Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VRIONI AND OTHERS v. ALBANIA AND ITALY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 35720/04/2009
STATO: Albania
DATA: 29/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF VRIONI AND OTHERS v. ALBANIA AND ITALY
(Applications nos. 35720/04 and 42832/06)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
(29 September 2009)
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Vrioni and Others v. Albania and Italy,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ledi Bianku,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in two applications against the Republics of Albania and Italy lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) as follows: application no. 35720/04, Vrioni, on 8 April 1999; application no. 42832/06, Vrioni and Others, on 15 August 2006.
2. The applicants were represented by Ms L. Sula and Ms. E. Qirjako, lawyers practising in Tirana. The Albanian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their then Agent, Ms S. Meneri.
3. The applicants alleged that there had been violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 13 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
4. On 9 February 2006 and 8 January 2007 the President of the Fourth Section of the Court decided to give notice of application no. 35720/04 and application no. 42832/06 respectively to the Government of Albania. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it was decided to examine the merits of the applications at the same time as their admissibility.
5. The applicants and the Government each filed further written observations (Rule 59 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. Mr S. V., the applicant in application no. 35720/04, is an Albanian national who was born in 1925 and lives in Albania. Mr G. L. F., Mr D. L. F. and Mr O. V., the applicants in application no. 42832/06, are Albanian and Italian nationals who were born in 1946, 1950 and 1974 respectively and live in Italy. Mr S. V. represented himself and the other applicants in the domestic courts' proceedings.
A. Background to the case
7. In 1950 a plot of land measuring 1,637 sq. m belonging to the applicants' ancestor, was confiscated by the then Albanian authorities without compensation.
8. On 1 July 1991 the Italian Embassy in Albania purchased two buildings in Tirana bordering on the property confiscated from the applicants' grandfather. The transaction was concluded through an
inter-State agreement validated by means of note verbale exchanges between the two governments. The note verbale did not contain any information as to the transfer of title to the surrounding or adjacent plots of land. The relevant property titles were not entered in the Tirana Property Register.
9. The Albanian Government subsequently used the income from the transaction to purchase the premises of the Albanian Embassy in Rome.
10. Under the Property Restitution and Compensation Act (“the Property Act”), the applicants lodged two applications in 1996 and 1999, respectively, with the Tirana Property Restitution and Compensation Commission (Komisioni i Kthimit dhe Kompensimit të Pronave – “the Commission”), claiming title to their deceased grandfather's property.
11. On 18 March 1996 and 14 December 1999 the Commission recognised the applicants' title to two plots of land measuring 1,100 sq. m. and 537 sq. m. respectively. The Commission held that it was impossible for the applicants to have the whole original plot of land allocated to them. It decided to restore to the applicants a vacant plot of land (një truall i lirë) measuring 1,456 sq. m., which was situated within the occupied grounds of the Italian Embassy, and ordered the authorities to pay compensation in respect of a plot of land measuring 181 sq. m. Moreover, it ordered that the applicants' title to the property be entered in the Tirana Property Register.
12. The applicants were also issued with two certificates of property registration by the Registry Office: registration no. 4373, dated 1 June 1996, and registration no. 420, dated 28 December 1999.
13. On an unspecified date in 1996, having regard to the fact that, according to the note verbale of 1991, the Italian Embassy had title to one of the buildings only, but not to the occupied plot of land, the applicants requested the Embassy to return their property which it was occupying without title.
14. On 27 November 1996 the Albanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, having regard to the applicants' property claims to the plot of land adjacent to the Embassy's buildings, offered mediation to the Italian Embassy with a view to entering into civil agreements with the applicants.
15. On 16 August 1997 the Italian Embassy in Albania, in reply to the applicants' request for recovery of their property, informed them that their property claims to the plot of land situated within its premises had to be settled with the Albanian authorities.
16. On 1 October 1997, following a request by the applicants, the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs informed them that by virtue of the note verbale exchanges of 1991 the Italian Embassy in Albania had full ownership of the buildings and adjacent land. Moreover, it referred the applicants to the Albanian authorities as competent to determine any claims for compensation that the applicants might submit.
