Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF IPTEH SA AND OTHERS v. MOLDOVA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 35367/08/2009
STATO: Moldova
DATA: 24/11/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF IPTEH SA AND OTHERS v. MOLDOVA
(Application no. 35367/08)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
24 November 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Ipteh SA and Others v. Moldova,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ledi Bianku,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 November 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 35367/08) against the Republic of Moldova lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by I. SA – a company incorporated in Moldova, W. Limited – a company incorporated in the United Kingdom, K. I. SA – a company incorporated in Romania and I. R. – a Romanian national, on 25 July 2008.
2. The applicants were represented by Ms J. Hanganu, a lawyer practising in Chişinău. The Moldovan Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr V. Grosu.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that they had been the victims of unfair civil proceedings and arbitrary deprivation of property.
4. On 9 October 2008 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. On the same date the Romanian and the United Kingdom Governments were informed of their right to intervene in the proceedings in accordance with Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1(b), but they did not communicate any wish to avail themselves of this right. It was decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3). It was also decided, under Rule 54 § 2 (c) of the Rules of Court, to grant the case priority under Rule 41 of the same Rules.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The first applicant, I. SA, is a company incorporated in Moldova. The other applicants are W. Limited (“the second applicant company”) – a company incorporated in the United Kingdom and holder of 35.29% of the shares of the first applicant; K. I. SA (“the third applicant company”) – a company incorporated in Romania and holder of 49.63% of the shares of the first applicant; and I. R. (“the fourth applicant”) – a Romanian national born in 1962, living in Iaşi and holder of 11.72% of the shares of the first applicant company.
6. At the end of the 1990s, I. SA and a third company, I., were owners of a six-floor building located on the main boulevard of Chişinău (“the building”). Both companies were State-owned and had as their only asset different parts of the building.
7. In 1999 the State decided to privatise the companies and sold their shares to a private company, U.
8. In 2000 and 2001 the new owner of the companies transferred all parts of the building to the first applicant company.
9. Also in 2000 the former director of the first applicant company challenged the privatisation in the courts. However, his action was dismissed by a final judgment of the Economic Court of the Republic of Moldova of 11 July 2000, the courts having found that the privatisation had been legal in all respects.
10. In July 2001 the fourth applicant bought 141,772 shares in the first applicant company.
11. In August 2001 the second applicant company bought the rest of the shares of the first applicant company.
12. In August 2006 the first applicant company issued 510,000 new shares and sold them to the third applicant company.
13. On an unspecified date in 2002 the Prime Minister requested the Prosecutor General's Office to conduct an investigation into the lawfulness of the privatisation. On 17 February 2002 the Prosecutor General informed the Prime Minister that he had verified the lawfulness of the privatisation and had found it to be “in strict compliance with the legislation in force”. The Prosecutor General also informed the Prime Minister that the lawfulness of the privatisation had been thoroughly verified during the proceedings ending with the final judgment of 11 July 2000.
14. On an unspecified date in 2003 the President of Moldova requested the Prosecutor General's Office to examine the possibility of challenging the privatisation of 1999. In a letter of 26 June 2003 the Prosecutor General informed President V. Voronin that the transaction had been lawful and that there were no grounds to challenge it. Moreover, he indicated that after the entry into force of the new Code of Civil Procedure on 12 June 2003 it had become impossible to bring an appeal in cassation against the final judgment of 11 July 2000.
15. On 19 April 2007 the Prosecutor General's Office instituted proceedings on behalf of the State in which it contested the lawfulness of the 1999 privatisation of the first applicant company and of company I. on the ground that two Government regulations concerning the sale of State- owned shares had been breached. In particular, the Prosecutor argued that the size of the down payment made by company U. was smaller than the one provided in the regulations and that the final price offered for the shares had been too low. The Prosecutor relied on Article 50 of the Civil Code as a legal basis for his action (see paragraph 16 below). As a consequence of the alleged illegality of the privatisation, the Prosecutor's Office also sought the annulment of all the subsequent transfers and issues of shares as a result of which the second, third and fourth applicants had become shareholders of the first applicant company.
