Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SULJAGIC v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 34, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 27912/02/2009
STATO: Bosnia Herzegovina
DATA: 03/11/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection dismissed (victim) ; Violation of P1-1 ; Non-pecuniary damage - award ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF SULJAGIĆ v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
(Application no. 27912/02)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
3 November 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Suljagić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ledi Bianku,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 13 October 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 27912/02) against Bosnia and Herzegovina lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mr M. S. (“the applicant”), on 2 July 2002.
2. The applicant alleged that the domestic legislation on “old” foreign-currency savings failed to strike a “fair balance” between the relevant interests in the light of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
3. By a decision of 20 June 2006 the Court joined to the merits the question of the applicant's victim status and declared the application admissible.
4. The applicant and the Government each filed further written observations (Rule 59 § 1). In addition, third-party comments were received from two associations, the Association for the Protection of Foreign-Currency Savers in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Udruženje za zaštitu deviznih štediša u Bosni i Hercegovini) from the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Association for the Return of Foreign-Currency Savings in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Diaspora (Udruženje građana za povrat stare devizne štednje u Bosni i Hercegovini i dijaspori) from the Republika Srpska, which had been invited to intervene in the written procedure (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 2). The parties replied to each other's observations and the third parties' comments at the hearing (Rule 44 § 5).
5. A hearing took place in public in the Human Rights Building, Strasbourg, on 10 March 2009 (Rule 59 § 3).
There appeared before the Court:
(a) for the Government
Ms M. Mijić, Agent,
Ms Z. Ibrahimović, Deputy Agent,
Ms B. Kujundžić, Assistant Agent,
Mr A. Džombić, Minister of Finance of the Republika Srpska,
Ms D. Aleksić, Assistant Minister of Finance of the Republika Srpska,
Mr T. Ćurak, Assistant Minister of Finance of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Mr E. Kubat, Adviser to Minister of Finance of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina,
Mr M. Lučić, Director for Finance of the Brčko District of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Advisers;
(b) for the applicant
Mr E. Suljagić, Counsel,
Mr S. Imamović, Assistant Counsel.
The Court heard addresses by Mr Suljagić and Ms Mijić.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Relevant background to the present case
6. The present case relates to the issue of “old” foreign-currency deposits (foreign currency deposited before the dissolution of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia – “the SFRY”).
7. Until the 1989/90 economic reforms (the so-called Marković reforms, named after the then Prime Minister Ante Marković), the commercial banking system of the SFRY consisted of self-managed basic and associated banks. Basic banks, founded and nominally controlled by socially owned enterprises, carried on day-to-day commercial banking activities. Two or more basic banks could form an associated bank through a self-management agreement, while preserving their legal personality. In the SFRY, there were more than 150 basic banks and nine associated banks (namely Jugobanka Beograd, Beogradska udružena banka Beograd, Vojvođanska banka Novi Sad, Kosovska banka Priština, Udružena banka Hrvatske Zagreb, Ljubljanska banka Ljubljana, Privredna banka Sarajevo, Stopanska banka Skopje and Investiciona banka Titograd).
8. Hard-pressed for hard currency as it was, the SFRY made it attractive for its expatriate workers and other citizens to deposit their foreign currency with commercial banks based in the SFRY: such deposits earned high interest (the annual interest rate often exceeded 10%) and were guaranteed by the State (see, for example, section 14(3) of the Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 19851 and section 76(1) of the Banks and Other Financial Institutions Act 19892).
9. The Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 19773 introduced a system for redepositing of foreign currency by commercial banks with the National Bank of Yugoslavia. Although the system was optional, it allowed commercial banks to shift the currency risk to the State and practically all foreign currency was thus redeposited. In addition, the National Bank of Yugoslavia was required to grant national-currency loans (initially, interest-free) to commercial banks to the value of the redeposited foreign currency. It should be underlined, however, that such redepositing was as a rule only a paper transaction, because commercial banks had insufficient liquid funds: it would appear that commercial banks redeposited in total 12.2 billion United States dollars (USD), out of which only USD 1.7 billion (approximately 14%) was actually transferred to the National Bank of Yugoslavia (see Kovačić and Others v. Slovenia [GC], nos. 44574/98, 45133/98 and 48316/99, §§ 36 and 39, ECHR 2008-...; see also decision AP 164/04 of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 1 April 2006, § 53). In 1988 the system of redeposits was brought to an end (see section 103 of the Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 1985, as amended on 15 October 1988).
10. Problems resulting from the foreign and domestic debt of the SFRY caused a monetary crisis in the 1980s. The national economy was on the verge of collapse and the SFRY resorted to emergency measures, such as statutory restrictions on the repayment of foreign-currency deposits (see section 71 of the Foreign-Currency Transactions Act 1985). As a result, foreign-currency deposits were practically frozen.
11. Within the framework of the Marković reforms, the SFRY abolished the system of basic and associated banks described above. This shift in the banking regulations allowed some basic banks to opt for an independent status, while other basic banks became branches (without legal personality) of the associated banks to which they had beforehand belonged.
12. Some important features of the banking system remained, however, unaffected by the reforms. First of all, commercial banks remained under the regime of “social ownership” – a concept which, while it does exist in other countries, was particularly highly developed in the SFRY. Secondly, both commercial banks and the State had financial obligations arising from foreign-currency savings: depositors were entitled to collect their deposits at any time, together with accumulated interest, from commercial banks (see sections 1035 and 1045 of the Civil Obligations Act 19784) or, in the event of a commercial bank's “manifest insolvency” or bankruptcy, from the State (see sections 1004(2) and 1007(2) of the Civil Obligations Act 1978, section 18 of the Banks and Other Financial Institutions Insolvency Act 19895 and a decision of the SFRY Government of 23 May 19906).
13. In 1991/92 the SFRY ceased to exist. It was replaced by five successor States: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (succeeded in 2006 by Serbia), “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” and Slovenia.
14. A brutal war started in Bosnia and Herzegovina shortly after its declaration of independence. During the war, Bosnia and Herzegovina took over the statutory guarantee for “old” foreign-currency savings from the SFRY (pursuant to section 6 of the SFRY Legislation Application Act 19927). Furthermore, the concept of “social ownership” was abandoned (see the Social Ownership Transformation Act 19938 and the Social Ownership Transformation Act 19949). As a result, all commercial banks based in Bosnia and Herzegovina were effectively nationalised. While the use of “old” foreign-currency savings was allowed in some exceptional situations during the war, it would appear that this possibility remained only theoretical (see a decision of the Presidency of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 18 February 199310 and a decision of the National Bank of the Republika Srpska of 17 June 199311).
15. On 14 December 1995 the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Dayton Peace Agreement”) entered into force. It confirmed the continuation of the legal existence of Bosnia and Herzegovina as a State, while modifying its internal structure (Article 1 § 1 of Annex 4 to the Dayton Peace Agreement, named the “Constitution of Bosnia and Herzegovina”). In accordance with Article 1 § 3 of Annex 4, Bosnia and Herzegovina consists of two Entities: the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska. The Dayton Peace Agreement failed to resolve the Inter-Entity Boundary Line in the Brčko area, but the parties agreed to a binding arbitration in this regard under UNCITRAL rules (Article V of Annex 2 to the Dayton Peace Agreement). Meanwhile, the rural parts of the pre-war Brčko municipality remained under the control of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the town of Brčko under the control of the Republika Srpska. An arbitral tribunal issued its final award on 5 March 1999. It suspended the legal authority of the Entities within the whole territory of the pre-war Brčko municipality and transferred all of the Entity powers to the newly-created Brčko District under the exclusive sovereignty of Bosnia and Herzegovina and international supervision. The Brčko District was formally inaugurated on 8 March 2000. Nevertheless, Entity legislation continued to apply in the District until modified by the Supervisor of Brčko or the District Assembly. All Entity legislation ceased to have legal effect in the District on 4 August 2006.
16. On 28 November 1997 the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina assumed full liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in locally based commercial banks in order to prepare them for privatisation (in accordance with section 3(1) of the Claims Settlement Act 199712 and the Non-Residents' Claims Settlement Decree 199913). While withdrawal remained impossible, residents of that Entity were given the possibility of using their “old” foreign-currency savings to purchase the State-owned flats in which they lived (where this was indeed the case) and certain State-owned companies (see section 18 of the Claims Settlement Act 1997, as amended on 21 August 2004 and on 7 November 2007).
17. Similarly, the Republika Srpska assumed full liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in commercial banks based there (see section 20 of the Opening Balance Sheets (Banks) Act 1998, as amended on 8 January 200214). However, unlike in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, where the liability shifted simultaneously with respect to all commercial banks, in the Republika Srpska the liability shifted for each commercial bank upon its privatisation. The relevant dates for the two main commercial banks with “old” foreign-currency deposits, the Banjalučka banka and the Kristal banka, were 18 January and 17 April 2002 respectively. The privatisation process was completed in the Republika Srpska in respect of commercial banks on 31 December 2002. Residents of that Entity were also given the possibility of using their “old” foreign-currency savings to purchase the State-owned flats in which they lived and certain State-owned companies (see section 19 of the Privatisation of Companies Act 199815).
18. In the course of 2002 all commercial banks in the Brčko District were privatised by the Entities through an agreement with the District and with the approval of the Supervisor of Brčko.
19. Legislation providing for the use of “old” foreign-currency savings in the privatisation process had limited appeal and, moreover, led to abuses: an unofficial market emerged on which such savings were sometimes sold for no more than 3% of their nominal value. In 2004, in an attempt to remedy the situation, the Entities and the District agreed to recompense “old” foreign-currency savers in cash and government bonds and set up repayment schemes to this effect. However, pursuant to decision U 14/05 of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina of 2 December 2005, the three repayment schemes were replaced by one for the entire territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina (see “Relevant domestic law and practice” below).
B. The present case
20. The applicant was born in 1935 and lives in the vicinity of Srebrenik, in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
21. He worked across Europe as a mailman, construction worker and handyman in the 1970s and 1980s and deposited foreign currency earned abroad with a basic bank based in Tuzla, a member of the Privredna banka Sarajevo. During the Marković reforms the bank became a separate entity, named Tuzlanska banka. In 1994 it was nationalised (see paragraph 14 above) and in 1998 it was sold to a commercial bank based in Slovenia (Nova Ljubljanska banka).
22. After several failed attempts to withdraw his funds, the applicant complained to the Human Rights Chamber (a human-rights body set up under Annex 6 to the Dayton Peace Agreement). By a decision of 6 April 2005 (decision CH/98/375 et al.), the Human Rights Commission, the legal successor of the Human Rights Chamber, found the contemporary legislation to be contrary to Article 6 of the Convention (on account of the lack of procedural guarantees) and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (on account of the lack of a fair balance between the relevant interests). Besides some general measures, it awarded the applicant 500 convertible marks (BAM)16 in respect of non-pecuniary damage and legal costs.
23. On 29 December 2006 the competent verification agency assessed the amount of the applicant's “old” foreign-currency savings at BAM 269,275.21 (see paragraph 27 below).
24. On 11 June 2007 the applicant received BAM 1,000 (see paragraph 29 below). On 14 May 2009 he received the first instalments of the principal debt and of interest on the bonds, both due on 27 September 2008, in the total amount of BAM 4,237.44 (see paragraph 31 below).
25. It would appear that the government bonds due on 31 March 2008 have not yet been issued (see paragraph 30 below) and that the second instalment of interest on the bonds, due on 27 March 2009, has not yet been paid (see paragraph 31 below).
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
26. For the relevant law and practice, see the admissibility decision in Jeličić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 41183/02, ECHR 2005-XII; Suljagić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 27912/02, 20 June 2006; and the judgment in Jeličić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 41183/02, ECHR 2006-XII.
27. Furthermore, the Old Foreign-Currency Savings Act 200617 entered into force on 15 April 2006 (“the 2006 Act”). Bosnia and Herzegovina undertook to recompense original deposits in locally based banks and interest accrued by 31 December 1991 at the original rate, less any funds already used (see paragraphs 14 and 16-17 above). Interest accrued from 1 January 1992 until 15 April 2006 is to be cancelled and calculated afresh at an annual rate of 0.5%. The assessment of the amounts due to each claimant is to be carried out under an administrative procedure by verification agencies. The deadline for submitting an application to this effect has been extended on several occasions.
28. The Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina has examined the constitutionality of the provision concerning the reduction of the interest rate to 0.5% for the period from 1 January 1992 until 15 April 2006 and considered it to be justified given the overall circumstances, notably the need to reconstruct the national economy following a devastating war (see decision U 13/06 of 28 March 2008, § 28).
29. All claimants that have obtained verification certificates (see the penultimate sentence of paragraph 27 above) are entitled to a cash payment of up to BAM 1,000 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Brčko District and up to BAM 2,000 in the Republika Srpska. Any remaining amount will then be reimbursed in government bonds.
30. In accordance with the 2006 Act, government bonds were to be issued by 31 March 2008. They should be amortized by 31 December 2016 at the latest and earn interest at an annual rate of 2.5%. While it had initially been planned to issue State bonds through the Central Bank, on 12 January 2008 the Republika Srpska passed its own Old Foreign-Currency Savings Act 2008 (“the RS Act”)18, cutting the amortisation period for government bonds down to five years, and issued its own Entity bonds on 28 February 2008. On 4 October 2008 the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina declared the RS Act constitutional (decision U 3/08 of 4 October 2008). It decided that the constituent units (the Entities and the District) had jurisdiction to regulate the matter of “old” foreign-currency savings, provided that they remained within the framework of the 2006 Act. Following this decision, the Central Bank refused to issue government bonds only for some constituent units. As a result, the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Brčko District had to issue their own bonds. While the Brčko District did so on 30 June 2009, it would appear that bonds have not yet been issued in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
31. Meanwhile, amortisation plans were adopted on 21 February 2008 for the Republika Srpska19 and on 9 April 2008 for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Brčko District.20 On 24 June 2009 a new amortisation plan was adopted for the Brčko District which is along the lines of that of 9 April 2008.21
In the Republika Srpska, bonds are to be amortised by 28 February 2013 in ten instalments (on 28 February and 28 August every year from 28 August 2008 to 28 February 2013) together with interest on the bonds (at an annual rate of 2.5%). The first three instalments were paid, as planned, on 28 August 2008, 28 February and 28 August 2009. In the event of late payment, default interest is to be paid at the statutory rate.
In the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, bonds are to be amortised by 27 March 2015 in eight instalments as follows: 7.5% of the entire debt is to be paid on 27 September 2008, 9% on 27 September 2009, 11% on 27 September 2010, 12% on 27 September 2011, 13% on 27 September 2012, 15% on 27 September 2013, 15.5% on 27 September 2014 and 17% on 27 March 2015. Interest on the bonds (at an annual rate of 2.5%) is to be paid on 27 March and 27 September every year from 27 September 2008 to 27 March 2015. The first instalments of the principal debt and of interest on the bonds (both due on 27 September 2008) were paid on 14 May 2009. It would appear that the instalments due on 27 March and 27 September 2009 have not yet been paid.
Lastly, under the old amortisation plan, the Brčko District paid the first instalments of the principal debt and of interest on the bonds (both due on 27 September 2008) on 24 December 2008 and the second instalment of interest on the bonds (due on 27 March 2009) on 11 June 2009. Pursuant to the new plan, bonds are now to be amortised by 31 March 2015 in seven instalments as follows: 9.5% of the entire debt is to be paid on 30 September 2009, 11.5% on 30 September 2010, 12.5% on 30 September 2011, 14% on 30 September 2012, 16.5% on 30 September 2013, 17.5% on 30 September 2014 and 18.5% on 31 March 2015. Interest on the bonds (at an annual rate of 2.5%) is to be paid on 31 March and 30 September every year from 30 September 2009 to 31 March 2015. The instalment due on 30 September 2009 has been paid in time. In case of the late payment of any forthcoming instalment, default interest is to be paid at the statutory rate.
32. Since government bonds are redeemable before their maturity, once issued, they may be traded on the Stock Exchange. In the Republika Srpska, their current trade price on the Stock Exchange is around 90% of their nominal value. Given that government bonds have been issued in the Brčko District only recently, their trade price on the Stock Exchange has not yet consolidated. As mentioned above, it would appear that bonds have not yet been issued in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
33. The present case is fundamentally about the compliance of the domestic legislation on “old” foreign-currency savings with the conditions laid down by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which is worded as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
34. The concept of “possessions” has an autonomous meaning which is not limited to the ownership of material goods. In the same way as material goods, certain other rights and interests constituting assets can also be regarded as “possessions” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, among many authorities, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 129, ECHR 2004-V). Claims, provided that they have a sufficient basis in domestic law, qualify as an “asset” and can thus be regarded as “possessions” within the meaning of this provision (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 52, ECHR 2004-IX).
35. The applicant in the present case, upon depositing foreign currency with a commercial bank, acquired an entitlement to collect at any time his deposit, together with accumulated interest, from the commercial bank or, in the event of its “manifest insolvency” or bankruptcy, from the State (see paragraph 12 above). While it is true that towards the end of its existence, the SFRY and its commercial banking sector had difficulties in honouring their financial obligations (see paragraph 10 above), the entitlement subsisted.
36. Despite varying approaches to this issue following the dissolution of the SFRY and the shifting of responsibilities from one level of government to another (see paragraphs 14, 16-17, 19 and 27-32 above), there has never been any doubt that Bosnia and Herzegovina and/or its constituent units had a legal duty to repay “old” foreign-currency savings in locally based commercial banks. In such circumstances, the Court concludes that the applicant had, and still has, a claim amounting to a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The guarantees of that provision therefore apply to the present case.
B. Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
1. Applicable rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
37. As the Court has stated on a number of occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting Parties are entitled, among other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among many authorities, Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 98, ECHR 2000-I).
38. For many years, the applicant in the present case has been unable to freely dispose of his “old” foreign-currency savings. At the time of the introduction of his application (2 July 2002) and, more importantly, the date of the ratification of Protocol No. 1 by Bosnia and Herzegovina (12 July 2002), he could use those funds only to purchase certain State-owned companies (see paragraph 16 above). As he was the owner of the house in which he lived, the possibility of buying a State-owned flat was not open to the applicant. The 2004 legislation then followed (see paragraph 19 above) and finally the current legislation (see paragraphs 27-32 above), each limiting the use of “old” foreign-currency savings. This has not been contested before the Court.
In such circumstances, the present case falls to be examined under the third rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see also Trajkovski v. “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” (dec.), no. 53320/99, ECHR 2002-IV).
2. General principles
39. The general principles were recently restated in Broniowski, cited above, §§ 147-51 (references omitted).
(a) Principle of lawfulness
40. The first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention.
The principle of lawfulness also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application.
(b) Principle of a legitimate aim in the public/general interest
41. Any interference with the enjoyment of a right or freedom recognised by the Convention must pursue a legitimate aim. By the same token, in cases involving a positive duty, there must be a legitimate justification for the State's inaction. The principle of a “fair balance” inherent in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 itself presupposes the existence of a general interest of the community. Moreover, it should be reiterated that the various rules incorporated in Article 1 are not distinct, in the sense of being unconnected, and that the second and third rules are concerned only with particular instances of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of property. One of the effects of this is that the existence of a “public interest” required under the second sentence, or the “general interest” referred to in the second paragraph, are in fact corollaries of the principle set forth in the first sentence, so that an interference with the exercise of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 must also pursue an aim in the public interest.
42. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures to be applied in the sphere of the exercise of the right of property, including deprivation or control of property. Accordingly, the national authorities enjoy a wide margin of appreciation in this field.
Furthermore, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. In particular, the decision to enact laws expropriating or controlling property or affording publicly funded compensation for expropriated property will commonly involve consideration of political, economic and social issues. The Court has declared that, finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, it will respect the legislature's judgment as to what is “in the public interest” unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation. This logic applies to such fundamental changes of a country's system as the transition from a totalitarian regime to a democratic form of government, the reform of the State's political, legal and economic structure and indeed the dissolution of the State followed by a brutal war, phenomena which inevitably involve the enactment of large-scale economic and social legislation.
(c) Principle of a “fair balance”
43. Both an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions and an abstention from action must strike a fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights.
The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a whole. In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measures applied by the State, including measures depriving a person of his of her possessions. In each case involving the alleged violation of that Article the Court must, therefore, ascertain whether by reason of the State's action or inaction the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden.
44. In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. That assessment may involve not only the relevant compensation terms – if the situation is akin to the taking of property – but also the conduct of the parties, including the means employed by the State and their implementation. In that context, it should be stressed that uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State's conduct. Indeed, where an issue in the general interest is at stake, it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, in an appropriate and consistent manner.
3. Application of the above principles to the present case
(a) The applicant's submissions
45. While recognising improvements in the current legislation, the applicant maintained that it was still incompatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. First of all, according to his understanding of the current legislation, he would receive no payment in cash other than the initial payment of BAM 1,000. He would receive government bonds only at the end of the amortisation period (in 2015), which he would then have to sell on an unofficial market, most likely for a fraction of their nominal value. The applicant considered this to be unacceptable given notably his age and poor health. Secondly, he complained about the interest rate for the period from 1 January 1992 until 15 April 2006 (0.5%). Lastly, the applicant maintained that the current legislation lacked guarantees that the necessary funds would indeed be allocated on time.
(b) The Government's submissions
46. The Government acknowledged that the domestic authorities had assumed full liability for “old” foreign-currency savings in locally based commercial banks. According to preliminary data, the associated public debt exceeded 1 billion euros (EUR). In view of various other financial obligations of different levels of government and the overall circumstances, including the dissolution of the SFRY in 1991/92 and the subsequent war, the Government maintained that the current legislation was the best solution feasible. In support of their argument, they underlined that the legislation had been prepared with the assistance of the International Monetary Fund. As regards the interest rate for the period from 1 January 1992 until 15 April 2006, which the applicant particularly criticised, the Government claimed that it corresponded to the average interest rate applicable to overnight foreign-currency deposits for the same period. Lastly, they dismissed the applicant's concerns as regards the ability of the domestic authorities to implement the current legislation. Despite initial delays in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Brčko District, the Government emphasised that measures had been taken, including loans from commercial banks, to ensure timely payment of the forthcoming instalments.
(c) The third parties' submissions
47. The third parties, in their written submissions to the Court, accused all levels of government of incompetence and corruption. They criticised above all the 1997 legislation of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the equivalent legislation in the Republika Srpska. Allegedly, the conditions had been such that “old” foreign-currency savers had no other option but to accept privatisation certificates in lieu of their savings and sell them on an unofficial market for a fraction of their nominal value. The scheme, it was said, had allowed some notorious tycoons and war profiteers with ties with the Government to obtain valuable assets for hardly anything.
48. The association from the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina added that abuses also continued under the current legislation, but failed to substantiate this contention.
(d) The Court's assessment
49. Before embarking upon these issues, it should be underlined that the present case has a long history. The applicant lodged his complaints on 2 July 2002, before Bosnia and Herzegovina had even ratified Protocol No. 1, and repeatedly reaffirmed them thereafter. Although the contested situation has evolved, the Court will limit its analysis to the current legislation. The Court further wishes to underline that it considers it irrelevant that the applicant's complaints were lodged before the ratification of Protocol No. 1, because of the continuing nature of the impugned situation and the fact that the initial complaints have been reaffirmed on numerous occasions after ratification (see Čeh v. Serbia, no. 9906/04, §§ 36-39, 1 July 2008).
50. Turning to the general principles set out above, there is no doubt that the first two were respected in the present case (see, by analogy, Trajkovski, cited above). The Court will therefore proceed to examine the core question, namely whether the contested measures struck a “fair balance” between the relevant interests in the light of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
51. To begin with, it is a well-known fact that the global economic crisis of the 1970s hit the SFRY particularly hard. The SFRY turned to international capital markets and soon became one of the most indebted countries in the world. When the international community backed away from the loose lending practices of the 1970s, the SFRY resorted to foreign-currency savings of its citizens to pay foreign debts and finance imports. The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe has established that, as a result, a major part of the original deposits ceased to exist before the dissolution of the SFRY (see its Resolution 1410 (2004) adopted on 23 November 2004 – reproduced in Kovačić and Others, cited above, § 188 – as well as the explanatory memorandum by Mr Erik Jurgens). While it is true that “old” foreign-currency claims as such survived the dissolution of the SFRY and that Bosnia and Herzegovina assumed full liability for such claims in locally based banks, the fact that the original deposits had been spent, in all probability, by the former regime explains why Bosnia and Herzegovina has not been able to allow the uncontrolled withdrawal of these deposits.
52. The applicant maintained that he was entitled under the current legislation to no more than BAM 1,000 in cash until 27 March 2015. The Court observes, however, that the applicant is entitled to receive his entire “old” foreign-currency savings by 27 March 2015 in eight instalments and has already thus received BAM 5,237.44. Given the catastrophic effects of the 1992-95 war and the ongoing reforms of the State's political, legal and economic structure, the Court accepts that this solution remained within the respondent State's margin of appreciation.
53. The applicant also expressed concerns that he would not be able to sell government bonds for anything near their nominal value. While understandable in view of past abuses (see paragraphs 19 and 47 above), such concerns are unsubstantiated. Unlike privatisation certificates under the former legislation, government bonds under the current legislation may be traded on the Stock Exchange, which, together with the interest on the bonds (at an annual rate of 2.5%) and the relatively short amortisation period, should ensure a significantly higher price. Indeed, such bonds are at present sold in the Republika Srpska for around 90% of their nominal value. There is no reason why such bonds should be traded for anything less in the Brčko District or, once issued, in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Anyhow, the applicant is not required to sell government bonds in order to obtain his “old” foreign-currency savings. He could instead opt for cash payments in eight instalments. As opposed to privatisation certificates under the former legislation, government bonds under the current legislation are not designed to replace cash payments. On the contrary, their function is to make early cash payments possible for those who are unable or unwilling to wait until the end of the amortisation period (27 March 2015 in the applicant's case).
54. As regards the interest rate for the period from 1 January 1992 until 15 April 2006, which the applicant and the third parties considered to be too low, the Government submitted that it corresponded to the average interest rate applicable to overnight foreign-currency deposits. However, according to an official report submitted by the Government, at the request of the Court, in another case (Kudić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 28971/05, 9 December 2008), the relevant interest rate appears to be much higher – 2.33% on average (4.06% in 1992, 2.82% in 1993, 2.43% in 1994, 2.70% in 1995, 2.49% in 1996, 3.16% in 1997, 3.01% in 1998, 2.78% in 1999, 2.4% in 2000, 2.2% in 2001, 1.64% in 2002, 1.22% in 2003, 0.9% in 2004, 0.82% in 2005).
The Court has also taken note of the fact that the neighbouring countries, in which similar repayment schemes were set up, agreed to pay considerably higher interest rates: 5% in Croatia and 2% in Montenegro and Serbia.
Nevertheless, given the respondent State's wide margin of appreciation (see paragraph 42 above) and, in particular, the need to reconstruct the national economy following a devastating war, the Court does not consider this factor sufficient in itself to render the current legislation contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It agrees in this regard with the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina (see paragraph 28 above).
55. Whereas the Court finds the current legislation as such compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, it agrees with the applicant that its state of implementation is unsatisfactory. While in the Republika Srpska no delays were alleged, the same is not true for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Brčko District. In the Brčko District, government bonds, although due on 31 March 2008, were issued only on 30 June 2009. In the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, it appears that bonds, likewise due on 31 March 2008, have not yet been issued. As a result, the applicant is still unable to sell them on the Stock Exchange and thus obtain early cash payments (see paragraph 53 above). Moreover, the instalments due under the current legislation on 27 September 2008 were paid almost three months later (on 24 December 2008) in the Brčko District and almost eight months later (on 14 May 2009) in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Similarly, the instalment due on 27 March 2009 was paid almost three months later (on 11 June 2009) in the Brčko District and has not yet been paid in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
56. The Court is aware that “old” foreign-currency savings, inherited from the SFRY, constitute a considerable burden on all successor States. Nonetheless, having undertaken to repay “old” foreign-currency savings in locally based banks and having set up a repayment scheme in this regard, the respondent State must stand by its promises. The rule of law underlying the Convention and the principle of lawfulness in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 require the Contracting Parties to respect and apply, in a foreseeable and consistent manner, the laws they have enacted (see Broniowski, cited above, § 184).
57. In view of the deficient implementation of the domestic legislation on “old” foreign-currency savings, the Court concludes that the applicant may still claim to be a victim for the purposes of Article 34 of the Convention. Accordingly, the Government's preliminary objection is dismissed. For the same reason, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in the present case.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
58. Article 46 of the Convention reads as follows:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
A. The parties' submissions
59. The Government, as opposed to the applicant, objected to the application of the pilot-judgment procedure in the present case and repeated that the contested legislation complied with the conditions laid down by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
B. The Court's assessment
1. General principles
60. The Court reiterates that Article 46 of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of Article 1, imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to secure the right of the applicant which the Court found to be violated. Such measures must also be taken in respect of other persons in the applicant's position, notably by solving the problems that have led to the Court's findings (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000-VIII; Christine Goodwin v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 28957/95, § 120, ECHR 2002-VI; Lukenda v. Slovenia, no. 23032/02, § 94, ECHR 2005-X; and S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 30562/04 and 30566/04, § 134, ECHR 2008-...). This obligation has been consistently emphasised by the Committee of Ministers in the supervision of the execution of the Court's judgments (see, for example, ResDH(97)336, IntResDH(99)434, IntResDH(2001)65 and ResDH(2006)1).
61. In order to facilitate effective implementation of its judgments along these lines, the Court may adopt a pilot-judgment procedure allowing it to clearly identify in a judgment the existence of structural problems underlying the violations and to indicate specific measures or actions to be taken by the respondent state to remedy them (see Broniowski, cited above, §§ 189-94, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, §§ 231-39, ECHR 2006-VIII). This adjudicative approach is, however, pursued with due respect for the Convention institutions' respective functions: it falls to the Committee of Ministers to evaluate the implementation of individual and general measures under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention (see, by analogy, Broniowski v. Poland (friendly settlement) [GC], no. 31443/96, § 42, ECHR 2005-IX, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland (friendly settlement) [GC], no. 35014/97, § 42, ECHR 2008-...).
62. Another important aim of the pilot-judgment procedure is to induce the respondent State to resolve large numbers of individual cases arising from the same structural problem at domestic level, thus implementing the principle of subsidiarity which underpins the Convention system. Indeed, the Court's task as defined by Article 19, that is, to “ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the High Contracting Parties in the Convention and the Protocols thereto”, is not necessarily best achieved by repeating the same findings in large series of cases (see, by analogy, E.G. v. Poland (dec.), no. 50425/99, § 27, ECHR 2008-...). The object of the pilot-judgment procedure is to facilitate the speediest and most effective resolution of a dysfunction affecting the protection of the Convention rights in question in the national legal order (see Wolkenberg and Others v. Poland (dec.), no. 50003/99, § 34, ECHR 2007-XIV). While the respondent State's action should primarily aim at the resolution of such a dysfunction and at the introduction, where appropriate, of effective domestic remedies in respect of the violations in question, it may also include ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers in line with the Convention requirements. The Court may decide to adjourn the examination of all similar cases, thus giving the respondent State an opportunity to settle them in such various ways (see, by analogy, Broniowski, cited above, § 198, and Xenides-Arestis v. Turkey, no. 46347/99, § 50, 22 December 2005). If, however, the respondent State fails to adopt such measures following a pilot judgment and continues to violate the Convention, the Court will have no choice but to resume the examination of all similar applications pending before it and to take them to judgment so as to ensure effective observance of Convention (see, by analogy, E.G. v. Poland, cited above, § 28).
2. Application of the principles to the present case
63. The violation which the Court has found in the present case affects many people. According to the International Monetary Fund, more than a quarter of the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina had “old” foreign-currency savings (see Bosnia and Herzegovina: Selected Economic Issues, IMF Country Report No. 04/54, March 2004, p. 26). Moreover, there are already more than 1,350 similar applications, submitted on behalf of more than 13,500 applicants, pending before the Court. This represents a serious threat to the future effectiveness of the Convention machinery. The Court therefore considers it appropriate to apply the pilot-judgment procedure in the present case, notwithstanding the Government's objection in this regard.
64. Although it is in principle not for the Court to determine what remedial measures may be appropriate to satisfy the respondent State's obligations under Article 46 of the Convention, in view of the systemic situation which it has identified, the Court would observe that general measures at national level are undoubtedly called for in execution of the present judgment. Notably, the Court considers that government bonds must be issued and any outstanding instalments must be paid in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina within six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final. Within the same time-limit, the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina must also undertake, as the Republika Srpska and the Brčko District did (see paragraph 31 above), to pay default interest at the statutory rate in the event of late payment of any forthcoming instalment. As regards the past delays, the Court does not find it necessary, at present, to order that adequate redress be awarded to all persons affected. If, however, the respondent State fails to adopt the general measures indicated above and continues to violate the Convention, the Court may reconsider the issue of redress in an appropriate future case.
65. Turning to the many similar applications pending before the Court:
(i) The Court decides to adjourn adversarial proceedings for six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final in any cases pertaining to “old” foreign-currency savings in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Brčko District in which the applicants have obtained verification certificates (see, by analogy, Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 146, 15 January 2009). This decision is without prejudice to the Court's power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list in accordance with the Convention.
(ii) The Court may declare inadmissible in accordance with the Convention any cases pertaining to “old” foreign-currency savings in which the applicants have not obtained verification certificates, because it has found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only with respect to delays in the implementation of the current legislation (see paragraph 55 above) and those who have not obtained a verification certificate cannot be considered to be affected by those delays (see paragraph 29 above). That being said, the respondent State must ensure that the relevant deadlines are extended for at least six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final to enable everyone to obtain a verification certificate.
(iii) Lastly, the Court may declare inadmissible any cases pertaining to “old” foreign-currency savings in the Republika Srpska, even if the applicants have obtained verification certificates, because no delays in the implementation of the current legislation occurred in that Entity.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
66. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
67. Under the head of pecuniary damage, the applicant repeated his complaints concerning the content of the current legislation: he requested immediate payment of the total amount of his “old” foreign-currency savings and a higher interest rate. The Government disagreed. The Court observes that it has rejected these complaints (see paragraphs 51-54 above). It therefore also dismisses the applicant's claim for pecuniary damage.
68. The applicant further claimed BAM 20,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage. The Government maintained that the claim was unjustified. The Court, however, considers it clear that the applicant sustained some non-pecuniary loss arising from the breach of the Convention found in this case. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards the applicant EUR 5,000 under this head plus any tax that may be chargeable.
B. Costs and expenses
69. The applicant has already received under the Court's legal-aid scheme EUR 850 for the written part of the proceedings, EUR 1,350 plus travelling costs in connection with appearance at the hearing and EUR 300 for translation costs. On 20 March 2009 he sought reimbursement of additional translation costs in the amount of EUR 729. The Government described this claim as belated.
70. While it is true that the applicant should have submitted his claim by 1 February 2009 (as requested in a letter of 15 December 2008 from the Court) or, at the latest, at the hearing on 10 March 2009, the Court considers that the applicant's additional translation costs should be met in full.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds that the applicant may still claim to be a victim for the purposes of Article 34 of the Convention and dismisses the Government's preliminary objection;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that the above violation represents a systemic problem;
4. Holds that the respondent State must ensure, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention:
(a) that government bonds are issued in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina;
(b) that any outstanding instalments are paid in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina;
(c) that the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina undertakes to pay default interest at the statutory rate in the event of late payment of any forthcoming instalment;
5. Decides to adjourn, for six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final, the proceedings in all cases concerning “old” foreign-currency savings in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Brčko District in which the applicants have obtained verification certificates, without prejudice to the Court's power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list in accordance with the Convention;
6. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage and EUR 729 (seven hundred and twenty nine euros) in respect of costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable, to be converted into convertible marks at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
7. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 3 November 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the concurring opinion of Judge Mijović is annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
F.A.


CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE MIJOVIĆ
Although I have voted with the majority in the Chamber on all the operative provisions of the judgment, my reasoning with respect to a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention differs to a certain extent from the views expressed in the judgment.
According to the present judgment, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has been violated because of the deficient implementation of the domestic legislation on “old” foreign-currency savings, whilst in my personal opinion, a violation should be based on the solutions and measures contained in the legislation in question. The Chamber found that the current legislation as such was compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 but that it was its state of implementation that was unsatisfactory (namely, because government bonds in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina had not yet been issued and certain instalments had not yet been paid).
It is my view, however, that the current legislation - perhaps it is better to say the contested measures - does not in itself strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirement of the protection of the individual's rights.
The problem of “old” foreign-currency savings has a very long history and, as pointed out in the judgment, dates back to the 1980s. It survived the dissolution of the SFRY, and Bosnia and Herzegovina assumed full liability for this sort of claim. Preliminary data show that the associated public debt exceeds 1 billion euros. Given the overall circumstances, and above all the need to reconstruct the national economy, it is reasonable to accept that the owners of so-called “frozen” bank accounts cannot be paid their money without a carefully designed repayment scheme. That is a part of the judgment's reasoning I do support.
Where I disagree with the Chamber, however, is with regard to the legislative provision concerning the reduction of the interest rate to 0.5% for the period from 1 January 1992 to 15 April 2006, a measure that I consider neither justified nor proportional. In accordance with an official report submitted by the Government (see the judgment, paragraph 54) it is obvious that the relevant interest rate appears to be much higher - 2.33% on average). Compared to the interest rate in the neighbouring countries22, which have more or less experienced similarly catastrophic effects of the armed conflict and the ongoing reforms and have set up similar “old” foreign-currency savings repayment schemes, this interest rate of 0.5% is the lowest. The Chamber was of the opinion that this issue fell “within the State's margin of appreciation”, whilst in my opinion this interest rate provision would be more than sufficient in itself to render the current legislation contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
On the other hand, if the Chamber had opted for this line of reasoning, either the State or the Entities and the Brčko District would have had to pass new legislation which might subsequently have proven more time-consuming, economically challenging and questionable, and very discouraging for almost one quarter of the Bosnia and Herzegovina population - people who are not merely tired of waiting but are already at an advanced age and in despair. That is why I decided to vote with the majority.