B. Judicial proceedings for recovery of property and compensation
17. On 2 May 1997, following a civil action brought by the applicants against the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Tirana District Court (“the District Court”) found that the Italian Embassy was occupying the applicants' property without title and, being unable to take action against a diplomatic mission, ordered the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to facilitate the applicants' recovery of their property and also to pay them compensation amounting to 21,607.50 United States dollars.
18. On 27 January 1998 the Tirana Court of Appeal, (“the Court of Appeal”), quashed the District Court's judgment and remitted the case to a different bench of the District Court for fresh consideration. According to the Court of Appeal, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which had represented the Albanian State in the agreement relating to the transfer of the property to the Italian Embassy, could not be the defendant party in the proceedings in so far as the Ministry of Finance was the competent body to represent State interests in domestic proceedings. The applicants appealed against the Court of Appeal's judgment to the then Court of Cassation.
19. On 17 June 1998 the Court of Cassation quashed the Court of Appeal's judgment and remitted the case to that court for a fresh examination.
20. On 29 January 1999 the Court of Appeal, re-examining the case, found that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs could not be held liable in this connection and designated the Italian Embassy, which was occupying the applicants' property without title, as the liable entity in relation to the property. It quashed the District Court's judgment of 2 May 1997 and remitted the case to the same court for fresh consideration.
21. On 20 June 2000 the District Court dismissed the applicants' grounds of appeal, finding that the Commission's decisions of 18 March 1996 and 14 December 1999 had been unlawful, as they were in breach of section 4 of the Property Act.
22. The District Court found that the applicants' disputed plot of land, even though there were no buildings on it, constituted an integral part of the Italian Embassy's premises. Thus, the District Court declared null and void the Commission's decisions and held that the applicants were entitled to receive compensation for the original properties in one of the forms laid down in section 16 of the Property Act.
23. On 31 October 2001 the Court of Appeal quashed the District Court's judgment and remitted the case to a different bench of the Court of Appeal, in accordance with Article 467/a of the Code of Civil Procedure, as it had noted irregularities in the proceedings in the lower courts.
24. On 29 October 2002 the Court of Appeal, having duly given notice of the hearings to the opposing parties, namely the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Tirana Commission, the Ministry of Finance and the Italian Embassy in Albania, declared null and void the Commission's decisions of 18 March 1996 and 14 December 1999. It held that all applicants were entitled to receive compensation in lieu of the original property in one of the forms provided for by law in respect of the plot of land measuring 1,456 sq. m. Consequently, all applicants were to receive compensation in accordance with the Property Act for the totality of the 1,637 sq. m. of land. Moreover, the Court of Appeal found that, in so far as the property was an integral part of the Italian Embassy's premises, it could not be considered a vacant plot of land within the meaning of section 4 of the Property Act (see paragraph 31 below).
25. On 15 June 2004 the Supreme Court, which had replaced the Court of Cassation after the Albanian Constitution's entry into force on 28 November 1998, following an appeal by the applicants, upheld the reasoning of the Court of Appeal's judgment of 29 October 2002.
26. On an unspecified date in 2004 the applicants lodged an appeal with the Constitutional Court under Article 131 (f) of the Constitution, arguing that the Tirana Court of Appeal's judgment of 29 October 2002 and the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004 were unconstitutional.
27. The appeal was declared inadmissible by the Constitutional Court on 13 January 2005 by a bench of three judges. It found that the applicants' constitutional complaint concerned the assessment of evidence, which fell within the jurisdiction of the lower courts, but was outside its own jurisdiction.
II. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL AND DOMESTIC LAW
A. Relevant international law
28. The relevant international provisions have been set out in Treska v. Albania and Italy (dec.), no. 26937/04, ECHR 2006-... (extracts) and Manoilescu and Dobrescu v. Romania and Russia (dec.), no. 60861/00, §§ 38-39, ECHR 2005-VI.
B. Relevant domestic law
1. The Constitution
29. The relevant provisions of the Albanian Constitution read as follows:
Article 41
“1. The right of private property is protected by law.
2. Property may be acquired by gift, inheritance, purchase, or any other ordinary means provided for by the Civil Code.
3. The law may provide for expropriations or limitations in the exercise of a property right only in the public interest.
4. Expropriations, or limitations of a property right that are equivalent to expropriation, shall be permitted only in return for fair compensation.