16. The applicants opposed the action and argued, inter alia, that it was time-barred and contrary to the principle of legal certainty. They submitted that the provision of Article 86 of the old Civil Code exonerating the Prosecutor from observing the three-year time-limit when lodging actions in the interest of the State was contrary to Article 6 of the Convention and made reference to Dacia SRL v. Moldova (no. 3052/04, 18 March 2008). They also submitted that the lawfulness of the privatisation had been confirmed by a final judgment of 11 July 2000 with the power of res judicata and that they were bona fide buyers who had been discriminated against with respect to other companies which had obtained State property in similar conditions and whose privatisations had not been contested later by the State. They also challenged the presiding judge on grounds of lack of impartiality and argued that in the proceedings which had ended with the final judgment of 11 July 2000 he had been successfully challenged on such grounds. However, the challenge was dismissed.
17. On 10 June 2008 the Chişinău Economic Court ruled in favour of the Prosecutor General's Office in the absence of the third and fourth applicants, who had not been summoned. The court dismissed the applicants' objection concerning the existence of a final judgment of 11 July 2000. The court did not dispute the applicants' submission that the proceedings of 2000 had had a similar subject matter; however, it dismissed the objection on the ground that that judgment had been adopted in proceedings in which the Prosecutor General's Office had not been involved. The court also dismissed the applicants' objection concerning the Statute of Limitations, arguing that according to Article 86 of the Civil Code an action by the Prosecutors in the interest of the State could not be time-barred.
18. The applicants appealed on the basis of the same arguments which were put before the first-instance court. They also complained that not all of them had had the possibility to take part in the proceedings and that the judge had lacked impartiality.
19. On 28 August 2008 the Supreme Court of Justice heard the applicants' appeal. During the proceedings, the applicants challenged judge N.M. from the panel and expressed doubts as to the manner in which the President of the Supreme Court, Judge I.M., had composed the panel. On the same day, the Supreme Court dismissed the appeal and upheld the judgment of the first-instance court.
20. The Supreme Court relied on provisions of the old Civil Code in order to dismiss the applicants' objection concerning their status as good faith buyers. In particular, the court argued that according to the old Civil Code property obtained unlawfully from the State could be claimed back irrespective of the fact that it had been obtained by a bona fide buyer. However, when examining the problem of the Statute of Limitations, the Supreme Court agreed with the applicants' objection concerning Article 86 of the old Civil Code (see paragraph 16 above). Nonetheless, the court stated for the first time in the proceedings that since the Prosecutor had introduced his action after the entry into force of the new Civil Code, the rules concerning limitations in time contained in that Code should apply. The Supreme Court expressed the opinion that the Prosecutor's action concerned the declaration of the absolute nullity of the privatisation and that therefore, in accordance with the provisions of Article 217 of the new Civil Code, it could not be limited in time. The Supreme Court also dismissed the objection concerning the existence of a final judgment in respect of the same problem on the same grounds as the first-instance court and dismissed the objection concerning the non-participation of some of the applicants in the proceedings.
21. On 3 October 2008, the Government decided to privatise the building again and an auction for the sale of the building was scheduled for 5 November 2008. It appears that the building was not sold on that date and the Court has no information as to the subsequent development of the events.
22. It does not appear from the facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, that the applicants have been repaid the value of their initial investment.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
23. The relevant provisions of the Civil Code, in force at the moment of the privatisation, provide:
“Article 50. Nullity of contracts that are not in conformity with the law
A contract which is contrary to the law shall be null and void ...
When a contract is declared null and void, each party must return to the other party everything received from it on the basis of the contract ...
Article 74
The general limitation period for protection through a court action of the rights of a [natural] person is three years; it is one year for lawsuits between State organisations, collective farms and any other social organisations.
Article 78
The competent court ... shall apply the limitation period whether or not the parties request such application.
Article 83
Expiry of the limitation period prior to initiation of court proceedings constitutes a ground for rejecting the claim.
If the competent court ... finds that the action has not commenced within the limitation period for well-founded reasons, the right in question shall be protected.
Article 86
The limitation period does not apply:
...
(2) to claims by State organisations regarding restitution of State property found in the unlawful possession of ... other organisations ... and of citizens;”.
24. The relevant provisions of the new Civil Code, in force after 12 June 2003, read as follows:
“Article 6. The action in time of the civil law
(1) The civil law does not have a retroactive character. It cannot modify or suppress the conditions in which a prior legal situation was constituted or the conditions in which such a legal situation was extinguished. The new law cannot alter or abolish the already created effects of a legal situation which has extinguished or is in the process of execution.
