the applicant and those of society as a whole. The right to compensation under domestic legislation is material to the assessment of whether the contested measure respects the requisite fair balance and, notably, whether it imposes a disproportionate burden on the applicant. In this regard, the Court has previously held that a deprivation of property without payment of an amount reasonably related to its value will normally constitute a disproportionate interference, and that a total lack of compensation can be considered justifiable under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in exceptional circumstances (see N.A. and Others v. Turkey, no. 37451/97, § 41, ECHR 2005-X; Nastou v. Greece (no. 2), no. 16163/02, § 33, 15 July 2005; Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 111, ECHR 2005-VI).
45. In the instant case, the applicant did not have any realistic prospect of success in obtaining compensation for the deprivation of his property, given that the administrative courts upheld the Ankara Administrative Council's demolition order (see paragraphs 33 and 34 above). The lack of any domestic remedy to afford the applicant redress for the loss of his house thus impaired the full enjoyment of his right to property. In this connection, the Court notes that the Government did not cite any exceptional circumstances to justify the total lack of compensation for that deprivation, even though the domestic legislation stipulates that the State is responsible for any damage resulting from the keeping of land registry records (see paragraph 25 above). Thus, having recognised the applicant as the legal owner of the house in question by issuing a title deed, the national authorities' responsibility was automatically engaged for the damage suffered by the applicant as a result of the demolition of his house.
46. In view of the above, the Court considers that the failure to award any compensation to the applicant upset, to his detriment, the fair balance which has to be struck between the protection of property and the requirements of the general interest (see N.A. and Others, cited above, § 42). There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
47. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
48. The applicant claimed 57,977 Turkish liras (TRL) (approximately 27,000 euros (EUR)) in respect of pecuniary damage and TRL 100,000 (approximately EUR 46,500) for non-pecuniary damage for the stress and anxiety suffered by his family. He did not submit any quantified claim in respect of costs and expenses.
49. The Government submitted that the amounts claimed by the applicant were speculative and unsubstantiated.
50. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and must be reserved, due regard being had to the possibility of an agreement between the respondent State and the applicant.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final according to Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 24 November 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA YILDIRIR C. TURCHIA
(Richiesta n. 21482/03)
SENTENZA
(I meriti)
STRASBOURG
24 novembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Yıldırır c. Turchia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente, Ireneu Cabral Barreto, Danutė Jočienė, András Sajó, Nona Tsotsoria, Işıl Karakaş, Kristina Pardalos, giudici,
e Sally Dollé, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 3 novembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 21482/03) contro la Repubblica della Turchia depositata dalla Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino turco, il Sig. Z. Y. (“il richiedente”), il 21 maggio 2003.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. E. Y., un avvocato che pratica ad Ankara. Il Governo turco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che la demolizione del suo alloggio costituì una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. Il 3 giugno 2006 il Presidente della Seconda Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1939 e vive ad Ankara.
6. Sulla base di una licenza edile ottenuta il 10 agosto 1976, il Sig. M.A. ha costruito un alloggio a Boğazkurt, Ankara. La costruzione dell'alloggio e i sui annessi furono completati nel 1978. Il Sig. M.A. piantò alberi piantati intorno l'alloggio e regolarmente pagò la tassa di proprietà alle autorità. La proprietà in oggetto fu acquistata successivamente dal richiedente nel 1996 (vedere paragrafo 11 sotto).
7. Il 21 gennaio 1981 il Ministero dei Lavori Pubblici e degli Accordi notificò nel frattempo, al Sig. M.A. che la sua licenza edile era scaduta il 10 agosto 1980 e che lui non aveva fatto ancora domanda per una licenza di utilizzo della proprietà. In questo contesto, gli fu richiesto di fornire un rapporto che provasse che l’utilizzo della proprietà non poneva nessuna minaccia alla salute pubblica o all'ambiente.
8. Il 30 gennaio 1981 il dottore governativo del distretto di Kızılcahamam emise un rapporto che affermava che l'utilizzo della proprietà in oggetto non poneva qualsiasi minaccia alla salute pubblica e che la sua costruzione era stata completata in ottemperanza con le regolamentazioni ambientali.
