Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SIERPINSKI v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 38016/07/2009
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 03/11/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 6 ; Just satisfaction reserved
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF SIERPIŃSKI v. POLAND
(Application no. 38016/07)
JUDGMENT
(Merits)
STRASBOURG
3 November 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Sierpiński v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 13 October 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 38016/07) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Polish national, Mr W. S. (“the applicant”), on 21 August 2007.
2. The applicant, who had been granted legal aid, was represented by Ms M. G., a lawyer practising in Warszawa. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that he was deprived of a fair trial on account of the Supreme Court’s refusal to examine his cassation complaint (Article 6); he also complained about the alleged breach of his property rights (Article 1 of Protocol No. 1).
4. On 11 December 2007 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
5. The applicant, but not the Government, filed observations on the admissibility and merits of the application (Rule 59 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
1. Background to the case
6. The applicant was born in 1933 and lives in Warszawa.
7. The applicant’s family owned a plot of land situated in Warsaw. The applicant is the heir of the owners of that property.
8. By virtue of the Decree of 26 October 1945 on the Ownership and Use of Land in Warsaw (“the 1945 Decree”) the ownership of all private land was transferred to the City of Warsaw.
9. The applicant’s predecessors requested to be granted the right of temporary ownership (własność czasowa) of the plot of land pursuant to section 7 of the 1945 Decree. On 27 December 1966 the Board of the Warsaw National Council (Prezydium Rady Narodowej) refused the request on the basis that the plot of land had been designated for public use (namely, an agricultural co-operative).
10. On 27 June 1967 the Warsaw-Mokotów District National Council (Prezydium Dzielnicowej Rady Narodowej) issued a decision granting the right of perpetual use of the plot of land to T. K.
11. On 23 January 1992 the applicant’s predecessor Z.S. lodged an application with the Minister of Planning and Construction (Minister Gospodarki Przestrzennej i Budownictwa) for annulment of the administrative decision of 27 December 1966. On 10 February 1993 the Minister declared the decision null and void.
2. Proceedings in which the applicant sought to have the expropriation decision declared null and void
12. On 14 June 2000 the Local Government Board of Appeal (Samorządowe Kolegium Odwoławcze) declared that the decision of 27 June 1967 had been issued in breach of law. However, the Board refused to declare the decision null and void in view of its irreversible legal consequences – on the basis of the 1967 decision a civil contract had been concluded with the perpetual user of the land who, in 1990, had transferred the rights to the estate to his son.
13. On 3 March 2003 the Local Government Board of Appeal dismissed the applicant’s claim for compensation in respect of the 1967 decision on the grounds that he had not proved “an actual loss” (see domestic law part below).
14. On 8 April 2003 the applicant lodged a compensation claim with the Warsaw Regional Court.
15. On 10 November 2004 the Regional Court delivered a judgment and awarded the applicant PLN 604,000. The court found that as a consequence of the unlawful 1967 decision the applicant had lost his property right and thus had suffered loss amounting to the value of that right. The court further considered that the State Treasury had the legal capacity to be sued for damages in this case.
16. The State Treasury, represented by the Mayor of Warsaw, appealed against the judgment, arguing that the municipality (gmina) should have been sued in this case.
17. On 14 July 2005 the Warsaw Court of Appeal allowed the appeal and dismissed the applicant’s claim. The court, although it observed that the case-law had been divergent on the issue, inclined to the view expressed in a Supreme Court resolution of 16 November 2004, that the municipality – and not the State Treasury – had the legal capacity to be sued for damages resulting from an administrative decision issued before 27 May 1990, provided that the decision had been annulled or declared unlawful after that date (see domestic law part below).
18. The applicant lodged a cassation complaint. He submitted that the judgment was in breach of relevant substantive law on account of an erroneous interpretation of the Local Self-Government Act of 10 May 1990. He also invoked Articles 3984 § 1 (3) and 3989 of the Civil Procedure Code arguing that the examination of the cassation complaint was justified because there was a significant legal issue in the case and a need for an authoritative interpretation of provisions which had been interpreted differently in the courts’ case-law. The applicant gave examples of divergent case-law of the Supreme Court and Courts of Appeal. He further pointed to the fact that the resolution invoked by the Warsaw Court of Appeal, amending the hitherto prevailing jurisprudence, had been delivered six days after the judgment of the Regional Court.
19. On 10 January 2006 the Supreme Court refused to entertain the cassation complaint. The decision was taken by a single judge sitting in camera and was not reasoned.
3. Proceedings in which the applicant sought to have the judgment of the Court of Appeal declared to be contrary to law
20. On 7 December 2006 a panel of seven judges of the Supreme Court adopted a resolution in other proceedings in which it concluded that the State Treasury had the legal capacity to be sued for damages caused by an administrative decision delivered before 27 May 1990, even if the decision had been annulled or declared null and void after that date.
21. On 5 February 2007 the applicant lodged a complaint with the Supreme Court seeking to have the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 14 July 2005 declared contrary to law (see the domestic law part).
22. On 15 June 2007 the Supreme Court rejected the complaint. The court concluded that the notion of the judgment “appealed from” within the meaning of Article 4241 § 3 of the Code of Civil Procedure (preventing the examination of the complaint – see the domestic law part) required that a cassation complaint against a judgment had been lodged “effectively”, meaning it had not been rejected. In the court’s view a cassation complaint which the Supreme Court had refused to entertain should be understood, for the purpose of this Article, as an “effectively lodged cassation complaint”, as well as a cassation complaint which had been examined on the merits. The Supreme Court in its decision of 10 January 2006 refused to examine the applicant’s cassation complaint. The Supreme Court thus concluded that the judgment of the Court of Appeal had been appealed against effectively and the complaint under Article 4241 was not available.1
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
1. Relevant provisions concerning a cassation complaint
23. On 6 February 2005 new provisions on a “cassation complaint” came into effect, replacing the provisions concerning the cassation appeal.
24. Article 3981 of the Code of Civil Procedure provides that a party may lodge a cassation complaint against a final and valid judgment of a second-instance court. A party must be represented by an advocate or a legal adviser.
25. The relevant part of Article 3983 reads as follows:
“The cassation complaint may be based on the following grounds:
1) a breach of substantive law caused by its erroneous interpretation or wrongful application;
2) a breach of procedural provisions, if that defect could significantly affect the outcome of the case.”
26. Article 3984 specifies the requirements of a cassation complaint. It reads in its relevant part:
Ҥ 1. A cassation complaint should include:
1) an indication of the decision under appeal together with information as to whether the appeal is lodged against this decision in its entirety or in part only;
2) an indication of the grounds for the cassation complaint;
3) arguments showing that its examination would be justified;
4) a motion to have the decision under appeal quashed or amended, specifying also the scope of the motion.”
27. Article 3989 provides:
1. The Supreme Court shall entertain the cassation complaint if:
1) there is a significant legal issue in the case,
2) there is a need for the interpretation of provisions raising serious doubts or causing discrepancies in the courts’ case-law,
3) the proceedings are invalid at law,
4) the complaint is manifestly well-founded.
2. The Supreme Court shall decide to accept or refuse to entertain the cassation complaint during a sitting in camera; the decision shall not require written reasons.
28. According to Article 39810 a cassation is examined by a panel of three judges and in all other cases the Supreme Court takes decisions sitting in a single judge formation. As a rule, the cassation complaint is examined at a sitting in camera unless there is a significant legal issue in the case and the party lodging a complaint requested a hearing to be held, or the Supreme Court finds it appropriate to hold a hearing (Article 39811).
29. Pursuant to Article 39815 the Supreme Court, having allowed a cassation complaint, may quash the challenged judgment in its entirety or in part and remit the case for re-examination. Where the Supreme Court fails to find non-conformity with the law, it dismisses the cassation complaint (Article 39814).
2. The complaint to declare a final and binding ruling to be contrary to law
30. An amendment of 22 December 2004 to the Code of Civil Procedure, which entered into force on 6 February 2005, introduced a new extraordinary remedy against a final judicial decision – a complaint to declare a final and binding ruling to be contrary to law (skarga o stwierdzenie niezgodności z prawem prawomocnego orzeczenia).
31. According to Article 4241, a party to the proceedings may request the Supreme Court to declare a final decision of a second-instance court to be contrary to law, provided that the party has suffered damage as a result of that decision and it has been impossible to have the decision reversed or quashed by way of remedies available to the party.
32. Pursuant to § 3 of that Article a party cannot lodge a complaint against a second-instance decision which had already been challenged by way of a cassation, or against a decision issued by the Supreme Court.
3. The judgment of the Constitutional Court
33. The new regulations have been challenged before the Constitutional Court. In a judgment of 30 May 2007 (SK 68/06) the Constitutional Court found the new Article 3989 incompatible with the Constitution, but only insofar as it allowed the Supreme Court to refrain from giving reasons for its decisions.
34. In this respect the Constitutional Court referred, inter alia, to its judgment of 16 January 2006 (SK 30/05), in which it had already examined the possibility of the Supreme Court under the Criminal Procedure Code (Article 535 § 2) to dismiss an “evidently groundless” cassation appeal in a criminal case at a sitting without the participation of the parties and without giving written reasons for the judgment. The court found in this respect that “there is the accumulation at a single trial of three factors excluding the court’s obligations as regards the provision of information (i.e. the informational obligation of the court). These are: secrecy of the proceedings; the use of the ambiguous term “evidently groundless” by the legislator; and the absence of an obligation that reasons be provided.”
4. The individual constitutional complaint
35. Article 79 § 1 of the Constitution, which entered into force on 17 October 1997, provides as follows:
“In accordance with principles specified by statute, everyone whose constitutional freedoms or rights have been infringed, shall have the right to appeal to the Constitutional Court for a judgment on the conformity with the Constitution of a statute or another normative act on the basis of which a court or an administrative authority has issued a final decision on his freedoms or rights or on his obligations specified in the Constitution.”
36. Article 190 of the Constitution, insofar as relevant, provides as follows:
“1. Judgments of the Constitutional Court shall be universally binding and final.
2. Judgments of the Constitutional Court, ... shall be published without delay.
3. A judgment of the Constitutional Court shall take effect from the day of its publication; however, the Constitutional Court may specify another date for the end of the binding force of a normative act. Such time-limit may not exceed 18 months in relation to a statute or 12 months in relation to any other normative act. ...
4. A judgment of the Constitutional Court on the non-conformity with the Constitution, an international agreement or statute, of a normative act on the basis of which a final and enforceable judicial decision or a final administrative decision ... was given, shall be a basis for re-opening of the proceedings, or for quashing the decision ... in a manner and on principles specified in provisions applicable to the given proceedings.”
37. Article 39 of the Constitutional Court Act reads:
“1. The Court shall, at a sitting in camera, discontinue the proceedings:
1) if the pronouncement of a judicial decision would not serve any purpose or is inadmissible;
2) in consequence of the withdrawal of the application, question of law or constitutional complaint;
3) if the normative act has ceased to have effect ... prior to the delivery of a judicial decision by the Tribunal.
