Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF YURIY NIKOLAYEVICH IVANOV v. UKRAINE

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 13, 06, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 40450/04/2009
STATO: Ucraina
DATA: 15/10/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Violation of Art. 13 ; Respondent State to take individual measures ; Respondent State to take measures of a general character ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF YURIY NIKOLAYEVICH IVANOV v. UKRAINE
(Application no. 40450/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
15 October 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Yuriy Nikolayevich Ivanov v. Ukraine,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Mark Villiger,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
Mykhaylo Buromenskiy, ad hoc judge,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 22 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 40450/04) against Ukraine lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mr Y. N. I. (“the applicant”), on 13 September 2004.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr I. P., a lawyer practising in Kirovograd. The Ukrainian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Y. Zaytsev, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. On 24 October 2006 the President of the Fifth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
4. In accordance with Article 36 § 1 of the Convention, the Russian Government were invited to exercise their right to intervene in the proceedings, but they declined to do so.
5. On 25 November 2008 the Chamber decided to give priority treatment to the above application in accordance with Rule 41 of the Rules of Court and to inform the parties that it was considering the suitability of applying a pilot-judgment procedure in the case (see, for a recent authority, Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, §§129-130, 15 January 2009). The Chamber also decided to invite the parties, under Rule 54 § 2 (c), to submit further observations on the case.
6. The parties filed further written observations. The applicant requested the Chamber to hold a hearing and to relinquish jurisdiction in favour of the Grand Chamber under Rule 72. The Government objected to a hearing and to relinquishment of the Chamber's jurisdiction. The Chamber decided, pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 and Rule 72 §§ 1 and 2, that no hearing was required and that it was not necessary to refer this case to the Grand Chamber.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
7. The applicant was born in 1957 and lives in Moscow.
A. Proceedings against the military unit
8. In October 2000 the applicant retired from the Ukrainian Army. He was entitled to a lump-sum retirement payment and compensation for his uniform, but the payments were not made to him on his retirement.
9. In July 2001 the applicant instituted proceedings in the Cherkassy Regional Military Court against Military Unit A-1575, seeking recovery of the debt. On 22 August 2001 the court allowed his claim in full and ordered the military unit to pay the applicant 1,449.36 Ukrainian hryvnias (UAH)1 in compensation for his uniform, UAH 2,512.502 in retirement payment arrears, and UAH 513 by way of reimbursement for the court fees. On 22 September 2001 the court's judgment became final and enforceable.
10. On an unspecified date the applicant received UAH 2,512.504. The remainder of the award remained unpaid.
11. The enforcement proceedings concerning the judgment of 22 August 2001 commenced on 24 January 2002. In the course of those proceedings the bailiffs informed the applicant that they had frozen the debtor's bank accounts, though no funds had been found in those accounts.
12. In a letter of 12 November 2002 the Ministry of Defence informed the applicant that the legislative provisions entitling him to compensation for his uniform were suspended and that there were no budgetary allocations for such payments.
13. On 5 May 2003 the debtor military unit was disbanded and Military Unit A-0680 became its successor.
14. In a letter of 6 April 2004 the bailiffs informed the applicant that the latter military unit had no money to pay the applicant in compliance with the judgment of 22 August 2001. They also mentioned that the forced sale of assets belonging to military units was prohibited by the law.
15. The judgment of 22 August 2001 remains partially unenforced.
B. Proceedings against the bailiffs
16. In 2002 the applicant lodged with the Leninskyy District Court of Kirovograd (“the Leninskyy Court”) a complaint against the bailiffs, alleging that the judgment of 22 August 2001 had not been enforced because of fault on their part. On 3 December 2002 the court found that the bailiffs had not taken the necessary measures to enforce the judgment in the applicant's favour and ordered them to identify and freeze the bank accounts of the debtor military unit in order to seize the money available in those accounts.
17. According to the applicant, the bailiffs did not comply with the court's ruling of 3 December 2002. On 20 May 2003 he lodged a claim with the same court against the bailiffs, seeking compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage.
18. On 29 July 2003 the applicant's claim was partly allowed. The Leninskyy Court found that the judgment of 22 August 2001 remained unenforced through the fault of the bailiffs and awarded the applicant UAH 1,500.365 in compensation for pecuniary damage and UAH 1,0006 for non-pecuniary damage. On 29 August 2003 the judgment of 29 July 2003 became final and enforceable. On 25 February 2004 an appeal by the applicant against the judgment of 29 July 2003 was dismissed as having been lodged out of time.
19. On 3 March 2004 the applicant submitted a written request to the Leninskyy Court to issue a writ of execution in respect of the judgment of 29 July 2003. The applicant did not receive the writ or a reply to his request. The judgment of 29 July 2003 remains unenforced.
20. Throughout the proceedings against the bailiffs, the applicant was assisted and represented by a lawyer.
C. The application to the Court
21. According to the applicant's lawyer, in order to substantiate the application in the present case he had tried to obtain some unspecified documents from the applicant's case file kept by the Leninskyy Court. On 13 July 2004 he requested that court to send him all the documents from the case file, without specifying that he needed them for the applicant's case before the Strasbourg Court.
22. In a letter of 29 July 2004 the Leninskyy Court informed the lawyer that he had failed to provide a form of authority and thus could not obtain the documents requested.
23. The applicant's lawyer did not resubmit his request with an authority form.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Constitution of Ukraine of 26 June 1996
24. Article 124 of the Constitution provides as follows:
“... Judicial decisions are adopted by the courts in the name of Ukraine and are mandatory for execution throughout the entire territory of Ukraine.”
B. Criminal Code of 2001
25. Article 382 of the Code provides:
“1. Wilful failure of an official to comply with a sentence, judgment, ruling or resolution of a court which has entered into force, or hindrance of its enforcement,shall be punishable by a fine [in the amount] of five hundred to one thousand times the statutory non-taxable monthly income, or by deprivation of liberty for a term of up to three years with deprivation of the right to occupy certain positions or engage in certain activities for a term of up to three years.
2. The same actions committed by an official occupying a responsible or especially responsible position, or by a person previously convicted of the crime envisaged by this Article, or [the same actions] causing substantial damage to the legally protected rights and freedoms of citizens, State or public interests or the interests of legal entities,shall be punishable by restraint of liberty for a term of up to five years, or by deprivation of liberty for the same term with deprivation of the right to occupy certain positions or engage in certain activities for a term of up to three years.
3. Wilful failure of an official to comply with a judgment of the European Court of Human Rights shall be punishable by deprivation of liberty for a term of three to eight years with deprivation of the right to occupy certain positions or engage in certain activities for a term of up to three years.”
C. Enforcement Proceedings Act of 21 April 1999
26. The Act determines the procedure for forcible execution of decisions of courts and of other competent authorities and officials (“judgments”).
27. Under section 2 of the Act, the enforcement of judgments is entrusted to the State Bailiffs' Service, which forms part of the Ministry of Justice. Other entities and officials may also carry out enforcement in accordance with the law. In particular, pursuant to section 9, the bodies of the State Treasury are responsible for the enforcement of judgments concerning recovery of money from the State or local budgets or entities financed from the State budget.
28. The Act confers a wide range of powers on bailiffs in enforcement proceedings. In particular, they are entitled to seek and obtain, from any person concerned, information and documents that are necessary for the enforcement of decisions, to enter and inspect premises belonging or occupied by debtors, to seize and sell debtors' property, to freeze debtors' bank accounts, and to impose fines on citizens and officials in cases envisaged by the law (sections 4-5 of the Act). The bailiffs' orders concerning the enforcement of judgments are binding on all entities, organisations, officials and common citizens in the territory of Ukraine. Pursuant to sections 6 and 88 of the Act, the bailiffs are entitled to punish persons failing to comply with their orders by a fine amounting to ten to thirty times the statutory non-taxable monthly income. If the actions of the offenders fall within the ambit of the criminal law, the bailiffs are to request their prosecution.
29. Section 3 of the Act contains a list of documents on the basis of which bailiffs may proceed with forcible execution (“the enforcement documents”). It includes, inter alia, writs of execution issued by courts, rulings and resolutions of courts in civil, commercial, administrative and criminal cases, judicial orders, and judgments of the European Court of Human Rights. In order to initiate enforcement proceedings, the person in whose favour the judgment was delivered (“the creditor”) or a prosecutor who represented a citizen or the State in the court proceedings must submit to the bailiffs one of the documents specified in section 3 together with a request for its enforcement (section 18). The bailiffs have three days to determine whether the request was made in compliance with the law and, if so, to start the enforcement proceedings, which must normally be completed within six months (sections 24-25). Section 34 of the Act obliges the bailiffs to suspend the enforcement proceedings in specific situations. Such suspension is compulsory if, for instance, a commercial court has started bankruptcy proceedings against the debtor and imposed a ban on payments in respect of creditors' claims, or if the debtor is an enterprise included on the list of fuel and energy enterprises taking part in the procedure for recovery of debts pursuant to the Act on measures designed to ensure the stable functioning of fuel and energy enterprises.
30. Under section 37, enforcement proceedings are to be discontinued in cases where, for example, the judgment has actually been enforced in full, the time allowed for a particular type of debt collection has expired, or the enforcement document has been transferred to the debtor's liquidator following official recognition of the debtor's insolvency. The bailiffs must return the enforcement document to the creditor if, for instance, the debtor does not have property which could be seized with a view to enforcing the judgment and the measures adopted by the bailiffs in order to discover such property have proved to be unsuccessful.
31. Parties to enforcement proceedings or persons involved in them are entitled to challenge the bailiffs' actions or inactivity before their superiors or courts and to claim damages (sections 7, 85 and 86).
32. By the transitional provisions of the Act, the application of sections 4 and 5 was suspended in respect of enterprises included on the list of fuel and energy enterprises taking part in the procedure for recovery of debts pursuant to the Act on measures designed to ensure the stable functioning of fuel and energy enterprises.
D. State Bailiffs' Service Act of 24 March 1998
33. Section 11 of this Act provides that damage caused by bailiffs in the course of execution of a judgment is to be compensated at the expense of the State in accordance with the procedure established by law.
E. Act on Economic Activities in the Armed Forces of Ukraine of 21 September 1999
34. Under section 5 of this Act, a military unit, as an entity taking part in economic activities, is legally responsible for its failure to fulfil its contractual obligations and for damage caused to the environment and to the rights and interests of natural and legal persons and the State. The money allocated under the relevant provisions of its budget, excluding the money allocated in respect of protected items of the budget, may be used to fulfil the unit's obligations. If the amount of money available is insufficient, the Ministry of Defence becomes responsible for the unit's debts. No property allocated to the unit may be used for settlement of its debts.
III. RELEVANT COUNCIL OF EUROPE DOCUMENTS
A. Recommendation Rec(2004)6 of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the improvement of domestic remedies, 12 May 2004
35. At its 114th session on 12 May 2004 the Committee of Ministers, having considered the measures needed to guarantee the long-term effectiveness of the control system instituted by the Convention, recommended, inter alia, that member States
“review, following Court judgments which point to structural or general deficiencies in national law or practice, the effectiveness of the existing domestic remedies and, where necessary, set up effective remedies, in order to avoid repetitive cases being brought before the Court...”
36. In the Appendix to the Recommendation of 12 May 2004, the Committee of Ministers noted:
“... The Court is confronted with an ever-increasing number of applications. This situation jeopardises the long-term effectiveness of the system and therefore calls for a strong reaction from contracting parties. It is precisely within this context that the availability of effective domestic remedies becomes particularly important. The improvement of available domestic remedies will most probably have quantitative and qualitative effects on the workload of the Court:
 on the one hand, the volume of applications to be examined ought to be reduced: fewer applicants would feel compelled to bring the case before the Court if the examination of their complaints before the domestic authorities was sufficiently thorough;
 on the other hand, the examination of applications by the Court will be facilitated if an examination of the merits of cases has been carried out beforehand by a domestic authority, thanks to the improvement of domestic remedies...
13. When a judgment which points to structural or general deficiencies in national law or practice ('pilot case') has been delivered and a large number of applications to the Court concerning the same problem ('repetitive cases') are pending or likely to be lodged, the respondent state should ensure that potential applicants have, where appropriate, an effective remedy allowing them to apply to a competent national authority, which may also apply to current applicants. Such a rapid and effective remedy would enable them to obtain redress at national level, in line with the principle of subsidiarity of the Convention system.
14. The introduction of such a domestic remedy could also significantly reduce the Court's workload. While prompt execution of the pilot judgment remains essential for solving the structural problem and thus for preventing future applications on the same matter, there may exist a category of people who have already been affected by this problem prior to its resolution...
16. In particular, further to a pilot judgment in which a specific structural problem has been found, one alternative might be to adopt an ad hoc approach, whereby the state concerned would assess the appropriateness of introducing a specific remedy or widening an existing remedy by legislation or by judicial interpretation...
18. When specific remedies are set up following a pilot case, governments should speedily inform the Court so that it can take them into account in its treatment of subsequent repetitive cases...”
B. Resolution Res(2004)3 of the Committee of Ministers on judgments revealing an underlying systemic problem, 12 May 2004
37. At the same session of 12 May 2004 the Committee of Ministers adopted a resolution, by which it invited the Court to:
“ ... I. as far as possible, to identify, in its judgments finding a violation of the Convention, what it considers to be an underlying systemic problem and the source of this problem, in particular when it is likely to give rise to numerous applications, so as to assist states in finding the appropriate solution and the Committee of Ministers in supervising the execution of judgments;
II. to specially notify any judgment containing indications of the existence of a systemic problem and of the source of this problem not only to the state concerned and to the Committee of Ministers, but also to the Parliamentary Assembly, to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe and to the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, and to highlight such judgments in an appropriate manner in the database of the Court.”
C. Interim Resolution of the Committee of Ministers on the execution of the judgments of the European Court of Human Rights in 232 cases against Ukraine relative to the failure or serious delay in abiding by final domestic judicial decisions delivered against the state and its entities as well as the absence of an effective remedy, 6 March 2008
38. On 6 March 2008 the Committee of Ministers considered, pursuant to Article 46 § 2 of the Convention, the measures adopted by the Government of Ukraine with a view to complying with the Court's judgments concerning the issue of the prolonged non-enforcement of final domestic decisions. The Committee adopted an interim resolution (CM/ResDH(2008)1), the relevant provisions of which read as follows:
“The Committee of Ministers...
EXPRESSES PARTICULAR CONCERN that notwithstanding a number of legislative and other important initiatives, which have been repeatedly brought to the attention of the Committee of Ministers, little progress has been made so far in resolving the structural problem of non-execution of domestic judicial decisions;
STRONGLY ENCOURAGES the Ukrainian authorities to enhance their political commitment in order to achieve tangible results and to make it a high political priority to abide by their obligations under the Convention and by the Court's judgments, to ensure full and timely execution of the domestic courts' decision;
CALLS UPON the Ukrainian authorities to set up an effective national policy, coordinated at the highest governmental level, with a view to effectively implementing the package of measures announced and other measures which may be necessary to tackle the problem at issue;
URGES the Ukrainian authorities to adopt as a matter of priority the draft laws that were announced before the Committee of Ministers, in particular the law On Amendments to Certain Legal Acts of Ukraine (on the protection of the right to pre-trial and trial proceedings and enforcement of court decisions within reasonable time);
ENCOURAGES the authorities, pending the adoption of the draft laws announced, to consider the adoption of interim measures limiting as far as possible the risk of new violations of the Convention of the same kind, and in particular:
- to consider the adoption of measures similar to those taken in the education sector in other sectors which raise similar problems;
- to take measures to ensure effective management and control over state entities and enterprises to avoid debts arising to employees;
- to ensure in practice the effective liability of civil servants for non-enforcement;
- to award compensation for delays in enforcement of domestic judicial decisions directly on the basis of the Convention's provisions and the Court's case-law as provided by the Law on enforcement of judgments and the application of the case-law of the European Court;
INVITES the Ukrainian authorities to consider, in addition to the measures announced, appropriate solutions in the following areas:
- to improve budgetary planning, particularly by ensuring compatibility between the budgetary laws and the state's payment obligations;
- to ensure the existence of specific mechanisms for rapid additional funding to avoid unnecessary delays in the execution of judicial decisions in case of shortfalls in the initial budgetary appropriations; and
- to ensure the existence of an effective procedure and funds for the execution of domestic courts' judgements delivered against the state...”
D. Decision of the Committee of Ministers on 300 cases concerning the failure or substantial delay by the administration or state companies in abiding by final domestic judgments, 8 June 2009
39. From 2 to 5 June 2009 the Committee of Ministers resumed consideration under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention of the group of the Court's judgments against Ukraine concerning the failure to enforce, or delays in the enforcement of, domestic decisions. The following decision (CM/Del/Dec(2009)1059) was adopted by the Committee on that subject:
“The Deputies,
1. recalled that, as acknowledged by the Committee of Ministers in its Interim Resolution CM/ResDH(2008)1, the non-enforcement of domestic judicial decisions constitutes a structural problem in Ukraine;
2. noted that there are still a number of cases in which domestic court decisions remain unenforced despite the judgments of the European Court;
3. noted with concern that, notwithstanding the efforts made by the Ukrainian authorities in adopting interim measures, the structural problem underlying the violations has not been solved;