9. L’11 febbraio 1981 questo rapporto fu presentato al Ministero.
10. Il 10 maggio 1981 Sig. M.A registrò una richiesta presso la Direzione Provinciale per le Costruzioni di Ankara per il rinnovo della licenza edile. In risposta, l'amministrazione gli notificò il 21 maggio 1982 che si stava attualmente trattando con la sua richiesta.
11. Il 18 luglio 1996 il richiedente comprò la proprietà dal Sig. M.A. Lo stesso giorno, l'ufficio del registro fondiario gli emise un atto di titolo di proprietà che attestava il suo possesso della proprietà. Inoltre, il sindaco dek villaggio (muhtar) certificò per iscritto che il precedente proprietario risiedeva nella proprietà in oggetto dall’ 11 agosto 1976.
12. L’11 novembre 1998 la Direzione di Lavori Pubblici e degli Accordi del Governatorato di Ankara ha notificato al richiedente che la costruzione sul suo terreno doveva essere demolita siccome era stata completata in assenza della licenza edile richiesta.
13. Il 20 novembre 1998 la stessa direzione notificò al richiedente ciò che segue:
“La licenza edile per la proprietà fu emessa il 10 agosto 1976 ed è scaduta il 10 agosto 1980. Una richiesta per il rinnovo della licenza edile non fu registrata in tempo. Nemmeno la licenza di utilizzo della proprietà riguardata non fu ottenuta. La proprietà è localizzata nella zona di protezione assoluta che è la zona immediatamente entro 300 metri da fonti di acqua potabile. A norma della legge sull’ Igiene e della Regolamentazione sulla Prevenzione dell’Inquinamento dell’ Acqua, la costruzione entro i 300 metri da fonti di acqua potabile ed del suo bacino è proibita. Per queste ragioni, un ordine di demolizione della costruzione fu emesso riguardo all'alloggio l’11 novembre 1998. Siccome la questione di una nuova licenza edile non è giuridicamente possibile in queste circostanze, si richiede che la costruzione sul suo terreno venga demolita; altrimenti sarà demolita a seguito dell'adozione di una decisione da parte del Consiglio Amministrativo di Ankara.”
14. Il 5 gennaio 1999 il Consiglio Amministrativo di Ankara emise un ordine di demolizione basato sulle ragioni specificate nella notifica della Direzione dei Lavori Pubblici e degli Accordi del Governatorato di Ankara.
15. Il 26 febbraio 1999 il richiedente chiese l'annullamento dell'ordine di demolizione, affermando che la costruzione era stata completata entro due anni dopo che la licenza richiesta era stata ottenuta, così che la questione di una nuova licenza edile non era mai stata richiesta. Lui sostenne inoltre che il precedente proprietario aveva fatto domanda anche per un permesso di utilizzo della proprietà l’11 febbraio 1981, allegando i documenti richiesti alla sua richiesta, ma che l'amministrazione non aveva mai risposto.
16. Nel febbraio 1999 il richiedente introdusse un'azione di fronte alla Corte Civile di Kızılcahamam per far determinare la condizione giuridica della sua proprietà.
17. Il 16 febbraio 1999 un comitato di esperti nominato dalla corte visitò l'ubicazione e successivamente emise un rapporto che affermava che l'alloggio sul terreno del richiedente era stato costruito venti anni prima.
18. Il 22 settembre 1999 la Corte amministrativa di Ankara decise che l'ordine di demolizione emesso dal consiglio amministrativo doveva essere annullato, affermando ciò che segue:
“L'amministrazione andò a vuoto nel provare la data esatta dell'inizio e del completamento della costruzione in oggetto. Siccome non era stato definito che la costruzione della proprietà continuò ancora dopo la scadenza della licenza edile attinente, non era possibile decidere sulla condizione giuridica della costruzione. Nell'azione introdotta dal richiedente per la determinazione della condizione giuridica della proprietà, fu sostenuto, che l'alloggio fu costruito venti anni prima. Inoltre, in una notifica emessa dalla Direzione Provinciale di Ankara è stato affermato che il richiedente aveva fatto domanda per il rinnovo della licenza di costruzione il 5 maggio 1981. Infine, la Legge sull’Igiene e la Regolamentazione sulla Prevenzione dell’ Inquinamento dell’ Acqua prevede che costruzioni che non sono in ottemperanza con le sue disposizioni saranno chiuse, non demolite.”