2. If these circumstances come to light at the hearing, the Tribunal shall take a decision to discontinue the proceedings.
3. Item 1 (3) of the present Article does not apply if giving a decision on the compatibility with the Constitution of a normative act which has already lost its validity is necessary for the protection of the constitutional freedoms and rights.”
5. Re-opening of civil proceedings following a judgment of the Constitutional Court
38. Article 4011 of the Code of Civil Procedure provides that a party to civil proceedings which have ended with a final judgment on the merits can request that these proceedings be re-opened, if the Constitutional Court has found that the legal provision on the basis of which the judgment was given was incompatible with the Constitution. Such a request can be lodged with the competent court within one month from the date of the judgment of the Constitutional Court.
6. The 1945 Decree on real property in Warsaw and the Local Self-Government Act of 10 May 1990
39. The Decree of 26 October 1945 on real property in Warsaw expropriated real property situated in Warsaw and transferred ownership to the municipality of Warsaw.
40. Pursuant to section 33(2) of the Local State Administration Act of 20 March 1950, ownership of property situated in Warsaw was assigned to the State Treasury.
41. A very significant reduction in the State Treasury’s land resources was brought about by legislative measures aimed at reforming the administrative structure of the State.
42. The Local Self-Government Act (introductory provisions) of 10 May 1990 (Przepisy wprowadzające ustawę o samorządzie terytorialnym i ustawę o pracownikach samorządowych – “the 1990 Act”), which came into force on 27 May 1990, and other related statutes enacted at that time, re-established local self-government and municipalities and transferred to them powers that had previously been exercised solely by the local State administration. Pursuant to section 5(1), ownership of land which had previously been held by the State Treasury and which had been within the administrative territory of municipalities at the relevant time was transferred to the municipality.
43. Section 36 § 3 (3) of the Act provides:
“The State Treasury takes over:
3) obligations and receivables of local bodies of state administration (...) resulting from final and binding court rulings and administrative decisions delivered before 27 May 1990 (...).”
7. Temporary ownership and perpetual use
44. Under Article 7 of the 1945 Decree, former owners had the right to lodge an application for temporary ownership of his plots (własność czasowa). The authorities competent to deal with such applications first had to examine whether the plots concerned had not been designated for public use. If he considered that granting temporary ownership to former owners would not be incompatible with public use, a decision could be made in favour of the former owner.
45. Article 40 of the Law of 14 July 1961 on Administration of Land in Towns and Estates (ustawa o gospodarce terenami w miastach i osiedlach) replaced temporary ownership with perpetual use (użytkowanie wieczyste).
46. The right to perpetual use is regulated by the Civil Code. An individual or a legal entity may be granted such a right over land owned by the State or a local authority. The right comprises a right to use the land to the exclusion of others for ninety-nine years, on payment of a yearly fee. The person entitled to the right can dispose of it.
8. Compensation for damages caused by an administrative decision subsequently annulled or declared null and void
47. Article 155 of the Code of Administrative Procedure permits the amendment or annulment of any final administrative decision at any time where necessary in the general or individual interest, if this is not prohibited by specific legal provisions. In particular, pursuant to Article 156, a final administrative decision is subject to annulment if it has been issued by an authority which had no jurisdiction, or if it is without a legal basis or contrary to the applicable laws.
48. Article 160 of the Code of Administrative Procedure, as applicable at the material time, read in its relevant part:
“A person who has suffered loss on account of the issuing of a decision in a manner contrary to Article 156 § 1 or on account of the annulment of such a decision shall have a claim for compensation for actual loss, unless he has been responsible for the circumstances mentioned in this provision.”
49. An administrative decision in respect of the compensation claim could be appealed against in a civil court.
9. Resolutions of the Supreme Court concerning the capacity to be sued for damages caused by an administrative decision
50. Section 36 § 3 (3) of the 1990 Act raised doubts as to which legal entity was liable for damages caused by an unlawful administrative decision issued before the administrative reform. The problem was subject to divergent judicial interpretation.
51. On 16 November 2004 a panel of three judges of the Supreme Court adopted a resolution (no. III CZP 64/04), finding that the municipality – and not the State Treasury – had the legal capacity to be sued for damages resulting from an administrative decision issued before 27 May 1990, provided that the decision had been annulled or declared unlawful after that date.
52. In its resolution of 7 December 2006 (no. III CZP 99/06), adopted by a panel of seven judges, the Supreme Court concluded that the State Treasury had the capacity to be sued for damages caused by an administrative decision delivered before 27 May 1990, even if the decision had been annulled or declared null and void after that date. The resolution was adopted following a legal question referred to the Supreme Court by another Court of Appeal having a similar case before it.
53. The Supreme Court confirmed this stance in several subsequent judgments, delivered in cases similar to the present one (see below).
10. Examples of subsequent jurisprudence of the domestic courts
a. Judgment of the Supreme Court of 25 January 2007, ref no. V CSK 425/06
54. On 21 March 2001 the Opolskie Governor declared that the decision of 1983 of the Head of municipality D. had been adopted in breach of law. The plaintiff’s claim for compensation against the State Treasury (Opolskie Governor) was dismissed by the first- and second-instance courts. In particular, the Court of Appeal, invoking the resolution of the Supreme Court of 16 November 2004 (ref no. Ill CZP 64/04), considered that the State Treasury did not have the legal capacity to be sued in that case since municipality D. had taken over its obligations under Article 36 § 1 of the 1990 Introductory Provisions Act.
The Supreme Court quashed the appellate judgment and remitted the case, relying on the above-mentioned resolution of 7 December 2006.
b. Judgment of the Supreme Court of 14 March 2007, ref no. I CSK 247/06
55. In 1951 the Presidium of the Warsaw National Council refused to grant the right of perpetual use of land covered by the operation of the 1945 Decree. Subsequently, the State Treasury sold three flats in the building. On 22 September 1994 the Minister of Construction declared that the decision of 1951 had been adopted in breach of law.
The plaintiffs lodged a civil action for compensation against the State Treasury. The Warsaw Regional Court allowed his claim in part and awarded compensation from the State Treasury.
On 31 January 2006 the Warsaw Court of Appeal amended the first-instance judgment and dismissed the claim against the State Treasury finding that it lacked legal capacity to be sued in the case.
On 14 March 2007 the Supreme Court quashed the appellate judgment and remitted the case, invoking the resolution of 7 December 2006.
11. Resolution and judgment of the Supreme Court concerning the character of the compensation claim
56. In its judgment of 27 November 2002 (no. I CKN 1215/00), the Supreme Court ruled that there was a causal link between an administrative decision, taken under the 1945 Decree, refusing to grant the previous owner of a real property (a land with a building) the right of temporary ownership (perpetual use) of that property and the sale of apartments in the building by the State Treasury.
57. On 21 March 2003 the Supreme Court adopted a resolution (no. III CZP 6/03) in which it found that financial loss resulting from a decision under the 1945 Decree refusing to grant the right of perpetual use, which had been issued in breach of law, constituted a loss within the meaning of Article 361 § 2 of the Civil Code and an actual damage within the meaning of Article 160 of CAP.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLES 6 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION WITH REGARD TO THE PROCEEDINGS FOR COMPENSATION
58. The applicant complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and under Article 6 of the Convention that as a result of the shortcomings in the decisions of the domestic courts and the lack of legal certainty, he was deprived of compensation for damage caused by an unlawful administrative decision.
59. The applicant also complained under Articles 6 and 13 of Convention that he was deprived of a fair hearing (in particular that he was denied access to a court) and an effective remedy in respect of his allegations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that the Supreme Court had refused to entertain his cassation complaint without giving reasons.
60. These provisions provide in the relevant part:
Article 6
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
Article 13
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
61. The Government refrained from submitting observations on the admissibility and merits of these complaints.
A. Admissibility
62. The Court notes that these complaints are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
a. The parties’ submissions
63. The applicant complained that as a result of the shortcomings in the decisions of the domestic courts and the lack of legal certainty, he was deprived of compensation to which he was entitled under domestic law.
He alleged that the Court of Appeal unfairly dismissed his claim on the grounds that he had not sued the right legal entity, without giving proper consideration to the case-law invoked by him and despite a favourable judgment of the first-instance court.
The applicant further submitted that the Supreme Court had refused to entertain his cassation complaint although the applicant had indicated that all statutory requirements justifying the examination of the cassation complaint on the merits had been met, in particular that there was a need for interpretation of a significant legal issue causing discrepancies in the courts’ case-law.
64. The Government did not comment.
b. The Court’s assessment
i. Existence of possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
65. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is not limited to ownership of physical goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law. Accordingly, as well as physical goods, certain rights and interests constituting assets may also be regarded as “property rights”, and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 1999-II, and Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000-I). The concept of “possessions” is not limited to “existing possessions” but may also cover assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right (see, for example, Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, § 83, ECHR 2001-VIII).
Where the proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim it may be regarded as an “asset” only where it has a sufficient basis in national law, for example where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming it (Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, §§ 52, ECHR 2004-IX; Draon v. France [GC], no. 1513/03, § 68, 6 October 2005; Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 65, 11 January 2007).
Where that has been established, the concept of “legitimate expectation” can come into play, which must be of a nature more concrete than a mere hope and be based on a legal provision or a legal act such as a final judicial decision (see Draon, cited above, § 65, and Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 39794/98, § 73, ECHR 2002-VII).
66. Turning to the circumstances of the present case the Court observes that in the 2000 ruling the Local Government Board of Appeal established that the 1967 decision had been issued in breach of law and this fact entitled the applicant to seek compensation for damage. The Court notes that the entitlement was expressly provided for in domestic law and the domestic courts’ established case-law confirmed the existence of a causal link between a flawed administrative decision and loss sustained in result thereof (see paragraphs 56-57 above). Only the extent of the alleged loss and the amount of compensation remained to be established in judicial proceedings.
Furthermore, in its judgment of 10 November 2004 the Regional Court confirmed the applicant’s entitlement and awarded him PLN 604,000. The court found that as a consequence of the unlawful 1967 decision the applicant had lost his property right and thus had suffered loss amounting to the value of that right.
Therefore, in the Court’s view, the applicant could be considered to have a “legitimate expectation” that his claim would be dealt with in accordance with the applicable laws and, consequently, upheld (see Plechanow v. Poland, no. 22279/04, § 84-85, 7 July 2009 with references to Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, judgment of 20 November 1995, Series A no. 332, § 31 and S.A. Dangeville v. France, no. 36677/97, § 46-48, ECHR 2002-III).