5. A complaint may be lodged with a court to resolve disputes regarding the amount or extent of the compensation due.”
Article 42 § 2
“In the protection of his constitutional and legal rights, freedoms and interests, and in defending a criminal charge, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing, within a reasonable time, by an independent and impartial court established by law.”
Article 142 § 3
“State bodies shall comply with judicial decisions.”
Article 131
“The Constitutional Court shall decide on: ...
(f) final complaints by individuals alleging a violation of their constitutional rights to a fair hearing, after all legal remedies for the protection of those rights have been exhausted.”
Article 181
“1. Within two to three years from the date when this Constitution enters into force, the Assembly, guided by the provisions of Article 41, shall enact laws for the just resolution of different issues related to expropriations and confiscations carried out before the approval of this Constitution.
2. Laws and other normative acts that relate to expropriations and confiscations carried out before the entry into force of this Constitution shall be applied provided they are compatible with the latter.”
2. Property Restitution and Compensation Act (Law no. 7698 of 15 April 1993, as amended by Laws nos. 7736 and 7765 of 1993, Laws nos. 7808 and 7879 of 1994, Law no. 7916 of 1995, Law no. 8084 of 1996 and abrogated by Law no. 9235 dated 29 July 2004 and recently amended by Law. no. 9388 of 2005 and Law no. 9583 of 2006)
30. The relevant sections of the Property (Restitution and Compensation) Act have been described in Beshiri and Others v. Albania (no. 7352/03, §§ 21-29, 22 August 2006), Driza v. Albania (no. 33771/02, §§ 36-43, ECHR 2007-...) and Ramadhi and Others v. Albania (no. 38222/02, §§ 23-30, 13 November 2007).
31. Section 4 of the 1993 Property Act, as amended and as stood in force at the material time, provided that vacant plots of land were to be allocated and restored to the former landlords or their heirs, save as provided otherwise.
3. Code of Civil Procedure
32. The relevant provision of the Code of Civil Procedure reads as follows:
Article 39
“Members of consular and diplomatic representations residing in the Republic of Albania are not subject to the jurisdiction of Albanian courts, except:
(a) where they accept voluntarily;
(b) in the cases and conditions envisaged in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.”
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
33. Given that the two applications concern the same facts, complaints and domestic courts' proceedings, the Court decides that they shall be joined pursuant to Rule 42 § 1 of the Rules of Court.
II. ADMISSIBILITY
A. Compatibility ratione personae
34. The applicants complained against Italy about a violation under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in so far as the possession sine titulo by the Italian Embassy in Albania of the property allocated to them by virtue of the Property Act amounted to an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
35. The Court must determine whether the facts complained of by the applicants are such as to engage the responsibility of Italy under the Convention. As it has consistently held, the responsibility of a State is engaged if a violation of one of the rights and freedoms defined in the Convention is the result of a breach of Article 1, by which “[t]he High Contracting Parties shall secure to everyone within their jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in Section I of [the] Convention” (see Costello-Roberts v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 25 March 1993, Series A no. 247-C, p. 57, §§ 25-26).
36. The Court must therefore determine whether the applicants were “within the jurisdiction” of Italy within the meaning of that provision. In other words, it must be established whether, despite the fact that the proceedings in issue did not take place on that State's soil, Italy may still be held responsible for their outcome and for the alleged impossibility of enforcing the Albanian authorities' decisions in the applicants' favour.
37. The Court refers to its case-law on the exercise of territorial and extraterritorial jurisdiction by a Contracting State (see, for example, Drozd and Janousek v. France and Spain, judgment of 26 June 1992, Series A no. 240; Banković and Others v. Belgium and 16 Other Contracting States (dec.) [GC], no. 52207/99, ECHR 2001-XII; Ilaşcu and Others v. Moldova and Russia [GC], no. 48787/99, ECHR 2004-VII; McElhinney v. Ireland and the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], no. 31253/96, 9 February 2000).
38. The proceedings in issue were conducted exclusively on Albanian territory. The Albanian courts had sovereign authority in the applicants' case and the Italian authorities had no direct or indirect influence over decisions and judgments delivered in Albania. The obligation to comply with the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004, which ultimately decided on the award of compensation in respect of the applicants, lay with the Albanian authorities.