1 Zakon o deviznom poslovanju, published in the Official Gazette of the SFRY no. 66/85, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 13/86, 71/86, 2/87, 3/88, 59/88 and 82/90.

2 Zakon o bankama i drugim finansijskim organizacijama, published in the Official Gazette of the SFRY no. 10/89, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 40/89, 87/89, 18/90, 72/90 and 79/90.

3 Zakon o deviznom poslovanju i kreditnim odnosima, published in the Official Gazette of the SFRY no. 15/77, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 61/82, 77/82, 34/83, 70/83 and 71/84.

4 Zakon o obligacionim odnosima, published in the Official Gazette of the SFRY no. 29/78, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 39/85, 45/89 and 57/89.

5 Zakon o sanaciji, stečaju i likvidnosti banaka i drugih finansijskih organizacija, published in the Official Gazette of the SFRY no. 84/89, amendments published in the Official Gazette no. 63/90.

6 Odluka o načinu izvršavanja obaveza Federacije po osnovu jemstva za devize na deviznim računima i deviznim štednim ulozima građana, građanskih pravnih lica i stranih fizičkih lica, published in the Official Gazette of the SFRY no. 27/90.

7 Uredba sa zakonskom snagom o preuzimanju i primjenjivanju saveznih zakona koji se u Bosni i Hercegovini primjenjuju kao republički zakoni, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 2/92 of 11 April 1992.

8 Zakon o prenosu sredstava društvene u državnu svojinu, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 4/93 of 28 April 1993, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 29/94 of 28 November 1994, 31/94 of 27 December 1994, 9/95 of 19 June 1995, 19/95 of 2 October 1995, 8/96 of 10 April 1996 and 20/98 of 15 June 1998.

9 Zakon o pretvorbi društvene svojine, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 33/94 of 25 November 1994.

10 Odluka o uslovima i načinu isplata dinara po osnovu definitivne prodaje devizne štednje domaćih fizičkih lica i korišćenju deviza sa deviznih računa i deviznih štednih uloga domaćih fizičkih lica za potrebe liječenja i plaćanja školarine u inostranstvu, published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 4/93 of 6 March 1993.

11 Odluka o uslovima i načinu davanja kratkoročnih kredita bankama na osnovu definitivne prodaje deponovane devizne štednje građana i efektivno prodatih deviza od strane građana, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 10/93 of 15 July 1993, amendments published in the Official Gazette no. 2/94 of 21 February 1994.

12 Zakon o utvrđivanju i realizaciji potraživanja građana u postupku privatizacije, published in the Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 27/97 of 28 November 1997, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 8/99 of 5 March 1999, 45/00 of 25 October 2000, 54/00 of 26 December 2000, 32/01 of 24 July 2001, 27/02 of 28 June 2002, 57/03 of 21 November 2003, 44/04 of 21 August 2004 and 79/07 of 7 November 2007.

13 Uredba o ostvarivanju potraživanja lica koja su imala deviznu štednju u bankama na teritoriju Federacije Bosne i Hercegovine, a nisu imala prebivalište na teritoriju Federacije Bosne i Hercegovine, published in the Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 44/99 of 30 October 1999.

14 Zakon o početnom bilansu stanja u postupku privatizacije državnog kapitala u bankama, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 24/98 of 15 July 1998, amendments published in the Official Gazette no. 70/01 of 31 December 2001.

15 Zakon o privatizaciji državnog kapitala u preduzećima, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 24/98 of 15 July 1998, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 62/02 of 7 October 2002, 38/03 of 30 May 2003 and 65/03 of 11 August 2003.

16 The convertible mark (BAM) uses the same fixed exchange rate to the euro (EUR) that the German mark (DEM) has (EUR 1 = BAM 1.95583).

17 Zakon o izmirenju obaveza po osnovu računa stare devizne štednje, published in the Official Gazette of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 28/06 of 14 April 2006, amendments published in the Official Gazette nos. 76/06 of 25 September 2006 and 72/07 of 26 September 2007.

18 Zakon o uslovima i načinu izmirenja obaveza po osnovu računa stare devizne štednje emisijom obveznica u Republici Srpskoj, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 1/08 of 4 January 2008.

19 Odluka o emisiji obveznica Republike Srpske za izmirenje obaveza po osnovu verifikovanih računa stare devizne štednje, published in the Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska no. 20/08 of 5 March 2008.

20 Odluka o rasporedu po godinama dospijeća obveznica Bosne i Hercegovine koje se izdaju radi izmirenja obaveza po osnovu računa stare devizne štednje za Federaciju Bosne i Hercegovine i Brčko Distrikt Bosne i Hercegovine, published in the Official Gazette of Bosnia and Herzegovina no. 29/08 of 8 April 2008.

21 Odluka o emisiji obveznica Brčko Distrikta za izmirenje obaveza po osnovu verifikovanih računa stare devizne štednje, published in the Official Gazette of the Brčko District no. 19/09.