Article 217. The absolute nullity of a legal act
(1) The absolute nullity of a legal act can be invoked by any person having an interest. The court can invoke it on its own motion...
(3) An action to declare the absolute nullity is not limited in time.”
25. In a judgment of 20 April 2005 (case nr. 2ra-563/05) the Supreme Court of Justice dismissed the plaintiff's contentions based on the provisions of the new Civil Code on the ground that the facts of the case related to a period before the entry into force of the new Civil Code and that, therefore, the provisions of the old Civil Code were applicable.
THE LAW
26. The applicants complained that the proceedings were unfair, contrary to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which in so far as relevant provides:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair hearing ... by a tribunal ....”
27. The applicants also complained that their rights as guaranteed under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention had been violated as a result of the outcome of the proceedings. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
I. ADMISSIBILITY OF THE COMPLAINTS
28. The Court considers that the applicants' complaints raise questions of fact and law which are sufficiently serious that their determination should depend on an examination of the merits, and no other grounds for declaring them inadmissible have been established. The Court therefore declares the application admissible. In accordance with its decision to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention (see paragraph 4 above), the Court will immediately consider its merits.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
29. The applicants submitted that the proceedings were unfair because the domestic courts had failed to apply the Statute of Limitations in accordance with the provisions of the old Civil Code. As a result, the Prosecutor General was able to successfully challenge the privatisation after almost eight years in disregard of the principle enunciated in Article 6 of the new Civil Code (see paragraph 24 above). Moreover, the applicants stated that the case-law of the Supreme Court of Justice was contradictory regarding the interpretation and application of the Statute of Limitations.
30. According to the applicants, the principle of legal certainty was also breached by the domestic courts because they failed to take into consideration the fact that a similar challenge to the lawfulness of the privatisation had already been dismissed by a final judgment of 11 July 2000. The applicants finally argued that the proceedings had been unfair also because not all of the applicants had had the possibility to participate in them and to defend their rights and because the judges who examined the case had not been independent and impartial.
31. The Government argued that according to Article 217 § 1 of the new Civil Code, the absolute nullity of an act can be invoked by any person without any limitation in time. According to them, the absolute nullity of the privatisation was an essential premise for the admission of the Prosecutor General's action and the upholding of those actions after the expiry of the general time-limit did not breach the principles of fairness guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention. The Government also rebutted the applicants' contention about the lack of independence and impartiality of the judges involved in the proceedings and that the courts should have paid attention to the judgment of 11 July 2000.
32. The Court refers to its previous case-law in which it has stated that the observance of admissibility requirements for carrying out procedural acts is an important aspect of the right to a fair trial. The role played by limitation periods is of major importance when interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which, in its relevant part, declares the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States (see Dacia SRL v. Moldova, no. 3052/04, § 75, 18 March 2008).
33. The Court reiterates that it is not its task to take the place of the domestic courts in interpreting domestic legislation. It is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to resolve problems of interpretation. This applies in particular to the interpretation by courts of rules of a procedural nature such as the prescribed time-limit for instituting court actions. The Court's role is confined to ascertaining whether the effects of such an interpretation are compatible with the Convention in general and with the principle of legal certainty, guaranteed by its Article 6, in particular (see, mutatis mutandis, Platakou v. Greece, no. 38460/97, § 37, ECHR 2001-I).
34. In the present case the Court notes that the time-limit for challenging the privatisation of 1999 provided for by the Civil Code in force at the material time expired in 2002. This was indirectly confirmed by the Supreme Court of Justice, which accepted the applicants' objection concerning Article 86 of the old Civil Code (see paragraph 20 above). Nevertheless, the Supreme Court of Justice chose not to dismiss the Prosecutor General's action in accordance with the provisions of the old Civil Code but to apply the provisions of the new Civil Code, which entered into force in 2003, that is, approximately one year after the expiry of the time-limit.
35. The Court does not contest the State's power to enact new legislation regulating time-limits in civil proceedings. However, it does not follow, as the Government argue, that it is compatible with the Convention to apply those new rules in a manner which would unsettle legal situations which have become final due to the application of the limitation period before the enactment of such legislation. To admit the contrary would amount to admitting that a State is free to disregard a time-limit and challenge a final legal situation simply by making use of its power to enact new legislation after the expiry of the time-limit in question. The Court notes that the above conclusion appears to be consistent with Article 6 of the new Civil Code which states that the new Code cannot have retroactive effect and cannot “modify or suppress the conditions in which a prior legal situation was constituted or the conditions in which such a legal situation was extinguished”.