67. Accordingly, the applicant had a pecuniary interest which was recognised under Polish law and which was subject to the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
ii. Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
68. The Court reiterates that the genuine, effective exercise of the right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not depend merely on the State’s duty not to interfere, but may give rise to positive obligations (see Öneryıldız v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 134, ECHR 2004-XII, and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 143, ECHR 2004-V; Blumberga v. Latvia, no. 70930/01, § 65, 14 October 2008).
69. Such positive obligations may entail the taking of measures necessary to protect the right to property, particularly where there is a direct link between the measures an applicant may legitimately expect from the authorities and his effective enjoyment of his possessions, even in cases involving litigation between private entities. This means, in particular, that States are under an obligation to provide a judicial mechanism for settling effectively property disputes and to ensure compliance of those mechanisms with the procedural and material safeguards enshrined in the Convention. This principle applies with all the more force when it is the State itself which is in dispute with an individual.
Accordingly, serious deficiencies in the handling of such disputes may raise an issue under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
70. In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of.
71. While they have a wide margin of appreciation in assessing the existence of a problem of public concern warranting specific measures and in implementing social and economic policies (see Kopecký, cited above, § 37), where an issue in the general interest is at stake it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, in an appropriate manner and with utmost consistency (see Beyeler, cited above, §§ 110 in fine, 114 and 120 in fine; Broniowski, cited above, § 151; Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine, no. 48553/99, §§ 97-98, ECHR 2002-VII; Novoseletskiy v. Ukraine, no. 47148/99, § 102, ECHR 2005-II; Blücher v. the Czech Republic, no. 58580/00, § 57, 11 January 2005; and O.B. Heller, a.s., v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 55631/00, 9 November 2004).
72. The Court reiterates that the Convention imposes no specific obligation on States to right injustices or harm caused before they ratified the Convention. However, once such a solution has been adopted by a State, it must be implemented with reasonable clarity and coherence, in order to avoid, in so far as possible, legal uncertainty and ambiguity for the persons concerned by the implementing measures.
In that context, it should be stressed that uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is an important factor to be taken into account in assessing the State’s conduct (see Broniowski, cited above, § 151).
73. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that the applicant’s claim failed because, in the Court of Appeal’s view, he sued the wrong defendant. The applicant lodged his claim against the State Treasury (and was successful at first instance) on the basis of the hitherto prevailing case-law, which the Court of Appeal considered later to be obsolete. However, although the applicant’s cassation complaint was not admitted, his challenge proved to be in accordance with the latest jurisprudence of the Supreme Court
74. The Court further observes in this context that numerous court actions, such as those instituted by the applicant, have been brought before the domestic courts. Due to several major administrative reforms which had been implemented in Poland during the past fifty years, the courts have been required to determine the authority responsible for taking over the competencies of bodies which had existed previously. The interpretation of provisions of relevant laws introducing the administrative reforms has constantly changed, which has led to varying judicial rulings by different domestic courts on the same legal question (see paragraphs 50-55 above). As a result, the case-law at the domestic level, including the Supreme Court judgments and resolutions, has often been contradictory.
75. The examples of the subsequent case-law in this matter show that the question of liability for damages resulting from flawed administrative decisions was by no means clear at the time the applicant’s claim was examined and the divergences in the case-law continued several years later (see paragraphs 54-55 above).
76. The Court has already held that divergences in case-law are an inherent consequence of any judicial system which is based on a network of trial and appeal courts with authority over the area of its territorial jurisdiction, and that the role of a supreme court is precisely to resolve conflicts between decisions of the courts below (see Zielinski and Pradal and Gonzalez and Others v. France [GC], nos. 24846/94 and 34165/96 to 34173/96, § 59, ECHR 1999-VII). In the instant case, however, even the Supreme Court failed to have a uniform case-law on the legal questions in issue (see paragraphs 51-53 above).
77. The Court does not deny the complexity of the problems with which the courts were faced as a result of the fundamental changes in the competencies of all the various authorities at the local and State administrative levels. It considers, however, that shifting the duty of identifying the competent authority to be sued to the applicant and depriving him of compensation on that basis was a disproportionate requirement and failed to strike a fair balance between the public interest and the applicant’s rights (see Plechanow v. Poland, cited above, § 108).
78. In the Court’s view, when a public entity is liable for damages, the State’s positive obligation to facilitate identification of the correct defendant is all the more important.
79. In the Court’s opinion, the applicant seems to have fallen victim of the administrative reforms, the inconsistency of the case-law and the lack of legal certainty and coherence in this respect. As a result, the applicant was unable to obtain due compensation to which he was entitled.
80. In the light of the foregoing, the Court considers that the State has failed to comply with its positive obligation to provide measures safeguarding the applicant’s right to the effective enjoyment of his possessions as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, thus upsetting the “fair balance” between the demands of the public interest and the need to protect the applicant’s right (see Plechanow v. Poland, cited above, §§ 99-112 and, mutatis mutandis, Sovtransavto Holding, cited above, § 96).
81. Consequently, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. Articles 6 and 13 of Convention
82. Having regard to the particular circumstances of the present case and to the reasoning which led the Court to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that a separate examination of the merits of the case under Articles 6 and 13 of Convention is not necessary.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION WITH REGARD TO THE ACTION TO HAVE A FINAL JUDGMENT DECLARED CONTRARY TO LAW
83. The applicant further complained, relying on Article 13 of Convention, that his request to have the judgment of the Court of Appeal declared contrary to law was rejected by the Supreme Court on the grounds that he had already availed himself of a cassation complaint, although his cassation complaint had not been examined on the merits (see domestic law under 2.)
84. The Government refrained from submitting observations on the admissibility and merits of the complaint.
85. The Court considers the instant complaint concerns an alleged denial of access to a court and should therefore be examined under Article 6 of the Convention.
A. Admissibility
1. Applicability of Article 6
86. The Court must first examine whether Article 6 of the Convention was applicable to the proceedings concerned.
87. The Court recalls that Article 6 applies under its “civil head” if there was a “dispute” (“contestation”) over a “right” which can be said, at least on arguable grounds, to be recognised under domestic law. That dispute must be genuine and serious; it may relate not only to the existence of a right but also to its scope and the manner of its exercise. The Court must also be satisfied that the result of the proceedings at issue was directly decisive for the right asserted (see, mutatis mutandis, Georgiadis v. Greece, judgment of 29 May 1997, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-III, pp. 958-959, § 30, and Rolf Gustafson v. Sweden, judgment of 1 July 1997, Reports 1997-IV, p. 1160, § 38).
Finally, the right must be civil in character (see, for example, Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (no. 2), 19 February 1998, § 38, Reports 1998-I). In this context, Article 6 § 1 of the Convention is applicable where an action is “pecuniary” in nature and is founded on an alleged infringement of rights which are likewise pecuniary rights, notwithstanding the origin of the dispute (see, for example, Beaumartin v. France, judgment of 24 November 1994, Series A no. 296-B, p. 60-61, § 28).
88. In the present case, the Court has found that the domestic courts’ decisions had the effect of depriving the applicant of his right to claim compensation to which he was entitled. The Court has further established that the applicant’s claim “constituted an asset” and therefore amounted to a “possession” within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
89. The Court reiterates that there is no necessary interrelation between the existence of claims covered by the notion of “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the applicability of Article 6 § 1 (see Malhous v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 33071/96, ECHR 2000-XII; Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 52, ECHR 2004-IX; J.S. and A.S. v. Poland, no. 40732/98, § 51, 24 May 2005). However, the fact that the applicant had a legitimate expectation to obtain compensation confirms the existence of a genuine and serious dispute.
90. The Court observes that the remedy in question is provided for in the Code of Civil Procedure. Pursuant to Article 42411 of the Code, when the Supreme Court allows the complaint, it declares the decision complained of to be contrary to law. Such a declaration does not result in the annulment of the decision, which continues to have legal effects, nor does is open the possibility of re-opening the proceedings terminated by a final judicial decision (see, a contrario, Wierciszewska v. Poland, no. 41431/98, § 35, 25 November 2003). However, it does give rise to a compensation claim against the State.
Consequently, the pecuniary and thus “civil” character of the dispute cannot be denied.
91. The Court notes in this connection that it has found Article 6 applicable to an action instituted under Article 155 of the Code of Administrative Procedure (see domestic law, paragraphs 47-49 above) challenging a final administrative decision (see J.S. and A.S. v. Poland, cited above), a remedy similar to the remedy in question in that it may lead (besides the annulment of the impugned administrative decision) to a declaration - giving rise to a compensation claim - that the decision was issued in breach of law.
92. In the present case, the applicant sought to have the judgment of the Court of Appeal of 15 July 2005, in which the court dismissed his claim, declared contrary to law. He argued that the judgment was against the law, as it was contrary to the resolution of seven judges of the Supreme Court of 7 December 2006, which represented a binding interpretation of the relevant law. According to the resolution, the State Treasury had the legal capacity to be sued for damages caused by an administrative decision, whereas the Court of Appeal dismissed the applicant’s claim on the ground that he should have sued the municipality and not the State Treasury.
93. The Court notes that a party may lodge a complaint under Article 4241 only if no other remedy is available against an impugned judicial decision. In the present case, a cassation complaint had been available, and the applicant availed himself of it. However, his cassation complaint had not been examined on the merits. The applicant argued, therefore, that it could not be regarded as an effectively lodged cassation complaint within the meaning of § 3 of Article 4241.
Had the Supreme Court accepted his argument, it could have admitted his complaint and declared the 2005 judgment of the Court of Appeal contrary to law, thus creating for the applicant a legally enforceable claim to obtain compensation for damage suffered in consequence of the judgment. Although the Supreme Court eventually held that the applicant had no locus standi, in effect it determined a civil dispute (cf. Serghides and Christoforou v. Cyprus, (dec.) no. 44730/98, 22 May 2001).
94. In the light of the above, the Court concludes that Article 6 of the Convention is applicable to the proceedings concerned.
95. The Court further notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
96. The Supreme Court rejected the applicant’s complaint under Article 4241 of the Code of Civil Procedure concluding that a cassation complaint, which the Supreme Court had refused to entertain, qualified as an “effectively lodged cassation” in the same way as a cassation, which had been examined on its merits.
97. The applicant contested the conclusion. He disagreed with the presumption that the Supreme Court’s refusal to entertain a cassation complaint is equivalent to its finding that the impugned judgment was issued in accordance with law. He argued that had the Supreme Court admitted his cassation complaint, he would not have to seek another possibility to challenge the erroneous judgment of the Court of Appeal. By rejecting his complaint under Article 4241 the Supreme Court deprived him of all remedies capable of redressing the alleged violation of his property rights.
98. The Court reiterates that Article 6 does not guarantee a right of appeal and does not compel the Contracting States to set up courts of appeal or of cassation. Although where a right of appeal is provided in domestic law Article 6 § 1 applies to such appellate procedures, the right of access to an appeal court is not absolute and the State, which is permitted to place limitations on the right of appeal, enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in relation to such limitations (Delcourt v. Belgium judgment of 17 January 1970, Series A no. 11, § 25; De Ponte Nascimento v. the United Kingdom, (dec.), no. 55331/00, 31 January 2002).