22 5% in Croatia and 2% in Serbia and Montenegro



TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Eccezione preliminare respinta (vittima); Violazione di P1-1; danno morale - assegnazione; danno Materiale - rivendicazione respinta
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA SULJAGIĆ C. BOSNIA E ERZEGOVINA
(Richiesta n. 27912/02)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
3 novembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Suljagić c. Bosnia e Erzegovina,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose di:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ledi Bianku, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Sezione Cancelliere Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato 13 ottobre 2009,
Consegna la sentenza seguente sulla quale fu adottata quel la data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 27912/02) contro Bosnia e Erzegovina depositò con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino della Bosnia e Erzegovina, il Sig. M. S. (“il richiedente”), il 2 luglio 2002.
2. Il richiedente addusse che la legislazione nazionale sui “vecchi” risparmi di valuta estera andò a vuoto nel prevedere un “equilibrio equo” fra gli interessi attinenti alla luce dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
3. Con una decisione del 20 giugno 2006 la Corte congiunse ai meriti la questione dello status di vittima del richiedente e dichiarò la richiesta ammissibile.
4. Il richiedente ed il Governo entrambi registrarono inoltre osservazioni scritte (Articolo 59 § 1). Inoltre, commenti di terze parti furono ricevuti da due associazioni, l'Associazione per la Protezione dei risparmi in valuta Estera in Bosnia e Erzegovina (Udruženje za zaštitu deviznih štediša u Bosni i Hercegovini) dalla Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina e dall'Associazione per il Ritorno dei Risparmi in valuta Estera in Bosnia e Erzegovina e Diaspora (Udruženje građana za povrat fissano devizne štednje u Bosni i Hercegovini i dijaspori) dalla Repubblica Srpska che era stata invitata ad intervenire nella procedura scritta (Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 § 2). Le parti risposero alle osservazioni le une delle altre ed ai commenti delle terze parti all'udienza (Articolo 44 § 5).
5. Un'udienza ebbe luogo in pubblico presso la Corte dei Diritti umani a Strasburgo il 10 marzo 2009 (Articolo 59 § 3).
In questa sede comparvero di fronte alla Corte:
(a) per il Governo
Sig.ra M. Mijić Agente
Sig.ra Z. Ibrahimović Agente Aggiunto, la Sig.ra B. Kujundžić Assistente dell’ Agente il Sig. A. Džombić Ministro delle Finanze della Repubblica Srpska, la Sig.ra D. Aleksić Assistente del Ministro delle Finanze del Repubblica Srpska, il Sig. T. Ćurak Assistente del Ministro delle Finanze della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina, il Sig. E. Kubat Consulente per l’Amministrazione delle Finanze della Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina, il Sig. M. Lučić, Direttore per le Finanze del Distretto di Brčko della Bosnia e Erzegovina, Consulenti;
(b) per il richiedente il
Sig. E. S., Consulente legale, il Sig. S. I,, Consigliere Assistente.
La Corte ascoltò osservazioni da parte del Sig. S. e dalla Sig.ra Mijić.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. Background Attinente alla presente causa
6. La causa presente riferisce al problema dei “vecchi” depositi in valuta estera (valuta estera depositata prima dello scioglimento della Repubblica Federale Socialista della Iugoslavia-“la SFRY”).
7. Sino alle riforme economiche del 1989/90 (le così definite riforme Marković, che hanno preso il nome dal Primo Ministro Ante Marković), il sistema bancario commerciale della SFRY consisteva di banche autogestite di base ed associate . Le banche di base, fondate e nominalmente controllate da imprese socialmente possedute, portavano avanti attività bancarie commerciale giorno per giorno. Due o più banche di base avrebbero potuto formare una banca associata tramite un accordo di autogestione, preservando la loro personalità legale. Nella SFRY, erano più di 150 banche di base e nove banche associate (vale a dire Jugobanka Beograd, Beogradska udružena banka Beograd, Vojvođanska banka Novi Sad, Kosovska banka Priština, Udružena banka Hrvatske Zagreb, Ljubljanska banka Ljubljana, Privredna banka Sarajevo, Stopanska banka Skopje and Investiciona banka Titograd).
8. Così oppressa dalla forte valuta com’era, la SFRY rese attraente per i suoi lavoratori espatriati e gli altri cittadini depositare la loro valuta estera presso banche commerciali di base nella SFRY: simili depositi guadagnarono interessi alti (il tasso di interesse annuale eccedeva spesso il 10%) e fu garantito dallo Stato (vedere, per esempio, sezione 14(3) dell’Atto delle Operazioni di Valuta Estera del 19851 e sezione 76(1) dell’Atto delle Banche e di Altri Istituti di credito del 19892).
9. L’Atto delle Operazioni di Valuta Estera del 19773 introdusse un sistema per il deposito della valuta estera tramite banche commerciali presso la Banca Nazionale della Iugoslavia. Benché il sistema fosse opzionale, permise alle banche commerciali di spostare il rischio di valuta allo Stato e praticamente tutta la valuta estera fu così ridepositata. Inoltre, alla Banca Nazionale della Iugoslavia fu richiesto di accordare prestiti in valuta locale (inizialmente, senza interessi) a banche commerciali al valore della valuta estera ridepositata. Comunque, si dovrebbe sottolineare che simile rideposito era di norma solamente un'operazione sulla carta, perché le banche commerciali avevano finanziamenti liquidi insufficienti: sembrerebbe che le banche commerciali abbiano depositato denaro per un totale di 12.2 miliardo di dollari degli Stati Uniti (USD) di cui solamente USD 1.7 miliardi (approssimativamente il 14%) davvero furono trasferiti presso la Banca Nazionale dell'Iugoslavia (vedere Kovačić ed Altri c. Slovenia [GC], N. 44574/98, 45133/98 e 48316/99 §§ 36 e 39, ECHR 2008 -...; vedere anche decisione AP 164/04 della Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia e Erzegovina del 1 aprile 2006, § 53). Nel 1988 il sistema di ridepositi fu terminato (vedere sezione 103 dell’Atto delle Operazioni di Valuta Estera del 1985, come corretto il 15 ottobre 1988).
10. I problemi che sono il risultato del debito nazionale ed estero della SFRY provocarono una crisi valutaria negli anni ottanta. L'economia nazionale era sul limite del crollo e la SFRY ricorse a misure d’emergenza, come restrizioni legali sul rimborso dei depositi di valuta estera (vedere sezione 71 dell’Atto delle Operazioni di Valuta Estera del 1985). Di conseguenza, i depositi in valuta estera furono praticamente congelati.
11. All'interno della struttura della riforma Marković, la SFRY abolì il sistema delle banche di base ed associate descritto sopra. Questo cambio nelle regolamentazioni bancarie permise a delle banche di base di optare per uno status indipendente, mentre le altre banche di base divennero filiali (senza personalità legale) delle banche associate a cui erano appartenute in precedenza.
12. Delle importanti caratteristiche del sistema bancario rimasero, comunque, non soggette ad influssi da parte delle riforme. Prima di tutto le banche commerciali rimasero sotto il regime di “proprietà sociale”-un concetto che, mentre esiste in altri paesi,era in particolare estremamente sviluppato nella SFRY. In secondo luogo, sia le banche commerciali che lo Stato avevano degli obblighi finanziari derivanti da risparmi in valuta estera: ai depositanti fu concesso di prelevare i loro depositi in qualsiasi tempo, insieme con l’ interesse accumulato dalle banche commerciali (vedere sezioni 1035 e 1045 dell’Atto degli Obblighi Civili del 19784) o, in caso di “insolvenza manifesta” o fallimento di una banca commerciale, dallo Stato (vedere sezioni 1004(2) e 1007(2) dell’Atto degli Obblighi Civili del 1978, sezione 18 dell’Atto sull’Insolvenza delle Banche e di Altri Istituti di credito del 19895 ed una decisione del Governo della SFRY del 23 maggio 19906).
13. Nel 1991/92 la SFRY cessò di esistere. Fu sostituita da cinque Stati successori : Bosnia ed Erzegovina, Croazia, la Repubblica Federale della Iugoslavia (succeduta nel 2006 dalla Serbia), “la precedente Repubblica iugoslava di Macedonia” e la Slovenia.
14. Una guerra brutale cominciò in breve in Bosnia ed Erzegovina dopo la sua dichiarazione di indipendenza. Durante la guerra, la Bosnia ed Erzegovina si assunse la garanzia legale per i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera dalla SFRY (facendo seguito alla sezione 6 dell’Atto di Applicazione della Legislazione della SFRY del 19927). Inoltre, il concetto di “proprietà sociale” fu abbandonato (vedere l’Atto di Trasformazione della Proprietà Sociale del 19938 e l’Atto di Trasformazione della Proprietà Sociale del 19949). Di conseguenza, tutte le banche commerciali basate in Bosnia ed Erzegovina furono in effetti nazionalizzate. Se l'uso di “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera fu concesso in delle situazioni eccezionali durante la guerra, sembrerebbe che questa possibilità rimase solamente teoretica (vedere una decisione della Presidenza della Repubblica della Bosnia e Erzegovina del 18 febbraio 199310 ed una decisione della Banca Nazionale della Repubblica Srpska del 17 giugno 199311).
15. Il 14 dicembre 1995 l'Accordo della Struttura Generale per la Pace in Bosnia ed Erzegovina (“l’Accordo di Pace Dayton”) entrò in vigore. Confermò la continuazione dell'esistenza legale della Bosnia ed Erzegovina come Stato, cambiando la sua struttura interna (Articolo 1 § 1 dell’Annesso 4 all’ Accordo di Pace , chiamato la “Costituzione della Bosnia e Erzegovina”). In conformità con l’Articolo 1 § 3 dell’Annesso 4, la Bosnia ed Erzegovina consisteva di due Entità: la Federazione di Bosnia ed Erzegovina e la Repubblica Srpska. L’Accordo di Pace Dayton andò a vuoto nel chiarire la Linea di Confine tra Entità nell'area di Brčko, ma le parti accettarono un arbitrato vincolante a questo riguardo sotto le norme dell’UNCITRAL (Articolo V dell’Annesso 2 all’Accordo di Pace Dayton). Nel frattempo le parti rurali prima della guerra della municipalità di Brčko rimasero sotto il controllo della Federazione di Bosnia ed Erzegovina e la città di Brčko sotto il controllo della Repubblica Srpska. Un tribunale arbitrale emise la sua assegnazione definitiva il 5 marzo 1999. Sospese l'autorità legale delle Entità all'interno dell’intero territorio prima della guerra della municipalità di Brčko e trasferì tutti i poteri dell'Entità al Distretto di Brčko di recente-creato sotto la sovranità esclusiva della Bosnia ed Erzegovina e la soprintendenza internazionale. Il Distretto di Brčko fu insediato in carica formalmente l’8 marzo 2000. Ciononostante, la legislazione delle Entità si continuava ad applicare nel Distretto sino alla modifica da parte del Supervisore di Brčko o l’Assemblea del Distretto. Ogni legislazione delle Entità cessò di avere effetto legale nel Distretto il 4 agosto 2006.
16. Il 28 novembre 1997 la Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina assunse la piena responsabilità per i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera in banche commerciali di base locali per prepararle per la privatizzazione (in conformità con la sezione 3(1) dell’Atto dell’Ordinamento di Rivendicazioni del 199712 ed il Decreto dell’Ordinamento di Rivendicazioni dei Non -residenti del 199913). Mentre il ritiro rimase impossibile, ai residenti di quelle Entità fu data la possibilità di usare i loro “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera per acquistare gli appartamenti Statali nei quali vivevano (dove era davvero il caso) e certe società Statali (vedere sezione 18 dell’Atto dell’Ordinamento di Rivendicazioni del 1997, come da emendamento del 21 agosto 2004 e del 7 novembre 2007).
17. Similmente, la Repubblica Srpska assunse la piena responsabilità per i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera nelle banche commerciali con sede in questa (vedere sezione 20 dell’Atto dei bilanci di apertura (delle Banche) del 1998, come emendato l’ 8 gennaio 200214). Comunque, diversamente che nella Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina, dove la responsabilità si spostò simultaneamente riguardo a tutte le banche commerciali, nella Repubblica Srpska la responsabilità si spostò per ogni banca commerciale nel momento della sua privatizzazione. Le date attinenti per le due banche commerciali principali con i “vecchi” depositi in valuta estera , la Banjalučka banka ed la Kristal banka, erano rispettivamente il 18 gennaio e il 17 aprile 2002. Il processo di privatizzazione fu completato nella Repubblica Srpska a riguardo delle banche commerciali il 31 dicembre 2002. Anche ai residenti di questa Entità fu data la possibilità di usare i loro “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera per acquistare gli appartamenti Statali nei quali vivevano e certe società Statali (vedere sezione 19 dell’Atto di Privatizzazione delle Società 199815).
18. Nel corso del 2002 tutte le banche commerciali nel Distretto di Brčko furono privatizzate dalle Entità tramite un accordo col Distretto e con l'approvazione del Supervisore di Brčko.
19. La legislazione che prevede l'uso dei “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera nel processo di privatizzazione avevano ricorso limitato e, inoltre, aveva condotto a degli abusi: emerse un mercato non ufficiale in cui simile risparmi furono venduti qualche volta per non più del 3% del loro valore nominale. Nel 2004, in un tentativo di rimediare alla situazione, le Entità ed il Distretto concordarono di ricompensare i “vecchio” risparmi in valuta estera in contanti ed obbligazioni statali e prepararono degli schemi di rimborso a questo effetto. Comunque, facendo seguito alla decisione U 14/05 della Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia e Erzegovina del 2 dicembre 2005, i tre schemi di rimborso furono sostituiti con uno per l’intero territorio della Bosnia ed Erzegovina (vedere “diritto nazionale Attinente e pratica” sotto).
B. La presente causa
20. Il richiedente nacque nel 1935 e vive nelle vicinanze di Srebrenik, in Bosnia ed Erzegovina.
21. Lui lavorò in tutta Europa come portalettere, muratore ed uomo tuttofare negli anni settanta e depositò i risparmi in valuta estera guadagnati all'estero presso una banca di base con sede a Tuzla, un membro della Privredna banka Sarajevo. Durante le riforme di Markoviæ la banca divenne un'entità separata, chiamata Tuzlanska banka. Nel 1994 fu nazionalizzata (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra) e nel 1998 fu venduta ad una banca commerciale con sede in Slovenia (la Nova Ljubljanska banka).
22. Dopo numerosi tentativi falliti di ritirare le sue finanze, il richiedente si lamentò presso la Camera dei Diritti umani (un corpo di diritto umano stabilito sotto l’Annesso 6 all’Accordo di Pace Dayton). Con una decisione del 6 aprile 2005 (la decisione CH/98/375 et all.), la Commissione dei Diritti umani, il successore legale della Camera Diritti umani trovò la legislazione contemporanea come contraria all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (a causa della mancanza di garanzie procedurali) e all’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (a causa della mancanza di un equilibrio equo fra gli interessi attinenti). Insieme a delle misure generali, assegnò 500 marchi convertibili al richiedente (BAM)16 a riguardo del danno morale e delle spese processuali.
23. Il 29 dicembre 2006 l'agenzia di verifica competente valutò l'importo dei “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera del richiedente a BAM 269,275.21 (vedere paragrafo 27 sotto).
24. L’ 11 giugno 2007 il richiedente ricevette BAM 1,000 (vedere paragrafo 29 sotto). Il 14 maggio 2009 lui ricevette le prime rate del debito principale e dell’ interesse sulle obbligazioni, entrambi maturati il 27 settembre 2008, nell'importo totale di BAM 4,237.44 (vedere paragrafo 31 sotto).
25. Sembrerebbe che le obbligazioni statali maturate il 31 marzo 2008 non sono state ancora emesse (vedere paragrafo 30 sotto) e che la seconda rata dell’ interesse sulle obbligazioni, maturato il 27 marzo 2009, non è stato ancora pagato (vedere paragrafo 31 sotto).
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
26. Per la legge attinente e la pratica, vedere la decisione di ammissibilità in Jeličić c. Bosnia e Erzegovina (dec.), n. 41183/02, ECHR 2005-XII; Suljagić c. Bosnia de Erzegovina (dec.), n. 27912/02, 20 giugno 2006; e la sentenza in Jeličić c. Bosnia e Erzegovina, n. 41183/02, ECHR 2006-XII.
27. Inoltre, l’Atto sui Vecchi Risparmi in Valuta Estera del 200617 entrò in vigore il 15 aprile 2006 (“l'Atto del 2006”). La Bosnia ed Erzegovina si impegnarono a ricompensare i depositi originali in banche con sede locale e l’ interesse accumulato al 31 dicembre 1991 al tasso originale, meno qualsiasi finanze già utilizzate (vedere paragrafi 14 e 16-17 sopra). L’interesse accumulato dal 1 gennaio 1992 fino al 15 aprile 2006 sarà annullato e sarà calcolato da capo ad un tasso annuale dello 0.5%. La valutazione degli importi dovuti ad ogni rivendicatore sarà eseguita sotto una procedura amministrativa da parte di agenzie di verifica. Il termine massimo per presentare una richiesta a questo effetto è stato prolungato in molte occasioni.
28. La Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia ed Erzegovina ha esaminato la costituzionalità della disposizione riguardo alla riduzione del tasso di interesse allo 0.5% per il periodo dal 1 gennaio 1992 sino al 15 aprile 2006 e lo considerò come giustificato date le circostanze complessive, in particolare il bisogno di ricostruire l'economia nazionale a seguito di una guerra devastatrice (vedere decisione U 13/06 del 28 marzo 2008, § 28).
29. A tutti i rivendicatori che hanno ottenuto certificati di verifica (vedere la penultima frase del paragrafo 27 sopra) viene concesso un pagamento in contanti fino a BAM 1,000 nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina e nel Distretto di Brčko e fino a BAM 2,000 nel Repubblica Srpska. Qualsiasi importo rimanente sarà rimborsato poi in obbligazioni statali.
30. In conformità con l'Atto del 2006, le obbligazioni statali dovevano essere emesse entro il 31 marzo 2008. Avrebbero dovuto essere ammortizzate entro il 31 dicembre 2016 al massimo ed avrebbero dovuto guadagnare un interesse ad un tasso annuale del 2.5%. Mentre era stato progettato inizialmente di emettere obbligazioni Statali per la Banca Centrale, il 12 gennaio 2008 la Repubblica Srpska passò il suo proprio Atto sui Vecchi Risparmi in Valuta estera del 2008 (“l’Atto RS ” )18, riducendo il periodo di ammortizzazione per le obbligazioni statali a cinque anni e la sua propria Entità emise i suoi propri bond il 28 febbraio 2008. Il 4 ottobre 2008 la Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia ed Erzegovina dichiarò L’Atto RS costituzionale (la decisione U 3/08 del 4 ottobre 2008). Decise che le unità costituenti (le Entità ed il Distretto) aveva giurisdizione per regolare la questione dei “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera, purché rimanessero all'interno della struttura dell'Atto del 2006. A seguito di questa decisione, la Banca Centrale rifiutò di emettere obbligazioni statali solamente per alcune unità costituenti. Di conseguenza, la Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina ed il Distretto di Brčko dovevano emettere le loro proprie obbligazioni. Mentre il Distretto di Brčko fece così il 30 giugno 2009 sembrerebbe, che delle obbligazioni non siano state ancora emesse nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina.