36. In the light of the above and having regard in particular to the acceptance by the Supreme Court that there were no compelling circumstances such as those foreseen in Article 86 of the old Civil Code for displacing the three year limitation period, the Court considers that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention as a result of the upholding, in breach of the principle of legal certainty, of the Prosecutor General's action for the annulment of the privatisation. In the circumstances, the Court does not consider it necessary to examine, additionally, whether other aspects of the proceedings did or did not comply with that provision.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
37. The applicants complained that the judgments by which the Prosecutor General's action for annulment of the privatisation was upheld had had the effect of infringing their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions as secured by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The Government disputed the applicants' contention and argued that the privatisation of 1999 had been carried out with serious breaches of the legislation and that, therefore, there has been no breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
38. The Court considers that the applicants had a “possession” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court found in paragraph 36 above that the upholding of the Prosecutor General's action after the expiry of the general time-limit, and in the absence of any compelling reasons, was incompatible with the principle of legal certainty. In such circumstances the Court cannot but find that the upholding of the Prosecutor General's actions constituted an unjustified interference with the applicants' right to property, because a fair balance was not preserved and the applicants were required to bear and continue to bear an individual and excessive burden (see, mutatis mutandis, Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, §§ 75-80, ECHR 1999-VII). As in Dacia SRL (cited above), the domestic courts did not provide any justification whatsoever for such interference. It follows that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
39. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
40. The applicants submitted that since they had encountered difficulties in obtaining all the necessary documents, they were unable to present any observations concerning just satisfaction. Accordingly, they asked the Court to reserve the question of just satisfaction.
41. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the further procedure fixed with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Moldovan Government and the applicants.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of the breach of the principle of legal certainty;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine separately the applicants' other complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention;
5. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision and accordingly
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Moldovan Government and the applicants to submit, within the forthcoming three months, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 24 November 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA IPTEH SA ED ALTRI C. MOLDAVIA
(Richiesta n. 35367/08)
SENTENZA
(i meriti)
STRASBOURG
24 novembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Ipteh SA ed Altri c. Moldavia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ledi Bianku, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 3 novembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 35367/08) contro la Repubblica della Moldavia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da I. SA-una società incorporata in Moldavia, W. L. -una società incorporata nel Regno Unito, K. I. SA-una società incorporata in Romania ed I. R.- un cittadino rumeno, il 25 luglio 2008.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dalla Sig.ra J. H., un avvocato che pratica a Chişinău. Il Governo moldavo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. V. Grosu.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, di essere state le vittime di procedimenti civili ingiusti e della privazione arbitraria di proprietà.
4. Il 9 ottobre 2008 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Nella stessa data i Governi rumeno ed il Regno Unito furono informati del loro diritto ad intervenire nei procedimenti in conformità con l’ Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 44 § 1(b), ma non comunicarono nessun desiderio di giovarsi di questo diritto. Fu deciso di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3). Fu deciso anche, sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2 (c) dell’Ordinamento di Corte, di accordare la priorità di causa sotto l’ Articolo 41 degli stessi Articoli.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. La prima richiedente, I. SA è una società incorporata in Moldavia. Gli altri richiedenti sono W. Limited (“la seconda società richiedente”)-una società incorporata nel Regno Unito e detentrice del 35.29% delle quote della prima richiedente; K. I. SA (“la terza società richiedente”)-una società incorporata in Romania e detentrice del 49.63% delle quote della prima richiedente; ed I. R. (“il quarto richiedente”)-un cittadino rumeno nato nel 1962, che vive a Iaşi e detentore dell’ 11.72% delle quote della prima società richiedente.
6. Alla fine degli anni novanta, I. SA ed una terza società, I., era proprietari di un edificio di sei- piani situato sul viale principale di Chişinău (“l'edificio”). Ambo le società erano Statali ed avevano come loro asset solo differenti parti dell'edificio.
7. Nel 1999 lo Stato decise di privatizzare le società e vendette le loro quote ad una società privata, U.
8. Nel 2000 e 2001 il nuovo proprietario delle società trasferì tutte le parti dell'edificio alla prima società richiedente.