4. observed that failure to adopt all necessary measures, including previously announced legislative measures, has resulted in a steady increase in the number of new applications lodged with the European Court concerning non-enforcement of domestic judicial decisions;
5. noted with concern in this context that priority has not been given to setting up a domestic remedy in case of non-enforcement or delayed enforcement of domestic judicial decisions, despite the Committee's repeated calls to this effect;
6. called upon the Ukrainian authorities once again to take rapidly the necessary action to ensure Ukraine's compliance with its obligations under the Convention, and in particular to reconsider the various proposal for reforms made during the examination of these cases (see, in particular, CM/Inf/DH(2007)30 revised and CM/Inf/DH(2007)33);
7. decided to resume consideration of these items at the latest at their 1072nd meeting (December 2009) (DH), possibly in light of a draft interim resolution taking stock of the general and individual measures adopted by then and other outstanding issues if any.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
40. The applicant complained about the non-enforcement of the judgments of the Cherkassy Regional Military Court of 22 August 2001 and of the Leninskyy District Court of 29 July 2003, and of the ruling of the Leninskyy District Court of 3 December 2002. He invoked in this respect Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which provide, in so far as relevant:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] tribunal...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law...”
A. The parties' submissions
41. The Government submitted that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention was inapplicable ratione materiae to the proceedings concerning compensation for the uniform which the applicant had been obliged to wear in the exercise of his public functions. In their view, the award was of a public-law nature and was not decisive for the applicant's private-law rights or obligations. Relying on the same grounds, they suggested that there had been no interference with the applicant's right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the award of 22 August 2001.
42. The Government further argued that that the applicant had not exhausted domestic remedies and had not acquired victim status in respect of his complaints relating to the non-enforcement of the judgment of 29 July 2003, as he had failed to lodge with the Bailiffs' Service a writ of execution for the initiation of enforcement proceedings in respect of that judgment. They submitted that the State was not responsible for its enforcement.
43. The Government therefore invited the Court to declare the application inadmissible.
44. The applicant disagreed. In particular he contended that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 were applicable in his case, as he had discontinued his service in the Army and the award of 22 August 2001 was of a private nature. He further argued that he could not institute enforcement proceedings in respect of the judgment of 29 July 2003 because of the authorities' failure to provide him with a writ of execution for that judgment.
B. The Court's assessment
1. Admissibility
45. The Court observes that it has already held in similar cases against Ukraine that Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are applicable to proceedings concerning claims for compensation for a military officer's uniform as such proceedings concern the right to compensation and not, as the Government put it, title to the uniform; that at the material time the applicants in those cases had already retired from public service and had access to a court under national law, and that a judgment debt constitutes a possession for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for instance, Voytenko v. Ukraine, no. 18966/02, §§ 51-54, 29 June 2004, and Peretyatko v. Ukraine, no. 37758/05, § 16, 27 November 2008). The Court finds no reason to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
46. As regards the question of the admissibility of the complaints concerning the non-enforcement of the judgment of 29 July 2003, the Court reiterates that a person who has obtained a final judgment against the State cannot be expected to bring separate enforcement proceedings (see Metaxas v. Greece, no. 8415/02, § 19, 27 May 2004, and Lizanets v. Ukraine, no. 6725/03, § 43, 31 May 2007). In such cases, the defendant State authority which was duly notified of the judgment must take all necessary measures to comply with it or to transmit it to another competent authority for execution (see Burdov (no. 2), cited above, § 68).
47. Furthermore, the Court notes that the enforcement of the judgment of 29 July 2003 depended on the availability of sufficient budgetary allocations for such purposes and the bailiffs had no power to compel the State to amend its budget laws (see, for instance, Voytenko, cited above, § 30; Glova and Bregin v. Ukraine, nos. 4292/04 and 4347/04, § 14, 28 February 2006; and Vasylyev v. Ukraine, no. 10232/02, § 29, 13 July 2006).
48. Therefore, the Court finds that the applicant cannot be criticised for not lodging with the Bailiffs' Service an application, or a writ of execution, for the initiation of enforcement proceedings.
49. On the same grounds the Court finds that this state of affairs engaged the responsibility of the State for the enforcement of the judgment of 29 July 2003 and that the applicant may claim to be the victim of a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in relation to its non-enforcement.
50. In view of the above considerations, the Court dismisses the Government's objections to the admissibility of this part of the application and concludes that it raises issues of fact and law under the Convention, the determination of which requires an examination of the merits. It finds no ground for declaring it inadmissible. Accordingly, this part of the application must be declared admissible.
2. Merits
(a) General principles
51. The Court reiterates that the right to a court protected by Article 6 would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party (see Hornsby v. Greece, 19 March 1997, § 40, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II). The effective access to court includes the right to have a court decision enforced without undue delay (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 66, ECHR 1999-V).
52. In the same context, the impossibility for an applicant to obtain the execution of a judgment in his or her favour in due time constitutes an interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions, as set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, among other authorities, Voytenko, cited above, § 53).
53. An unreasonably long delay in the enforcement of a binding judgment may therefore breach the Convention (see Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, ECHR 2002-III). The reasonableness of such delay is to be determined having regard in particular to the complexity of the enforcement proceedings, the applicant's own behaviour and that of the competent authorities, and the amount and nature of the court award (see Raylyan v. Russia, no. 22000/03, § 31, 15 February 2007). In assessing the reasonableness of the delay in enforcement due regard must be paid to the fact that a delay of one year and four months in the enforcement of a monetary award against the State body has been found by the Court to be excessive (see Zubko and Others v. Ukraine, nos. 3955/04, 5622/04, 8538/04 and 11418/04, § 70, ECHR 2006-VI).
54. The Court further reiterates that it is the State's obligation to ensure that final decisions against its organs, or entities or companies owned or controlled by the State, are enforced in compliance with the above-mentioned Convention requirements (see Voytenko, cited above; Romashov v. Ukraine, no. 67534/01, 27 July 2004; Dubenko v. Ukraine, no. 74221/01, 11 January 2005; and Kozachek v. Ukraine, no. 29508/04, 7 December 2006). It is not open to the State to cite lack of funds as an excuse for not honouring judgments against it or against entities or companies owned or controlled by it (see Shmalko v. Ukraine, no. 60750/00, § 44, 20 July 2004). The State is responsible for the enforcement of final decisions if the factors impeding or blocking their full and timely enforcement are within the control of the authorities (see Sokur v. Ukraine, no. 29439/02, 26 April 2005, and Kryshchuk v. Ukraine, no. 1811/06, 19 February 2009).
(b) Application of these principles to the present case
55. The Court observes that in the present case the judgment of the Cherkassy Regional Military Court of 22 August 2001 has not been fully enforced so far, the delay in its enforcement being about seven years and ten months. The judgment of the Leninskyy District Court of 29 July 2003 has remained unenforced for about five years and eleven months. The Government's submissions do not contain any justification for such substantial delays in the enforcement of the judgments in the applicant's favour. The Court notes that the delays were caused by a combination of factors, including the lack of budgetary funds, omissions on the part of the bailiffs, and shortcomings in the national legislation, as a result of which there existed no possibility for the applicant to have the judgments enforced in the event of a lack of budgetary allocations for such purposes (see paragraphs 12, 14, 16, 18, 30, and 34 above). The Court considers that those factors were not outside the control of the authorities and thus holds the State fully responsible for this state of affairs.
56. The Court observes that it has frequently found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in cases raising issues similar to those raised in the present case (see, for example, Sinko v. Ukraine, no. 4504/04, § 17, 1 June 2006, and Kozachek, cited above, § 31). There are no arguments in the case capable of persuading the Court to reach a different conclusion.
57. Accordingly, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the prolonged non-enforcement of the judgments of the Cherkassy Regional Military Court of 22 August 2001 and of the Leninskyy District Court of 29 July 2003.
58. In view of its above findings, the Court does not consider it necessary to examine the applicant's complaint under the same provisions about the non-enforcement of the ruling of the Leninskyy District Court of 3 December 2002, by which the bailiffs were ordered to take specific measures with a view to enforcing the judgment of 22 August 2001, as that ruling concerned no more than an incidental matter which arose in the course of the enforcement of the latter judgment (see Zhmak v. Ukraine, no. 36852/03, § 21, 29 June 2006).
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
59. The applicant complained of the lack of effective domestic remedies in respect of his complaints about the non-enforcement of the judgments in his favour. He relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which provides as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The parties' submissions
60. Relying on their objection to the applicability of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see paragraph 41 above), the Government initially argued that Article 13 of the Convention was equally not applicable in the applicant's case. In their further observations the Government did not elaborate on that matter, despite the Court's explicit request for the parties' additional observations on the question of domestic remedies in respect of the prolonged non-enforcement of domestic judgments.
61. The applicant maintained his allegations about the lack of effective remedies in the Ukrainian legal system in respect of the matters raised in the present case.
B. The Court's assessment
1. Admissibility
62. The Court notes that this part of the application is linked to the complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible (see paragraphs 45-50 above).
2. Merits
(a) General principles
63. The Court reiterates that Article 13 of the Convention gives direct expression to the States' obligation, enshrined in Article 1 of the Convention, to protect human rights first and foremost within their own legal system. It therefore requires that the States provide a domestic remedy to deal with the substance of an “arguable complaint” under the Convention and to grant appropriate relief (see Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 152, ECHR 2000-XI).
64. The scope of the Contracting States' obligations under Article 13 of the Convention varies depending on the nature of the applicant's complaint; the “effectiveness” of a “remedy” within the meaning of this provision does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant. At the same time, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law in the sense either of preventing the alleged violation or its continuation, or of providing adequate redress for any violation that has already occurred. Even if a single remedy does not by itself entirely satisfy the requirements of Article 13, the aggregate of remedies provided for under domestic law may do so (see Kudła, cited above, §§ 157-158, and Wasserman v. Russia (no. 2), no. 21071/05, § 45, 10 April 2008).
65. The Court has already given an extensive interpretation of the requirements of Article 13 of the Convention as regards complaints of non-enforcement of domestic court decisions in the recent judgment of Burdov (no. 2) (cited above, §§ 98-100), the relevant parts of which read as follows:
“98. As regards more particularly length-of-proceedings cases, a remedy designed to expedite the proceedings in order to prevent them from becoming excessively lengthy is the most effective solution (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 183, ECHR 2006-...). Likewise, in cases concerning non-enforcement of judicial decisions, any domestic means to prevent a violation by ensuring timely enforcement is, in principle, of greatest value. However, where a judgment is delivered in favour of an individual against the State, the former should not, in principle, be compelled to use such means (see, mutatis mutandis, Metaxas, cited above, § 19): the burden to comply with such a judgment lies primarily with the State authorities, which should use all means available in the domestic legal system in order to speed up the enforcement, thus preventing violations of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Akashev, cited above, §§ 21-22).
99. States can also choose to introduce only a compensatory remedy, without that remedy being regarded as ineffective. Where such a compensatory remedy is available in the domestic legal system, the Court must leave a wider margin of appreciation to the State to allow it to organise the remedy in a manner consistent with its own legal system and traditions and consonant with the standard of living in the country concerned. The Court is nonetheless required to verify whether the way in which the domestic law is interpreted and applied produces consequences that are consistent with the Convention principles, as interpreted in the light of the Court's case-law (see Scordino, cited above, §§ 187-191). The Court has set key criteria for verification of the effectiveness of a compensatory remedy in respect of the excessive length of judicial proceedings. These criteria, which also apply to non-enforcement cases (see Wasserman, cited above, §§ 49 and 51), are as follows:
•an action for compensation must be heard within a reasonable time (see Scordino, cited above, § 195 in fine);
•the compensation must be paid promptly and generally no later than six months from the date on which the decision awarding compensation becomes enforceable (ibid., § 198);
•the procedural rules governing an action for compensation must conform to the principle of fairness guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention (ibid., § 200);
•the rules regarding legal costs must not place an excessive burden on litigants where their action is justified (ibid., § 201);
•the level of compensation must not be unreasonable in comparison with the awards made by the Court in similar cases (ibid., §§ 202-206 and 213).
100. On this last criterion, the Court indicated that, with regard to pecuniary damage, the domestic courts are clearly in a better position to determine the existence and quantum. The situation is, however, different with regard to non-pecuniary damage. There exists a strong but rebuttable presumption that excessively long proceedings will occasion non-pecuniary damage (see Scordino, cited above, §§ 203-204, and Wasserman, cited above, §50). The Court considers this presumption to be particularly strong in the event of excessive delay in enforcement by the State of a judgment delivered against it, given the inevitable frustration arising from the State's disregard for its obligation to honour its debt and the fact that the applicant has already gone through judicial proceedings and obtained success...”
(b) Application of these principles in cases against Ukraine and in the present case
66. The Court refers to one of its first cases against Ukraine, in which it considered the issue of the availability of effective domestic remedies in respect of complaints of prolonged non-enforcement of judgments and made the following conclusions on that issue (see Voytenko, cited above, §§ 30 -31 and 48):
“30. The Government invoked the possibility for the applicant to challenge any inactivity or omissions on the part of the Bailiffs' Service and the Treasury, and to seek compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage caused by them. In the present case, however, the debtor is a State body and the enforcement of judgments against it, as it appears from the case file, can only be carried out if the State foresees and makes provision for the appropriate expenditures in the State Budget of Ukraine by taking the appropriate legislative measures. The facts of the case show that, throughout the period under consideration, the enforcement of the judgment in question was prevented precisely because of the lack of legislative measures, rather then by a bailiff's misconduct. The applicant cannot therefore be reproached for not having taken proceedings against the bailiff (see Shestakov v. Russia, decision, no. 48757/99, 18 June 2002). Moreover, the Court notes that the Government maintained that there were no irregularities in the way the Bailiffs' Service and the Treasury had conducted the enforcement proceedings.
31. In these circumstances, the Court concludes that the applicant was absolved from pursuing the remedy invoked by the Government.
...48. The Court refers to its findings (at paragraphs 30-31 above) in the present case concerning the Government's argument regarding domestic remedies. For the same reasons, the Court concludes that the applicant did not have an effective domestic remedy, as required by Article 13 of the Convention, to redress the damage created by the delay in the present proceedings. Accordingly, there has been a breach of this provision...”
67. The Court confirmed its above findings in subsequent cases raising a similar issue (see, for instance, Romashov, cited above, §§ 31-32 and 47; Garkusha v. Ukraine, no. 4629/03, §§ 18-20, 13 December 2005; Mikhaylova and Others v. Ukraine, no. 16475/02, §§ 27 and 36, 15 June 2006; Vasylyev, cited above, §§ 31-33 and 41; Raisa Tarasenko v. Ukraine, no. 43485/02, § 13, 14 and 23, 7 December 2006; and Pivnenko v. Ukraine, no. 36369/04, §§ 18-20, 12 October 2006).
68. Turning to the present case, the Court finds that there is nothing in the parties' submissions to suggest that there existed a remedy at national level satisfying the requirements of Article 13 of the Convention in respect of the applicant's complaints about the non-enforcement of the judgments in his favour.
69. The proceedings which the applicant instituted against the bailiffs, despite their outcome in his favour, did not provide him with an opportunity to prevent or put right the violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 subsequently found by the Court in his case. While it is true that, in the final judgment of 29 July 2003, the bailiffs were held responsible for the prolonged non-enforcement of the judgment of 22 August 2001 and were ordered to pay compensation to the applicant, this did not improve his situation, since the enforcement of the judgment of 22 August 2001 was not completed, let alone accelerated, and the compensation awarded in the judgment of 29 July 2003 remained unpaid.
70. Accordingly, the Court finds that there has been a breach of Article 13 of the Convention in the present case.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 34 OF THE CONVENTION
71. The applicant alleged that his lawyer had been unable to obtain some unspecified documents from the applicant's case file kept by the Leninskyy Court which he had deemed necessary for the substantiation of the present application. He invoked Article 34 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“The Court may receive applications from any person, non-governmental organisation or group of individuals claiming to be the victim of a violation by one of the High Contracting Parties of the rights set forth in the Convention or the Protocols thereto. The High Contracting Parties undertake not to hinder in any way the effective exercise of this right.”
72. The Court notes that it received copies from the applicant and his lawyer of all documents which it considered necessary to deal with the present case. Furthermore, the Court observes that the lawyer did not submit a power of attorney to the Leninskyy Court authorising him to act on behalf of the applicant. On the whole, the application does not contain any appearance of hindrance in the exercise of the applicant's right under Article 34 of the Convention. Accordingly, no further examination of this matter is required (see, mutatis mutandis, Moiseyev v. Russia (dec.), no. 62936/00, 9 December 2004).
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
73. The Court notes that the instant case concerns a recurring problem underlying the most frequent violations of the Convention found by the Court in respect of Ukraine; more than half of its judgments in Ukrainian cases have concerned the issue of prolonged non-enforcement of final decisions for which the Ukrainian authorities were responsible. The Court observes that one of the first such judgments, delivered in June 2004, was based on facts similar to the circumstances of the present case (see Voytenko, cited above). In particular, in the case of Voytenko the applicant could not receive the sums awarded to him in relation to the termination of his military service for about four years. As well as finding a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the delay in the enforcement of the domestic award in Voytenko, the Court concluded that the Ukrainian legal system offered no effective domestic remedy, as required by Article 13 of the Convention, to prevent delays in the enforcement of judgments or to afford redress for the damage created by such delays.