31. Nel frattempo, dei piani di ammortamento furono adottati il 21 febbraio 2008 per la Repubblica Srpska19 e il 9 aprile 2008 per la Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina ed il Distretto di Brčko.20 Il 24 giugno 2009 un nuovo piano di ammortamento fu adottato per il Distretto di Brčko seguendo le linee di quello del 9 aprile 2008.21
Nella Repubblica Srpska, le obbligazioni saranno ammortate entro il 28 febbraio 2013 in dieci rate (il 28 febbraio e il 28 agosto ogni anno dal di 28 agosto 2008 al 28 febbraio 2013) insieme con l’interesse sulle obbligazioni (ad un tasso annuale del 2.5%). Le prime tre rate furono pagate, come progettato, il 28 agosto 2008, il 28 febbraio e il 28 agosto 2009. In caso di tardo pagamento, un interesse di mora sarà pagato al tasso legale.
Nella Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina, le obbligazioni saranno ammortate entro il 27 marzo 2015 in otto rate come segue: 7.5% dell’intero debito saranno pagati il 27 settembre 2008 , il 9% il 27 settembre 2009, l’ 11% il 27 settembre 2010, il 12% il 27 settembre 2011 , il 13% il 27 settembre 2012 , il 15% il 27 settembre 2013, il 15.5% il 27 settembre 2014 e il 17% il 27 marzo 2015. L’interesse sulle obbligazioni (ad un tasso annuale del 2.5%) sarà pagato il 27 marzo e il 27 settembre di ogni anno dal 27 settembre 2008 al 27 marzo 2015. Le prime rate del debito principale e dell’interesse sulle obbligazioni (entrambi dovuti il 27 settembre 2008) furono pagate il 14 maggio 2009. Sembrerebbe che le rate dovute il 27 marzo e il 27 settembre 2009 non sono state ancora pagate.
Infine, sotto il vecchio piano d’ammortamento , il Distretto di Brčko pagò le prime rate del debito principale e dell’ interesse sulle obbligazioni (entrambe dovute il 27 settembre 2008) il 24 dicembre 2008 e la seconda rata dell’ interesse sulle obbligazioni (dovuta il 27 marzo 2009) l’11 giugno 2009. Facendo seguito al nuovo piano, le obbligazioni ora devono essere ammortate entro il 31 marzo 2015 in sette rate come segue: il 9.5% dell’ intero debito sarà pagato il 30 settembre 2009 , l’ 11.5% il 30 settembre 2010 , il 12.5% il 30 settembre 2011 , il 14% il 30 settembre 2012, il 16.5% il 30 settembre 2013, il 17.5% il 30 settembre 2014 e il 18.5% il 31 marzo 2015. L’interesse sulle obbligazioni (ad un tasso annuale del 2.5%) sarà pagato il 31 marzo e il 30 settembre di ogni anno dal 30 settembre 2009 al 31 marzo 2015. La rata dovuta il 30 settembre 2009 è stata pagata in tempo. In caso di pagamento ritardato di qualsiasi rata imminente, un interesse di mora sarà pagato al tasso legale.
32. Poiché le obbligazioni statali sono riscattabili prima della loro maturità, una volta emesse, possono essere commerciati nella Borsa Valori. Nella Repubblica Srpska, il loro prezzo di scambio corrente nella Borsa Valori è circa il 90% del loro valore nominale. Dato che le obbligazioni statali sono state emesse solamente di recente nel Distretto di Brčko, il loro prezzo di scambio nella Borsa Valori non si è ancora consolidato. Come menzionato sopra, sembrerebbe che le obbligazioni non sono state ancora emesse nella Federazione della Bosnia e dErzegovina.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
33. La presente causa fondamentalmente è circa l'ottemperanza della legislazione nazionale sui “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera con le condizioni stabilite dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che è messo in parole come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. L'Applicabilità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
34. Il concetto di “ proprietà” ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato alla proprietà di beni materiali. Allo stesso modo dei beni materiali, anche certi altri diritti ed interessi che costituiscono dei beni possono essere considerati come “ proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, fra molte autorità, Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 129 il 2004-V di ECHR).
Le rivendicazioni, purché abbiano una base sufficiente in diritto nazionale, si qualificano come un “bene” e possono essere considerate così come “proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 52 ECHR 2004-IX).
35. Il richiedente nella presente causa, depositando valuta estera presso una banca commerciale ha acquisito un diritto a prelevare in qualsiasi tempo il suo deposito, insieme all’ interesse accumulato dalla banca commerciale o, nel caso di sua “insolvenza manifesta” o fallimento, dallo Stato (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra). Mentre è vero che verso la fine della sua esistenza, la SFRY ed il suo settore delle banche commerciali avevano delle difficoltà nell'onorare i loro obblighi finanziari (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra), il diritto sussisteva.
36. Nonostante approcci diversi a questo problema a seguito della dissoluzione della SFRY ed al cambiamento delle responsabilità da un livello di governo ad un altro (vedere paragrafi 14, 16-17 19 e 27-32 sopra), non vi è stato mai alcun dubbio che la Bosnia ed Erzegovina e/o le sue unità costituenti avevano un dovere legale di rimborsare i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera in banche commerciali e con sede locale. In simili circostanze, la Corte conclude, che il richiedente aveva, ed ancora ha, una rivendicazione che corrispondeva ad una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Le garanzie di questo provvedimento si applicano perciò alla presente causa.
B. Ottemperanza l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
1. Articolo applicabile dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
37. Come la Corte ha affermato in numerose occasioni, l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che alle Parti Contraenti viene concesso, fra le altre cose, il controllo dell'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono distinti nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari casi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo (vedere, fra le molte autorità, Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 98 ECHR 2000-I).
38. Per molti anni, il richiedente nella presente causa non è stato capace di disporre liberamente dei sui “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera. Al tempo dell'introduzione della sua richiesta (2 luglio 2002) e, più importante, in data della ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1 della Bosnia ed Erzegovina (12 luglio 2002), lui avrebbe potuto usare quei finanziamenti solamente per acquistare certe società Statali (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra). Siccome lui era il proprietario dell'alloggio nel quale viveva, la possibilità di comprare un appartamento Statale non era aperta al richiedente. Po seguì la legislazione del 2004 (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra) ed infine la legislazione corrente (vedere paragrafi 27-32 sopra), ciascuna che limitava l'uso dei “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera. Questo non è stato contestato di fronte alla Corte.
In simili circostanze, la presente causa deve essere esaminata sotto il terzo articolo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere anche Trajkovski c. “ Precedente repubblica iugoslava della Macedonia” (dec.), n. 53320/99, ECHR 2002-IV).
2. Principi Generali
39. I principi generali furono riaffermati recentemente in Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 147-51 (riferimenti omessi).
(a) Principio della legalità
40. Il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione di proprietà solamente “soggetta a condizioni previste dalla legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto al controllo dell'uso di proprietà mettendo in opera “leggi.” Inoltre, la preminenza del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione.
Il principio della legalità presuppone anche che le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale siano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione.
(b) Principio di uno scopo legittimo nell'interesse pubblico/generale
41. Qualsiasi interferenza col godimento di un diritto o della libertà riconosciuti dalla Convenzione deve perseguire uno scopo legittimo. Per lo steso motivo, in cause che comportano un dovere positivo deve esserci una giustificazione legittima per l'inazione dello Stato. Il principio di un “equilibrio equo” inerente all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 presuppone l'esistenza di un interesse generale della comunità. Inoltre, dovrebbe essere reiterato che i vari articoli incorporati nell’ Articolo 1 non sono distinti, nel senso di essere distaccati, e che il secondo e il terzo articolo concernono solamente dei particolari casi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Uno degli effetti di questo è che l'esistenza di un “interesse pubblico” richiesto sotto la seconda frase, o l’ “interesse generale” a cui si fa riferimento nel secondo paragrafo, sono infatti corollari del principio stabilito nella prima frase, così che un'interferenza con l'esercizio del diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà all'interno del significato della prima frase dell’ Articolo 1 deve perseguire anche uno scopo nell'interesse pubblico.
42. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono in principio meglio collocate rispetto al giudice internazionale per valutare ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito dalla Convenzione, spetta così alle autorità nazionali fare la valutazione iniziale riguardo all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che richiede l’applicazione di misure nella sfera dell'esercizio del diritto di proprietà, inclusi la privazione o il controllo della proprietà. Di conseguenza, le autorità nazionali godono un ampio margine di valutazione in questo campo.
Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” è necessariamente ampia. In particolare, la decisione di decretare leggi che espropriano o controllano la proprietà o riconoscendo pubblicamente il risarcimento consolidato per la proprietà espropriata implicherà comunemente dei problemi politici, economici e sociali. La Corte ha dichiarato che, trovandolo naturale che il margine di valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell'implementare le politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio, rispetterà il giudizio della legislatura riguardo a ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno che questo giudizio sia manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole. Questa logica si applica a simili cambi fondamentali del sistema di un paese come la transizione da un regime totalitario ad una forma democratica di governo, la riforma della struttura politica, legale ed economica dello Stato e in realtà alla dissoluzione dello Stato seguita da una guerra brutale, fenomeni che inevitabilmente comportano l’applicazione su larga scala di una legislazione economica e sociale.
(c) il Principio di un “equilibrio equo”
43. Sia un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo di proprietà che un'astensione dall’ azione deve prevedere un equilibrio equo fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo.
La preoccupazione di realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nell'insieme. In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo che si cerca di realizzare con qualsiasi misura applicata dallo Stato, incluso le misure che spogliano una persona della sua proprietà. In ogni caso che comporta la violazione addotta di questo Articolo la Corte deve, perciò accertare se in ragione dell'azione dello Stato o dell’ inazione la persona riguardata ha dovuto sopportare un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo.
44. Nel valutare l’ottemperanza con Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve fare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in gioco, tenendo presente che la Convenzione è stata voluta per salvaguardare diritti che sono “pratici ed effettivi.” Deve guardare dietro alle apparenze e deve investigare la realtà della situazione di cui ci si lamenta . Questa valutazione non solo deve coinvolgere i termini attinenti del risarcimento-se la situazione è simile alla presa di proprietà -ma anche la condotta delle parti, incluso i mezzi utilizzati dallo Stato e la loro attuazione. In questo contesto, dovrebbe essere sottolineato che l'incertezza-sia legislativa, amministrativa o che nasce da pratiche applicate dalle autorità -è un fattore da prendere in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato. Effettivamente, dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale, spetta alle autorità pubbliche agire nel dovuto tempo, in modo appropriato e coerente.
3. L’applicazione dei principi sopra alla presente causa
(a) Le osservazioni del richiedente
45. Riconoscendo dei miglioramenti nella legislazione corrente, il richiedente sostenne che ancora era incompatibile con l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Prima di tutto, secondo la sua comprensione della legislazione corrente non riceverebbe alcun pagamento in contanti se non il pagamento iniziale di BAM 1,000. Riceverebbe solamente obbligazioni statali alla fine del periodo di ammortamento (nel 2015) che lui dovrebbe vendere poi su un mercato non ufficiale, più probabile per una frazione del loro valore nominale. Il richiedente ha considerato che questo fosse inaccettabile dato in particolare la sua età e la sua salute cagionevole. In secondo luogo, si lamentò del tasso di interesse per il periodo dal 1 gennaio 1992 sino al 15 aprile 2006 (0.5%). Infine, il richiedente sostenne che alla legislazione corrente mancavano le garanzie per cui i finanziamenti necessari sarebbero stati davvero assegnati in tempo.
(b) Le osservazioni del Governo
46. Il Governo ammise che le autorità nazionali avevano assunto la piena responsabilità per i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera presso le banche commerciali e con sede locale. Secondo i dati preliminari, il debito pubblico associato eccedeva 1 miliardo euro (EUR). Nella prospettiva di vari altri obblighi finanziari di livelli diversi di governo e delle circostanze complessive, incluso la dissoluzione della SFRY nel 1991/92 e la guerra susseguente il Governo sostenne che la legislazione corrente era la migliore soluzione fattibile. In appoggio al suo argomento, sottolineò, che la legislazione era stata preparata con l'assistenza del Fondo Monetario Internazionale. Riguardo al tasso di interesse per il periodo dal 1 gennaio 1992 sino al 15 aprile 2006 criticato in particolare dal richiedente, il Governo affermò che corrispondeva al tasso di interesse medio applicabile a depositi in valuta estera la notte prima per lo stesso periodo. Infine, respinse le preoccupazioni del richiedente riguardo alla capacità delle autorità nazionali di implementare la legislazione corrente. Nonostante i ritardi iniziali nella Federazione di Bosnia ed Erzegovina e nel Distretto di Brčko, il Governo enfatizzò, che delle misure erano state prese, inclusi i prestiti da banche commerciali, per assicurare il pagamento opportuno delle rate imminenti.
(c) le osservazioni delle terze parti
47. Le terze parti, nelle loro osservazioni scritte alla Corte accusavano tutti i livelli di governo d'incompetenza e di corruzione. Loro criticarono soprattutto la legislazione del 1997 della Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina e la legislazione equivalente nella Repubblica Srpska. Presumibilmente, le condizioni erano state simili ai “vecchi” risparmiatori di valuta estera che non avevano altra scelta se non accettare i certificati di privatizzazione al posto dei loro risparmi e venderli su un mercato non ufficiale per una frazione del loro valore nominale. Lo schema, è stato detto, aveva permesso a dei noti tycoon e approfittatori guerrafondai con cravatte presso il Governo di ottenere beni preziosi per solo pochi soldi.
48. L'associazione dalla Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina aggiunse che gli abusi continuavano anche sotto la legislazione corrente, ma non riuscì a provare questa affermazione.
(d) La valutazione della Corte
49. Prima di imbarcarsi su questi problemi, dovrebbe essere sottolineato, che la presente causa ha una storia lunga. Il richiedente presentò i suoi reclami il 2 luglio 2002, prima che la Bosnia ed Erzegovina aveva ratificato il Protocollo N.ro 1, e li riaffermò ripetutamente da allora in poi. Benché la situazione contestata si fosse evoluta, la Corte limiterà la sua analisi alla legislazione corrente. La Corte desidera inoltre sottolineare che considera irrilevante che i reclami del richiedente furono presentati prima della ratifica del Protocollo N.ro 1, a causa della natura continua della situazione contestata ed al fatto che le azioni di reclamo iniziali sono state riaffermate in numerose occasioni dopo la ratifica (vedere Čeh c. Serbia, n. 9906/04, §§ 36-39 del 1 luglio 2008).
50. Rivolgendosi ai principi generali esposti sopra, non c'è dubbio che i primi due furono rispettati nella presente causa (vedere, per analogia, Trajkovski, citata sopra). La Corte procederà perciò ad esaminare la questione centrale, vale a dire se le misure contestate hanno previsto un “equilibrio equo” fra gli interessi attinenti alla luce dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
51. Per cominciare, è un fatto noto che la crisi economica globale degli anni settanta colpì la SFRY in modo particolarmente duro. La SFRY si rivolse a mercati dei capitali internazionali e presto divenne uno dei paesi più indebitati al mondo. Quando la comunità internazionale retrocedette dalle pratiche di prestito a fondo perso degli anni settanta, la SFRY ricorse ai risparmi in valuta estera dei suoi cittadini per pagare i debiti esteri e le importazioni di capitali. La Riunione Parlamentare del Consiglio d'Europa ha stabilito che, di conseguenza, una parte notevole dei depositi originali cessò di esistere prima della dissoluzione della SFRY (vedere la sua Decisione 1410 (2004) adottata il 23 novembre 2004-riprodotta in Kovačić ed Altri, citata sopra, § 188-così come il memorandum esplicativo del Sig. Erik Jurgens). Mentre è vero che le “vecchie” rivendicazioni in valuta estera di questo tipo rimasero valide anche dopo la dissoluzione della SFRY e che la Bosnia ed Erzegovina assunsero la piena responsabilità per simili rivendicazioni in banche con sede locale, il fatto che i depositi originali erano stati spesi, con ogni probabilità, dal regime precedente spiega perché la Bosnia ed Erzegovina non è stata in grado di concedere il ritiro incontrollato di questi depositi.