However, the limitations applied cannot restrict or reduce the access left to the individual in such a way or to such an extent that the very essence of the right is impaired (see, inter alia, Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, § 44, ECHR 2001-VIII). Furthermore, a limitation will not be compatible with Article 6 § 1 if it does not pursue a legitimate aim and if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be achieved (see, inter alia, Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, § 44, 12 July 2001, to be published in ECHR 2001-VII).
It is for the Contracting States to decide how they should comply with the obligations arising under the Convention. The Court must satisfy itself that the method chosen by the domestic authorities in a particular case is compatible with the Convention.
99. The compatibility of the limitations permitted under domestic law with the right of access to a court set forth in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention depends on the special features of the proceedings in issue, and it is necessary to take into account the whole of the trial conducted according to the rules of the domestic legal system and the role played in that trial by the highest court, since the conditions of admissibility of an appeal on points of law or to a superior appeal courts may be more rigorous than those for an ordinary appeal (Delcourt, cited above, p. 15, § 26; Wells v. the United Kingdom, (dec.) no. 37794/05, 16 January 2007).
100. The Court first notes that the applicant’s case was examined on the merits by two judicial instances with full jurisdiction as to the facts and law. The Supreme Court subsequently refused to entertain his cassation complaint.
101. The Court further observes that the applicant’s right of access to a court was subject to certain limitations in so far as his action for a declaration that a final judicial decision was contrary to law was rejected by the Supreme Court on the ground that he had already availed himself of a cassation complaint.
102. The Court notes, in this connection, that according to the relevant provisions, the complaint is not available against a judgment that was or could have been challenged by way of other available remedies. The aim of this limitation is to avoid a double examination of the same case by the Supreme Court under a different but substantially similar legal basis. The Court finds this aim legitimate.
103. With regard to the interpretation of the relevant provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure, which was disputed in the present case by the applicant, the Court reiterates that such interpretation lies within the margin of appreciation which the Court must leave to the State to allow it to organise a given remedy in a manner consistent with its own legal system, in this case the conditions of admissibility of a complaint to the superior court.
Having regard to the abovementioned aim of the relevant legislation, it does not seem per se unreasonable or arbitrary to reject a case which had already been examined by the Supreme Court and which (in that court’s view) had not disclosed any indication of being contrary to law. Otherwise, the Supreme Court would have to call into question its own decision, which would be against the principle of legal certainty.
104. In view of the above, the Court considers that in the circumstances of this case there is no appearance of an unreasonable or disproportionate restriction on access to court for the purposes of Article 6 of the Convention. Consequently, it cannot be maintained that the very essence of the applicant’s right to a court was impaired.
105. There has been, therefore, no violation of Article 6 of Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
106. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
107. The applicant claimed PLN 604,000 (approx. EUR 140,480) in respect of pecuniary damage and EUR 15,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
108. The applicant also claimed PLN 3,660 (approx. EUR 350) for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court in addition to the amount already received by the applicant as legal aid from the Council of Europe.
109. The Government did not comment.
110. In the circumstances of the case and having regard to the parties’ submissions, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention as regards pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage and costs and expenses is not ready for decision and reserves it, due regard being had to the possibility that an agreement between the respondent State and the applicant may be reached (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine separately the applicant’s complaints under Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention with regard to the proceedings for compensation;
4. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 of the Convention with regard to the action for a declaration that the final judgment in the applicant’s case was contrary to law;
5. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and accordingly;
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 3 November 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President
1 “Dokonując wykładni art. 4241 § 3 k.p.c., w piśmiennictwie wyrażono trafny pogląd, że przez skargę kasacyjna „wniesioną” należy rozumieć skargę „wniesioną skutecznie”, tj. taką, która nie została odrzucona, a Sąd Najwyższy poddał ja co najmniej tzw. przedsądowi (art. 3989) albo rozpoznał po przyjęciu do rozpoznania. (…) Od wyroku Sądu Apelacyjnego zaskarżonego przez powoda rozpoznawaną skargą wniósł on wcześniej skutecznie skargę kasacyjną, której przyjęcia do rozpoznania odmówił jednak Sąd Najwyższy. Zgodnie zatem z powołanym art. 4241 § 3 k.p.c., skarga o stwierdzenie niezgodności z prawem tego wyroku nie jest dopuszczalna.”


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 6; soddisfazione equa riservata
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA SIERPIŃSKI C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 38016/07)
SENTENZA
(I meriti)
STRASBOURG
3 novembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Sierpiński c. Polonia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 13 ottobre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 38016/07) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino polacco, il Sig. W. S. (“il richiedente”), il 21 agosto 2007.
2. Il richiedente a cui era stato accordato il patrocinio gratuito fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra M. G., un avvocato che pratica a Varsavia. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wołąsiewicz del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, di essere stato privato di un processo equanime a causa del rifiuto della Corte Suprema di esaminare la sua azione di reclamo di cassazione (Articolo 6); lui si lamentò anche della violazione addotta dei suoi diritti alla proprietà (Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1).
4. L’ 11 dicembre 2007 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Decise anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
5. Il richiedente, ma non il Governo, depositò osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e sui meriti della richiesta (Articolo 59 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
1. Background della causa
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1933 e vive a Varsavia.
7. La famiglia del richiedente possedeva un'area di terreno situato a Varsavia. Il richiedente è l'erede dei proprietari di quella proprietà.
8. In virtù del Decreto del 26 ottobre 1945 sulla Proprietà e l’Uso del Terreno a Varsavia (“il Decreto del 1945”) la proprietà di ogni terreno privato fu trasferita alla Città di Varsavia.
9. I predecessori del richiedente richiesero che venisse accordato loro il diritto di proprietà provvisorio (własność czasowa) dell'area di terreno facendo seguito alla sezione 7 del Decreto del 1945. Il 27 dicembre 1966 il Consiglio del Consiglio Nazionale di Varsavia (Prezydium Rady Narodowej) rifiutò la richiesta sulla base che l'area di terreno era stata designata ad uso pubblico (vale a dire, una cooperativa agricola).
10. Il 27 giugno 1967 il Consiglio del Distretto Nazionale di Varsavia-Mokotów (Prezydium Dzielnicowej Rady Narodowej) emise una decisione che accordava a T. K. il diritto usufrutto a vita dell'area di terreno.
11. Il 23 gennaio 1992 il predecessore del richiedente Z.S. depositò una richiesta presso il Ministro di Progettazione e Costruzione (Ministro Gospodarki Przestrzennej i Budownictwa) per annullamento della decisione amministrativa del 27 dicembre 1966. Il 10 febbraio 1993 il Ministro dichiarò la decisione priva di valore legale.
2. Procedimenti nei quali il richiedente cercò di far dichiarare la decisione di espropriazione priva di valore legale
12. Il 14 giugno 2000 il Consiglio del Governo locale di Ricorso (Samorządowe Kolegium Odwoławcze) dichiarò che la decisione del 27 giugno 1967 era stata emessa in violazione della legge. Comunque, il Consiglio rifiutò di dichiarare la decisione priva di valore legale nella prospettiva delle sue conseguenze legali ed irreversibili -sulla base della decisione del 1967 un contratto civile era stato concluso con l'utente con usufrutto a vita del terreno che, nel 1990, aveva trasferito i diritti sull'appezzamento di terreno a suo figlio.
13. Il 3 marzo 2003 il Consiglio del Governo locale di Ricorso respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente per il risarcimento a riguardo della decisione del 1967 per il motivo che non aveva provato “una perdita effettiva” (vedere parte del diritto nazionale sotto).
14. L’ 8 aprile 2003 il richiedente depositò una rivendicazione di risarcimento presso la Corte Regionale di Varsavia.
15. Il 10 novembre 2004 la Corte Regionale consegnò una sentenza ed assegnò PLN 604,000 al richiedente. La corte trovò che come conseguenza della decisione illegale del 1967 il richiedente aveva perso il suo diritto di proprietà e così aveva sofferto di perdita corrispondente al valore di quel diritto. La corte considerò inoltre che la Tesoreria Statale aveva la qualità giuridica per essere citata in giudizio per danni in questa causa.
16. La Tesoreria Statale, rappresentata dal Sindaco di Varsavia, fece appello contro la sentenza dibattendo che il municipio (gmina) avrebbe dovuto essere citato in giudizio in questa causa.
17. Il 14 luglio 2005 la Corte d'appello di Varsavia accolse il ricorso e respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente. La corte, benché osservò che la giurisprudenza era stata divergente sulla questione, propendeva verso la prospettiva espressa in una decisione della Corte Suprema del 16 novembre 2004, per cui il municipio-e non la Tesoreria Statale- aveva la qualità giuridica per essere citato in giudizio per i danni che sono il risultato di una decisione amministrativa emessa prima del 27 maggio 1990, ammesso che la decisione era stata annullata o era stata dichiarata illegale dopo questa data (vedere parte di diritto nazionale sotto).
18. Il richiedente presentò un reclamo di cassazione. Lui presentò che la sentenza era in violazione del diritto sostanziale attinente a causa di un'interpretazione erronea dell'Atto di Autogoverno Locale del 10 maggio 1990. Lui invocò anche gli Articoli 3984 § 1 (3) e 3989 Codice di Procedura Civile dibattendo che l'esame dell'azione di reclamo di cassazione era giustificato perché c'era un problema legale significativo nella causa e la necessità di un'interpretazione autorevole di disposizioni che erano state interpretate differentemente nella giurisprudenza dei tribunali. Il richiedente fece degli esempi di giurisprudenza divergente della Corte Suprema e della Corte d'appello. Evidenziò inoltre al fatto che la decisione invocata dalla Corte d'appello di Varsavia, correggendo la giurisprudenza prevalente fino a questo momento, era stata consegnata sei giorni dopo la sentenza della Corte Regionale.
19. Il 10 gennaio 2006 la Corte Suprema rifiutò di accogliere l'azione di reclamo di cassazione. La decisione fu presa da un solo giudice riunendosi in camera e non fu ragionata.
3. Procedimenti nei quali il richiedente cercò fa dichiarare la sentenza della Corte d'appello contraria alla legge
20. Il 7 dicembre 2006 un pannello di sette giudici della Corte Suprema adottò una decisione in altri procedimenti nei quali conclusero che la Tesoreria Statale aveva la qualità giuridica per essere citata in giudizio per danni causati da una decisione amministrativa consegnata prima del 27 maggio 1990, anche se la decisione era stata annullata o era stata dichiarata priva di valore legale dopo quella data.
21. Il 5 febbraio 2007 il richiedente presentò un reclamo presso la Corte Suprema cercando di far dichiarare la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 14 luglio 2005 contraria alla legge (vedere la parte del diritto nazionale).