74. The instant case demonstrates that the issues of the prolonged non-enforcement of final decisions and of the lack of effective domestic remedies in the Ukrainian legal system remain without a solution, despite the fact that there is clear case-law urging the Government to take appropriate measures to resolve those issues.
75. In these circumstances the Court considers it necessary to examine this case under Article 46 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
A. The parties' submissions
76. The applicant submitted that the Ukrainian authorities' recurrent failure to enforce domestic decisions delivered against the authorities or companies owned or controlled by the State and to introduce an effective domestic remedy constituted a systemic problem. He referred to several cases raising similar issues which had already been determined with final effect by the Court, including Svintitskiy and Goncharov v. Ukraine (no. 59312/00, 4 October 2005); Mikhaylova and Others v. Ukraine (no. 16475/02, 15 June 2006); Aleksandr Shevchenko v. Ukraine (no. 8371/02, 26 April 2007); Kolesnik v. Ukraine (no. 20824/02, 10 April 2008); Maydanik v. Ukraine (no. 20826/02, 10 April 2008); and Tishchenko v. Ukraine (no. 33892/04, 25 September 2008).
77. The Government submitted that the problems impeding the enforcement of domestic decisions differed in particular cases. In some instances, domestic decisions remained unenforced because of the lack of budgetary allocations, whereas in other cases this was due to shortcomings in national legislation and administrative practice, or, as in the present case, because of omissions or inaction on the part of the bailiffs. In their view, this case therefore did not concern a systemic problem. The Government further argued that the pilot-judgment procedure should not be applied in the present case as the measures aimed at resolving the problems of prolonged non-enforcement had already been determined by the Committee of Ministers in its Interim Resolution of 6 March 2008. They suggested that the application of such a procedure in the present case would amount to the performance of a supervisory function by the Court.
B. The Court's assessment
1. Application of the pilot-judgment procedure
78. The Court reiterates that Article 46 of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of Article 1, imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to secure the right of the applicant which the Court found to be violated. Such measures must also be taken in respect of other persons in the applicant's position, notably by solving the problems that have led to the Court's findings (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000 VIII; Christine Goodwin v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 28957/95, § 120, ECHR 2002 VI; Lukenda v. Slovenia, no. 23032/02, § 94, ECHR 2005-X; and S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 30562/04 and 30566/04, § 134, ECHR 2008-...).
79. In its resolution on judgments revealing an underlying systemic problem, adopted on 12 May 2004, the Committee of Ministers invited the Court “to identify in its judgments finding a violation of the Convention what it considers to be an underlying systemic problem and the source of that problem, in particular when it is likely to give rise to numerous applications, so as to assist States in finding the appropriate solution and the Committee of Ministers in supervising the execution of judgments” (see paragraph 37 above).
80. In order to facilitate the effective implementation of its judgments along these lines, the Court may adopt a pilot-judgment procedure allowing it to clearly identify in a judgment the existence of structural problems underlying the violations and to indicate specific measures or actions to be taken by the respondent state to remedy them (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 and the operative part, ECHR 2004-V, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC] no. 35014/97, §§ 231-239 and the operative part, ECHR 2006-VIII).
81. In line with its approach in the case of Burdov (no. 2) (cited above, §§ 129-130), which concerned similar issues of non-enforcement of domestic decisions in the Russian Federation, the Court considers it appropriate to apply the pilot-judgment procedure in the present case, given notably the recurrent and persistent nature of the underlying problems, the large number of people affected by them in Ukraine and the urgent need to grant them speedy and appropriate redress at domestic level.
82. Contrary to the Government's submissions, the application of the pilot-judgment procedure in the present case does not run counter to the division of functions between the Convention institutions. Although it is for the Committee of Ministers to supervise the implementation of measures designed to satisfy the respondent State's obligations under Article 46 of the Convention, it is the Court's task, as defined by Article 19 of the Convention, to “ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the High Contracting Parties in the Convention and the Protocols thereto” and this task is not necessarily best achieved by repeating the same findings in large series of cases (see, mutatis mutandis, E.G. v. Poland (dec.), no. 50425/99, § 27, 23 September 2008). Therefore, in view of the recurrent problems with which the Court is dealing in the present case, it is within its competence to apply the pilot-judgment procedure in order to induce the respondent State to resolve large numbers of individual cases arising from the same structural problem at domestic level (see Burdov (no. 2), cited above, § 127).
2. Existence of a practice incompatible with the Convention
83. The Court notes that it has delivered judgments in more than 300 cases against Ukraine during the past five years since its first judgments (see, for instance, Voytenko, cited above) finding repetitive violations of the Convention on account of the non-enforcement or the lengthy enforcement of final domestic awards in Ukraine and on account of the absence of effective domestic remedies in respect of such shortcomings. While it is true that there are some vulnerable groups of the Ukrainian population who are affected by those problems more than others, it is not necessarily the case that persons in the same situation as the applicant belong to “an identifiable class of citizens” (compare Broniowski, cited above, § 189, and Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 229). As follows from the Court's current case-law on the matter, any person who has obtained a final domestic decision for the enforcement of which the Ukrainian authorities are responsible runs the risk of being deprived of the possibility of drawing benefit from such a decision in compliance with the Convention.
84. The Court sees no reason to disagree with the Government that the delays in the enforcement of final domestic decisions are caused by a variety of dysfunctions in the Ukrainian legal system. In particular, the Court refers to its findings under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the present case that the enforcement of the judgments in the applicant's favour was hindered by a combination of factors, including the lack of budgetary allocations, the bailiffs' omissions and the shortcomings in the national legislation (see paragraph 55 above). In other cases raising similar issues, applicants have been unable to obtain the enforcement of court awards in due time because of the authorities' failure to take specific budgetary measures, or because of the introduction of bans on the attachment and sale of property belonging to State-owned or controlled companies (see, for instance, Romashov, Dubenko and Kozachek, all cited above).
85. The Court notes that the above-mentioned factors were all within the control of the State, which has failed so far to adopt any measures aimed at improving the situation, despite the Court's substantial and consistent case-law on the matter.
86. The systemic character of the problems identified in the present case is further evidenced by the fact that approximately 1,400 applications against Ukraine, which concern, fully or in part, the above problems, are currently pending before the Court and the number of such applications is constantly increasing.
87. The Court pays due regard to the position of the Committee of Ministers, which has acknowledged that the non-enforcement of domestic judicial decisions constitutes a structural problem in Ukraine which remains unsolved (see paragraphs 38-39 above).
88. In view of the foregoing, the Court concludes that the violations found in the present judgment were neither prompted by an isolated incident, nor were they attributable to a particular turn of events in this case, but were the consequence of regulatory shortcomings and administrative conduct of the State authorities with regard to the enforcement of domestic decisions for which they were responsible. Accordingly, the situation in the present case must be qualified as resulting from a practice incompatible with the Convention (see Bottazzi v. Italy [GC], no. 34884/97, § 22, ECHR 1999-V, and Burdov (no. 2), cited above, §§ 134-135).
3. Adoption of general measures to remedy the structural problems underlying violations of the Convention in the present case
89. The Court reiterates that it is in principle not its task to determine what remedial measures may be appropriate to satisfy the respondent State's obligations under Article 46 of the Convention. Subject to monitoring by the Committee of Ministers, the respondent State remains free to choose the means by which it will discharge its legal obligation under Article 46 of the Convention, provided that such means are compatible with the conclusions set out in the Court's judgment (see Scozzari and Giunta, cited above, § 249).
90. The structural problems with which the Court is dealing in the present case are large-scale and complex in nature. They prima facie require the implementation of comprehensive and complex measures, possibly of a legislative and administrative character, involving various domestic authorities. Indeed, the Committee of Ministers is better placed and equipped to monitor the measures to be adopted by Ukraine in this respect.
91. The Court notes with satisfaction that the adoption of measures in response to the structural problems of prolonged non-enforcement and the lack of domestic remedies have been thoroughly considered by the Committee of Ministers in cooperation with the Ukrainian authorities (see paragraphs 38-39 above). However, as is evident from the Court's own findings in the present case and similar cases against Ukraine, viewed in conjunction with other relevant material in its possession, the respondent State has demonstrated an almost complete reluctance to resolve the problems at hand.
92. The Court stresses that specific reforms in Ukraine's legislation and administrative practice should be implemented without delay in order to bring it into line with the Court's conclusions in the present judgment and to comply with the requirements of Article 46 of the Convention. The Court leaves it to the Committee of Ministers to determine what would be the most appropriate way to tackle the problems and to indicate any general measure to be taken by the respondent State.
93. In this context, the Court refers to the basic principles deriving from its case-law on the issue, to which the required general measures must conform (see paragraphs 45-46 and 51-54 above).
94. In any event, the respondent State must introduce without delay, and at the latest within one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final a remedy or a combination of remedies in the national legal system and ensure that the remedy or remedies comply, both in theory and in practice, with the key criteria set by the Court and reiterated in the present judgment (see paragraphs 63-65 above). In so doing, the Ukrainian authorities should also have due regard to the Committee of Ministers' recommendations to the member States on the improvement of domestic remedies (see paragraphs 35-36 above).
4. Procedure to be followed in similar cases
95. The Court reiterates that one of the aims of the pilot-judgment procedure is to allow the speediest possible redress to be granted at domestic level to the large numbers of persons suffering from the structural problem identified in the pilot judgment (see Burdov (no.2), cited above, § 127). While the respondent State's action should primarily aim at the resolution of such a dysfunction and at the introduction, where appropriate, of effective domestic remedies in respect of the violations in question, it may also include ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers in line with the Convention requirements. The Court is thus in a position to decide in the pilot judgment on the procedure to be followed in cases stemming from the same structural problems (see, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski, cited above, § 198, and Xenides-Arestis v. Turkey, no. 46347/99, § 50, 22 December 2005).
96. In the present circumstances, the Court finds it necessary to adjourn the examination of similar cases pending the implementation of the relevant measures by the respondent State. The Court considers it appropriate to differentiate between cases already pending before it and those that may arrive after the delivery of the present judgment, thereby giving the respondent State an opportunity to settle the former category of cases in various ways, as indicated below.
(a) Applications lodged after the delivery of the present judgment
97. The Court will adjourn proceedings concerning all new applications lodged with it after the delivery of the present judgment in which the applicants raise arguable complaints relating solely to the prolonged non-enforcement of domestic decisions for the execution of which the State is responsible, including applications in which complaints alleging a lack of effective remedies in respect of such non-enforcement are also raised. The adjournment will be effective for a period of one year after the present judgment becomes final. The applicants in such cases will be informed accordingly.
(b) Applications lodged before the delivery of the present judgment
98. The Court decides, however, to follow a somewhat different course of action in respect of applications lodged before the delivery of the present judgment. In particular, following the delivery of the present judgment the Court will give notice to the Government of Ukraine of applications which raise similar issues to those raised in the present case and contain no other arguable complaints. The adversarial proceedings in all such cases will be adjourned for one year from the date on which this judgment becomes final. Proceedings in cases which have already been communicated to the Government under Rule 54 § 2 (b) of the Rules of Court, but in which the Court has not yet decided on the merits, will also be adjourned for the same period of time.
99. Meanwhile, the respondent State must grant adequate and sufficient redress, within one year from the date on which the present judgment becomes final, to all applicants in the cases mentioned in the preceding paragraph whose complaints about the prolonged non-enforcement of domestic decisions have been communicated to the respondent Government. The Court reiterates that delays in the enforcement of domestic decisions should be calculated and assessed by reference to the Convention requirements and, notably, in accordance with the criteria defined in the present judgment (see in particular paragraph 53 above). In the Court's view, such redress may be achieved through implementation proprio motu by the authorities of an effective domestic remedy in those cases or through ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers in line with the Convention requirements (see paragraph 95 above).
100. If, however, the respondent State fails to adopt such measures following a pilot judgment and continues to violate the Convention, the Court will have no choice but to resume the examination of all similar applications pending before it and to take them to judgment so as to ensure effective observance of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, E.G., cited above, § 28).
101. The decision to adjourn the above cases will be taken without prejudice to the Court's power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list following a friendly settlement between the parties or the resolution of the matter by other means in accordance with Articles 37 or 39 of the Convention.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
102. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
103. The applicant, referring to the fact that the court awards remained unpaid to him for a very lengthy period of time, claimed UAH 1,837.637 to cover inflation-linked adjustments of the outstanding debt resulting from the judgments in his favour. In support of that claim, the applicant provided detailed calculations based on the official inflation rates issued by the State Statistics Committee of Ukraine. According to the calculations, as a result of inflation the amounts due to him lost approximately half in their value. The applicant also claimed EUR 7,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
104. The Government contested the applicant's claims as excessive and unsubstantiated. As regards the claims for inflation losses, they argued that the applicant had provided no documents in support of his calculations.
105. The Court notes that it is undisputed that the State still has an outstanding obligation to enforce the judgments at issue.
106. The Court further notes that the applicant's claim in respect of inflation-linked adjustments is supported by detailed calculations based on the official data on inflation rates. Taking into account the fact that the Government did not dispute the method of calculation employed by the applicant or the accuracy of his calculations (see, for example, Maksimikha v. Ukraine, no. 43483/02, § 29, 14 December 2006), the Court awards him the amount claimed, namely EUR 174.
107. As to the claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage, the Court finds that the applicant must have suffered some distress and anxiety on account of the violations found. Ruling on an equitable basis, it awards him EUR 2,500 under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
108. The applicant also claimed UAH 4,3508 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and UAH 14,0009 for those incurred before the Court. He produced contracts for legal services and receipts providing evidence of payments made to his lawyer.
109. The Government submitted that the above claims were exorbitant and requested the Court to consider them in the light of the criteria laid down in its case-law, referring in particular to Tolstoy Miloslavsky v. the United Kingdom (13 July 1995, § 77, Series A no. 316-B).
110. The Court reiterates that, according to its case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the requested amount of EUR 1,740.
C. Default interest
111. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares admissible the complaints under Article 6 § 1 and Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the remainder of the applicant's complaints inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention;
4. Holds that the above violations originated in a practice incompatible with the Convention which consists in the respondent State's recurrent failure to comply in due time with domestic decisions for the enforcement of which it is responsible and in respect of which aggrieved parties have no effective domestic remedy;
5. Holds that the respondent State must set up without delay, and at the latest within one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, an effective domestic remedy or combination of such remedies capable of securing adequate and sufficient redress for the non-enforcement or delayed enforcement of domestic decisions, in line with the Convention principles as established in the Court's case-law;
6. Holds that the respondent State must grant such redress, within one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final, to all applicants whose applications pending before the Court were communicated to the Government under Rule 54 § 2 (b) of the Rules of Court before the delivery of the present judgment or will be communicated further to this judgment and concern arguable complaints relating solely to the prolonged non-enforcement of domestic decisions for which the State was responsible, including where complaints alleging a lack of effective remedies in respect of such non-enforcement are also raised;
7. Holds that pending the adoption of the above measures, the Court will adjourn, for one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final, the proceedings in all cases in which the applicants raise arguable complaints relating solely to the prolonged non-enforcement of domestic decisions for which the State is responsible, including cases in which complaints alleging a lack of effective remedies in respect of such non-enforcement are also raised, without prejudice to the Court's power at any moment to declare any such case inadmissible or to strike it out of its list following a friendly settlement between the parties or the resolution of the matter by other means in accordance with Articles 37 or 39 of the Convention;
8. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final:
(i) the outstanding debt under the judgments of 22 August 2001 and 29 July 2003 and EUR 174 (one hundred and seventy-four euros) to cover inflation-linked adjustments;
(ii) EUR 2,500 (two thousand five hundred euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage and EUR 1,740 (one thousand seven hundred and forty euros) in respect of costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant;
(b) that the above sums be converted into the national currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(c) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
9. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 October 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President
1. About 296 euros (EUR).