19. Il 29 marzo 2001, la Corte amministrativa Suprema annullò, su ricorso dell'amministrazione, questa sentenza per i motivi che l'alloggio del richiedente era stato costruito dopo che la licenza attinente era scaduta.
20. Il 6 marzo 2003 la Corte amministrativa di Ankara seguì la decisione della Corte amministrativa Suprema e respinse l'azione del richiedente per l'annullamento dell'ordine di demolizione.
21. Il 21 aprile 2003 la Direzione dei Lavori Pubblici e degli Accordi del Governatorato di Ankara notificò al richiedente che, facendo seguito alla sentenza della Corte amministrativa di Ankara del 6 marzo 2003, lui doveva far demolire il suo alloggio entro trenta giorni dal ricevimento della notifica.
22. Il 26 maggio 2004 l'alloggio del richiedente fu demolito dall'amministrazione.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
23. La Sezione 10 dell'ora defunta Legge di Zonizzazione N.ro 6785 (6785 Sayılı İmar Kanunu, “Legge di Zonizzazione”) prevede che il periodo per cominciare la costruzione era di un anno dalla data in cui è stata emessa una licenza. Nel caso in cui la costruzione non era stata cominciata o non era stata completata entro quattro anni,c’era bisogno di ottenere una nuova .
24. Sotto la sezione 16 della Legge di Zonizzazione il proprietario della costruzione era costretto ad ottenere un permesso dal Municipio per usare l'edificio. C’era bisogno di un'ulteriore approvazione dal Settore Medico, che confermava che non ci fossero ostacoli dall'essere usato come edificio. L'amministrazione (il governatorato) era costretto ad emettere una licenza per usare l'edificio entro trenta giorni della data della richiesta. Si riteneva che l'amministrazione avesse autorizzato l'uso dei dell’ edificio completato o in parte completato nel caso un cui che non fosse riuscita a rispondere entro quel tempo-limite.
25. Il Codice civile turco contiene le seguenti disposizioni riguardo alla registrazione del patrimonio immobiliare e dei diritti su questo:
Articolo 1007 § 1
“Lo Stato è responsabile per qualsiasi danno che è il risultato della custodia dei registri fondiari...
Cause che comportano la responsabilità dello Stato sono trattate dai tribunali dove [la proprietà] è stata registrata.”
Articolo 1023
“I diritti di una terza persona che acquisisce una proprietà o un diritto in rem, appellandosi alle registrazioni del registro fondiario ed in buon fede, sarà protetta.”
26. La Sezione 12 della Legge di Procedura Amministrativa (la Legge n. 2577) si legge come segue:
“Qualsiasi persona che subisce un danno come risultato di un atto amministrativo può introdurre direttamente un'azione per una piena via di ricorso o unire un’azione per annullamento di fronte alla Corte amministrativa Suprema o ai Tribunali Fiscali ed Amministrativi. Può anche introdurre prima un'azione d’annullamento e poi, alla sua conclusione, introdurre un'azione per una piena via di ricorso per il danno che è il risultato della notifica della sentenza o dell'esecuzione di un atto all'interno dei tempo-limiti richiesti...”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
27. Il richiedente si lamentò di essere stato privato della sua proprietà in circostanze che erano incompatibili coi requisiti dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
28. Il Governo contestò questo argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
29. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali del tutto disponibili siccome lui non era riuscito ad introdurre un'azione per una piena via di ricorso (tam yargı davası) presso la Corte amministrativa di Ankara contro il Governatorato di Ankara. Un'azione di piena via di ricorso avrebbe potuto garantire l'annullamento della decisione per demolire l'edificio o, alternativamente, avrebbe potuto fornire al richiedente il risarcimento sufficiente per la proprietà in oggetto (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra).