9. Anche nel 2000 il precedente direttore della prima società richiedente impugnò la privatizzazione presso i tribunali. Comunque, la sua azione fu respinta con una sentenza definitiva della Corte Economica della Repubblica della Moldavia dell’ 11 luglio 2000, avendo trovato i tribunali che la privatizzazione era stata legale in tutti i suoi aspetti.
10. Nel luglio 2001 il quarto richiedente comprò 141,772 quote nella prima società richiedente.
11. Nell’ agosto 2001 la seconda società richiedente comprò il resto delle quote della prima società richiedente.
12. Nell’ agosto 2006 la prima società richiedente emise 510,000 nuove quote e le vendette alla terza società richiedente.
13. In una data non specificata nel 2002 il Primo Ministro richiese all'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale di condurre un'indagine a riguardo della legalità della privatizzazione. Il 17 febbraio 2002 il Procuratore Generale informò il Primo Ministro di aver verificato la legalità della privatizzazione e l'aveva trovata “in stretta ottemperanza con la legislazione vigente.” Il Procuratore Generale informò anche il Primo Ministro che la legalità della privatizzazione era stata completamente verificata durante i procedimenti che terminarono con la sentenza definitiva dell’ 11 luglio 2000.
14. In una data non specificata nel 2003 il Presidente della Moldavia richiese all'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale di esaminare la possibilità di impugnare la privatizzazione del 1999. In una lettera del 26 giugno 2003 Il Procuratore Generale informò Presidente V. Voronin che l'operazione era stata legale e che non c'erano nessun motivo per impugnarla. Inoltre, lui indicò che dopo l'entrata in vigore del nuovo Codice di Procedura Civile il 12 giugno 2003 era divenuto impossibile introdurre un ricorso in cassazione contro la sentenza definitiva dell’ 11 luglio 2000.
15. Il 19 aprile 2007 l'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale avviò procedimenti a favore dello Stato nel quale contestò la legalità della privatizzazione del 1999 della prima società richiedente e della società I. sulla base che due regolamentazioni Statali riguardo alla vendita di società possedute dallo Stato erano state violate. In particolare, Il Procuratore dibatté che l’entità del pagamento immediato fatto dalla società U. era più piccola di quella prevista nelle regolamentazioni e che il prezzo definitivo offerto per le quote era stato troppo basso. Il Procuratore si appellò all’ Articolo 50 del Codice civile come base legale per la sua azione (vedere paragrafo 16 sotto). Come conseguenza dell'illegalità addotta della privatizzazione, l'Ufficio del Procuratore chiese anche l'annullamento di tutti i susseguenti trasferimenti ed emissioni di quote come risultato di cui il secondo, il terzo e il quarto richiedente erano divenuti azionisti della prima società richiedente.
16. I richiedenti si opposero all'azione e dibatterono, inter alia che era vincolata dal tempo e contraria al principio di certezza legale. Loro presentarono che la disposizione dell’ Articolo 86 del vecchio Codice civile che esonerava il Procuratore dall'osservare il tempo-limite dei tre- anni nel depositare le azioni nell'interesse dello Stato era contrario all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e fece riferimento a Dacia SRL c. Moldavia (n. 3052/04, 18 marzo 2008). Loro presentarono anche che la legalità della privatizzazione era stata confermata da una sentenza definitiva dell’ 11 luglio 2000 col potere di res judicata e che loro erano acquirenti in buona fede che erano stati discriminati in confronto ad altre società che avevano ottenuto la proprietà Statale in condizioni simili e le cui privatizzazioni non erano state contestate più tardi dallo Stato. Loro impugnarono anche il giudice che presiedeva sulla base di mancanza d'imparzialità e dibatterono che nei procedimenti che erano terminati con la sentenza definitiva dell’ 11 luglio 2000 era stato impugnato con successo per simili motivi. Comunque, la richiesta fu respinta.
17. Il 10 giugno 2008 la Corte Economica di Chişinău ha deciso a favore dell'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale in assenza del terzo e del quarto richiedente che non erano stati chiamati in causa. La corte respinse l'eccezione dei richiedenti riguardo all'esistenza di una sentenza definitiva dell’ 11 luglio 2000. La corte non contestò l'osservazione dei richiedenti che i procedimenti del 2000 avevano avuto un argomento simile; comunque, respinse l'eccezione sulla base che questa sentenza era stata adottata in procedimenti nei quali non era stato coinvolto l'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale. La corte respinse anche l'eccezione dei richiedenti riguardo alla Prescrizione, dibattendo che secondo l’Articolo 86 del Codice civile un'azione dei Procuratori nell'interesse dello Stato non poteva essere vincolata dal tempo.