39. It is clear from the circumstances of the present case that the applicants were not within the jurisdiction of Italy. That State did not exercise jurisdiction over the applicants. There is no justifying factor to bring the applications within the jurisdiction of Italy for the purposes of Article 1 of the Convention (see Treska, cited above; Manoilescu and Dobrescu, cited above, §§ 104–105).
40. It follows that this complaint is incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
B. Compliance with the six-month rule
41. On 6 June 2006 the applicant in respect of application no. 35720/04 submitted a new complaint to the Court about the lack of reasoning in the Constitutional Court's decision of 13 January 2005.
42. The Court reiterates that, as regards complaints not included in the initial application, the running of the six-month time-limit is not interrupted until the date when the complaint is first submitted to a Convention organ (see Allan v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 48539/99, decision of 28 August 2001).
43. It follows that the complaint about lack of reasons was introduced more than six months after the date of the Constitutional Court's decision of 13 January 2005 and should therefore be rejected pursuant to Article 35 §§ 1 and 4.
C. Other issues
44. The applicants complained of a denial of access to a court on account of their inability to take proceedings against a diplomatic mission, namely the Embassy of the Republic of Italy in Albania.
45. Article 6 § 1 secures to everyone the right to have any claim relating to his civil rights and obligations brought before a court (see Golder v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 21 February 1975, Series A no. 18, § 36). The right of access to a court is not, however, absolute, but may be subject to limitations; these are permitted by implication since the right of access by its very nature calls for regulation by the State (see Ashingdane v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 28 May 1985, Series A no. 93, § 57).
46. The Court reiterates that generally recognised rules of international law on State immunity cannot be regarded as imposing a disproportionate restriction on the right of access to a court as embodied in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. As the right of access to a court is an inherent part of the fair-trial guarantee in that Article, so some restrictions on access must likewise be regarded as inherent, an example being those limitations generally accepted by the community of nations as part of the doctrine of State immunity (see McElhinney v. Ireland [GC], no. 31253/96, § 37, ECHR 2001-XI; Manoilescu and Dobrescu, (dec.), cited above, § 80, ECHR 2005-VI; and, Treska, cited above).
47. There is nothing in the present case to warrant departing from those conclusions. In these circumstances, the facts complained of do not disclose an unjustified restriction on the applicants' right of access to a court. The complaint is therefore inadmissible as being manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected under Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
48. The applicants alleged that there had been several violations under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, mainly on account of the excessive length of the domestic proceedings and the failure to enforce the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004.
Article 6 of the Convention, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. Non-enforcement of the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004
1. Admissibility
49. The applicants complained about the authorities' failure to enforce in practice the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004 that ordered the payment of compensation to them in respect of their ancestor's plot of land.
50. The Government maintained that the applicants had not exhausted the new domestic remedies introduced by the Property Act 2004 with respect to this complaint.
51. The Court reiterates the principle enunciated in Driza (cited above, § 57), and considers that the question of the effectiveness of the remedies offered by the Property Acts is central to the merits of the applicants' complaint under Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It holds that both questions should be examined together on the merits. Moreover, this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It finds that no other grounds for declaring this complaint inadmissible have been established and therefore declares it admissible.
2. Merits
(a) The parties' submissions
52. The Government repeated that the authorities could not be held responsible for the non-enforcement of the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004 since its execution depended upon the applicants' taking the appropriate steps, namely bringing an action seeking its enforcement. The Government referred to their earlier arguments on exhaustion of domestic remedies.
53. The applicants contested the Government's argument.
(b) The Court's assessment
54. The right of access to a tribunal guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. Execution of a judgment given by any court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 (see, inter alia, Beshiri and Others, cited above, § 60).
55. The Convention cannot be interpreted as imposing any general obligation on the Contracting States to restore property which was transferred to them before they had ratified the Convention (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, and von Maltzan and Others v. Germany (dec.) [GC], nos. 71916/01, 71917/01 and 10260/02, § 74, ECHR 2005-V). Nor is there any general obligation under the Convention to establish legal procedures in which restitution of property may be sought. However, once a Contracting State decides to establish legal procedures of such a kind, it cannot be exempted from the obligation to honour all relevant guarantees provided for by the Convention, in particular in Article 6 § 1.