2. About EUR 513.

3. About EUR 10.

4. About EUR 513.

5. About EUR 256.

6. About EUR 171.

7. About EUR 174.

8. About EUR 413.

9. About EUR 1,327.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; Violazione dell’ Art. 13; Stato rispondente per prendere misure individuali; Stato Rispondente per prendere misure di carattere generale; danno morale - assegnazione
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA YURIY NIKOLAYEVICH IVANOV C. UCRAINA
(Richiesta n. 40450/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
15 ottobre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Yuriy Nikolayevich Ivanov c. Ucraina,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste il Mark Villiger, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva giudici, Mykhaylo Buromenskiy ad giudice di hoc,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione
Avendo deliberato in privato il 22 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 40450/04) contro l'Ucraina depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, Sig. Y. N. I. (“il richiedente”), il 13 settembre 2004.
2. Il richiedente è stato rappresentato dal Sig. I. P., un avvocato che pratica a Kirovograd. Il Governo ucraino (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Y. Zaytsev, del Ministero di Giustizia.
3. Il 24 ottobre 2006 il Presidente della quinta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
4. In conformità con l’Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione, il Governo russo fu invitato ad esercitare il suo diritto ad intervenire nei procedimenti, ma ha declinato l’invito.
5. Il 25 novembre 2008 la Camera decise di dare trattamento prioritario alla richiesta sopra in conformità con l’Articolo 41 dell’ordinamento di Corte ed informare le parti che stava considerando l'appropriatezza di applicare una procedura di sentenza pilota nella causa (vedere, per una recente autorità, Burdov c. Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, §§129-130 15 gennaio 2009). La Camera decise anche di invitare le parti, sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2 (c), a presentare ulteriori osservazioni sulla causa.
6. Le parti inoltre depositarono osservazioni scritte. Il richiedente richiese alla Camera di tenere un'udienza ed abbandonare la giurisdizione a favore della Grande Camera sotto l’Articolo 72. Il Governo fece obiezione all’udienza ed all’ abbandono della giurisdizione della Camera. La Camera decise, facendo seguito all’Articolo 54 § 3 e l’Articolo 72 §§ 1 e 2, che nessuna udienza era richiesta e che non era necessario fa riferimento in questa causa alla Grande Camera.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
7. Il richiedente nacque nel 1957 e vive a Mosca.
A. Procedimenti contro l'unità militare
8. Nell’ ottobre 2000 il richiedente andò in pensione dall'Esercito ucraino. Gli fu concesso un pagamento globale per pensionamento e risarcimento per la sua uniforme, ma i pagamenti non gli furono fatti nel momento del suo pensionamento.
9. Nel luglio 2001 il richiedente avviò dei procedimenti presso la Corte Militare Regionale di Cherkassy contro l’ Unità Militare A-1575, chiedendo il ricupero del debito. Il 22 agosto 2001 la corte accolse la sua rivendicazione in pieno ed ordinò all'unità militare di pagare al richiedente 1,449.36 hryvnia ucraini (UAH)1 per risarcimento per la sua uniforme, UAH 2,512.502 di arretrati di pagamento di pensionamento, ed UAH 513 come rimborso per le parcelle della corte. Il 22 settembre 2001 la sentenza della corte divenne definitiva ed esecutiva.
10. In una data non specificata il richiedente ricevette UAH 2,512.504. Il resto dell'assegnazione rimase non retribuito.
11. I procedimenti di esecuzione riguardo alla sentenza del 22 agosto 2001 cominciarono il 24 gennaio 2002. Nel corso di quei procedimenti gli ufficiali giudiziari informarono il richiedente che erano stati congelati i conti bancari del debitore, sebbene nessun fondo fosse stato trovato in quei conti.
12. In una lettera del 12 novembre 2002 il Ministero della Difesa informò il richiedente che le disposizioni legislative che gli davano un titolo al risarcimento per la sua uniforme erano state sospese e che non c'erano assegnazioni budgetarie per simili pagamenti.
13. Il 5 maggio 2003 l’unità militare debitrice fu smantellata e l’ Unità Militare Un-0680 divenne il suo successore.
14. In una lettera del 6 aprile 2004 gli ufficiali giudiziari informarono il richiedente che quest’ultima unità militare non aveva soldi per pagare il richiedente in ottemperanza con la sentenza del 22 agosto 2001. Menzionò anche che la vendita forzata di beni appartenenti ad unità militari era proibita dalla legge.
15. La sentenza del 22 agosto 2001 restò parzialmente ineseguita.
B. Procedimenti contro gli ufficiali giudiziari
16. Nel 2002 il richiedente depositò presso la Corte distrettuale di Leninskyy di Kirovograd (“La Corte di Leninskyy”) un'azione di reclamo contro gli ufficiali giudiziari, adducendo che la sentenza del 22 agosto 2001 non era stata eseguita per causa loro. Il 3 dicembre 2002 la corte trovò che gli ufficiali giudiziari non avevano preso le misure necessarie per eseguire la sentenza a favore del richiedente e ordinò a loro di identificare e congelare i conti bancari dell’unità militare debitrice di prelevare i soldi disponibile in quei conti.
17. Secondo il richiedente, gli ufficiali giudiziari non si attennero alla decisione corte del 3 dicembre 2002. Il 20 maggio 2003 depositò una rivendicazione presso la stessa corte contro gli ufficiali giudiziari, chiedendo il risarcimento per danno materiale e morale.
18. Il 29 luglio 2003 fu ammessa in parte la rivendicazione del richiedente. La Corte di Leninskyy trovò che la sentenza del 22 agosto 2001 rimase non eseguita per la colpa degli ufficiali giudiziari ed assegnò UAH 1,500.365 al richiedente per risarcimento per danno materiale ed UAH 1,0006 per danno morale. Il 29 agosto 2003 la sentenza del 29 luglio 2003 divenne definitiva ed esecutiva. Il 25 febbraio 2004 fu respinto un ricorso da parte del richiedente contro la sentenza del 29 luglio 2003 siccome era stato depositato fuori termini.
19. Il 3 marzo 2004 il richiedente presentò una richiesta scritta alla Corte di Leninskyy per emettere un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza a riguardo della sentenza del 29 luglio 2003. Il richiedente non ricevette il documento o una risposta alla sua richiesta. La sentenza del 29 luglio 2003 rimane no eseguita.
20. Durante tutti i procedimenti contro gli ufficiali giudiziari, il richiedente fu assistito, e rappresentato da un avvocato.
C. La richiesta alla Corte
21. Secondo l'avvocato del richiedente, a sostegno della richiesta nella presente causa, aveva tentato di ottenere dei documenti non specificati dall'archivio della causa del richiedente tenuti dalla Corte di Leninskyy. Il 13 luglio 2004 richiese alla corte di spedirgli tutti i documenti dalla causa registrati, senza specificare che lui ne aveva bisogno per la causa del richiedente di fronte alla Corte di Strasbourg.
22. In una lettera del 29 luglio 2004 la Corte di Leninskyy informò l'avvocato di non essere riuscita ad offrire una forma di autorità e così non poteva ottenere i documenti richiesti.
23. L'avvocato del richiedente non sottopose di nuovo la sua richiesta con una forma di autorità.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Costituzione dell’ Ucraina del 26 giugno 1996
24. L’ Articolo 124 della Costituzione prevede come segue:
“... Le decisioni giudiziali sono adottate dai tribunali a nome dell'Ucraina e sono obbligatorie per esecuzione in tutto l’intero territorio dell'Ucraina.”
B. Codice Criminale del 2001
25. L’Articolo 382 del Codice prevede:
“1. L’Insuccesso ripetuto di un ufficiale nell’ attenersi ad una sentenza, ad un giudizio , ad una direttiva o ad una decisione di un tribunale che è entrata in vigore, o l’ostacolo alla sua esecuzione,sarà punibile con una multa [nell'importo] da cinquecento a mille volte il reddito mensile legale non tassabile , o con la privazione della libertà per un termine fino a tre anni con privazione del diritto ad occupare certe posizioni o a prendere parte in certe attività per un termine fino a tre anni.
2. Le stesse azioni commesse da un ufficiale che occupa una posizione o particolarmente responsabile, o da una persona dichiarata precedentemente colpevole del crimine previsto da questo Articolo, o [le stesse azioni] che provocano danno sostanziale ai diritti giuridicamente protetti e alle libertà dei cittadini, dello Stato od ai interessi pubblici o ad interessi di persone giuridiche,sarà punibile con limitazione della libertà per un termine fino a cinque anni, o con la privazione della libertà per lo stesso termine con privazione del diritto ad occupare certe posizioni o a prendere parte a certe attività per un termine fino a tre anni.
3. L’Insuccesso ripetuto di un ufficiale nell’ attenersi ad una sentenza della Corte europea dei Diritti umani sarà punibile con la privazione della libertà per un termine dai tre agli otto anni con privazione del diritto ad occupare certe posizioni o a prendere parte a certe attività per un termine fino a tre anni.”
C. Atto dei Procedimenti Esecutivi del 21 aprile 1999
26. L'Atto determina la procedura per l’esecuzione forzata di decisioni dei tribunali e di altre autorità ufficiali competenti (“le sentenze”).
27. Sotto la sezione 2 dell'Atto, l'esecuzione delle sentenze viene affidata al Servizio degli Ufficiali giudiziari Statali che forma parte del Ministero della Giustizia. Anche le altre entità ufficiali possono eseguire l’esecuzione in conformità con la legge. In particolare, facendo seguito alla sezione 9 i corpi della Tesoreria Statale sono responsabili per l'esecuzione di sentenze riguardo al ricupero di denaro dai bilanci Statali o locali o da entità finanziate dal bilancio Statale.
28. L'Atto conferisce un’ampia serie di poteri ad ufficiali giudiziari in procedimenti di esecuzione. In particolare, viene dato loro il titolo per chiedere ed ottenere da qualsiasi persona riguardata, informazioni e documenti che sono necessari per l'esecuzione di decisioni, di entrare ed ispezionare i locali appartenenti od occupati dai debitori, sequestrare e vendere la proprietà dei debitori, congelare i conti bancari dei debitori ed imporre multe a cittadini ed ufficiali in casi previsti dalla legge (sezioni 4-5 dell'Atto). Gli ordini degli ufficiali giudiziari riguardo all'esecuzione di sentenze sono vincolanti per tutte le entità, organizzazioni, ufficiali e cittadini comuni nel territorio dell'Ucraina. Facendo seguito alle sezioni 6 e 88 dell'Atto, agli ufficiali giudiziari viene concesse di punire le persone che non riescono ad attenersi coi loro ordini con una multa corrispondente da dieci a trenta volte il reddito legale mensile non tassabile. Se le azioni degli offensori rientrano all'interno dell'ambito del diritto penale, gli ufficiali giudiziari devono richiedere per loro un’azione penale.
29. La Sezione 3 dell'Atto contiene una lista di documenti sulla base della quale gli ufficiali giudiziari possono procedere con l’ esecuzione forzata (“i documenti d’esecuzione”). Include, inter alia, ordini di esecuzione della sentenza emessi da corti, direttive e decisioni dei tribunali in cause civili, commerciali, amministrativi e penali, ordini giudiziali, e sentenze della Corte europea dei Diritti umani. Per iniziare procedimenti di esecuzione, la persona a favore della quale fu consegnata la sentenza (“il creditore”) o un querelante che rappresentava un cittadino o lo Stato negli atti deve presentare agli ufficiali giudiziari uno dei documenti specificati alla sezione 3 insieme con una richiesta per la sua esecuzione (sezione 18). Gli ufficiali giudiziari hanno tre giorni per determinare se la richiesta è stata fatta in ottemperanza con la legge e, in tal caso, avviare i procedimenti di esecuzione che normalmente devono essere completati entro sei mesi (sezioni 24-25). La Sezione 34 dell'Atto obbliga gli ufficiali giudiziari a sospendere i procedimenti di esecuzione nelle specifiche situazioni. Simile sospensione è obbligatoria se, per esempio, un tribunale di commercio ha avviato procedimenti fallimentari contro il debitore e ha imposto una proibizione sui pagamenti a riguardo delle rivendicazioni dei creditori, o se il debitore è un'impresa inclusa nella lista delle imprese di combustibili e di energia che prendono parte nella procedura per il recupero dei debiti facendo seguito all'Atto sulle misure concepito per assicurare il funzionamento stabile delle imprese di combustibile ed energetiche.
30. Sotto la sezione 37, i procedimenti di esecuzione saranno cessati in casi in cui, per esempio, la sentenza è stata davvero eseguita in pieno, il tempo concesso ad una particolare tipo di raccolta dei debito è scaduto, o il documento di esecuzione è stato trasferito al liquidatore del debitore a seguito del seguente riconoscimento ufficiale dell'insolvenza del debitore. Gli ufficiali giudiziari devono restituire il documento di esecuzione al creditore se, per esempio, il debitore non ha proprietà da poter essere sequestrate nella prospettiva di eseguire la sentenza e le misure adottate dagli ufficiali giudiziari per scoprire simili proprietà si sono rivelate senza successo.
31. Alle parti ai procedimenti di esecuzione o alle persone coinvolte in questi viene dato un titolo per impugnare le azioni degli ufficiali giudiziari o l'inattività di fronte ai loro superiori o ai tribunali e chiedere i danni (sezioni 7, 85 e 86).
32. Con le disposizioni di transizione dell'Atto, l’applicazioni delle sezioni 4 e 5 fu sospesa a riguardo delle imprese incluse nella lista delle imprese di combustibile ed energetiche che prendono parte alla procedura per ricupero di debiti facendo seguito all'Atto sulle misure concepito per assicurare il funzionamento stabile delle imprese di combustibile ed energetiche.
D. Atto del Servizio degli Ufficiali giudiziari Statali del 24 marzo 1998
33. La Sezione 11 di questo Atto prevede che i danni causati da ufficiali giudiziari nel corso dell’esecuzione di una sentenza sarà compensato a spese dello Stato in conformità con la procedura stabilita dalla legge.
E. Atto sulle Attività Economiche nelle Forze armate dell’ Ucraina del 21 settembre 1999
34. Sotto la sezione 5 di questo Atto, un'unità militare, come un'entità che prende parte ad attività economiche è giuridicamente responsabile per il suo insuccesso nell’ adempiere i suoi obblighi contrattuali e per i danni causati all'ambiente ed ai diritti ed interessi di persone fisiche o giuridiche e dello Stato. I soldi assegnati sotto le disposizioni attinenti del suo bilancio, escludendo i soldi assegnati a riguardo di voci protette del bilancio, possono essere utilizzati per adempiere gli obblighi dell'unità. Se l'importo di soldi disponibile è insufficiente, il Ministero della Difesa diviene responsabile per i debiti dell'unità. Nessuna proprietà assegnata all'unità può essere usata per saldo dei suoi debiti.