18. I richiedenti fecero appello sulla base degli stessi argomenti che furono esposti di fronte alla corte di prima -istanza. Loro si lamentarono anche che non tutti loro avevano avuto la possibilità di prendere parte ai procedimenti e che al giudice era mancata l'imparzialità.
19. Il 28 agosto 2008 la Corte di giustizia Suprema ascoltò il ricorso dei richiedenti. Durante i procedimenti, i richiedenti impugnarono il giudice N.M. dal pannello ed espressero dubbi riguardo al modo in cui il Presidente della Corte Suprema, Giudice I.M., aveva composto il pannello. Nello stesso giorno, la Corte Suprema respinse il ricorso e sostenne la sentenza della corte di prima -istanza.
20. La Corte Suprema si appellò alle disposizioni del vecchio Codice civile per respingere l'eccezione dei richiedenti concernente il loro status come acquirenti in buona fede. In particolare, la corte dibatté che secondo il vecchio Codice civile la proprietà ottenuta illegalmente dallo Stato avrebbe potuta essere rivendicata posteriormente a prescindere dal fatto che era stata ottenuto da un acquirente in bona fide. Comunque, esaminando il problema della Prescrizione, la Corte Suprema si confece con l'eccezione dei richiedenti riguardo all’ Articolo 86 del vecchio Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra). Nondimeno, la corte affermò per la prima volta nei procedimenti che poiché il Procuratore aveva introdotto la sua azione dopo l'entrata in vigore del nuovo Codice civile, gli articoli riguardo alla limitazioni del tempo contenute in quel Codice avrebbero dovuto essere applicate. La Corte Suprema espresse l'opinione che l'azione del Procuratore riguardava la dichiarazione della nullità assoluta della privatizzazione e che in conformità con le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 217 del Codice nuovo civile, non poteva essere limitata perciò, nel tempo. La Corte Suprema respinse anche l'eccezione riguardo all'esistenza di una sentenza definitiva a riguardo dello stesso problema per gli stessi motivi della corte di prima -istanza e respinse l'eccezione riguardo alla non-partecipazione di alcuni dei richiedenti nei procedimenti.
21. Il 3 ottobre 2008, il Governo decise di privatizzare di nuovo l'edificio ed una vendita all'asta per la vendita dell'edificio fu stabilita per il 5 novembre 2008. Sembra che l'edificio non è stato venduto in quella data e la Corte non ha informazioni in merito al susseguente sviluppo degli eventi.
22. Non sembra dai fatti della causa, come presentati dalle parti, che i richiedenti sono stati rimborsati del valore del loro investimento iniziale.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
23. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice civile, in vigore al momento della privatizzazione prevedono:
“Articolo 50. La nullità dei contratti che non sono in conformità con la legge
Un contratto che è contrario alla legge sarà privo di valore legale...
Quando un contratto è dichiarato privo di valore legale, ogni parte deve restituire all'altra parte tutto ciò che ha ricevuto da questa sulla base del contratto...
Articolo 74
Il termine di prescrizione generale per la protezione tramite un'azione di tribunale dei diritti di una persona [fisica] è di tre anni; è un anno per i processi fra organizzazioni Statali, fattorie collettive e qualsiasi altre organizzazioni sociali.
Articolo 78
La corte competente... applicherà il termine di prescrizione se le parti richiedono o meno tale applicazione .
Articolo 83
La scadenza del termine di prescrizione prima dell’inizio degli atti del tribunale costituisce una base per respingere la rivendicazione.
Se la corte competente... costata che l'azione non è cominciato all'interno del termine di prescrizione per ragioni fondate, il diritto in oggetto sarà protetto.
Articolo 86
Il termine di prescrizione non si applica:
...
(2) a rivendicazioni da parte di organizzazioni Statali riguardo alla restituzione di proprietà Statale trovata nella proprietà illegale di... altre organizzazioni... e di cittadini;.”
24. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice nuovo civile, in vigore dopo il 12 giugno 2003, si leggono come segue:
“Articolo 6. L'azione in tempo del diritto civile
(1) il diritto civile non ha un carattere retroattivo. Non può cambiare o non può sopprimere le condizioni nelle quali fu costituita una situazione legale precedente o le condizioni nelle quali fu estinta tale situazione legale. La nuova legge non può alterare o non può abolire gli effetti già creati da una situazione legale che si è estinta o che è nel processo di esecuzione.
Articolo 217. La nullità assoluta di un atto legale
(1) la nullità assoluta di un atto legale può essere invocata da qualsiasi persona che ha un interesse. La corte può invocarla di sua propria iniziativa...
(3) un'azione per dichiarare la nullità assoluta non è limitata nel tempo.”
25. In una sentenza del 20 aprile 2005 (nr della causa. 2ra-563/05) la Corte di giustizia Suprema respinse le contese del querelante basate sulle disposizioni del Codice nuovo civile sulla base che i fatti della causa facevano riferimento ad un periodo prima dell'entrata in vigore del Codice nuovo civile e che, perciò, le disposizioni del vecchio Codice civile erano applicabili.
LA LEGGE
26. I richiedenti si lamentarono che i procedimenti erano ingiusti, contrari all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che nella parte attinente prevede:
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ad ognuno viene concesso un'udienza corretta... da parte di un tribunale....”
27. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche che i loro diritti come garantiti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione erano stati violati come conseguenza del risultato dei procedimenti. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
I. AMMISSIBILITÀ DELLE AZIONI DI RECLAMO
28. La Corte considera che le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti pongono questioni di fatto e diritto che sono sufficientemente serie la cui determinazione dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei meriti, e non è stato stabilito nessun altro motivo per dichiararle inammissibili. La Corte dichiara perciò la richiesta ammissibile. In conformità con la sua decisione di applicare l’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 4 sopra), la Corte considererà immediatamente i suoi meriti.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
29. I richiedenti presentarono che i procedimenti erano ingiusti perché i tribunali nazionali erano andati a vuoto nell’applicare la Prescrizione in conformità con le disposizioni del vecchio Codice civile. Di conseguenza, Il Procuratore Generale è stato in grado impugnare con successo la privatizzazione dopo pressoché otto anni nella noncuranza del principio enunciato nell’ Articolo 6 del Codice nuovo civile (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). Inoltre, i richiedenti affermarono che la giurisprudenza della Corte di giustizia Suprema era contraddittoria riguardo all'interpretazione e l’applicazione della Prescrizione.
30. Secondo i richiedenti, il principio di certezza legale fu violato anche dai tribunali nazionali perché loro non riuscirono a prendere in esame il fatto che una mozione riguardo alla legalità della privatizzazione era già stata respinta da una sentenza definitiva dell’ 11 luglio 2000. I richiedenti infine dibatterono che i procedimenti erano stati anche ingiusti perché non tutti i richiedenti avevano avuto la possibilità di partecipare e difendere i loro diritti e perché i giudici che esaminarono la causa non erano stati indipendenti ed imparziali.
31. Il Governo dibatté che secondo l’Articolo 217 § 1 del Codice nuovo civile, la nullità assoluta di un atto può essere invocata da qualsiasi persona senza qualsiasi limitazione nel tempo. Secondo lui, la nullità assoluta della privatizzazione era una premessa essenziale per l'ammissione dell'azione del Procuratore Generale ed sostenere quelle azioni dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite generale non ha violato i principi d'equità garantiti dall’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Il Governo rifiutò anche la contesa dei richiedenti della mancanza d'indipendenza e d'imparzialità dei giudici coinvolti nei procedimenti e che i tribunali avrebbero dovuto dare retta alla sentenza dell’ 11 luglio 2000.
32. La Corte si riferisce alla sua giurisprudenza precedente nella quale ha affermato che l'osservanza dei requisiti di ammissibilità per eseguire atti procedurali è un importante aspetto del diritto ad un processo equanime. Il ruolo giocato dai termini di prescrizione è d'importanza notevole quando interpretata alla luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, dichiara la preminenza del diritto come parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti (vedere Dacia SRL c. Moldavia, n. 3052/04, § 75 del 18 marzo 2008).