56. The Court recalls its finding in paragraph 38 above. The Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004, which upheld the Court of Appeal's judgment of 29 October 2002, can be interpreted as ordering the authorities to offer the applicants a form of compensation which would indemnify them in lieu of the restitution of their original property.
57. The Court observes that following the delivery of the judgment in 2004 the authorities failed to offer the applicants the option of obtaining appropriate compensation (contrast Užkurėlienė and Others v. Lithuania, no. 62988/00, § 36, 7 April 2005). Thus, the applicants did not even have the possibility of considering an offer of compensation in lieu of the restitution of the property that had previously been allocated to them (see Driza, cited above, § 90.)
58. Moreover, the Government have not provided any explanation as to why the judgment of 15 June 2004 has still not been enforced more than five years after it was delivered. It does not appear that the administrative authorities have taken any measures to execute the judgment.
59. Consequently, the Court considers that the problem persists and remains unresolved, notwithstanding the indications it gave in Beshiri and Others that “in the execution of judgments in which the State was ordered to make a payment, a person who had obtained a judgment debt against the State should not be required to bring enforcement proceedings in order to recover the sum due” (see § 108).
60. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that, by failing to take the necessary measures to comply with the judgment of 15 June 2004, the Albanian authorities deprived the provisions of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention of all useful effect.
61. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in this respect.
B. Length of proceedings
1. Admissibility
62. The Court considers that the complaint under this head is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It moreover finds that no other grounds for declaring this part of the complaint inadmissible have been established and therefore declares it admissible.
2. Merits
(a) The parties' submissions
63. The applicants complained about the unreasonable length of the domestic proceedings, which had lasted almost eight years for nine levels of jurisdiction. They attributed this delay to the domestic authorities, which had drawn different conclusions at various levels of jurisdiction, and to the position maintained by the Albanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs concerning his right of property.
64. The Government submitted that the proceedings had been complex owing to the changes in and assessment of property rights in different periods and because of the fact that a diplomatic mission accredited in Albania was involved. They added that the complexity of the facts combined with the lack of case-law had resulted in frequent remittals of the case for fresh examination. They contended that the length of the proceedings did not directly influence the applicants' right as they had never effectively possessed their property.
(b) The Court's assessment
65. The Court notes that all the proceedings at issue concerned the question of the applicants' property rights. The period to be taken into account should cover the entire length of proceedings, which started on an unspecified date in 1997 and ended with the Constitutional Court's decision of 13 January 2005. Moreover, the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004 has not yet been enforced. To date, the proceedings have lasted for more than eleven years.
66. However, the Court considers that in the light of its finding of a violation under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention about the non-enforcement of the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004, it does not have to rule separately on the merits of the length of proceedings complaint (see Lizanets v. Ukraine, no. 6725/03, § 48, 31 May 2007).
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
67. The applicants complained that the failure to grant them compensation, by virtue of the final judgment of 15 June 2004, had entailed a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
68. The Court considers that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It moreover finds that no other grounds for declaring it inadmissible have been established and therefore declares it admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
69. The Government submitted that the applicants' right to property had not been breached since the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004 had upheld their right to compensation in one of the forms under the law. They contended that the applicants had not yet complied with the rules set forth in the Property Act in order to establish the form of that compensation. They added that the compensation process had been hampered by its prolonged duration, which had also been the result of objective circumstances such as lack of funds and the general interests of the community.
70. The applicants maintained that there had been a breach of their right to property.
2. The Court's assessment
71. The Court reiterates the principles established in its case-law under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, among other authorities, Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35; von Maltzan and Others v. Germany (dec.) [GC], nos. 71916/01, 71917/01 and 10260/02, § 74, ECHR 2005-V; and Beshiri and Others, cited above).
72. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or assets, including, in certain well-defined situations, claims. For a claim to be capable of being considered an “asset” falling within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the claimant must establish that it has a sufficient basis in national law, for example where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming it, or where there is a final court judgment in the claimant's favour. Where that has been done, the concept of “legitimate expectation” can come into play (see Draon v. France [GC], no. 1513/03, § 68, 6 October 2005, ECHR 2005-IX, and Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 40, ECHR 2002-III).
73. The Court observes that the applicants were recognised as having a right to compensation by virtue of the Supreme Court's final judgment of 15 June 2004 (see paragraph 25 above). Therefore, the applicants had enforceable claims deriving from the judgment in question.