III. DOCUMENTI ATTINENTI DEL CONSIGLIO D’ EUROPA
A. Raccomandazione Res(2004)6 del Comitato dei Ministri agli Stati membro sul miglioramento delle vie di ricorso nazionali, 12 maggio 2004
35. Nella sua 114a sessione del 12 maggio 2004 il Comitato dei Ministri, avendo considerato le misure necessitate a garantire l'efficacia a lungo termine del sistema di controllo avviato dalla Convenzione, ha raccomandato inter alia che gli Stati membro,
“revisionino, a seguito delle sentenze della Corte che mettono in evidenza deficienze strutturali o generali nella legge nazionale o pratica, l'efficacia delle vie di ricorso nazionali esistenti e, dove necessario, predispongano vie di ricorso effettive per evitare cause ripetitive portate di fronte alla Corte...”
36. Nell'Appendice alla Raccomandazione del 12 maggio 2004, il Comitato dei Ministri notò,:
“... La Corte si trova di fronte ad un numero sempre in aumento di richieste. Questa situazione mette in pericolo l'efficacia a lungo termine del sistema e perciò richiede una forte reazione da parte delle parti contraenti. È precisamente all'interno di questo contesto che la disponibilità delle vie di ricorso nazionali effettive diviene particolarmente importante. Il miglioramento delle vie di ricorso nazionali e disponibili avrà effetti più probabilmente quantitativi e qualitativi sul carico di lavoro della Corte:
da una parte, il volume delle richieste da esaminare dovrebbe essere ridotto,: meno richiedenti si sentirebbero obbligati a portare la causa di fronte alla Corte se l'esame delle loro azioni di reclamo di fronte alle autorità nazionali fosse sufficientemente completo;
Dall’altra parte l'esame delle richieste della Corte si faciliterà se un esame dei meriti delle cause è stato eseguito in anticipo da un'autorità nazionale, grazie al miglioramento delle vie di ricorso nazionali...
13. Quando una sentenza che evidenzia delle deficienze strutturali o generali in legge nazionale o pratica ('causa pilota') è stata consegnata e un gran numero di richieste alla Corte riguardo allo stesso problema ('cause ripetitive) è pendente o è probabile che vengano depositate lo stato rispondente dovrebbe assicurare che i potenziali richiedenti abbiano, dove appropriato, una via di ricorso effettiva che conceda loro di fare domanda ad un'autorità nazionale competente che si possa applicare anche agli attuali richiedenti. Tale via di ricorso rapida ed effettiva li abiliterebbe ad ottenere una compensazione a livello nazionale, in linea col principio di sussidiarietà del sistema della Convenzione.
14. L'introduzione di tale via di ricorso nazionale potrebbe ridurre anche significativamente il carico di lavoro della Corte. Mentre l’esecuzione della sentenza pilota resta essenziale per risolvere il problema strutturale e così per ostacolare le future richieste sulla stessa questione, può esistere però una categoria di persone che già sono state colpite da questo problema prima della sua decisione...
16. In particolare, oltre ad una sentenza pilota nella quale è stato trovato uno specifico problema strutturale, un'alternativa sarebbe adottare un approccio ad hoc, da cui lo stato riguardò valuterebbe l'appropriatezza di introdurre una specifica via di ricorso o ampliare una via di ricorso esistente tramite legislazione od interpretazione giudiziale...
18. Quando le specifiche vie di ricorso a seguito di una causa pilota vengono preparate, i governi dovrebbero informare velocemente la Corte così da poterle prendere in considerazione nel suo trattamento di susseguenti cause ripetitive...”
B. Decisione Res(2004)3 del Comitato dei Ministri sulle sentenze che rivelano un problema sistematico e fondamentale, 12 maggio 2004
37. Nella stessa sessione del 12 maggio 2004 il Comitato dei Ministri adottò una decisione con la quale invitò la Corte a:
“... I. quanto più possibile, identificare, nelle sue sentenze che trovano una violazione della Convenzione ciò che considera essere un problema sistematico e fondamentale e la fonte di questo problema, in particolare quando è probabile che generi numerose richieste, così da assistere gli stati nel trovare la soluzione appropriata ed il Comitato dei Ministri nel soprintendere all'esecuzione delle sentenze;
II. notificare specialmente qualsiasi sentenza contenente indicazioni dell'esistenza di un problema sistematico e della fonte di questo problema non solo allo stato riguardato ed al Comitato di Ministri, ma anche alla Riunione Parlamentare, al Segretario Generale del Consiglio dell'Europa ed al Consiglio del Commissario di Europa per i Diritti umani, ed evidenziare simili sentenze in modo appropriato nel database della Corte.”
C. Decisione Provvisoria del Comitato dei Ministri sull'esecuzione delle sentenze della Corte europea dei Diritti umani in 232 cause contro l'Ucraina relative all'insuccesso o al grave ritardo nell'attenersi a decisioni giudiziali nazionali definitive consegnate contro lo stato e le sue entità così come l'assenza di una via di ricorso effettiva, 6 marzo 2008
38. Il 6 marzo 2008 il Comitato dei Ministri considerò, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione, le misure adottate dal Governo dell'Ucraina nella prospettiva di attenersi alle sentenze della Corte riguardo al problema della non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni nazionali definitive. Il Comitato adottò una decisione provvisoria (CM/ResDH(2008)1), le cui disposizioni attinenti si leggono come segue:
“Il Comitato dei Ministri...
ESPRIME PARTICLARE PREOCCUPAZIONE che nonostante un numero di importanti iniziative legislative ed altre iniziative che sono state portate ripetutamente all'attenzione del Comitato dei Ministri è stato fatto un piccolo progresso finora nel chiarire il problema strutturale di non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali;
FORTEMENTE INCORAGGIA le autorità ucraine a migliorare il loro impegno politico per realizzare risultati tangibili e a dare un’alta priorità politica per attenersi ai loro obblighi sotto la Convenzione e alle sentenze della Corte, per assicurare la piena ed opportuna esecuzione della decisione dei tribunali nazionali;
FA PRESSIONE sulle autorità ucraine per preparare una politica nazionale effettiva, coordinata al più alto livello governativo e nella prospettiva di implementare efficacemente il pacchetto di misure annunciato e le altre misure che possono essere necessarie per fermare il problema in questione;
SPINGE le autorità ucraine ad adottare come questione di priorità delle bozze di leggi che sono state annunciate di fronte al Comitato ei Ministri, in particolare la legge Sugli Emendamenti a Certi Atti Legali dell'Ucraina (sulla protezione del diritto ad un processo preliminare e procedimenti di processo ed esecuzione di decisioni di corte all'interno di termine ragionevole);
Incoraggia le autorità, essendo pendente l'adozione delle bozze di leggi annunciata a considerare l'adozione di misure provvisorie che limitano il più possibile il rischio di nuove violazioni della Convenzione dello stesso genere, ed in particolare:
- considerare l'adozione di misure simile a quelle prese nel settore dell’educazione negli altri settori che sollevano problemi simili;
- prendere misure per assicurare la gestione effettiva e il controllo delle entità statali e delle imprese per evitare debiti che nascono a favore degli impiegati;
- assicurare in pratica la responsabilità effettiva degli ufficiali civili per non-esecuzione;
- assegnare direttamente il risarcimento per i ritardi nell’ esecuzione delle decisioni giudiziali nazionali sulla base delle disposizioni della Convenzione e la giurisprudenza della Corte come previsto dalla Legge sull’ esecuzione delle sentenze e l’applicazione della giurisprudenza della Corte europea;
Invita le autorità ucraine a considerare, oltre alle misure annunciate soluzioni appropriate nelle seguenti aree:
- migliorare la programmazione del bilancio, in particolare assicurando la compatibilità fra le leggi budgetarie e gli obblighi di pagamento dello stato;
- assicurare l'esistenza di specifici meccanismi per il rapido consolidamento supplementare per evitare ritardi non necessari nell'esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali in casi di ammanchi nelle appropriazioni budgetarie iniziali; e
- assicurare l'esistenza di una procedura effettiva e finanziamenti per l'esecuzione dei giudizi dei tribunali nazionali consegnati contro lo stato...”
D. Decisione del Comitato dei Ministri su 300 cause riguardo all'insuccesso o al ritardo sostanziale da parte dell'amministrazione o di società statali nell'attenersi a sentenze nazionali definitive, 8 giugno 2009
39. Dal 2 al 5 giugno 2009 il Comitato dei Ministri riprese la considerazione sotto l’Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione del gruppo delle sentenze della Corte contro l'Ucraina riguardo all'insuccesso nell’esecuzione, o ai ritardi nell'esecuzione di decisioni nazionali. La seguente decisione (CM/Del/Dec(2009)1059) fu adottata dal Comitato su quella materia:
“I Deputati
1. richiamato che, come ammesso dal Comitato dei Ministri nella sua Decisione Provvisoria CM/ResDH(2008)1, la non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali costituisce un problema strutturale in Ucraina;
2. notato che c'è ancora un numero di cause in cui delle decisioni dei tribunali nazionali rimangono non eseguite nonostante le sentenze della Corte europea;
3. notato con preoccupazione che, nonostante gli sforzi fatti dalle autorità ucraine nell'adottare misure provvisorie, il problema strutturale sottoatante alle violazioni non è stato risolto,;
4. osservato che l’ insuccesso nell’adottare tutte le misure necessarie, incluse le prime misure legislative annunciate è risultato in un sostanziale aumento nel numero delle nuove richieste depositate presso la Corte europea riguardo alla non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali;
5. notato con preoccupazione in questo contesto che non è stata data priorità alla preparazione di una via di ricorso nazionale in caso di non-esecuzione o esecuzione ritardata di decisioni giudiziali nazionali, nonostante i ripetuti richiami del Comitato a questo effetto;
6. ancora una volta fa appello alle autorità ucraine per prendere rapidamente l’azione necessaria per assicurare l'ottemperanza dell'Ucraina coi suoi obblighi sotto la Convenzione, ed in particolare riconsiderare le varie proposte per riforme fatte durante l'esame di queste cause (vedere, in particolare, CM/Inf/DH(2007)30 revisionata e CM/Inf/DH(2007)33);
7. deciso di riprendere la considerazione di queste voci al più tardi nella alla loro 1072a riunione (dicembre 2009) (DH), possibilmente alla luce di una bozza di decisione provvisoria che faccia scorta delle misure generali e individuali adottate fino a quel punto e di altri problemi insoluti nel caso ce ne fossero.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
40. Il richiedente si lamentò della non-esecuzione delle sentenze della Cherkassy Corte Militare e Regionale del 22 agosto 2001 e della Corte distrettuale di Leninskyy del 29 luglio 2003, e della direttiva della Corte distrettuale di Leninskyy del 3 dicembre 2002. Lui invocò a questo riguardo l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che prevedono nella loro parte attinente come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale...”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
41. Il Governo presentò che l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione era inapplicabile ratione materiae ai procedimenti riguardo al risarcimento per l'uniforme che il richiedente era stato obbligato a portare nell'esercizio delle sue funzioni pubbliche. Nella sua prospettiva, l'assegnazione era di natura di legge pubblica e non era decisiva per i diritti od obblighi di legge privata del richiedente. Appellandosi agli stessi motivi, loro suggerì che non c'era stata interferenza col diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo dell'assegnazione del 22 agosto 2001.
42. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che il richiedente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali e non aveva acquisito lo status di vittima a riguardo delle sue azioni di reclamo relative alla non-esecuzione della sentenza del 29 luglio 2003, siccome non era riuscito a depositare presso il Servizio degli Ufficiali giudiziari un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza per l'inizio di procedimenti di esecuzione a riguardo di quella sentenza. Presentò che lo Stato non era responsabile per la sua esecuzione.
43. Il Governo invitò perciò la Corte a dichiarare la richiesta inammissibile.
44. Il richiedente non era d'accordo. In particolare contese che l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 erano applicabili alla sua causa, siccome lui aveva cessato il suo servizio nell'Esercito e l'assegnazione del 22 agosto 2001 era di natura privata. Lui dibatté inoltre di non poter avviare procedimenti di esecuzione a riguardo della sentenza di 29 luglio 2003 a causa dell'insuccesso delle autorità di offrirgli un ordine di esecuzione di quella sentenza.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
45. La Corte osserva che ha già sostenuto in cause simili contro l'Ucraina che l'Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sono applicabili a procedimenti riguardo a rivendicazioni per il risarcimento per l'uniforme di un ufficiale militare siccome simili procedimenti riguardano il diritto al risarcimento e non, come il Governo lo pose, il titolo all'uniforme; che al tempo attinente i richiedenti in quelle cause erano già andati in pensione dal servizio pubblico ed avevano avuto accesso ad un tribunale sotto la legge nazionale, e che un debito di sentenza costituisce una proprietà ai fini di Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, per esempio, Voytenko c. Ucraina, n. 18966/02, §§ 51-54, 29 giugno 2004, e Peretyatko c. Ucraina, n. 37758/05, § 16 del 27 novembre 2008). La Corte non trova nessuna ragione di giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella presente causa.
46. Riguardo alla questione dell'ammissibilità delle azioni di reclamo riguardo alla non-esecuzione della sentenza del 29 luglio 2003, la Corte reitera che non ci si può aspettare che una persona che ha ottenuto una sentenza definitiva contro lo Stato intraprenda procedimenti di esecuzione separati (vedere Metaxas c. Grecia, n. 8415/02, § 19, 27 maggio 2004, e Lizanets c. Ucraina, n. 6725/03, § 43 31 maggio 2007). In simile casi, l'autorità Statale imputata a cui fu notificato debitamente la sentenza deve prendere tutte le misure necessarie per attenersi a questa o trasmetterla ad un'altra autorità competente per l’esecuzione (vedere Burdov (n. 2), citata sopra, § 68).