30. Il richiedente asserì che, in assenza di qualsiasi decisione del tribunale favorevole, un'azione di piena via di ricorso sarebbe condannata all’ insuccesso. Lui disse perciò di essersi giovato di tutte le via di ricorso in diritto nazionale.
31. La Corte reitera che sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, un richiedente dovrebbe di norma avere accesso vie di ricorso che sono disponibili e sufficienti per riconoscere una compensazione a riguardo delle violazioni addotte. L'esistenza delle vie di ricorso in oggetto non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicura in teoria ma anche in pratica, in mancanza di ciò mancherà dell'accessibilità richiesta e dell'efficacia (vedere, inter alia, Vernillo c. Francia, 20 febbraio 1991, § 27 Serie A n. 198, e Johnston ed Altri c. Irlanda, 18 dicembre 1986, § 22 Serie A n. 112).
32. Inoltre nell'area dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali, vi è una distribuzione dell'onere della prova. Spetta al Governo rivendicare il non esaurimento per soddisfare la Corte che la vie di ricorso erano effettive, disponibili in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente vale a dire che erano accessibili e capaci di offrire una compensazione a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e delle prospettive ragionevoli di successo. Una volta che questo onere della prova è stato soddisfatto, spetta al richiedente stabilire che la via di ricorso avanzata dal Governo è stata di fatti utilizzata o è stata per una qualsiasi ragione inadeguata ed inefficace nelle particolari circostanze della causa o che esistevano delle circostanze speciali che lo assolvevano dal requisito (vedere Akdivar ed Altri c. Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, § 68 Relazioni delle Sentenze e delle Decisioni 1996-IV).
33. In base al ragionamento sopra , la Corte nota, che il richiedente avrebbe potuto introdurre un'azione per una piena via di ricorso presso la Corte amministrativa di Ankara utilizzando la procedura sotto la sezione 12 della Legge di Procedura Amministrativa. Comunque, indica che, in una sentenza del 6 marzo 2003, la stessa corte aveva già respinto l'azione del richiedente per l'annullamento della decisione di demolire il suo alloggio susseguente alla costatazione che la costruzione dell'alloggio in oggetto nell'area era illegale (vedere paragrafi 19 e 20 sopra). In altre parole, la sentenza definitiva della Corte amministrativa di Ankara preparò la via per la demolizione dell'alloggio del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra).
34. In questa prospettiva, la Corte non considera, che un'azione per una piena via di ricorso, introdotta dal richiedente per chiedere il risarcimento per la perdita subita come risultato della demolizione del suo alloggio, avrebbe avuto una qualsiasi prospettiva di successo nelle circostanze della causa. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che il Governo non ha fornito nessuna decisione della corte amministrativa che dimostrasse che uno avrebbe potuto introdurre con successo un'azione per una piena via di ricorso a seguito di una decisione non favorevole all’interno di un'azione annullatrice di un atto amministrativo presumibilmente illegale. Alla luce di ciò che precede, la Corte respinge la dichiarazione del Governo di non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali.