74. It notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined under Article 6 § 1 in relation to the failure to enforce a final decision (see paragraphs 54–61 above).
75. The Court considers that the failure of the authorities to enforce the judgment of 15 June 2004 for such a prolonged time amounts to an interference with their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
76. As to the justification advanced by the Government for this interference, the Court reiterates that a lack of funds cannot justify a failure to enforce payment of a final and binding judgment debt owed by the State (see Driza, cited above, § 108; Pasteli and Others v. Moldova, nos. 9898/02, 9863/02, 6255/02 and 10425/02, § 30, 15 June 2004; Voytenko v. Ukraine, no. 18966/02, § 55, 29 June 2004; and Shmalko v. Ukraine, no. 60750/00, § 57, 20 July 2004).
77. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in this regard.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
78. The applicants complained of the lack of effective remedies by which to obtain a final determination of their property rights. They relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. Admissibility
79. The Court considers that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It moreover finds that no other grounds for declaring it inadmissible have been established and therefore declares it admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
80. The applicants submitted that there was no effective remedy by which to claim compensation in lieu of restitution of property. They argued that owing to the Government's observations about the lack of funds and unavailability of vacant plots of land, they could not obtain any compensation pursuant to the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004.
81. The Government raised the same objections concerning the alleged failure to exhaust domestic remedies (see paragraph 52 above). They pointed to the remedies introduced by the Property Act 2004, which were to be considered effective for the purposes of Article 13.
2. The Court's assessment
82. The Court notes that the applicants' complaint under Article 1 of Protocol 1 to the Convention was indisputably “arguable”. The applicant was therefore entitled to an effective domestic remedy within the meaning of Article 13 of the Convention.
83. Moreover, the “authority” referred to in Article 13 may not necessarily in all instances be a judicial authority in the strict sense. Nevertheless, the powers and procedural guarantees an authority possesses are relevant in determining whether the remedy before it is effective (see Klass and Others v. Germany, judgment of 6 September 1978, Series A no. 28, p. 30, § 67). The remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law, in particular, in the sense that its exercise must not be unjustifiably hindered by the acts or omissions of the authorities of the respondent State (see Aksoy v. Turkey, judgment of 18 December 1996, Reports 1996-VI, p. 2286, § 95 in fine).
84. The Court refers to its findings in Driza, cited above, §§ 117-120. The Government did not provide any information as to whether there had been any particular measures adopted or actions taken since the delivery of the Driza judgment. There is nothing in the present case to warrant a departure from those findings. It follows that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
85. On that account, the Government's preliminary objection based on
non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLES 46 AND 41 OF THE CONVENTION
A. Article 46 of the Convention
86. Article 46 of the Convention provides:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
87. The Court reiterates its findings in Driza (cited above, §§ 122 – 126) in respect of Article 46 of the Convention. It urges the respondent State to adopt general measures as indicated in paragraph 126 of the said judgment.
B. Article 41 of the Convention
88. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
89. The applicants claimed a total of 2,719,500 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage and of EUR 200,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage. As regards the claim in respect of pecuniary damage, the applicants submitted an expert valuation of the property, which assessed its value at EUR 2,184,000, and estimated the loss of profits between 1996 and 2006 at EUR 535,500.
90. The Government did not submit any comments.
91. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the further procedure fixed with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Albanian Government and the applicants.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decides to join the applications;
2. Declares the applicants' complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention concerning the denial of access to a court and the lack of reasoning in the Constitutional Court's decision of 13 January 2005 inadmissible;
3. Declares the applicants' complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in so far as it was directed against Italy incompatible ratione personae;
4. Joins to the merits the Government's preliminary objection regarding the applicants' failure to exhaust domestic remedies and declares admissible the remainder of the applications;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention as regards the non-enforcement of the Supreme Court's judgment of 15 June 2004;
6. Holds that it does not consider it necessary to examine the complaint about the length of the proceedings under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
7. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
8. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and dismisses in consequence the Government's preliminary objection;
9. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within the forthcoming three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA VRIONI ED ALTRI C. ALBANIA ITALIA
(Richieste N. 35720/04 e 42832/06)
SENTENZA
(meriti)
STRASBOURG
(29 settembre 2009)
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Vrioni ed Altri c. Albania e Italia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki , Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ledi Bianku, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione
Avendo deliberato in privato l’8 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da due richieste contro la Repubblica d’ Albania e l’Italia depositate presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) come segue: richiesta n. 35720/04, Vrioni 8 aprile 1999; richiesta n. 42832/06, Vrioni ed Altri, 15 agosto 2006.