47. Inoltre, la Corte nota che l'esecuzione della sentenza del 29 luglio 2003 dipese dalla disponibilità delle allocazioni budgetarie sufficienti per simili fini e gli ufficiali giudiziari non avevano nessun potere di obbligare lo Stato a correggere le sue leggi di bilancio (vedere, per esempio, Voytenko, citata sopra, § 30; Glova e Bregin c. Ucraina, N. 4292/04 e 4347/04, § 14 del 28 febbraio 2006; e Vasylyev c. Ucraina, n. 10232/02, § 29 del 13 luglio 2006).
48. Perciò, la Corte costata che il richiedente non può essere criticato per non aver depositato presso il Servizio degli Ufficiali giudiziari una richiesta, o un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza, per l'inizio di procedimenti di esecuzione.
49. Per stessi motivi ls Corte costata che questo stato degli affari ha impegnato la responsabilità dello Stato per l'esecuzione della sentenza del 29 luglio 2003 e che il richiedente può pretendere di essere la vittima di una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in relazione alla sua non-esecuzione.
50. Nella prospettiva delle considerazioni sopra, la Corte respinge le eccezioni del Governo all'ammissibilità di questa parte della richiesta e conclude che solleva problemi di fatto e di diritto sotto la Convenzione, la determinazione di cui richiede un esame dei meriti. Non trova nessuna base per dichiararla inammissibile. Di conseguenza, questa parte della richiesta deve essere dichiarata ammissibile.
2. Meriti
(a) Principi Generali
51. La Corte reitera che il diritto ad una corte protetto dall’ Articolo 6 sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di uno Stato Contraente concedesse che una decisione giudiziale definitiva e vincolante rimanga non operante al danno di una parte (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, 19 marzo 1997, § 40 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II). L'accesso effettivo ad un tribunale include il diritto di far eseguire una decisione di corte senza ritardo indebito (vedere Immobiliare Saffi c. Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 66 il 1999-V di ECHR).
52. Nello stesso contesto, l'impossibilità per un richiedente di ottenere l'esecuzione di una sentenza a suo favore in tempo dovuto costituisce un'interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà, come esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Voytenko, citata sopra, § 53).
53. Un ritardo irragionevolmente lungo nell'esecuzione di una sentenza vincolante può violare perciò la Convenzione (vedere Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, ECHR 2002-III). La ragionevolezza di simile ritardo a sarà determinata avuto riguardo in particolare alla complessità dei procedimenti di esecuzione, al comportamento stesso del richiedente e quello delle autorità competenti, e all'importo e alla natura dell'assegnazione del tribunale (vedere Raylyan c. Russia, n. 22000/03, § 31 del 15 febbraio 2007). Nel valutare la ragionevolezza del ritardo nell’ esecuzione deve essere dato dovuto riguardo al fatto che un ritardo di un anno e quattro mesi nell'esecuzione di un'assegnazione valutaria contro il corpo Statale è stato trovato dalla Corte come eccessivo (vedere Zubko ed Altri c. Ucraina, N. 3955/04, 5622/04 8538/04 e 11418/04, § 70 ECHR 2006-VI).
54. La Corte reitera inoltre che è l'obbligo dello Stato di garantire qualsiasi decisione definitiva contro i suoi organi, o le entità o società possedute o controllate dallo Stato, venga eseguita in ottemperanza coi summenzionati requisiti della Convenzione (vedere Voytenko, citata sopra; Romashov c. Ucraina, n. 67534/01, 27 luglio 2004; Dubenko c. Ucraina, n. 74221/01, 11 gennaio 2005; e Kozachek c. Ucraina, n. 29508/04, 7 dicembre 2006). Non è aperto allo Stato citare la mancanza di finanziamenti come una scusa per non onorare le sentenze contro di sé o contro le entità o le società possedute o controllate con sé (vedere Shmalko c. Ucraina, n. 60750/00, § 44 20 luglio 2004). Lo Stato è responsabile per l'esecuzione di decisioni definitive se i fattori che impediscono o rendono impraticabile la loro piena ed opportuna esecuzione sono all'interno del controllo delle autorità (vedere Sokur c. Ucraina, n. 29439/02, 26 aprile 2005, e Kryshchuk c. Ucraina, n. 1811/06, 19 febbraio 2009).
(b) L’applicazione di questi principi alla presente causa
55. La Corte osserva che nella presente causa la sentenza della Corte Militare e Regionale Cherkassy del 22 agosto 2001 non è stata eseguita pienamente ad oggi, essendo il ritardo nella sua esecuzione di approssimativamente sette anni e dieci mesi. La sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Leninskyy del 29 luglio 2003 rimane ineseguita da approssimativamente cinque anni ed undici mesi. Le osservazioni del Governo non contengono qualsiasi giustificazione per dei ritardi così sostanziali nell'esecuzione delle sentenze a favore del richiedente. La Corte nota che i ritardi furono causati da una combinazione di fattori, incluso la mancanza di finanziamenti budgetari omissioni da parte degli ufficiali giudiziari, e difetti nella legislazione nazionale, come risultato dei quali non esisteva possibilità per il richiedente di far eseguire le sentenze nel caso di una mancanza di allocazioni budgetarie per simili fini (vedere paragrafi 12, 14, 16, 18, 30, e 34 sopra). La Corte considera che quei fattori non erano fuori dal controllo delle autorità e così ritiene lo Stato completamente responsabile per questo stato degli affari.
56. La Corte osserva che ha trovato frequentemente violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in cause che sollevavano problemi simile a quelli sollevati nella presente causa (vedere, per esempio, Sinko c. Ucraina, n. 4504/04, § 17, 1 giugno 2006, e Kozachek citata sopra, § 31). Non ci sono argomenti nella causa in grado di persuadere la Corte a giungere ad una conclusione diversa.
57. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa della non-esecuzione prolungata delle sentenze della Corte Militare e Regionale di Cherkassy del 22 agosto 2001 e della Corte distrettuale di Leninskyy del 29 luglio 2003.
58. In prospettiva delle sue costatazioni sopra, la Corte non considera necessario esaminare l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto le stesse disposizioni della non-esecuzione della direttiva della Corte distrettuale di Leninskyy del 3 dicembre 2002 con la quale fu ordinato agli ufficiali giudiziari di cominciare le specifiche misure nella prospettiva di eseguire la sentenza del 22 agosto 2001, siccome questa regola interessava non più di una questione inerente che nasceva nel corso dell'esecuzione di quest’ultima sentenza (vedere Zhmak c. Ucraina, n. 36852/03, § 21 del 29 giugno 2006).
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
59. Il richiedente si lamentò della mancanza di vie di ricorso nazionali effettive a riguardo delle sue azioni di reclamo della non-esecuzione delle sentenze a suo favore. Lui si appellò all’Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
60. Appellandosi alla loro eccezione all'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra), il Governo dibatté inizialmente che l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione non era ugualmente applicabile nella causa del richiedente. Nelle sue ulteriori osservazioni il Governo non elaborò su questa questione, nonostante la richiesta esplicita della Corte di osservazioni supplementari delle parti sulla questione delle vie di ricorso nazionali a riguardo della non-esecuzione prolungata di sentenze nazionali.
61. Il richiedente sostenne le sue dichiarazioni della mancanza di vie di ricorso effettive nell'ordinamento giuridico ucraino a riguardo delle questioni sollevata nella presente causa.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
62. La Corte nota che questa parte della richiesta è collegata alle azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 esaminato sopra e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile (vedere paragrafi 45-50 sopra).
2. Meriti
(a) Principi Generali
63. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione dà espressione diretta all'obbligo degli Stati, custodito nell’ Articolo 1 della Convenzione, di proteggere i diritti umani da prima e principalmente all'interno del loro proprio ordinamento giuridico. Richiede perciò che gli Stati offrano una via di ricorso nazionale per trattare con la sostanza di un’ “azione di reclamo difendibile” sotto la Convenzione ed accordare ilrisarcimento appropriato (vedere Kudła c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 152 ECHR 2000-XI).
64. La sfera degli obblighi degli Stati Contraenti sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione varia a seconda della natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente; “l'efficacia” di una “via di ricorso” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione non dipende dalla certezza di un risultato favorevole per il richiedente. Allo stesso tempo, la via di ricorso richiesta dall’ Articolo 13 deve essere, “effettiva” in pratica così come in legge nel senso di prevenire sia la violazione addotta sia la sua continuazione, o di offrire compensazione adeguata per qualsiasi violazione che è già accaduta. Anche se una sola via di ricorso non soddisfa da sola completamente i requisiti dell’ Articolo 13, l’insieme delle vie di ricorso previste sotto diritto nazionale dovrebbe fare così (vedere Kudła, citata sopra, §§ 157-158, e Wasserman c. Russia (n. 2), n. 21071/05, § 45 10 aprile 2008).
65. La Corte ha già dato un'interpretazione estesa dei requisiti dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione riguardo alle azioni di reclamo di non-esecuzione di decisioni dei tribunali nazionali nella recente sentenza di Burdov (n. 2) (citata sopra, §§ 98-100), le cui parti attinenti si leggono come segue:
“98. Riguardo più in particolare a cause di lunghezza- del -procedimento, una via di ricorso progettata per accelerare i procedimenti per impedire loro dal divenire smodatamente lunghi è la soluzione più effettiva (vedere Scordino c. l'Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 183 ECHR 2006 -...). Similmente, in cause riguardo alla non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali qualsiasi mezzo nazionale per ostacolare una violazione assicurando l’esecuzione opportuna è, in principio, di più grande valore. Comunque, dove una sentenza viene consegnata a favore di un individuo contro lo Stato, il primo non deve, in principio, essere obbligato ad usare simili mezzi (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Metaxas citata sopra, § 19): l’onere di attenersi a tale sentenze spetta primariamente alle autorità Statali che dovrebbero usare tutti i mezzi disponibili nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale per accelerazione l'esecuzione, prevenendo così violazioni della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Akashev citata sopra, §§ 21-22).
99. Gli Stati possono scegliere anche di introdurre solamente una via di ricorso compensativa, senza che questa via di ricorso venga considerata come inefficace. Dove è disponibile nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale tale via di ricorso compensativa, la Corte deve lasciare un margine più ampio di valutazione allo Stato per concedergli di organizzare la via di ricorso in modo coerente col suo proprio ordinamento giuridico e le sue tradizioni e in modo consone con lo standard di vita nel paese riguardato. La Corte è costretta nondimeno a verificare se il modo in cui il diritto nazionale viene interpretato e viene applicato produce conseguenze che sono coerenti coi principi della Convenzione, come interpretati alla luce della giurisprudenza della Corte (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, §§ 187-191). La Corte ha esposto criteri chiave per la verifica dell'efficacia di una via di ricorso compensativa a riguardo della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti giudiziali. Questi criteri che si applicano anche a cause di non-esecuzione (vedere Wasserman, citatoa sopra, §§ 49 e 51), sono i seguenti:
•un'azione per il risarcimento deve essere ascoltata all'interno di un termine ragionevole (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 195 in fine);
•il risarcimento deve essere pagato prontamente e generalmente non più tardi dei sei mesi dalla data in cui la decisione che assegna il risarcimento diviene esecutiva (ibid., § 198);
•le norme procedurali che disciplinano un'azione per il risarcimento devono adattarsi al principio dell'equità garantito dall’Articolo 6 della Convenzione (ibid., § 200);
•le norme riguardo alle spese processuali non devono mettere un carico eccessivo sui contendenti dove la loro azione è giustificata (l'ibid., § 201);
•il livello del risarcimento non deve essere irragionevole rispetto dalle assegnazioni rese da parte della Corte in cause simili (ibid., §§ 202-206 e 213).
100. Su questo ultimo criterio, la Corte indicò, che, riguardo al danno materiale, i tribunali nazionali chiaramente sono in una posizione migliore per determinarne l'esistenza e il quantum. Comunque, la situazione è diversa riguardo al danno morale. Là esiste una presunzione forte ma respingibile che procedimenti smodatamente lunghi causeranno danno morale (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, §§ 203-204, e Wasserman, citata sopra, §50). La Corte considera questa presunzione particolarmente forte nel caso di ritardo eccessivo nell’ esecuzione da parte dello Stato di una sentenza consegnata contro sé, data la frustrazione inevitabile che sorge dalla noncuranza dello Stato per il suo obbligo di onorare il suo debito ed il fatto che il richiedente ha già superato procedimenti giudiziali ed ottenuto il successo...”
(b) la Richiesta di questi principi in cause contro l'Ucraina e nella causa presente
66. La Corte si riferisce ad una delle sue prime cause contro l’Ucraina dove considerò il problema della disponibilità delle vie di ricorso nazionali effettive a riguardo di azioni di reclamo di non-esecuzione prolungata di sentenze e fece le seguenti conclusioni su questo problema (vedere Voytenko, citata sopra, §§ 30 -31 e 48):
“30. Il Governo invocò la possibilità per il richiedente di impugnare qualsiasi inattività od omissioni da parte del Servizio degli Ufficiali giudiziari e della Tesoreria, e chiedere il risarcimento per danno materiale e morale causato da loro. Nella presente causa, comunque il debitore è un corpo Statale e l'esecuzione di sentenze contro sé, come sembra dall'archivio della causa, può essere eseguito solamente se lo Stato prevede e fa disposizioni per le spese appropriate nel Bilancio Statale dell'Ucraina prendendo misure legislative appropriate. I fatti della causa mostrano che, in tutto il periodo sotto considerazione, l'esecuzione della sentenza in oggetto fu ostacolato precisamente a causa della mancanza di misure legislative, piuttosto che dalla cattiva condotta di un ufficiale giudiziario. Il richiedente non può essere rimproverato perciò per non avere intrapreso procedimenti contro l'ufficiale giudiziario (vedere Shestakov c. Russia, decisione n. 48757/99, 18 giugno 2002). Inoltre, la Corte nota che il Governo sostenne che non c'erano irregolarità nel modo in cui il Servizio degli Ufficiali giudiziari e la Tesoreria avevano condotto i procedimenti di esecuzione.