22. Il 15 giugno 2007 la Corte Suprema respinse l'azione di reclamo. La corte concluse che la nozione di giudizio “fatto appello da” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 4241 § 3 del Codice di Procedura Civile (che impedisce l'esame dell'azione di reclamo-vedere la parte di diritto nazionale) richiedeva che un reclamo di cassazione contro una sentenza fosse stato presentato “efficacemente”, il che significava non era stato respinto. Nella prospettiva della corte un'azione di reclamo di cassazione che la Corte Suprema aveva rifiutato di accogliere avrebbe dovuto essere interpretata, al fine di questo Articolo, come un “reclamo di cassazione presentata efficacemente”, così come un'azione di reclamo di cassazione che era stata esaminata sui meriti. La Corte Suprema nella sua decisione del 10 gennaio 2006 rifiutò di esaminare l'azione di reclamo di cassazione del richiedente. La Corte Suprema concluse così che era stato fatto appello in modo efficace contro la sentenza della Corte d'appello e l'azione di reclamo sotto Articolo 4241 non era disponibile.1
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
1. Disposizioni attinenti riguardo ad un'azione di reclamo di cassazione
23. Il 6 febbraio 2005 entrarono in vigore nuove disposizioni su un “azione di reclamo di cassazione”, sostituendo le disposizioni a riguardo del ricorso di cassazione.
24. L’Articolo 3981 del Codice di Procedura Civile prevede che una parte può presentare un reclamo di cassazione contro una sentenza definitiva valida di un tribunale di seconda -istanza. Una parte deve essere rappresentata da un difensore o da consulente legale.
25. La parte attinente dell’ Articolo 3983 si legge come segue:
“L'azione di reclamo di cassazione può essere basata sui seguenti motivi:
1) una violazione di diritto sostanziale causata dalla sua interpretazione erronea o dall’applicazione sbagliata;
2) una violazione di disposizioni procedurali, se questo difetto potrebbe colpire significativamente il risultato della causa.”
26. L’Articolo 3984 specifica i requisiti di un'azione di reclamo di cassazione. La sua parte attinente si legge così:
Ҥ 1. Un'azione di reclamo di cassazione dovrebbe includere:
1) un'indicazione della decisione sotto ricorso insieme con le informazioni riguardo a se il ricorso viene depositato contro questa decisione nella sua interezza o solamente in parte;
2) un'indicazione dei motivi per l'azione di reclamo di cassazione;
3) argomenti che mostrano che il suo esame sarebbe giustificato;
4) un'istanza per far annullare o correggere la decisione sotto ricorso, specificando anche lo scopo dell'istanza.”
27. L’Articolo 3989 prevede:
1. La Corte Suprema accoglierà l'azione di reclamo di cassazione se:
1) c'è una questione legale significativo nella causa,
2) c'è bisogno dell'interpretazione di disposizioni che sollevano dubbi seri o discrepanze che causano nella giurisprudenza dei tribunali,
3) i procedimenti sono nulli per la legge,
4) l'azione di reclamo è manifestamente fondata.
2. La Corte Suprema deciderà di accettare o rifiutare di accogliere l'azione di reclamo di cassazione durante una seduta in camera; la decisione non richiederà ragioni scritte.
28. Secondo l’Articolo 39810 una cassazione viene esaminata da un pannello di tre giudici ed in tutte le altre cause la Corte Suprema prende decisioni riunendosi in una sola formazione di giudizio. Come regola, l'azione di reclamo di cassazione viene esaminata in una seduta in camera a meno che ci sia una questione legale significativa nella causa e la parte che presenta un reclamo abbia richiesto di tenere un'udienza, o la Corte Suprema costati appropriato tenere un'udienza (Articolo 39811).
29. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 39815 la Corte Suprema, avendo accolto un'azione di reclamo di cassazione, può annullare la sentenza impugnata nella sua interezza o in parte e rinvia la causa per un riesame. Dove la Corte Suprema va a vuoto nel trovare la non-conformità con la legge, respinge l'azione di reclamo di cassazione (Articolo 39814).
2. L'azione di reclamo per dichiarare un decisione definitiva e vincolante contraria alla legge
30. Un emendamento del 22 dicembre 2004 al Codice di Procedura Civile che entrò in vigore il 6 febbraio 2005 introdusse una nuova via di ricorso straordinaria contro una decisione giudiziale definitiva - un'azione di reclamo per far dichiarare una decisione definitiva e vincolante contraria alla legge (skarga o stwierdzenie niezgodności z prawem prawomocnego orzeczenia).
31. Secondo l’Articolo 4241, una parte ai procedimenti può richiedere alla Corte Suprema di dichiarare una decisione definitiva di un tribunale di seconda -istanza contraria alla legge, purché la parte abbia sofferto di un danno come risultato di questa decisione e sia stato impossibile far revocare o annullare la decisione tramite ricorso disponibile alla parte.
32. Facendo seguito al § 3 di questo Articolo una parte non può presentare un reclamo contro una decisione di seconda -istanza che già era stata impugnata tramite una cassazione, o contro una decisione emessa dalla Corte Suprema.
3. La sentenza della Corte Costituzionale
33. Le nuove regolamentazioni sono state impugnate di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale. In una sentenza del 30 maggio 2007 (SK 68/06) la Corte Costituzionale trovò il nuovo Articolo 3989 incompatibile con la Costituzione, ma solamente per quanto permetteva alla Corte Suprema di astenersi dal dare ragioni per le sue decisioni.
34. A questo riguardo la Corte Costituzionale fece riferimento, inter alia, alla sua sentenza del 16 gennaio 2006 (SK 30/05) in cui aveva già esaminato la possibilità della Corte Suprema sotto il Codice di Procedura Penale (Articolo 535 § 2) di respingere un ricorso di cassazione“evidentemente infondato” in una causa penale in una seduta senza la partecipazione delle parti e senza dare ragioni scritte per la sentenza. La corte ha trovato a questo riguardo che “c'è un accumulo in un solo processo di tre fattori che escludono gli obblighi della corte riguardo alla questione di fornire informazioni (cioè l'obbligo d’informazione della corte). Questi sono: la segretezza dei procedimenti; l'uso del termine ambiguo “evidentemente infondato” da parte del legislatore; e l'assenza di un obbligo di fornire delle ragioni.”
4. L'azione di reclamo costituzionale ed individuale
35. L’Articolo 79 § 1 della Costituzione che entrò in vigore il 17 ottobre 1997 prevede come segue:
“In conformità con principi specificati dallo statuto, ognuno le cui libertà costituzionali o i diritti sono stati infranti avrà diritto a fare appello presso la Corte Costituzionale per una sentenza sulla conformità con la Costituzione di uno statuto o di un altro atto normativo sulla base di cui un tribunale o un'autorità amministrativa ha emesso una decisione definitiva sulle sue libertà o sui diritti o sui suoi obblighi specificati nella Costituzione.”
36. L’Articolo 190 della Costituzione, nella sua parte attinente, prevede come segue:
“1. Le Sentenze della Corte Costituzionale saranno universalmente vincolanti e definitivo.
2. Le Sentenze della Corte Costituzionale,... saranno pubblicate senza ritardo.
3. Una sentenza della Corte Costituzionale prenderà effetto dal giorno della sua pubblicazione; comunque, la Corte Costituzionale può specificare un'altra data per la fine della forza vincolante di un atto normativo. Simile tempo-limite non può eccedere i 18 mesi in relazione ad uno statuto o 12 mesi in relazione a qualsiasi altro atto normativo. ...
4. Una sentenza della Corte Costituzionale sulla non-conformità con la Costituzione, un accordo internazionale o statuto, di un atto normativo sulla base di cui una decisione giudiziale definitiva e ed esecutiva o una decisione amministrativa definitiva... fu resa, sarà una base per la riapertura dei procedimenti, o per annullare la decisione... in modo e su dei principi specificati nelle disposizioni applicabili a determinati procedimenti.”
37. L’Articolo 39 dell’ Atto della Corte Costituzionale enuncia:
“1. La Corte può, in una seduta in camera, cessare i procedimenti:
1) se la dichiarazione di una decisione giudiziale non servisse qualsiasi fine o fosse inammissibile;
2) in conseguenza del ritiro della richiesta, questione di legge o azione di reclamo costituzionale;
3) se l'atto normativo ha cessato di avere effetto... prima della consegna di una decisione giudiziale del Tribunale.
2. Se queste circostanze vengono alla luce nell'udienza, il Tribunale prenderà una decisione di cessare i procedimenti.
3. La voce 1 (3) del presente Articolo non si applica se il dare una decisione sulla compatibilità con la Costituzione di un atto normativo che già ha perso la sua validità è necessario per la protezione delle libertà costituzionali e dei diritti.”
5. Riapertura dei procedimenti civili che seguono una sentenza della Corte Costituzionale
38. L’Articolo 4011 del Codice di Procedura Civile prevede che una parte a procedimenti civili che sono terminati con una sentenza definitiva sui meriti può richiedere che questi procedimenti vengano riaperti, se la Corte Costituzionale ha trovato che la disposizione legale sulla base della quale la sentenza fu resa era incompatibile con la Costituzione. Tale richiesta può essere depositata presso il tribunale competente entro un mese dalla data della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale.
6. Il Decreto del 1945 su beni immobili a Varsavia e l'Atto di Autogoverno Locale del 10 maggio 1990
39. Il Decreto del 26 ottobre 1945 sui beni immobili a Varsavia , beni immobili espropriati situati a Varsavia e trasferiti nella proprietà del municipio di Varsavia.
40. Facendo seguito alla sezione 33(2) dell'Atto di Amministrazione Statale e Locale del 20 marzo 1950, il possesso di proprietà situate a Varsavia fu assegnato alla Tesoreria Statale.
41. Una riduzione molto significativa nelle risorse di terreno della Tesoreria Statale fu provocata da misure legislative che miravano a riformare la struttura amministrativa dello Stato.
42. L'Atto di Autogoverno Locale (disposizioni introduttive) del 10 maggio 1990 (Przepisy wprowadzające ustawę o samorządzie terytorialnym i ustawę o pracownikach samorządowych- “l'Atto del 1990”) che entrò in vigore il 27 maggio 1990 e gli altri statuti relativi decretati a quel tempo, ristabiliva l’autogoverno locale e le municipalità e trasferiva a loro i poteri che prima erano stati esercitati solamente dall'amministrazione Statale locale. Facendo seguito alla sezione 5(1), la proprietà dei terreni che prima erano tenuti dalla Tesoreria Statale e che erano all'interno del territorio amministrativo di municipi al tempo attinente fu trasferita al municipio.
43. La Sezione 36 § 3 (3) dell'Atto prevede:
“La Tesoreria Statale si prende carico:
3) di obblighi e di attivi di enti locali di amministrazione statale (...) che sono il risultato di direttive definitive e e vincolanti dei tribunali e di decisioni amministrative consegnate prima del 27 maggio 1990 (...).”