52. Il richiedente sostenne che gli erano stati concessi sotto la legislazione corrente non più di BAM 1,000 in contanti sino al 27 marzo 2015. Comunque, la Corte osserva che al richiedente è concesso di ricevere i suoi interi “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera il 27 marzo 2015 in otto rate e ha già così ricevuto BAM 5,237.44. Dato gli effetti catastrofici della guerra del 1992-95 e le riforme in corso della struttura politica, legale ed economica dello Stato, la Corte accetta che questa soluzione è rimasta all'interno del margine di valutazione dello Stato rispondente.
53. Il richiedente espresse anche preoccupazioni per il fato che non sarebbe stato in grado di vendere le obbligazioni statali per ad un prezzo che si sarebbe almeno avvicinato al loro valore nominale. Benché comprensibile nella prospettiva degli abusi passati (vedere paragrafi 19 e 47 sopra), simili preoccupazioni sono non comprovate. Diversamente dai certificati di privatizzazione sotto la legislazione precedente, le obbligazioni statali sotto la legislazione corrente possono essere commerciate nella Borsa Valori il che, insieme con l'interesse sulle obbligazioni (ad un tasso annuale del 2.5%) ed il periodo di ammortamento relativamente breve, dovrebbe assicurare un prezzo significativamente più alto. Simili obbligazioni sono effettivamente vendute attualmente, nella Repubblica Srpska per circa il 90% del loro valore nominale. Non c'é ragione perché simili obbligazioni dovrebbero essere commerciate per un valore inferiore nel Distretto di Brčko o, una volta emesse, nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina. Comunque, il richiedente non è costretto a vendere le obbligazioni statali per ottenere i suoi “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera. Lui potrebbe optare invece per pagamenti in contanti in otto rate. A differenza dei certificati di privatizzazione sotto la legislazione precedente, le obbligazioni statali sotto la legislazione corrente non sono progettate per sostituire i pagamenti in contanti. Al contrario, la loro funzione è rendere possibile i pagamenti anticipati in contanti per coloro che non sono in grado o non sono disposti ad aspettare sino alla fine del periodo di ammortamento presto (il 27 marzo 2015 nel caso del richiedente).
54. Riguardo al tasso di interesse per il periodo dal 1 gennaio 1992 sino al 15 aprile 2006 che il richiedente e le terze parti considerarono troppo basso, il Governo presentò che corrispondeva al tasso di interesse medio applicabile ai depositi in valuta estera la notte prima. Comunque, secondo un rapporto ufficiale presentato dal Governo, su richiesta della Corte in un'altra causa (Kudić c. Bosnia e Erzegovina, n. 28971/05, 9 dicembre 2008), il tasso di interesse attinente sembra essere molto più alto-2.33% in media (4.06% nel 1992, 2.82% nel 1993, 2.43% nel 1994, 2.70% nel 1995, 2.49% nel 1996, 3.16% nel 1997, 3.01% nel 1998, 2.78% nel 1999, 2.4% nel 2000, 2.2% nel 2001, 1.64% nel 2002, 1.22% nel 2003, 0.9% nel 2004, 0.82% nel 2005).
La Corte ha preso anche nota del fatto che i paesi vicini nei quali furono predisposti degli schemi di rimborso simili, furono d'accordo a pagare dei tassi di interesse notevolmente più alti: 5% in Croazia e 2% nel Montenegro e Serbia.
Ciononostante, dato il margine di valutazione ampio dello Stato rispondente (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra) e, in particolare, il bisogno di ricostruire l'economia nazionale a seguito di una guerra devastatrice, la Corte non considera questo fattore sufficiente di per sé a rendere la legislazione corrente contraria all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Concorda a questo riguardo con la Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia ed Erzegovina (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra).
55. Se da una parte la Corte trova la legislazione corrente così com’è compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, dall’altra conviene col richiedente che il suo stato di attuazione è insoddisfacente. Mentre nella Repubblica Srpska non è stato accumulato nessun ritardo, lo stesso non è vero per la Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina e per il Distretto di Brčko. Nel Distretto di Brčko, le obbligazioni statali, benché dovute il 31 marzo 2008, sono state emesse solamente il 30 giugno 2009. Nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina, sembra, che le obbligazioni, similmente dovute il 31 marzo 2008, non sono state ancora emesse. Di conseguenza, il richiedente non è ancora in grado di venderli nella Borsa Valori ed ottenere così i pagamenti anticipati in contanti (vedere paragrafo 53 sopra). Inoltre, le rate dovute sotto la legislazione corrente il 27 settembre 2008 furono pagato pressoché tre mesi più tardi (24 dicembre 2008) nel Distretto di Brčko e pressoché otto mesi più tardi (il 14 maggio 2009) nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina. Similmente, la rata dovuts il 27 marzo 2009 fu pagata pressoché tre mesi più tardi (11 giugno 2009) nel Distretto di Brčko e non è stata ancora pagata nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina.
56. La Corte è consapevole che i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera, ereditati dalla SFRY costituiscono un carico considerevole per ogni Stato successore . Nondimeno, essendosi impegnato a rimborsare i“vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera in banche con sede locale ed avendo stabilito uno schema di rimborso a questo riguardo , lo Stato rispondente deve mantenere le sue promesse. La preminenza del diritto che sta sotto la Convenzione ed il principio della legalità nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 costringe le Parti Contraenti a rispettare ed applicare, in modo prevedibile e coerente le leggi che hanno decretato (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, § 184).
57. Nella prospettiva dell'attuazione deficiente della legislazione nazionale sui “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera, la Corte conclude che il richiedente può ancora pretendere di essere una vittima ai fini dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, l'eccezione preliminare del Governo è respinta. Per la stessa ragione, vi è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nella presente causa.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
58. L’Articolo 46 della Convenzione si legge come segue:
“1. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà la sua esecuzione.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
59. Il Governo, opponendosi al richiedente, obiettò alla richiesta della procedura della sentenza-pilota nella presente causa e ha ripetuto che la legislazione contestata si è attenuta alle condizioni stabilite dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Principi Generali
60. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, come interpretato alla luce dell’ Articolo 1, impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato dei Ministri delle misure individuali e/o generali appropriate per garantire il diritto del richiedente che la Corte ha trovato essere stato violato. Simili misure devono essere prese anche a riguardo di altre persone nella posizione del richiedente, in particolare risolvendo i problemi che hanno condotto alle sentenze della Corte (vedere Scozzari e Giunta c. Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000-VIII; Christine Goodwin c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 28957/95, § 120 ECHR 2002-VI; Lukenda c. Slovenia, n. 23032/02, § 94 ECHR 2005-X; e S. e Marper c. Regno Unito [GC], N. 30562/04 e 30566/04, § 134 ECHR 2008 -...). Questo obbligo è stato enfatizzato costantemente dal Comitato dei Ministri nella soprintendenza dell'esecuzione delle sentenze della Corte (vedere, per esempio, ResDH(97)336, IntResDH(99)434, IntResDH(2001)65 e ResDH(2006)1).
61. Per facilitare l’attuazione effettiva delle sue sentenze lungo queste linee la Corte può adottare una procedura di sentenza-pilota che le concede chiaramente di identificare in una sentenza l'esistenza di problemi strutturali sottostanti alle violazioni e di indicare le specifiche misure o azioni da prendere da parte dello stato rispondente per rimediarli (veda Broniowski, citata sopra, §§ 189-94, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, §§ 231-39 ECHR 2006-VIII). Comunque, questo approccio aggiudicativo viene intrapreso con dovuto riguardo alle rispettive funzioni delle istituzioni della Convenzione: spetta al Comitato dei Ministri valutare l'attuazione di misure individuali o generali sotto l’Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione (vedere, per analogia, Broniowski c. Polonia (regolamento amichevole) [GC], n. 31443/96, § 42, ECHR 2005-IX, e Hutten-Czapska c. la Polonia (regolamento amichevole) [GC], n. 35014/97, § 42 ECHR 2008 -...).
62. Un altro importante scopo della procedura della sentenza-pilota è incitare lo Stato rispondente a chiarire i grandi numeri di cause individuali che sorgono dallo stesso problema strutturale a livello nazionale, implementando così il principio di sussidiarietà che sostiene il sistema della Convenzione. Effettivamente, il compito della Corte come definito dall’ Articolo 19, è che, “assicuri l'osservanza degli impegni assunti dalle Alti Parti Contraenti nella Convenzione e nei Protocolli”, non è realizzato necessariamente meglio ripetendo le stesse sentenze in una grande serie di cause (vedere, per analogia, E.G. c. Polonia (dec.), n. 50425/99, § 27 ECHR 2008 -...). L'oggetto della procedura della sentenza-pilota è facilitare la risoluzione più veloce ed effettiva di una disfunzione che colpisce la protezione dei diritti della Convenzione in oggetto nell'ordine legale e nazionale (vedere Wolkenberg ed Altri c. Polonia (dec.), n. 50003/99, § 34 ECHR 2007-XIV). Mentre l'azione dello Stato rispondente dovrebbe mirare primariamente alla risoluzione di tale disfunzione ed all'introduzione, dove appropriato, di vie di ricorso nazionali effettive a riguardo delle violazioni in oggetto, può includere anche soluzioni ad hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatrici ed unilaterali in linea coi requisiti della Convenzione. La Corte può decidere di aggiornare l'esame di tutte le cause simili, dando così allo Stato rispondente un'opportunità di stabilirli in modi così vari (vedere, per analogia, Broniowski, citata sopra, § 198, e Xenides-Arestis c. Turchia, n. 46347/99, § 50 del 22 dicembre 2005). Comunque, se lo stato rispondente fallisce nell’ adottare simili misure a seguito di una sentenza pilota e continua a violare la Convenzione, la Corte non avrà nessuna alternativa se non riprendere l'esame di tutte le richieste simili pendenti di fronte a sé e portarle a giudizio così da assicurare l’osservanza effettiva della Convenzione (vedere, per analogia, E.G. c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 28).
2. L’applicazione dei principi alla presente causa
63. La violazione che la Corte ha trovato nella presente causa colpisce molte persone. Secondo il Fondo Monetario Internazionale, più di un quarto della popolazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina aveva, “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera (vedere Bosnia ed Erzegovina: Problemi Economici selezionati, Relazione del Paese della Fmi N.ro 04/54, marzo 2004, p. 26). Ci sono già inoltre, più di 1,350 richieste simili, presentate a favore di più di 13,500 richiedenti pendenti di fronte alla Corte. Questo rappresenta una minaccia seria alla futura efficacia del sistema della Convenzione. La Corte considera perciò appropriato applicare la procedura della sentenza-pilota nella presente causa, nonostante l'eccezione del Governo a questo riguardo .
64. Benché non spetti in principio alla Corte per determinare quali misure riparatrici possano essere appropriati per soddisfare gli obblighi dello Stato rispondente sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, nella prospettiva della situazione sistematica che ha identificato la Corte osserva che delle misure generali a livello nazionale sono indubbiamente richieste in esecuzione della presente sentenza. In particolare, la Corte considera che le obbligazioni statali devono essere emesse e che qualsiasi rata insoluta deve essere pagata nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva. All'interno dello stesso tempo-limite, la Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina deve impegnarsi anche, come la Repubblica Srpska ed il Distretto di Brčko hanno fatto (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra), a pagare l’ interesse di mora al tasso legale i caso di tardo pagamento di qualsiasi rata imminente. Riguardo ai ritardi trascorsi, la Corte non trova necessario, attualmente, ordinare che venga assegnata una compensazione adeguata a tutte le persone colpite. Comunque, se gli stati rispondenti falliscono nell0 adottare le misure generali indicate sopra e continuano a violare la Convenzione, la Corte può riconsiderare il problema della compensazione in una futura causa appropriata.
65. Rivolgendosi alle molte richieste simili pendenti di fronte alla Corte:
(i) La Corte decide di aggiornare i procedimenti contraddittori per sei mesi dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva in qualsiasi causa concernente i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina e nel Distretto di Brčko nella quale i richiedenti hanno ottenuto certificati di verifica (vedere, per analogia, Burdov c. Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 146 del 15 gennaio 2009). Questa decisione non pregiudica il potere della Corte in qualsiasi momento di dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi causa simile o di cancellarla dal suo ruolo in conformità con la Convenzione.
(ii) La Corte può dichiarare inammissibile in conformità con la Convenzione qualsiasi causa concernente i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera nella quale i richiedenti non hanno ottenuto certificati di verifica, perché ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente riguardo ai ritardi nell'attuazione della legislazione corrente (vedere paragrafo 55 sopra) e non si può considerare che coloro che non hanno ottenuto un certificato di verifica siano stati colpiti da quei ritardi, (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra). Detto questo, lo Stato rispondente deve assicurare che i termine massimi attinenti vengano estesi per almeno sei mesi dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva per permettere ad ognuno di ottenere un certificato di verifica.
(iii) Infine, la Corte può dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi causa concernente i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera nella Repubblica Srpska, anche se i richiedenti hanno ottenuto certificati di verifica, perché nessun ritardo nell'attuazione della legislazione corrente si è verificato in quella Entità.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
66. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
67. Sotto il capo del danno materiale, il richiedente ha ripetuto le sue azioni di reclamo riguardo al contenuto della legislazione corrente: lui richiese il pagamento immediato dell'importo totale dei suoi “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera ed un tasso di interesse più alto. Il Governo non era d'accordo. La Corte osserva che ha respinto queste azioni di reclamo (vedere paragrafi 51-54 sopra). Respinge perciò anche la rivendicazione del richiedente per danno materiale.
68. Il richiedente chiese inoltre BAM 20,000 a riguardo del danno morale. Il Governo sostenne che la rivendicazione era ingiustificata. Comunque, la Corte considera chiaro che il richiedente ha subito una perdita morale che sorge dalla violazione della Convenzione trovata in questa causa. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna EUR 5,000 al richiedente sotto questo capo più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile.
B. Costi e spese
69. Il richiedente ha già ricevuto sotto lo schema di aiuto legale della Corte EUR 850 per la parte scritta dei procedimenti, più EUR 1,350 per costi di viaggio in collegamento con la sua comparizione all'udienza ed EUR 300 per i costi di traduzione. Il 20 marzo 2009 lui ha chiesto un rimborso supplementare dei costi traduzione nell'importo di EUR 729. Il Governo ha descritto questa rivendicazione come tardiva.
70. Mentre è vero che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto presentare la sua rivendicazione entro il 1 febbraio 2009 (come richiesto in una lettera del 15 dicembre 2008 dalla Corte) o, all'ultimo, all'udienza 10 marzo 2009, la Corte considera che i costi di traduzione supplementare del richiedente dovrebbe essere accordato in pieno.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Sostiene che il richiedente può ancora pretendere di essere una vittima ai fini dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione e respinge l'eccezione preliminare del Governo;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che la violazione sopra rappresenta un problema sistematico;
4. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente deve assicurare, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione:
(a) chele obbligazioni statali vengano emesse nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina;
(b) che qualsiasi rata insoluta venga pagata nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina;
(c) che la Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina si impegna a pagare l’interesse di mora al tasso legale in caso di pagamento tardivo di qualsiasi rata imminente;
5. Decide di aggiornare, per sei mesi dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva i procedimenti in tutte le cause che riguardano i “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera nella Federazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina e nel Distretto di Brčko nei quali i richiedenti hanno ottenuto certificati di verifica, senza pregiudizio al potere della Corte in qualsiasi momento di dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi simile causa o di cancellarla dal suo ruolo in conformità con la Convenzione;
6. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro) a riguardo del danno morale ed EUR 729 (settecento e venti nove euro) a riguardo dei costi e delle spese, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, da convertire in marchi convertibili al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
7. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 3 novembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento di Corte, l'opinione concordante del Giudice Mijović è annessa a questa sentenza.
N.B.
F.A.


OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE MIJOVIĆ
Benché io abbia votato con la maggioranza nella Camera su tutte le disposizioni operative della sentenza, il mio ragionamento riguardo ad una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione differisce in una certa misura dalle prospettive espresse nella sentenza.
Secondo la presente sentenza, l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è stato violato a causa dell'attuazione deficiente della legislazione nazionale sui “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera, mentre nella mia opinione personale, una violazione dovrebbe essere basata sulle soluzioni e sulle misure contenute nella legislazione in oggetto. La Camera ha trovato che la legislazione corrente come tale fosse compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ma che era il suo stato di attuazione che era insoddisfacente (vale a dire, perché le obbligazioni statali nella Federazione della Bosnia e Erzegovina non erano state ancora emesse e certe rate non erano state ancora pagate).
Comunque, la mia prospettiva è che la legislazione corrente - forse è meglio dire le misure contestate - non prevedono di per sé un “equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed il requisito della protezione dei diritti dell'individuo.
Il problema dei “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera hanno una storia molto lunga e, come indicato nella sentenza, risale agli anni ottanta. Sopravvisse alla dissoluzione della SFRY, e la Bosnia ed Erzegovina assunsero la piena responsabilità per questo genere di rivendicazioni. I dati preliminari mostrano che il debito pubblico associato eccede 1 miliardo euro. Dati le circostanze complessive, e soprattutto il bisogno di ricostruire l'economia nazionale, è ragionevole accettare che ai proprietari dei così definiti conti bancari “congelati” non possa essere pagato il loro denaro senza uno schema di rimborso attentamente disegnato. Questa è una parte del ragionamento della sentenza che io sostengo.
Dove non sono d'accordo con la Camera, comunque è a riguardo della disposizione legislativa riguardo alla riduzione del tasso di interesse a 0.5% per il periodo dal 1 gennaio 1992 al 15 aprile 2006, una misura che io non considero né giustificata, né proporzionale. In conformità con un rapporto ufficiale presentato dal Governo (vedere la sentenza, paragrafi 54) è ovvio che il tasso di interesse attinente sembra essere molto più alto - 2.33% in media). Comparato al tasso di interesse nei paesi vicini22 che hanno sperimentato più o meno simili effetti catastrofici del conflitto armato e le riforme in corso e che ha predisposto schemi simili di rimborso dei “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera, questo tasso di interesse del 0.5% è il più basso. La Camera era dell'opinione che questo problema rientrava “all'interno del margine di valutazione dello Stato”, mentre secondo me questa disposizione di tasso di interesse sarebbe più che sufficiente di per sé a rendere la legislazione corrente contraria all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
D'altra parte se la Camera avesse optato per questa linea di ragionamento, sia lo Stato che le Entità ed il Distretto di Brčko avrebbero dovuto passare la nuova legislazione che si sarebbe dimostrata successivamente più lunga, economicamente impugnabile e discutibile, e molto scoraggiante per pressoché un quarto della popolazione della Bosnia ed Erzegovina - persone che non si sono soltanto stancate di aspettare ma sono già in un'età avanzata ed in disperazione. Ecco perché i decisi di votare con la maggioranza.