31. In queste circostanze, la Corte conclude, che il richiedente era esonerato dall'intraprendere la via di ricorso invocata dal Governo.
...48. La Corte si riferisce alle sue sentenze (ai paragrafi 30-31 sopra) nella presente causa riguardo all'argomento del Governo riguardante le vie di ricorso nazionali. Per le stesse ragioni, la Corte conclude, che il richiedente non aveva una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva, come richiesto dall’Articolo 13 della Convenzione, per compensare il danno creato dal ritardo nei presenti procedimenti. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione di questa disposizione...”
67. La Corte confermò le sue sentenze sopra in cause susseguenti che sollevavano un problema simile (vedere, per esempio, Romashov, citata sopra, §§ 31-32 e 47; Garkusha c. Ucraina, n. 4629/03, §§ 18-20 del 13 dicembre 2005; Mikhaylova ed Altri c. Ucraina, n. 16475/02, §§ 27 e 36, 15 giugno 2006; Vasylyev, citata sopra, §§ 31-33 e 41; Raisa Tarasenko c. Ucraina, n. 43485/02, § 13, 14 e 23 7 dicembre 2006; e Pivnenko c. Ucraina, n. 36369/04, §§ 18-20 del 12 ottobre 2006).
68. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte costata che non c'è niente nelle osservazioni delle parti da suggerire che esisteva una via di ricorso a livello dei cittadini che soddisfacesse i requisiti dell’Articolo 13 della Convenzione a riguardo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente della non-esecuzione delle sentenze al suo favore.
69. I procedimenti che il richiedente avviò contro gli ufficiali giudiziari, nonostante il loro risultato a suo favore non gli offrirono un'opportunità per prevenire o porre rimedio alle le violazioni dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 successivamente trovate dalla Corte nella sua causa. Mentre è vero che, nella sentenza definitiva del 29 luglio 2003, gli ufficiali giudiziari furono ritenuti responsabili per la non-esecuzione prolungata della sentenza del 22 agosto 2001 e fu ordinato loro di pagare il risarcimento al richiedente, questo non migliorò la sua situazione, poiché l'esecuzione della sentenza del 22 agosto 2001 non fu completata, nemmeno accelerata, ed il risarcimento assegnato nella sentenza del 29 luglio 2003 è rimasto non retribuito.
70. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione nella presente causa.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 34 DELLA CONVENZIONE
71. Il richiedente addusse che il suo avvocato non era stato in grado di ottenere dei documenti non specificati dall'archivio di causa del richiedente trattenuti dalla Corte di Leninskyy che lui aveva ritenuto necessari per le prove della presente richiesta. Lui invocò l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“La Corte può ricevere richieste da qualsiasi persona, organizzazione non-governativa o gruppo di individui che pretendono di essere vittime di una violazione all’interno di una delle Alti Parti Contraenti dei diritti garantiti dalla Convenzione o dai Protocolli. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano a non impedire in nessun modo l'esercizio effettivo di questo diritto.”
72. La Corte nota che ha ricevuto copie dal richiedente ed dal suo avvocato di tutti i documenti che consideravano necessari venissero trattati con la presente causa. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che l'avvocato non presentò una procura alla Corte di Leninskyy che lo autorizzava ad agire a favore del richiedente. Nell’insieme, la richiesta non contiene, qualsiasi comparizione di ostacolo nell'esercizio del diritto del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, nessun ulteriore esame di questa questione è richiesto (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Moiseyev c. Russia (dec.), n. 62936/00, 9 dicembre 2004).
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
73. La Corte nota che la presente causa concerne un problema ricorrente sottostante le violazioni più frequenti della Convenzione trovate dalle Corte a riguardo dell'Ucraina; più della metà delle sue sentenze nelle cause ucraine riguardava il problema della non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni definitive per cui le autorità ucraine erano responsabili. La Corte osserva che una delle prime sentenze di questo tipo, consegnata nel giugno 2004, era basata su fatti simili alle circostanze della presente causa (vedere Voytenko, citata sopra). In particolare, nella causa Voytenko il richiedente non ha potuto ricevere le somme assegnate a lui in relazione alla conclusione del suo servizio militare per approssimativamente quattro anni. Oltre a trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa del ritardo nell'esecuzione dell'assegnazione nazionale in Voytenko, la Corte concluse che l'ordinamento giuridico ucraino non offriva vie di ricorso nazionali effettive, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione, per prevenire i ritardi nell'esecuzione di sentenze o riconoscere compensazione per il danno creato da simili ritardi.
74. La presente causa dimostra che i problemi della non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni definitive e della mancanza di vie di ricorso nazionali effettive nell'ordinamento giuridico ucraino rimane senza una soluzione, nonostante il fatto che c'è una giurisprudenza chiara che esorta il Governo a prendere misure appropriate per risolvere questi problemi.
75. In queste circostanze la Corte considera necessario esaminare questa causa sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“1. Le Alte Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
76. Il richiedente presentò che l'insuccesso ricorrente delle autorità ucraine nell’eseguire decisioni nazionali consegnate contro le autorità o società possedute o controllate dallo Stato e nell’ introdurre una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva costituiva un problema sistematico. Lui si riferì a molte cause che sollevavano problemi simili che già erano stati determinati con effetto definitivo dalla Corte, incluso Svintitskiy e Goncharov c. Ucraina (n. 59312/00, 4 ottobre 2005); Mikhaylova ed Altri c. Ucraina (n. 16475/02, 15 giugno 2006); Aleksandr Shevchenko c. Ucraina (n. 8371/02, 26 aprile 2007); Kolesnik c. Ucraina (n. 20824/02, 10 aprile 2008); Maydanik c. Ucraina (n. 20826/02, 10 aprile 2008); e Tishchenko c. Ucraina (n. 33892/04, 25 settembre 2008).
77. Il Governo presentò che i problemi che impedivano l'esecuzione di decisioni nazionali differivano nelle particolari cause. In alcuni casi, delle decisioni nazionali rimasero non eseguite a causa della mancanza delle allocazioni budgetarie, mentre in altri casi questo era dovuto a difetti nella legislazione nazionale e nella pratica amministrativa, o, come nella presente causa, a causa di omissioni o di inazioni da parte degli ufficiali giudiziari. Nella sua prospettiva, questa causa non riguardava perciò un problema sistematico. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che la procedura della sentenza pilota non dovrebbe essere applicata nella presente causa siccome le misure mirate a chiarire i problemi di non-esecuzione prolungata erano già stati determinati dal Comitato dei Ministri nella sua Decisione Provvisoria del 6 marzo 2008. Suggerì che l’applicazione di tale procedura nella presente causa avrebbe corrisposto all'adempimento di una funzione direttiva da parte della Corte.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. L’applicazione della procedura della sentenza pilota
78. La Corte reitera che Articolo 46 della Convenzione, come interpretato alla luce dell’ Articolo 1, impone sullo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato dei Ministri misure individuali e/o generali appropriate per garantire il diritto del richiedente di cui la Corte ha trovato violazione. Simili misure devono essere prese anche a riguardo di altre persone nella posizione del richiedente, in particolare risolvendo i problemi che hanno condotto alle sentenze della Corte (vedere Scozzari e Giunta c. Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000 VIII; Christine Goodwin c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 28957/95, § 120 ECHR 2002 VI; Lukenda c. Slovenia, n. 23032/02, § 94 ECHR 2005-X; e S. e Marper c. Regno Unito [GC], N. 30562/04 e 30566/04, § 134 ECHR 2008 -...).
79. Nella sua decisione sulle sentenze che rivelano un problema sistematico fondamentale, adottata il 12 maggio 2004, il Comitato dei Ministri invitò la Corte ad “identificare nelle sue sentenze che trovano una violazione della Convenzione ciò che considera essere un problema sistematico e fondamentale e la fonte di questo problema, in particolare quando è probabile che generi numerose richieste, così come assistere gli Stati nel trovare la soluzione appropriata ed il Comitato dei Ministri nel soprintendere all'esecuzione delle sentenze” (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra).
80. Per facilitare l'attuazione effettiva delle sue sentenze lungo queste linee la Corte può adottare una procedura di sentenza pilota che le concede chiaramente di identificare in una sentenza l'esistenza di problemi strutturali sottostanti alle violazioni ed indicare le specifiche misure od azioni da prendere da parte dello stato rispondente per rimediarli (veda Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 e la parte operativa, ECHR 2004-V, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC] n. 35014/97, §§ 231-239 e la parte operativa ECHR 2006-VIII).
81. In linea col suo approccio nella causa Burdov (n. 2) (citata sopra, §§ 129-130) questi simili problemi riguardati di non-esecuzione di decisioni nazionali nella Federazione russa, la Corte considera appropriato applicare la procedura della sentenza pilota nella presente causa, dato in particolare la natura ricorrente e persistente dei problemi fondamentali, il grande numero di persone colpito da questi in Ucraina ed il bisogno urgente di accordare loro compensazione veloce ed appropriata a livello nazionale.
82. Contrariamente alle osservazioni del Governo, la richiesta della procedura della sentenza pilota nella presente causa non funziona in modo contrario alla divisione delle funzioni fra le istituzioni della Convenzione. Benché spetti al Comitato dei Ministri soprintendere l'attuazione delle misure progettate per soddisfare gli obblighi dello Stato rispondente sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, è compito della Corte, come definito dall’ Articolo 19 della Convenzione, “assicurare l'osservanza degli impegni assunti dalle Alti Parti Contraenti nella Convenzione e nei Protocolli” e questo compito non è meglio realizzato necessariamente ripetendo le stesse sentenze in una grande serie di cause (vedere, mutatis mutandis, E.G. c. Polonia (dec.), n. 50425/99, § 27 del 23 settembre 2008). Nella prospettiva dei problemi ricorrenti con cui la Corte sta trattando nella presente causa, è perciò, all'interno della sua competenza applicare la procedura della sentenza pilota per incitare lo Stato rispondente a chiarire i grandi numeri di cause individuali che sorgono dallo stesso problema strutturale a livello nazionale (vedere Burdov (n. 2), citata sopra, § 127).
2. Esistenza di una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione
83. La Corte nota che ha consegnato sentenze più di 300 cause contro l'Ucraina durante i cinque anni passati dalle sue prime sentenze (vedere, per esempio, Voytenko, citata sopra) trovando violazioni ripetitive della Convenzione a causa della non-esecuzione o dell’ esecuzione prolungata di assegnazioni nazionali definitive in Ucraina e a causa dell'assenza di vie di ricorso nazionali effettive a riguardo di simile difetti. Mentre è vero che ci sono dei gruppi vulnerabili della popolazione ucraina che vengono colpiti da questi problemi più di altri, non è necessariamente il caso che persone nella stessa situazione del richiedente appartengono a “una classe identificabile di cittadini” (confronta Broniowski, citata sopra, § 189, e Hutten-Czapska, citata sopra, § 229). Come risulta dalla giurisprudenza corrente della Corte sulla questione qualsiasi persona che ha ottenuto una decisione nazionale definitiva per l'esecuzione della quale le autorità ucraine sono responsabili corre il rischio di essere privato della possibilità di trarre beneficio da tale decisione in ottemperanza con la Convenzione.
84. La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di non essere d'accordo col Governo che i ritardi nell'esecuzione di decisioni nazionali definitive sono causati da una varietà di disfunzioni nell'ordinamento giuridico ucraino. In particolare, la Corte si riferisce alle sue costatazioni sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nella presente causa per cui l'esecuzione delle sentenze a favore del richiedente è stata impedita da una combinazione di fattori, incluso la mancanza delle allocazioni budgetarie, le omissioni degli ufficiali giudiziari ed i difetti nella legislazione nazionale (vedere paragrafo 55 sopra). In altre cause che sollevavano problemi simili, i richiedenti non sono stati capaci di ottenere l'esecuzione di assegnazioni di corte in tempo dovuto a causa dell'insuccesso delle autorità nel prendere le specifiche misure budgetarie, o a causa dell'introduzione di proibizioni sul sequestro e la vendita di proprietà appartenenti a società Statali o controllate dallo Stato (vedere, per esempio, Romashov, Dubenko e Kozachek, tutti citate sopra).
85. La Corte nota che i fattori summenzionati erano tutti all'interno del controllo dello Stato che è andato a vuoto finora nell’ adottare qualsiasi misura atta a migliorare la situazione nonostante la giurisprudenza sostanziale e coerente della Corte sulla questione.
86. Il carattere sistematico dei problemi identificati nella presente causa è attestato inoltre dal fatto che le approssimativamente 1,400 richieste contro l’Ucraina che riguardano pienamente o in parte, i problemi sopra, sono attualmente pendenti di fronte alla Corte ed il numero di simili richieste sta aumentando continuamente.
87. La Corte dà dovuto riguardo alla posizione del Comitato dei Ministri che ha ammesso che la non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali costituisce un problema strutturale in Ucraina che rimane insoluto (vedere paragrafi 38-39 sopra).
88. Nella prospettiva di ciò che precede, la Corte conclude, che le violazioni trovate nella presente sentenza né furono causate da un incidente isolato, né erano attribuibili ad una particolare svolta degli eventi in questa causa, ma erano la conseguenza di difetti regolatori e della condotta amministrativa delle autorità Statali riguardo all'esecuzione di decisioni nazionali per la quale loro erano responsabili. Di conseguenza, la situazione nella presente causa deve essere qualificata come il risultato di una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione (vedere Bottazzi c. Italia [GC], n. 34884/97, § 22, il 1999-V di ECHR, e Burdov (n. 2), citata sopra, §§ 134-135).