35. La Corte nota che la richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
36. Il richiedente contese che le autorità nazionali avevano demolito illegalmente il suo alloggio senza pagargli qualsiasi risarcimento. Lui notò che il registro fondiario non conteneva nessuna annotazione che classificava l'alloggio come una costruzione illegale o che impediva di venderlo. Lui aveva comprato così l'alloggio dal suo precedente proprietario in buon fede ed avendo fiducia nei documenti ufficiali tenuti dall'ufficio del registro fondiario. Contrariamente alle dichiarazioni del Governo, il precedente proprietario dell'alloggio aveva ottenuto la licenza edile nel 1976 ed aveva finito la costruzione dell'alloggio nel 1978; lui aveva cominciato a pagare la tassa sui beni immobili dopo avere dichiarato l'edificio al Municipio di Keçiören. Lui non aveva ecceduto perciò il tempo-limite dei quattro anni per il completamento della costruzione. Il comitato degli esperti nominato dalla Corte di Prima Istanza di Kızılcahamam aveva trovato anche inoltre, nel 1999 che l'edificio in oggetto era stato costruito 20 anni prima. Nella prospettiva di ciò che precede, il richiedente sostenne, che la demolizione del suo alloggio senza pagamento di qualsiasi risarcimento aveva violato i suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) Il Governo
37. Il Governo ammise che la demolizione dell'alloggio del richiedente aveva corrisposto ad un'interferenza con i diritti di proprietà, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Secondo luo, questa interferenza era stata comunque, compatibile con la certezza legale e mirava ad assicurare l’ ottemperanza con gli articoli generali riguardo alle proibizioni edili. In questo collegamento, notò, che la licenza edile per l'edificio in oggetto era stata emesso il 10 agosto 1976, in conformità con la Legge di Zonizzazione. Ancora, la licenza non era stata rinnovata benché la sua validità fosse scaduta il 10 agosto 1980. Neanche la licenza per l’uso l'edificio era stata ottenuta. Di conseguenza, il richiedente non aveva “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 poiché la sua acquisizione non era mai stata valida. In qualsiasi caso, era impossibile per le autorità emettere una licenza per l'alloggio del richiedente poiché era localizzato nella zona protetta della Diga di Kurtboğazı che forniva acqua potabile ad Ankara. L'interferenza in oggetto aveva soddisfatto così il requisito della legalità e non era stata arbitraria. Aveva intrapreso gli scopi legittimi di preservare l'ambiente, proteggendo la salute pubblica ed assicurare l’ ottemperanza con le regolamentazioni edili , nella prospettiva di garantire lo sviluppo ordinato delle zone residenziali e della campagna.
2. La valutazione della Corte
38. Il riassunto della giurisprudenza attinente applicabile nella presente causa può essere trovato nella sentenza N.A. ed Altri c. Turchia (n. 37451/97, §§ 36-37 ECHR 2005-X).
39. La Corte nota che non è in controversia fra le parti che la demolizione dell'alloggio del richiedente ha corrisposto ad una “ privazione” di proprietà all'interno del significato della seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
40. Prima di affrontare la questione se la privazione riguardata era stata giustificata nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte nota all'inizio che il richiedente acquistò l'alloggio in questione dal suo precedente proprietario nel 1996, appellandosi a dei documenti tenuti dall'ufficio del registro fondiario. Quest’ultimo che è la sola autorità per la registrazione e il trasferimento del patrimonio immobiliare, ha gli emesso un atto di titolo , attestando il suo possesso della proprietà (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra). Secondo diritto nazionale e la pratica qualsiasi limitazione concernente simile proprietà deve essere annotata sul registro fondiario. I diritti di coloro che acquisiscono proprietà appellandosi ai documenti tenuti dal'ufficio del registro fondiario sono protetti da qualsiasi danno che è il risultato della custodia di quei documenti impegna la responsabilità dello Stato (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra).
41. Essendo così, non sembra che il richiedente abbia saputo o avrebbe dovuto sapere che l'alloggio era una costruzione illegale sotto il diritto nazionale poiché il registro fondiario non conteneva qualsiasi annotazione riguardo all'illegalità della costruzione e che limitava il suo trasferimento. Effettivamente, il Governo non contestò questo. Avendo acquistato così l'alloggio in buon fede ed avendo ottenuto un atto di titolo di proprietà, il richiedente pagò le tasse appropriate ed i doveri su questo. In altre parole, come possessore di un atto di titolo che attestava la sua proprietà dell'alloggio il richiedente aveva una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 senza qualsiasi restrizione, finché lui fu privato di questo dalle autorità locali.
42. Comunque, l'alloggio del richiedente fu demolito dalle autorità locali a seguito della decisione del Consiglio Amministrativo di Ankara e la sentenza dei tribunali nazionali per il motivo che era una costruzione illegale che poneva una minaccia alla salute pubblica e all'ambiente (vedere paragrafi 14 e 20 sopra).
43. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota che, benché non c'è disposizione nella Convenzione che riconosce la protezione generale per l'ambiente, ha riconosciuto che nella società odierna simile protezione è una considerazione in modo crescente importante (vedere Fredin c. Svezia (n. 1), sentenza del 18 febbraio 1991, Serie A n. 192, p. 16, § 48). In un numero di cause la Corte ha trattato inoltre, questioni simili e ha sottolineato l'importanza della protezione dell'ambiente (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Taşkın ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 46117/99, ECHR 2004-X; Moreno Gómez c. Spagna, n. 4143/02, ECHR 2004-X; Fadeyeva c. Russia, n. 55723/00, ECHR 2005-IV). Nella prospettiva di ciò che precede, ed avendo riguardo alle ragioni date dai tribunali nazionali, la Corte considera, che non è in controversia che il richiedente è stato privato della sua proprietà “nell'interesse pubblico”, vale a dire proteggere la salute pubblica e l'ambiente (vedere Lazaridi c. Grecia, n. 31282/04, § 34 13 luglio 2006). Ne segue che questa privazione di proprietà ha intrapreso uno scopo legittimo.
44. Occorre ora accertare se l'interferenza in oggetto ha previsto un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi del richiedente e quelli della società nell'insieme. Il diritto al risarcimento sotto la legislazione nazionale è attinente alla valutazione di se la misura contestata rispetta l'equilibrio equo richiesto e, in particolare, se impone un carico sproporzionato sul richiedente. A questo riguardo , la Corte prima ha sostenuto che una privazione di proprietà senza pagamento di un importo ragionevolmente riferito al suo valore costituirà normalmente un'interferenza sproporzionata, e che una mancanza totale di risarcimento può essere considerata giustificabile sotto Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente in circostanze eccezionali (vedere N.A. ed Altri c. la Turchia, n. 37451/97, § 41 ECHR 2005-X; Nastou c. la Grecia (n. 2), n. 16163/02, § 33 15 luglio 2005; Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 111 ECHR 2005-VI).
45. Nella presente causa, il richiedente non aveva nessuna prospettiva realistica di successo di ottenere il risarcimento per la privazione della sua proprietà, dato che i tribunali amministrativi sostennero l'ordine di demolizione del Consiglio Amministrativo di Ankara (vedere paragrafi 33 e 34 sopra). Così la mancanza di qualsiasi via di ricorso nazionale per riconoscere la compensazione del richiedente per la perdita dell’ alloggio ha danneggiato il suo pieno godimento del suo diritto alla proprietà. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che il Governo non ha citato alcuna circostanza eccezionale per giustificare la mancanza totale del risarcimento per quella privazione, anche se la legislazione nazionale conviene che lo Stato è responsabile per qualsiasi danno che è il risultato della custodia delle registrazioni sul registro fondiario (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra). Così, avendo riconosciuto il richiedente come il proprietario legale dell'alloggio in oggetto emettendo un atto di titolo di proprietà , la responsabilità delle autorità nazionali fu automaticamente impegnata per il danno subito dal richiedente come risultato della demolizione del suo alloggio.
46. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte considera, che l'insuccesso nell’ assegnare qualsiasi risarcimento al richiedente sconvolse, a suo danno l'equilibrio equo che doveva essere previsto fra la protezione della proprietà ed i requisiti dell'interesse generale (vedere N.A. ed Altri, citata sopra, § 42). C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. LA APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
47. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
48. Il richiedente chiese 57,977 lire turche (TRL) (approssimativamente 27,000 euro (EUR)) a riguardo del danno patrimoniale e TRL 100,000 (circa EUR 46,500) per danno non-patrimoniale per lo stress e l'ansia subito dalla sua famiglia. Lui non presentò nessuna rivendicazione a riguardo dei costi e delle spese.
49. Il Governo presentò che gli importi chiesti dal richiedente erano speculativi e non comprovati.
50. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione e deve essere riservata, avuto riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo fra lo Stato rispondente ed il richiedente.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva secondo l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale possono giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere per fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 24 novembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.