7. Proprietà provvisoria ed usufrutto a vita
44. Sotto l’Articolo 7 del Decreto del 1945, i precedenti proprietari avevano diritto a depositare una richiesta per la proprietà provvisoria delle sue aree (własność czasowa). L’ autorità competente per trattare con simile richieste prima doveva esaminare se le aree riguardate non erano state designate ad uso pubblico. Se avesse considerato che accordare una proprietà provvisoria a proprietari precedenti non sarebbe stato incompatibile con l’ uso pubblico, si sarebbe potuto prendere una decisione a favore del proprietario precedente.
45. L’Articolo 40 della Legge del 14 luglio 1961 sull’ Amministrazione dei Terreni nella Città e degli Appezzamenti (ustawa o gospodarce terenami w miastach i osiedlach) sostituì la proprietà provvisoria con l’usufrutto a vita (użytkowanie wieczyste).
46. Il diritto all’usufrutto a vita è regolato dal Codice civile. Può essere accordato tale diritto ad un individuo o ad una persona giuridica su un terreno posseduto dallo Stato o da un'autorità locale. Il diritto comprende un diritto all’uso del terreno ad esclusione di altri per novanta-nove anni, su pagamento di una parcella annuale. La persona a cui viene concesso il diritto può disporne.
8. Il risarcimento per danni causati successivamente da una decisione amministrativa annullata o dichiarata priva di valore legale
47. L’Articolo 155 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa permette l'emendamento o l’annullamento di qualsiasi decisione amministrativa definitiva in qualsiasi tempo dove necessario nell’ interesse generale o individuale, se questo non è proibito dalle specifiche disposizioni legali. In particolare, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 156, una decisione amministrativa definitiva è soggetta ad annullamento se è stato emessa da un'autorità che non aveva giurisdizione, o se è senza una base legale o contraria alle leggi applicabili.
48. L’ Articolo 160 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa, come applicabile al tempo attinente, nella sua parte pertinente si legge:
“Una persona che ha sofferto di una perdita a causa dell'uscita di una decisione in modo contrario all’ Articolo 156 § 1 o a causa dell'annullamento di tale decisione avrà una rivendicazione per il risarcimento per la perdita effettiva, a meno che lui sia stato responsabile per le circostanze menzionate in questa disposizione.”
49. Si potrebbe fare ricorso contro una decisione amministrativa a riguardo della rivendicazione di risarcimento in un tribunale civile.
9. Decisioni della Corte Suprema riguardo alla veste di essere citato in giudizio per danni causati da una decisione amministrativa
50. La Sezione 36 § 3 (3) dell'Atto del 1990 ha sollevato dubbi riguardo a quale persona giuridica era responsabile per danni causati da una decisione amministrativa illegale emessa prima della riforma amministrativa . Il problema era soggetto ad interpretazione giudiziale divergente.
51. Il 16 novembre 2004 un pannello di tre giudici della Corte Suprema adottò una decisione (n. III CZP 64/04), trovando che il municipio-e non la Tesoreria Statale -aveva la qualità giuridica per essere citato in giudizio per danni che sono il risultato di una decisione amministrativa emessa prima del 27 maggio 1990, purché questa decisione sia stata annullata o sia stata dichiarata illegale dopo quella data.
52. Nella sua decisione del 7 dicembre 2006 (n. III CZP 99/06), adottata da un pannello di sette giudici, la Corte Suprema concluse che la Tesoreria Statale aveva la veste per essere citata in giudizio per danni causati da una decisione amministrativa consegnata prima del 27 maggio 1990, anche se la decisione era stata annullata o era stata dichiarata priva di valore legale dopo quella data. La decisione fu adottata a seguito di un quesito legale riferito alla Corte Suprema da un'altra Corte d'appello che aveva una causa simile di fronte a sé.
53. La Corte Suprema confermò questa posizione in molte susseguenti sentenze, consegnate in cause simili alla presente (vedere sotto).
10. Esempi della giurisprudenza susseguente dei tribunali nazionali
a. Sentenza della Corte Suprema di 25 gennaio 2007, ref n. il V CSK 425/06
54. Il 21 marzo 2001 il Governatore di Opolskie dichiarò che la decisione del 1983 del Capo del municipio D. era stata adottata in violazione della legge. La rivendicazione del querelante per il risarcimento contro la Tesoreria Statale (Governatore di Opolskie) fu respinta da tribunali di prima - e seconda -istanza. In particolare, la Corte d'appello, invocando la decisione della Corte Suprema del 16 novembre 2004 (ref n. Ill CZP 64/04), considerò che la Tesoreria Statale non aveva la qualità giuridica per essere citata in giudizio in questa causa poiché la municipalità D. aveva assunto i suoi obblighi sotto l’Articolo 36 § 1 dell'Atto delle Disposizioni Introduttive del 1990.
La Corte Suprema annullò la sentenza di appello e rinviò la causa, appellandosi alla decisione summenzionata dwl 7 dicembre 2006.
b. Sentenza della Corte Suprema del 14 marzo 2007, ref n. V CSK 247/06
55. Nel 1951 il Presidium del Consiglio Nazionale di Varsavia si rifiutò di accordare il diritto di usufrutto a vita del terreno coperto dall'operazione del Decreto del 1945. Successivamente, la Tesoreria Statale vendette tre appartamenti nell'edificio. Il 22 settembre 1994 il Ministro delle Costruzioni dichiarò che la decisione del 1951 era stata adottata in violazione della legge.
I querelanti depositarono un'azione civile per il risarcimento contro la Tesoreria Statale. La Corte Regionale di Varsavia accolse la sua rivendicazione in parte ed assegnò un risarcimento dalla Tesoreria Statale.
Il 31 gennaio 2006 la Corte d'appello di Varsavia corresse la sentenza di prima -istanza e respinse la rivendicazione contro la Tesoreria Statale trovando che mancava della qualità giuridica per essere citata in giudizio nella causa.
Il 14 marzo 2007 la Corte Suprema annullò la sentenza di appello e rinviò la causa, invocando la decisione del 7 dicembre 2006.
11. Decisione e sentenza della Corte Suprema riguardo al carattere della rivendicazione di risarcimento
56. Nella sua sentenza del 27 novembre 2002 (n. I CKN 1215/00), la Corte Suprema stabilì che c'era un collegamento causale fra una decisione amministrativa, presa sotto il Decreto del 1945 che rifiutava di accordare al precedente proprietario di un bene immobile (un terreno con un edificio) il diritto di proprietà provvisoria (usufrutto a vita) di quella proprietà e la vendita di appartamenti nell'edificio della Tesoreria Statale.
57. Il 21 marzo 2003 la Corte Suprema adottò una decisione (n. III CZP 6/03) in cui trovò che la perdita finanziaria che era il risultato di una decisione sotto il Decreto del 1945 che rifiuta di accordare il diritto di usufrutto a vita che era stato emesso in violazione della legge costituiva una perdita all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 361 § 2 del Codice civile ed un danno effettivo all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 160 del CAP.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE E DEGLI ARTICOLI 6 E 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE ARIGUARDO DEI PROCEDIMENTI PER IL RISARCIMENTO
58. Il richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione che come risultato dei difetti nelle decisioni dei tribunali nazionali e della mancanza di certezza legale, fu privato del risarcimento per danno causato da una decisione amministrativa illegale.
59. Il richiedente si lamentò anche sotto gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione di essere stato privato di un'udienza corretta (in particolare che gli fu negato accesso ad un tribunale) ed una via di ricorso effettiva a riguardo delle sue dichiarazioni sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in cui la Corte Suprema aveva rifiutato di accogliere la sua azione di reclamo di cassazione senza dare ragioni.
60. Queste disposizioni prevedono nella parte attinente:
Articolo 6
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
Articolo 13
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
61. Il Governo si è astenuto dal presentare osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e i meriti di queste azioni di reclamo.
A. Ammissibilità
62. La Corte nota che queste azioni di reclamo non sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo. Devono essere dichiarate perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
a. Le osservazioni delle parti
63. Il richiedente si lamentò che come risultato dei difetti nelle decisioni dei tribunali nazionali e della mancanza di certezza legale, fu privato di un risarcimento che gli fu concesso sotto il diritto nazionale.
Lui addusse che la Corte d'appello respinse ingiustamente la sua rivendicazione per il motivo che lui non aveva citato in giudizio la persona giuridica giusta, senza dare la corretta considerazione alla giurisprudenza invocata da lui e nonostante una sentenza favorevole del tribunale di prima -istanza.
Il richiedente presentò inoltre che la Corte Suprema aveva rifiutato di accogliere la sua azione di reclamo di cassazione benché il richiedente avesse indicato che tutti i requisiti legali che giustificavano l'esame dell'azione di reclamo di cassazione sui meriti erano stati soddisfatti, in particolare che c'era un bisogno per un’ interpretazione di un problema legale significativo che provocava discrepanze nella giurisprudenza dei tribunali.
64. Il Governo non fece commenti.
b. La valutazione della Corte
i. Esistenza di una proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
65. La Corte reitera che il concetto di “ proprietà” nella prima parte dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato alla proprietà di beni fisici ed è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale. Di conseguenza, così come i beni fisici, anche certi diritti ed interessi che costituiscono dei beni possono essere considerati come “diritti di proprietà”, e così come “proprietà” ai fini di questa disposizione (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 1999-II, e Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 100 ECHR 2000-I). Il concetto di “proprietà” non è limitato a “proprietà esistenti” ma può coprire anche dei beni, incluse rivendicazioni a riguardo dei quali il richiedente può dibattere di avere almeno una “aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (vedere, per esempio, Principe Hans-Adam II del Liechtenstein c. Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, § 83 ECHR 2001-VIII).
Dove l'interesse di proprietà è nella natura di una rivendicazione può essere considerato come un “bene” solamente dove ha una base sufficiente in legge nazionale, per esempio dove è stabilito nella giurisprudenza dei tribunali nazionali che lo confermano (Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, §§ 52 ECHR 2004-IX; Draon c. Francia [GC], n. 1513/03, § 68 del 6 ottobre 2005; Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 65 dell’11 gennaio 2007).
Dove ciò è stato stabilito, il concetto di “aspettativa legittima” può entrare in gioco, che deve essere di natura più concreta di una mera speranza e deve basarsi su una disposizione legale o su un atto legale come una decisione giudiziale definitiva (vedere Draon, citata sopra, § 65, e Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 39794/98, § 73 ECHR 2002-VII).
66. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa la Corte osserva che nei considerando del 2000 il Consiglio di Governo locale del Ricorso ha stabilito che la decisione del 1967 era stata emessa in violazione di legge e questo fatto diede al richiedente un titolo per chiedere il risarcimento per il danno. La Corte nota che il diritto fu offerto espressamente in diritto nazionale e la giurisprudenza stabilita dei tribunali nazionale confermò l'esistenza di un collegamento causale fra una decisione amministrativa difettosa e la perdita subita a riguardo come risultato (vedere divide 56-57 sopra). Rimane da stabilire solamente la misura della perdita addotta e l'importo del risarcimento nei procedimenti giudiziali.
Nella sua sentenza del 10 novembre 2004 la Corte Regionale confermò inoltre, il diritto del richiedente e gli assegnò PLN 604,000. La corte trovò che come conseguenza della decisione illegale del 1967 il richiedente aveva perso il suo diritto di proprietà e così aveva sofferto di una perdita corrispondente al valore di quel diritto.
Perciò, si potrebbe considerare che il richiedente abbia, nella prospettiva della Corte, un’ “aspettativa legittima” che la sua rivendicazione sarebbe stata trattata in conformità con le leggi applicabili e, di conseguenza, sostenuta (vedere Plechanow c. Polonia, n. 22279/04, § 84-85 del 7 luglio 2009 con riferimenti a Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri c. Belgio, sentenza del 20 novembre 1995 Serie A n. 332, § 31 e S.A. Dangeville c. Francia, n. 36677/97, § 46-48 ECHR 2002-III).
67. Di conseguenza, il richiedente aveva un interesse materiale che fu riconosciuto sotto la legge polacca e che era soggetto alla protezione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
ii. Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
68. La Corte reitera che il genuino, esercizio effettivo del diritto protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non dipende soltanto dal dovere dello Stato di non interferire, ma può generare obblighi positivi (vedere Öneryıldız c. Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 134 ECHR 2004-XII, e Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 143 ECHR 2004-V; Blumberga c. Lettonia, n. 70930/01, § 65 del 14 ottobre 2008).
69. Così degli obblighi positivi possono comportare la presa di misure necessarie a proteggere il diritto alla proprietà, in particolare dove c'è un collegamento diretto fra le misure che un richiedente legittimamente può aspettarsi dalle autorità ed il suo godimento effettivo delle sue proprietà, anche in casi che comportano una controversia fra entità private. Questo vuole dire, in particolare, che gli Stati sono sotto l’ obbligo di offrire un meccanismo giudiziale per stabilire efficacemente la proprietà contesta ed assicurare l’ottemperanza di qui meccanismi con le salvaguardie procedurali e materiale custodite nella Convenzione. Questo principio si applica con maggior forza quando è lo Stato stesso che è in controversia con un individuo.
Di conseguenza, le deficienze serie nel trattamento di simili controversie possono sollevare un problema sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
70. Nel valutare l’ottemperanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte deve fare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in gioco, tenendo presente che la Convenzione deve salvaguardare diritti che sono “pratici ed effettivi.” Deve guardare dietro le apparenze e deve investigare le realtà della situazione di cui ci si lamenta.
71. Mentre hanno un ampio margine di valutazione nel valutare l'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica garantendo le specifiche misure e nell'implementare delle politiche sociali ed economiche (vedere Kopecký, citata sopra, § 37), dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale spetta alle autorità pubbliche agire nel tempo dovuto, in modo appropriato e con la massima consistenza (vedere Beyeler, citata sopra, §§ 110 in fine, 114 e 120 in fine; Broniowski, citata sopra, § 151; Sovtransavto Holding c. Ucraina, n. 48553/99, §§ 97-98 ECHR 2002-VII; Novoseletskiy c. Ucraina, n. 47148/99, § 102 ECHR 2005-II; Blücher c. Repubblica ceca, n. 58580/00, § 57 dell’ 11 gennaio 2005; ed O.B. Heller, a.s., c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 55631/00, 9 novembre 2004).
72. La Corte reitera che la Convenzione non impone uno specifico obbligo sugli Stati di correggere le ingiustizie o i danni causati prima della loro ratifica della Convenzione. Comunque una volta che tale soluzione comunque è stata adottata, da un Stato, deve essere implementata con chiarezza ragionevole e con coesione per evitare, per quanto possibile, l’incertezza legale e l'ambiguità per le persone riguardate dalle misure implementate.
In questo contesto, dovrebbe essere sottolineato che l'incertezza-sia legislativa, amministrativa o che sorge da pratiche applicate dalle autorità -è un importante fattore da prendere in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato (vedere Broniowski, citata sopra, § 151).
73. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte nota che la rivendicazione del richiedente andò a vuoto perché, nella prospettiva della Corte d'appello, lui citò in giudizio l'imputato sbagliato. Il richiedente depositò la sua rivendicazione contro la Tesoreria Statale (ed aveva avuto successo in prima istanza) sulla base della giurisprudenza prevalente finora che la Corte d'appello considerò più tardi essere desueta. Comunque, benché l'azione di reclamo di cassazione del richiedente non fu ammessa, fu provato che la sua richiesta era in conformità con l'ultima giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema
74. La Corte osserva inoltre in questo contesto che le numerose azioni dei tribunali, come quelle avviate dal richiedente sono state portate di fronte ai tribunali nazionali. A causa di molte notevoli riforme amministrative che erano state implementate in Polonia durante gli ultimi cinquanta anni , le corti sono state costrette a determinare l'autorità responsabile per prendere le competenze dei corpi che erano esisti prima i. L'interpretazione delle disposizioni delle leggi attinenti che introducono le riforme amministrative è cambiata continuamente il che ha condotto a variare le direttive giudiziali dei diversi tribunali nazionali sullo stesso quesito legale (vedere paragrafi 50-55 sopra). Di conseguenza, la giurisprudenza a livello nazionale, incluse le sentenze della Corte Suprema e le decisioni è stata spesso contraddittoria.
75. Gli esempi della susseguente giurisprudenza a questo riguardo mostrano che la questione della responsabilità per danni che sono il risultato di decisioni amministrative difettose non era affatto chiara al tempo in cui la rivendicazione del richiedente fu esaminata e le divergenze nella giurisprudenza continuò per molti anni dopo (vedere paragrafi 54-55 sopra).
76. La Corte ha già sostenuto che delle divergenze nella giurisprudenza sono una conseguenza inerente a qualsiasi sistema giudiziale che è basato su una rete di processi e di tribunali d’appello con autorità sull'area della sua giurisdizione territoriale, e che il ruolo di una corte suprema deve chiarire precisamente i conflitti fra le decisioni dei tribunali inferiori (vedere Zielinski e Pradal e Gonzalez ed Altri c. Francia [GC], N. 24846/94 e 34165/96 a 34173/96, § 59 ECHR 1999-VII). Nella presente causa, comunque la Corte Suprema andò a vuoto anche nell’uniformare la giurisprudenza sui quesiti legali in oggetto (vedere paragrafi 51-53 sopra).
77. La Corte non nega la complessità dei problemi con cui i tribunali furono messi a confronto come risultato dei cambi fondamentali nelle competenze di tutte le varie autorità dello Stato al livello locale e amministrativo. Comunque, considera che spostando il dovere di identificare l'autorità competente da citare in giudizio al richiedente e spogliarlo del risarcimento su questa base era un requisito sproporzionato e non è riuscito a prevedere un equilibrio equo fra l'interesse pubblico ed i diritti del richiedente (vedere Plechanow c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 108).
78. Nella prospettiva della Corte, quando un'entità pubblica è responsabile per danni, l'obbligo positivo dello Stato di facilitare l’ identificazione dell'imputato corretto è tra tutti il più importante.
79. Nell'opinione della Corte, il richiedente sembra essere stato vittima delle riforme amministrative, della discordanza della giurisprudenza e della mancanza di certezza legale e coesione a questo riguardo. Di conseguenza, il richiedente non era in grado di ottenere risarcimento dovuto che gli era stato concesso.
80. Nella luce di ciò che precede, la Corte considera, che lo Stato è andato a vuoto nell’ attenersi col suo obbligo positivo di offrire delle misure che salvaguardano il diritto del richiedente al godimento effettivo delle sue proprietà come garantito dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, sconvolgendo così l’“equilibrio equo” fra le richieste dell'interesse pubblico ed il bisogno di proteggere il diritto del richiedente (vedere Plechanow c. Polonia, citata sopra, §§ 99-112 e, mutatis mutandis, Sovtransavto Holding citata sopra, § 96).
81. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. Gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione
82. Avendo riguardo alle particolari circostanze della presente causa ed al ragionamento che ha condotto la Corte a trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che non è necessario un esame separato dei meriti della causa sotto gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE RIGUARDO ALL'AZIONE PER FAR DICHIARARE UNA SENTENZA DEFINITIVA CONTRARIA ALLA LEGGE
83. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre, appellandosi all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che la sua richiesta per far dichiarare la sentenza della Corte d'appello contraria alla legge fu respinta dalla Corte Suprema al motivo che lui si era già giovato di un'azione di reclamo di cassazione, benché la sua azione di reclamo di cassazione non fosse stata esaminata sui meriti (vedere diritto nazionale sotto 2.)
84. Il Governo si astenne dal presentare osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e sui meriti dell'azione di reclamo.
85. La Corte considera la presente azione di reclamo concernente l’addotto rifiuto dell’ accesso ad un tribunale e dovrebbe essere esaminata perciò sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 6
86. La Corte prima deve esaminare se l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione era applicabile ai procedimenti riguardati.
87. La Corte richiama che l’Articolo 6 si applica sotto il suo “risvolto civile” se c'era una “controversia” (“contestazione”) su un “diritto” di cui si può dire, almeno sulla base di motivi difendibili, di essere riconosciuto sotto il diritto nazionale. Questa controversia deve essere genuina e seria; non solo può fare riferimento all'esistenza di un diritto ma anche al suo scopo e al modo di esercitarlo. La Corte deve essere soddisfatta anche che il risultato dei procedimenti in questione era direttamente decisivo per il diritto asserito (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Georgiadis c. Grecia, sentenza del 29 maggio 1997, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-III, pp. 958-959, § 30, e Rolf Gustafson c. Svezia, sentenza del 1 luglio 1997, Relazioni 1997-IV, p. 1160, § 38).
Infine, il diritto deve essere di carattere civile (vedere, per esempio, Allan Jacobsson c. Svezia (n. 2), 19 febbraio 1998, § 38 le Relazioni 1998-I). In questo contesto, l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione è applicabile dove è un'azione “materiale” in natura ed è fondata su una violazione addotta dei diritti che sono similmente diritti materiali, nonostante l'origine della controversia (vedere, per esempio, Beaumartin c. Francia, sentenza del 24 novembre 1994 Serie A n. 296-B, p. 60-61, § 28).