1 Zakon o deviznom poslovanju, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della SFRY n. 66/85, emendamenti pubblicati nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 13/86, 71/86, 2/87, 3/88, 59/88 e 82/90.

2 Zakon o bankama i drugim finansijskim organizacijama, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della SFRY n. 10/89, emendamenti pubblicati nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 40/89, 87/89, 18/90, 72/90 e 79/90.

3 Zakon o deviznom poslovanju i kreditnim odnosima, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della SFRY n. 15/77, emendamenti pubblicati nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 61/82, 77/82, 34/83, 70/83 e 71/84.

4 Zakon o obligacionim odnosima, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della SFRY n. 29/78, emendamenti pubblicati nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 39/85, 45/89 e 57/89.

5 Zakon o sanaciji, stečaju i likvidnosti banaka i drugih finansijskih organizacija, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della SFRY n. 84/89, emendamenti pubblicati nella Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 63/90.

6 Odluka o načinu izvršavanja obaveza Federacije po osnovu jemstva za devize na deviznim računima i deviznim štednim ulozima građana, građanskih pravnih lica i stranih fizičkih lica, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della SFRY n. 27/90.

7 Uredba sa zakonskom snagom o preuzimanju i primjenjivanju saveznih zakona koji se u Bosni i Hercegovini primjenjuju kao republički zakoni,, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Bosnia ed Erzegovina n. 2/92 il 11 aprile 1992.

8 Zakon o prenosu sredstava društvene u državnu svojinu pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Srpska n. 4/93 28 aprile 1993, emendamenti pubblicati pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 29/94 il 28 novembre 1994 31/94 il 27 dicembre 1994 e 9/95 il 19 giugno 1995 19/95 il 2 ottobre 1995 8/96 il 10 aprile 1996 e 20/98 il 15 giugno 1998.

9 Zakon o pretvorbi društvene svojine, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 33/94 25 novembre 1994.

10 Odluka o uslovima i načinu isplata dinara po osnovu definitivne prodaje devizne štednje domaćih fizičkih lica i korišćenju deviza sa deviznih računa i deviznih štednih uloga domaćih fizičkih lica za potrebe liječenja i plaćanja školarine u inostranstvu, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 4/93 il 6 marzo 1993.

11 Odluka o uslovima i načinu davanja kratkoročnih kredita bankama na osnovu definitivne prodaje deponovane devizne štednje građana i efektivno prodatih deviza od strane građana,, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Srpska n. 10/93 15 luglio 1993, emendamenti pubblicati nella Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 2/94 il 21 febbraio 1994.

12 Zakon o utvrđivanju i realizaciji potraživanja građana u postupku privatizacije pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Federazione di Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 27/97 il 28 novembre 1997, emendamenti pubblicati pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 8/99 5 del 5 marzo 1999 45/00 d3l 25 ottobre 2000 54/00 d3l 26 dicembre 2000 32/01 del 24 luglio 2001 27/02 del 28 giugno 2002 57/03 del 21 novembre 2003 44/04 del 21 agosto 2004 e 79/07 del 7 novembre 2007.

13 Uredba o ostvarivanju potraživanja lica koja su imala deviznu štednju u bankama na teritoriju Federacije Bosne i Hercegovine, a nisu imala prebivalište na teritoriju Federacije Bosne i Hercegovine,, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Federazione di Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 44/99 30 ottobre 1999.

14 Zakon o početnom bilansu stanja u postupku privatizacije državnog kapitala u bankama, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Srpska n. 24/98 15 luglio 1998, emendamenti pubblicati pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 70/01 31 dicembre 2001.

15 Zakon o privatizaciji državnog kapitala u preduzećima, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Srpska n. 24/98 15 luglio 1998, emendamenti pubblicati pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 62/02 del 7 ottobre 2002 38/03 del 30 maggio 2003 e 65/03 dell’11 agosto 2003.

16 il marchio convertibile (BAM) usa lo stesso cambio fisso all'euro (EUR) che ha il marchio tedesco (DEM) (EUR 1 = BAM 1.95583).

17 Zakon o izmirenju obaveza po osnovu računa stare devizne štednje, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale di Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 28/06 14 aprile 2006, emendamenti pubblicati pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 76/06 25 settembre 2006 e 72/07 di 26 settembre 2007.

18 Zakon o uslovima i načinu izmirenja obaveza po osnovu računa stare devizne štednje emisijom obveznica u Republici Srpskoj, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Srpska n. 1/08 del 4 gennaio 2008.

19 Odluka o emisiji obveznica Republike Srpske za izmirenje obaveza po osnovu verifikovanih računa stare devizne štednje,pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Srpska n. 20/08 del 5 marzo 2008.

20 Odluka o rasporedu po godinama dospijeća obveznica Bosne i Hercegovine koje se izdaju radi izmirenja obaveza po osnovu računa stare devizne štednje za Federaciju Bosne i Hercegovine i Brčko Distrikt Bosne i Hercegovine, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Bosnia e Erzegovina n. 29/08 dell’8 aprile 2008.

21 Odluka o emisiji obveznica Brčko Distrikta za izmirenje obaveza po osnovu verifikovanih računa stare devizne štednje, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del Distretto di Brčko n. 19/09.

22 5% in Croatia e 2% in Serbia ed Montenegro





DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.