3. L'adozione di misure generali per rimediare ai problemi strutturali sottostanti alle violazioni fondamentali della Convenzione nella causa presente
89. La Corte reitera che non è in principio il suo compito determinare quali misure riparatrici possano essere appropriate per soddisfare gli obblighi dello Stato rispondente sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione. Soggetto al monitoraggio da parte del Comitato di Ministri, lo Sato rispondente resta libero di scegliere i mezzi con cui assolverà il suo obbligo legale sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, purché simili mezzi siano compatibili con le conclusioni esposte nella sentenza della Corte (vedere Scozzari e Giunta, citata sopra, § 249).
90. I problemi strutturali con cui la Corte sta trattando nella presente causa sono di grande potenza e complessi per natura. Loro richiedono prima facie l'attuazione di misure comprensive e complesse, possibilmente di carattere legislativo ed amministrativo che coinvolge le varie autorità nazionali. Il Comitato dei Ministri è collocato meglio effettivamente, ed equipaggiò per esaminare le misure da adottare da parte dell'Ucraina a questo riguardo.
91. La Corte nota con soddisfazione che l'adozione di misure in risposta ai problemi strutturali di non-esecuzione prolungata e la mancanza di vie di ricorso nazionali è stata considerata completamente dal Comitato di Ministri in cooperazione con le autorità ucraine (vedere paragrafi 38-39 sopra). Comunque, siccome è evidente dalle proprie costatazioni della Corte nella presente causa e cause simili contro Ucraina, viste in concomitanza con l'altro materiale attinente in sua proprietà lo Stato rispondente ha dimostrato una riluttanza quasi completa nel chiarire i problemi in oggetto.
92. La Corte sottolinea che specifiche riforme nella legislazione dell'Ucraina e nella pratica amministrativa dovrebbero essere implementate senza ritardo per portarlo in linea con le conclusioni della Corte nella presente sentenza ed attenersi ai requisiti dell’ Articolo 46 della Convenzione. La Corte lascia al Comitato dei Ministri la determinazione di quale sarebbe il modo più appropriato per affrontare i problemi ed indicare qualsiasi misura generale da prendere da parte dello Stato rispondente.
93. In questo contesto, la Corte si riferisce ai principi di base derivanti dalla sua giurisprudenza sul problema su cui devono adattare le misure generali richieste (vedere divide 45-46 e 51-54 sopra).
94. In qualsiasi caso, lo Stato rispondente deve introdurre senza ritardo, ed al massimo entro un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva una via di ricorso o una combinazione di vie di ricorso nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale ed assicurare che la via di ricorso o le vie di ricorso si attengono, sia in teoria che in pratica, al set di criteri chiave della Corte e reiterati nella presente sentenza (vedere paragrafi 63-65 sopra). Nel fare così, le autorità ucraine dovrebbero avere anche dovuto riguardo alle raccomandazioni dl Comitato dei Ministri agli stati membro sul miglioramento delle vie di ricorso nazionali (vedere paragrafi 35-36 sopra).
4. Procedura da seguire in cause simili
95. La Corte reitera che uno degli scopi della procedura della sentenza pilota è concedere la possibile compensazione più veloce da accordare a livello nazionale a grandi numeri di persone che subiscono il problema strutturale identificato nella sentenza pilota (vedere Burdov (no.2), citatao sopra, § 127). Mentre l'azione dello Stato rispondente dovrebbe mirare primariamente alla decisione di tale disfunzione ed all'introduzione, dove appropriato, di vie di ricorso nazionali effettive a riguardo delle violazioni in oggetto, può includere anche soluzioni ad hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatore unilaterali in linea coi requisiti della Convenzione. La Corte è così in una posizione per decidere nella sentenza pilota sulla procedura da seguire in cause che scaturiscono dagli stessi problemi strutturali (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski citata sopra, § 198, e Xenides-Arestis c. Turchia, n. 46347/99, § 50 del 22 dicembre 2005).
96. Nelle presenti circostanze, la Corte trova necessario aggiornare l'esame di cause simili durante l'attuazione delle misure attinenti da parte dello Stato rispondente. La Corte considera appropriato fare una distinzione fra le cause già pendenti di fronte a sé e quelle che possono arrivare dopo la consegna della presente sentenza, dando con ciò allo Stato rispondente un'opportunità per stabilire la categoria precedente di cause in vari modi, come indicato sotto.
(a) Le Richieste depositate dopo la consegna della presente sentenza
97. La Corte aggiornerà i procedimenti riguardo a tutte le nuove richieste depositate presso di lei dopo la consegna della presente sentenza nella quale i richiedenti sollevano solamente azioni di reclamo difendibili relative alla non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni nazionali per l'esecuzione della quale lo Stato è responsabile, incluso le richieste nelle quali sono sollevate anche azioni di reclamo che adducono una mancanza di vie di ricorso effettive a riguardo di simile non-esecuzione. L'aggiornamento sarà effettivo per un periodo di un anno dopo che la presente sentenza diviene definitiva. I richiedenti in simili cause saranno informati di conseguenza.
(b) Le Richieste depositate prima della consegna della presente sentenza
98. Comunque, la Corte decide di seguire un corso di azione piuttosto diverso riguardo le richieste depositate prima della consegna della presente sentenza. In particolare, a seguito della consegna della presente sentenza la Corte darà avviso al Governo dell’ Ucraina di richieste che sollevano problemi simili a quelli sollevati nella presente causa e che non contengono altre azioni di reclamo difendibili. I procedimenti di contraddittorio in tutti simili cause saranno aggiornati per un anno dalla data i n cui questa sentenza diviene definitiva. I procedimenti in cause che sono già state comunicate al Governo sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2 (b) dell’Ordinamento di Corte, ma in cui la Corte non ha deciso ancora sui meriti, sarà aggiornato anche per lo stesso periodo di tempo.
99. Nel frattempo, lo Stato rispondente deve accordare compensazione adeguata e sufficiente, entro un anno dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva, a tutti i richiedenti nelle cause menzionate nel paragrafo precedente le cui azioni di reclamo di non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni nazionali sono state comunicate al Governo rispondente. La Corte reitera che i ritardi nell'esecuzione di decisioni nazionali dovrebbero essere calcolati e dovrebbero essere valutati con riferimento ai requisiti della Convenzione e, notevolmente, in conformità coi criteri definiti nella presente sentenza (vedere nel particolare paragrafo 53 sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte, simile compensazione può essere realizzata tramite implementazione proprio motu di da parte delle autorità di una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva in quelle cause o tramite soluzioni ad hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatore unilaterali in linea coi requisiti della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 95 sopra).
100. Comunque, se lo Stato rispondente no riesce ad adottare simili misure a seguito di una sentenza pilota e continua a violare la Convenzione, la Corte non avrà nessun alternativa se non riprendere l'esame di tutte le richieste simili pendenti di fronte a sé e portarle a giudizio così come assicurare l’osservanza effettiva della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, E.G., citata sopra, § 28).
101. La decisione di aggiornare le cause sopra sarà fatta senza portare pregiudizio al potere della Corte in qualsiasi momento di dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi simile causa o di cancellarla dal suo ruolo a seguito di un regolamento amichevole fra le parti o della decisione della questione tramite altri mezzi in conformità con gli Articoli 37 o 39 della Convenzione.
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
102. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
103. Il richiedente, riferendosi al fatto che le assegnazioni di corte sono rimaste non retribuite per un periodo di tempo molto lungo, richiede UAH 1,837.637 per coprire le rettifiche collegate all’inflazione della pendenza debitoria che origina dalle sentenze a suo favore. In appoggio di questa rivendicazione, il richiedente offrì calcoli particolareggiati basati sui tassi di inflazione ufficiali emessi dal Comitato Statale di Statistica dell'Ucraina. Secondo i calcoli, come risultato dell'inflazione gli importi dovuti a lui avrebbero perso circa la metà del loro valore. Il richiedente chiese anche EUR 7,000 a riguardo del danno morale.
104. Il Governo contestò le rivendicazioni del richiedente come eccessive e non comprovate. Riguardo alle rivendicazioni per perdite di inflazione, dibatté che il richiedente non aveva offerto documenti in appoggio ai suoi calcoli.
105. La Corte nota che è incontrastato che lo Stato ha ancora un obbligo insoluto di esecuzione delle sentenze in questione.
106. La Corte nota inoltre che la rivendicazione del richiedente a riguardo delle rettifiche collegate all’inflazione è sostenuta da calcoli particolareggiati basati sui dei dati ufficiali sui tassi di inflazione. Prendendo in considerazione il fatto che il Governo non ha contestato il metodo di calcolo utilizzato dal richiedente o l'accuratezza dei suoi calcoli (vedere, per esempio, Maksimikha c. Ucraina, n. 43483/02, § 29 del 14 dicembre 2006), la Corte gli assegna l'importo chiesto, vale a dire EUR 174.
107. Riguardo alla rivendicazione a riguardo del danno morale, i la Corte costata che il richiedente ha dovuto soffrire di angoscia e d’ansia a causa delle violazioni trovate. Decidendo su una base equa, gli assegna EUR 2,500 sotto questo capo.
B. Costi e spese
108. Il richiedente chiese anche UAH 4,3508 per i costi e le spese incorsi di fronte ai tribunali nazionali ed UAH 14,0009 per quelli incorsi di fronte alla Corte. Lui produsse contratti per servizi legali e ricevute che offrivano prova dei pagamenti fatti al suo avvocato.
109. Il Governo presentò che le rivendicazioni sopra erano esorbitanti e richiese alla Corte di considerarli alla luce dei criteri stabiliti nella sua giurisprudenza, riferendosi in particolare a Tolstoy Miloslavsky c. Regno Unito (13 luglio 1995, § 77 Serie A n. 316-B).
110. La Corte reitera che, secondo la sua giurisprudenza, ad un richiedente viene concesso un rimborso di costi e spese solamente se si dimostra che questi davvero e necessariamente sono stati sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa, auto riguardo alle informazioni in suo possesso ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare l'importo richiesto di EUR 1,740.
C. Interesse di mora
111. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara ammissibile le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 e l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ed il resto delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che le violazioni sopra sono nate da una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione che consiste nell'inosservanza ricorrente dello Stato rispondente in tempo dovuto di decisioni nazionali per l'esecuzione delle quali è responsabile ed a riguardo delle quali le parti colpite non hanno vie di ricorso nazionali effettive;
5. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente deve predisporre senza ritardo, ed al massimo entro un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva o una combinazione di simili vie di ricorso capaci di garantire compensazione adeguata e sufficiente per la non-esecuzione o l’esecuzione ritardata di decisioni nazionali, in linea coi principi della Convenzione come stabilito nella giurisprudenza della Corte;
6. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente deve accordare simile compensazione, entro un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva a tutti i richiedenti le cui richieste pendenti di fronte alla Corte furono comunicate al Governo sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2 (b) dell’Ordinamento di Corte prima della consegna della presente sentenza o saranno comunicate inoltre dopo questa sentenza e concernenti unicamente azioni di reclamo difendibili relative alla non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni nazionali per cui lo Stato era responsabile, incluso dove sono sollevate anche azioni di reclamo che adducono una mancanza di vie di ricorso effettive a riguardo di simile non-esecuzione;
7. Sostiene che durante l'adozione delle misure sopra, la Corte aggiornerà, per un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva, i procedimenti in tutte le cause nelle quali i richiedenti sollevano solamente azioni di reclamo difendibili relative alla non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni nazionali per le quale lo Stato è responsabile, incluso cause in cui sono sollevate anche azioni di reclamo che adducono una mancanza di vie di ricorso effettive a riguardo di simile non-esecuzione senza pregiudizio al potere della Corte in qualsiasi momento di dichiarare qualunque simile causa inammissibile o di cancellarla dal suo ruolo a seguito di un regolamento amichevole fra le parti o della decisione della questione tramite altri mezzi in conformità con gli Articoli 37 o 39 della Convenzione;
8. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare al richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva:
(i) la pendenza debitoria sotto le sentenze del 22 agosto 2001 e del 29 luglio 2003 ed EUR 174 (cento e settanta-quattro euro) per coprire le rettifiche collegate all’inflazione;
(ii) EUR 2,500 (due mila cinquecento euro) a riguardo del danno morale ed EUR 1,740 (mille settecento e quaranta euro) a riguardo di costi e spese, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente;
(b) che le somme sopra vengano convertite nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(c) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
9. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 15 ottobre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente
1. Approssimativamente 296 euro (EUR).

2. Circa EUR 513.

3. Circa EUR 10.

4. Circa EUR 513.

5. Circa EUR 256.

6. Circa EUR 171.

7. Circa EUR 174.

8. Circa EUR 413.

9. Circa EUR 1,327.


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.