88. Nella presente causa, la Corte ha trovato che le decisioni dei tribunali nazionali avevano avuto l'effetto di spogliare il richiedente del suo diritto a richiedere il risarcimento che gli fu concesso . La Corte ha stabilito inoltre che la rivendicazione del richiedente “costituiva un bene” e perciò corrispondeva ad una “proprietà” all'interno del significato della prima frase dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
89. La Corte reitera che non c'è interrelazione necessaria fra l'esistenza di rivendicazioni coperte dalla nozione di “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e l'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 (vedere Malhous c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 33071/96, ECHR 2000-XII; Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 52 ECHR 2004-IX; J.S. ed A.S. c. Polonia, n. 40732/98, § 51 del 24 maggio 2005). Comunque, il fatto che il richiedente aveva un'aspettativa legittima di ottenere il risarcimento conferma l'esistenza di una controversia genuina e seria.
90. La Corte osserva che la via di ricorso in oggetto è prevista dal Codice di Procedura Civile. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 42411 del Codice, quando la Corte Suprema accoglie l'azione di reclamo, dichiara la decisione di cui ci si lamentava contraria alla legge. Tale dichiarazione non dà luogo all'annullamento della decisione che continua ad avere effetti legali né è aperta la possibilità di riaprire i procedimenti terminati con una decisione giudiziale definitiva (vedere, a contrario, Wierciszewska c. Polonia, n. 41431/98, § 35 del 25 novembre 2003). Comunque, genera una rivendicazione di risarcimento contro lo Stato.
Di conseguenza, il carattere materiale e così “civile” della controversia non può essere negato.
91. La Corte nota in questo collegamento che ha trovato l’Articolo 6 applicabile ad un'azione avviata sotto l’Articolo 155 del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa (vedere diritto nazionale, paragrafi 47-49 sopra) che impugnava una decisione amministrativa definitiva (vedere J.S. ed A.S. c. Polonia, citata sopra), una via di ricorso simile alla via di ricorso in oggetto in quanto può condurre (oltre all'annullamento della decisione amministrativa contestata) ad una dichiarazione - generante una rivendicazione di risarcimento - che la decisione era stata emessa in violazione della legge.
92. Nella presente causa, il richiedente chiese di far dichiarare la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 15 luglio 2005 nella quale la corte respinse la sua rivendicazione, contraria alla legge. Lui dibatté che la sentenza era contro la legge, siccome era contraria alla decisione dei sette giudici della Corte Suprema del 7 dicembre 2006 che rappresentava un'interpretazione vincolante della legge attinente. Secondo la decisione, la Tesoreria Statale aveva la qualità giuridica per essere citata in giudizio per danni causati da una decisione amministrativa, mentre la Corte d'appello respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente sulla base che lui avrebbe dovuto citato in giudizio il municipio e non la Tesoreria Statale.
93. La Corte nota che una parte può presentare un reclamo sotto l’Articolo 4241 solamente se nessuna altra via di ricorso è disponibile contro una decisione giudiziale contestata. Nella presente causa, un'azione di reclamo di cassazione era disponibile, ed il richiedente se ne giovò. Comunque, la sua azione di reclamo di cassazione non era stata esaminata sui meriti. Il richiedente dibatté, perciò, che non poteva essere considerata un'azione di reclamo di cassazione efficacemente depositata all'interno del significato del § 3 dell’Articolo 4241.
Se la Corte Suprema avesse accettato il suo argomento, avrebbe potuto ammettere la sua azione di reclamo e avrebbe dichiarato la sentenza del 2005 della Corte d'appello contraria alla legge, creando così per il richiedente una rivendicazione giuridicamente esecutiva per ottenere il risarcimento per il danno subito in conseguenza della sentenza. Benché la Corte Suprema sostenne infine che il richiedente non aveva locus standi, in effetti determinò una controversia civile (cf. Serghides e Christoforou c. Cipro, (dec.) n. 44730/98, 22 maggio 2001).
94. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte conclude, che l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione è applicabile ai procedimenti riguardati.
95. La Corte nota inoltre che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
96. La Corte Suprema respinse l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 4241 del Codice di Procedura Civile concludendo che un'azione di reclamo di cassazione che la Corte Suprema aveva rifiutato di accogliere, si qualificava come un “cassazione depositata efficacemente” nello stesso modo come di una cassazione che era stata esaminata sui suoi meriti.
97. Il richiedente contestò la conclusione. Non era d'accordo con la presunzione che il rifiuto della Corte Suprema di accogliere un'azione di reclamo di cassazione fosse equivalente alla sua costatazione che la sentenza contestata era stata emessa in conformità con l legge. Lui dibatté che se la Corte Suprema avesse ammesso la sua azione di reclamo di cassazione, lui non avrebbe dovuto chiedere un'altra possibilità per impugnare la sentenza erronea della Corte d'appello. Respingendo la sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 4241 la Corte Suprema lo spogliò di tutte le vie di ricorso capaci di compensare la violazione addotta dei suoi diritti di proprietà.
98. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 6 non garantisce un diritto di appello e non obbliga gli Stati Contraenti a preparare una corte d'appello o di cassazione. Benché dove un diritto di appello è offerto in diritto nazionale l’Articolo 6 § 1 si applica a procedure di appello, il diritto di accesso ad una corte di ricorso non è assoluto e lo Stato a cui è permesso di mettere delle limitazioni sul diritto di appello gode così di un certo margine di valutazione in relazione a simile limitazioni (sentenza Delcourt c. Belgio del 17 gennaio 1970, Serie A n. 11, § 25; De Ponte Nascimento c. Regno Unito, (dec.), n. 55331/00, 31 gennaio 2002).
Comunque, le limitazioni applicate non possono restringere o non possono ridurre l'accesso lasciato all'individuo in modo tale o in tale misura da danneggiare la stessa essenza del diritto (vedere, inter alia, Principe Hans-Adam II del Liechtenstein c. Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, § 44 ECHR 2001-VIII). Inoltre, una limitazione non sarà compatibile con l’Articolo 6 § 1 se non insegue uno scopo legittimo e se non c'è una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo perseguito che si cerca di realizzare (vedere, inter alia, Principe Hans-Adam II del Liechtenstein c. Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, § 44, 12 luglio 2001 da pubblicare su ECHR 2001-VII).
Spetta agli Stati Contraenti decidere come attenersi agli obblighi derivanti dalla Convenzione. La Corte deve soddisfarsi che il metodo scelto dalle autorità nazionali in un particolare caso sia compatibile con la Convenzione.
99. La compatibilità delle limitazioni permesse sotto il diritto nazionale al diritto di accesso ad un tribunale stabilite nell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione dipende dalle caratteristiche speciali dei procedimenti in questione, ed è necessario prendere in considerazione il processo intero condotto secondo gli articoli dell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale ed il ruolo giocato in questo processo dalla corte più alta, poiché le condizioni di ammissibilità di un ricorso su questioni di diritto o ad un tribunale di ricorso superiore può essere più rigido di quelle per un ricorso ordinario (Delcourt, citata sopra, p. 15, § 26; Wells c. Regno Unito, (dec.) n. 37794/05, 16 gennaio 2007).
100. La Corte prima nota che la causa del richiedente fu esaminata sui meriti da due istanze giudiziali con la piena giurisdizione riguardo ai fatti e il diritto. La Corte Suprema rifiutò successivamente di accogliere la sua azione di reclamo di cassazione.
101. La Corte osserva inoltre che il diritto del richiedente di accesso ad un tribunale era finora soggetto a certe limitazioni dal momento che la sua azione riguardava il far dichiarare una decisione giudiziale definitiva che era contraria alla legge fu respinta dalla Corte Suprema sulla base che lui già si era giovato a di un'azione di reclamo di cassazione.
102. La Corte nota, in questo collegamento che secondo le disposizioni attinenti, l'azione di reclamo non è disponibile contro una sentenza che era o avrebbe potuta essere impugnata tramite altre vie di ricorso disponibili. Lo scopo di questa limitazione è di evitare un duplice esame della stessa causa da parte della Corte Suprema sotto una diversa base legale ma sostanzialmente simile. La Corte trova questo scopo legittimo.
103. Riguardo all'interpretazione delle disposizioni attinenti del Codice di Procedura Civile che fu contestata nella presente causa dal richiedente la Corte reitera che simile interpretazione rientra all'interno del margine di valutazione che la Corte deve lasciare allo Stato per permettergli di organizzare una determinata via di ricorso in una maniera coerente col suo proprio ordinamento giuridico, in questo caso le condizioni d’ammissibilità di un'azione di reclamo alla corte superiore.
Avendo riguardo allo scopo sopra menzionato della legislazione attinente, non sembra di per sé irragionevole o arbitrario respingere una causa che già era stata esaminata dalla Corte Suprema e che (nella prospettiva di quel tribunale) non aveva rivelato nessuna indicazione di essere contraria alla legge. La Corte Suprema dovrebbe altrimenti, chiamare in questione la sua propria decisione che sarebbe contro il principio di certezza legale.
104. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte considera, che nelle circostanze di questa causa non vi è nessuna comparizione di una restrizione irragionevole o sproporzionata all’ accesso al tribunale ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, non si può sostenere che la stessa essenza del diritto del richiedente ad un tribunale fu danneggiata.
105. Non c'è stata, perciò, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
106. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
107. Il richiedente chiese PLN 604,000 (approx. EUR 140,480) a riguardo del danno materiale ed EUR 15,000 a riguardo del danno morale.
108. Il richiedente chiese anche PLN 3,660 (approx. EUR 350) per i costi e le spese già incorse di fronte alla Corte oltre all'importo ricevuto dal richiedente come patrocinio gratuito dal Consiglio d'Europa.
109. Il Governo non fece commenti.
110. Nelle circostanze della causa ed avendo riguardo alle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione riguardo al danno materiale e morale e i costi e le spese non sono pronte per una decisione e la riserva, avendo riguardo alla possibilità che lo Stato rispondente ed al richiedente possano giungere ad un accordo (Articolo 75 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte).
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo Nessuno 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare separatamente le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione riguardo ai procedimenti per il risarcimento;
4. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione riguardo all'azione per far dichiarare la sentenza definitiva nella causa del richiedente contraria alla legge;
5. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per un a decisione e di conseguenza;
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 3 novembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente
1 “Dokonując wykładni art. 4241 § 3 k.p.c., w piśmiennictwie wyrażono trafny pogląd, że przez skargę kasacyjna „wniesioną” należy rozumieć skargę „wniesioną skutecznie”, tj. taką, która nie została odrzucona, a Sąd Najwyższy poddał ja co najmniej tzw. przedsądowi (art. 3989) albo rozpoznał po przyjęciu do rozpoznania. (…) Od wyroku Sądu Apelacyjnego zaskarżonego przez powoda rozpoznawaną skargą wniósł on wcześniej skutecznie skargę kasacyjną, której przyjęcia do rozpoznania odmówił jednak Sąd Najwyższy. Zgodnie zatem z powołanym art. 4241 § 3 k.p.c., skarga o stwierdzenie niezgodności z prawem tego wyroku nie jest dopuszczalna.”




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.