33. La Corte reitera che non è il suo compito succedere all'interpretare legislazione nazionale. Spetta primariamente alle autorità nazionali, in particolare ai tribunali, chiarire i problemi di interpretazione. Questo si applica in particolare all'interpretazione da parte dei tribunali degli articoli di una natura procedurale riguardo al tempo-limite prescritto per avviare azioni di corte. Il ruolo della Corte è confinato all’accertamento se gli effetti di tale interpretazione sono compatibili con la Convenzione in generale e col principio della certezza legale garantiti, in particolare, dal suo Articolo 6, (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Platakou c. Grecia, n. 38460/97, § 37 ECHR 2001-I).
34. Nella presente causa la Corte nota che il tempo-limite per impugnare la privatizzazione del 1999 previsto dal Codice civile in vigore al tempo attinente è scaduto nel 2002. Questo fu confermato indirettamente dalla Corte di giustizia Suprema che accettò l'eccezione dei richiedenti riguardo all’Articolo 86 del vecchio Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Ciononostante, la Corte di giustizia Suprema scelse di non respingere l'azione del Procuratore Generale in conformità con le disposizioni del vecchio Codice civile ma di applicare le disposizioni del nuovo Codice civile che entrò in vigore nel 2003 cioè approssimativamente un anno dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite.
35. La Corte non contesta il potere dello Stato di decretare una nuova legislazione tempo-limiti che regoli i procedimenti civili. Comunque, non segue, come il Governo dibatte, che è compatibile con la Convenzione applicare quei nuovi articoli in una maniera che sconvolgerebbe delle situazioni legali che sono divenute definitive a causa dell’applicazione del termine di prescrizione prima della promulgazione di simile legislazione. Ammettere il contrario corrisponderebbe ad ammettere che un Stato è libero di trascurare un tempo-limite ed impugnare una situazione definitiva legale semplicemente avvalendosi del suo potere per decretare una nuova legislazione dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite in oggetto. La Corte nota che la conclusione sopra sembra essere coerente con l’Articolo 6 del Codice nuovo civile che enuncia che il Codice nuovo non può avere effetto retroattivo e non può “cambiare o sopprimere le condizioni nelle quali fu costituita una precedente situazione legale o le condizioni nelle quali fu estinta tale situazione legale.”
36. Alla luce di quanto sopra ed avendo riguardo in particolare all'accettazione della Corte Suprema che non c'erano circostanze coercitive come quelle previste nell’ Articolo 86 del vecchio Codice civile per spostare il termine di prescrizione dei tre anni, la Corte considera, che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione come risultato del sostenere, in violazione del principio della certezza legale, l'azione del Procuratore Generale per l'annullamento della privatizzazione. Nelle circostanze, la Corte non considera necessario esaminare, inoltre, se gli altri aspetti dei procedimenti si attennero o meno a quella disposizione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
37. I richiedenti si lamentarono che le sentenze con le quali fu sostenuta l'azione di annullamento del Procuratore Generale della privatizzazione avevano avuto come effetto di infrangere il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà come dall’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Il Governo contestò la contesa dei richiedenti e dibatté che la privatizzazione del 1999 era stata eseguita con violazioni serie della legislazione e che, non c'è stata perciò, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
38. La Corte considera che i richiedenti avevano una “proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte ha trovato nel paragrafo 36 sopra che il sostenere l'azione delIProcuratore Generale dopo la scadenza del tempo-limite generale, e in assenza di qualsiasi ragione impellente, era incompatibile col principio di certezza legale. In simili circostanze la Corte non può che costatare che il sostenere le azioni del Procuratore Generale ha costituito un'interferenza ingiustificata col diritto dei richiedenti alla proprietà, perché un equilibrio equo non fu preservato ed ai richiedenti fu richiesto di sopportare e continuare a sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, §§ 75-80 ECHR 1999-VII). Come in Dacia SRL (citata sopra), i tribunali nazionali non previdero nessuna giustificazione per simile interferenza. Ne segue che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
39. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
40. I richiedenti presentarono che poiché loro avevano incontrato delle difficoltà nell'ottenere tutti i documenti necessari, erano incapaci di presentare qualsiasi osservazione concernente la soddisfazione equa. Di conseguenza, chiesero alla Corte di riservare la questione della soddisfazione equa.
41. La Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione. La questione di conseguenza deve essere riservata e l'ulteriore procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo alla possibilità dell’ accordo al quale il Governo Moldavi ed i richiedenti potrebbero giungere.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a causa della violazione del principio della certezza legale;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare separatamente le altre azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per una decisione e di conseguenza
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo Moldavo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro i tre mesi successivi le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 24 novembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.