2. I richiedenti sono stati rappresentati dalla Sig.ra L. S. e dalla Sig.ra E. Q., avvocati che praticano a Tirana. Il Governo albanese (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo allora Agente, la Sig.ra S. Meneri.
3. I richiedenti addussero che c'erano state violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 13 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
4. Il 9 febbraio 2006 e l’ 8 gennaio 2007 il Presidente della quarta Sezione della Corte decise di dare avviso rispettivamente della richiesta n. 35720/04 e della richiesta n. 42832/06 al Governo dell'Albania. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, fu deciso di esaminare i meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo della loro ammissibilità.
5. I richiedenti ed il Governo entrambi registrarono inoltre osservazioni scritte (Articolo 59 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il Sig. S. V., il richiedente nella richiesta n. 35720/04, è un cittadino albanese nato nel 1925 e che vive in Albania. Il Sig. G. L. F., il Sig. D. L. F. ed il Sig. O. V. i richiedenti nella richiesta n. 42832/06, sono cittadini albanesi ed italiani nati rispettivamente nel 1946, 1950 e 1974 e che vivono in Italia. Il Sig. S. V. ha rappresentato se stesso e gli altri richiedenti nei procedimenti dei tribunali nazionali.
A. Background alla causa
7. Nel 1950 un'area di terreno che misurava 1,637 metri quadrati appartenente all'antenato dei richiedenti, fu confiscata dall’allora autorità albanese senza risarcimento.
8. Il 1 luglio 1991 l'Ambasciata italiana in Albania acquistò due edifici a Tirana che confinavano con la proprietà confiscata dal nonno dei richiedenti. L'operazione fu conclusa per un
accordo inter-stato convalidato tramite scambi di note i verbali fra i due governi. Le note verbalinon contenevano alcuna informazione riguardo al trasferimento del titolo di proprietà delle aree di terreno circostanti o adiacenti. I titoli di proprietà attinenti non furono registrati nel Registro delle Proprietà di Tirana.
9. Il Governo albanese usò successivamente il reddito dall'operazione per acquistare i locali dell'Ambasciata albanese a Roma.
10. Sotto l’Atto di Restituzione della Proprietà e del Risarcimento (“L’ Atto di Proprietà”), i richiedenti depositarono le due richieste nel 1996 e nel 1999, rispettivamente presso la Commissione di Risarcimento e di Restituzione della Proprietà di Tirana ((Komisioni i Kthimit dhe Kompensimit të Pronave -“la Commissione”), chiedendo il titolo sulla proprietà del loro defunto nonno.
11. Il 18 marzo 1996 e il 14 dicembre 1999 la Commissione riconobbe il titolo dei richiedenti su due aree di terreno che misuravano rispettivamente 1,100 metri quadrati. e 537 metri quadrati. La Commissione sostenne che era impossibile per i richiedenti farsi assegnare l'intera area originale . Decise di ripristinare ai richiedenti un'area vacante di terreno (një truall i lirë) che misurava 1,456 metri quadrati situata all'interno dei terreno occupati dell'Ambasciata italiana ed ordinò alle autorità di pagare il risarcimento a riguardo di un'area di terreno che misurava 181 metri quadrati. Inoltre, ordinò che il titolo dei richiedenti sulla proprietà venisse registrato nel Registro delle Proprietà di Tirana.
12. Ai richiedenti furono emessi anche due certificati di registrazione di proprietà da parte dell'Ufficio della Cancelleria: registrazione n. 4373, del 1 giugno 1996, e registrazione n. 420, del 28 dicembre 1999.
13. In una data non specificata nel 1996, avendo riguardo al fatto che, secondo le note verbali del 1991, l'Ambasciata italiana aveva titolo solamente su uno degli edifici, ma non sull'area occupata di terreno, i richiedenti richiesero all'Ambasciata di restituire la loro proprietà che stava occupando senza titolo.
14. Il 27 novembre 1996 il Ministero albanese degli Affari Esteri, avendo riguardo alle rivendicazioni di proprietà dei richiedenti sull'area di terreno adiacente agli edifici dell'Ambasciata, offrì mediazione all'Ambasciata italiana nella prospettiva di concludere accordi civili coi richiedenti.
15. Il 16 agosto 1997 l'Ambasciata italiana in Albania, in replica alla richiesta dei richiedenti per il recupero della loro proprietà, li informò che la loro rivendicazione di proprietà sull'area di terra situata all'interno dei suoi locali doveva essere stabilita dalle autorità albanesi.
16. Il 1 ottobre 1997, a seguito di una richiesta da parte dei richiedenti, il Ministero italiano degli Affari Esteri li informò che in virtù degli scambi delle note verbali del 1991 l'Ambasciata italiana in Albania aveva la piena proprietà degli edifici e del terreno adiacente. Inoltre, riferì ai richiedenti che le autorità albanesi erano competenti per determinare qualsiasi rivendicazione per risarcimento che è probabile che i richiedenti presentino.
B. procedimenti Giudiziali per recupero della proprietà e per risarcimento
17. Il 2 maggio 1997, a seguito di un'azione civile portata si richiedenti contro il Ministero degli Affari Esteri, la Corte distrettuale di Tirana (“la Corte distrettuale”) trovò che l'Ambasciata italiana stava occupando la proprietà dei richiedenti senza titolo e, non essendo in grado di intentare una causa contro una rappresentanza diplomatica, ordinò al Ministero degli Affari Esteri di facilitare il recupero per i richiedenti della loro proprietà ed anche di pagare loro un risarcimento corrispondente a 21,607.50 dollari degli Stati Uniti.
18. Il 27 gennaio 1998 la Corte d'appello di Tirana, (“la Corte d'appello”), annullò la sentenza della Corte distrettuale e rinviò la causa ad un consiglio differente della Corte distrettuale per una nuova considerazione. Il Ministero degli Affari Esteri che aveva rappresentato lo Stato albanese nell'accordo relativo al trasferimento della proprietà all'Ambasciata italiana non poteva essere la parte di imputato nei procedimenti dal momento che il Ministero delle Finanze secondo la Corte d'appello, era il corpo competente per rappresentare gli interessi Statali nei procedimenti nazionali. I richiedenti fecero appello contro la sentenza della Corte d'appello presso l’allora Corte di Cassazione.
19. Il 17 giugno 1998 la Corte di Cassazione annullò la sentenza della Corte d'appello e rinviò la causa a quella corte per un nuovo esame.
20. Il 29 gennaio 1999 la Corte d'appello, riesaminando la causa, trovò che il Ministero degli Affari Esteri non poteva essere ritenuto responsabile in questo collegamento e designò l'Ambasciata italiana che stava occupando la proprietà dei richiedenti senza titolo come l'entità responsabile in relazione alla proprietà. Annullò la sentenza della Corte distrettuale del 2 maggio 1997 e rinviò la causa alla stessa corte per una nuova considerazione.
21. Il 20 giugno 2000 la Corte distrettuale respinse i motivi di ricorso dei richiedenti, trovando che le decisioni della Commissione del 18 marzo 1996 e del 14 dicembre 1999 erano state illegali, siccome erano in violazione della sezione 4 dell’Atto delle Proprietà .
22. La Corte distrettuale trovò che l'area di terreno contestata dei richiedenti, anche se non c'erano edifici su questa, costituiva una parte integrante dei locali dell'Ambasciata italiana. Così, la Corte distrettuale dichiarò prive di valore legale le decisioni della Commissione e sostenne che ai richiedenti era concesso ricevere il risarcimento per le proprietà originali in una delle forme stabilite nella sezione 16 dell’Atto delle Proprietà.
23. Il 31 ottobre 2001 la Corte d'appello annullò la sentenza della Corte distrettuale e rinviò la causa ad un consiglio diverso della Corte d'appello, in conformità con l’Articolo 467/a del Codice di Procedura Civile siccome aveva notato irregolarità nei procedimenti nei tribunali inferiori.
24. Il 29 ottobre 2002 la Corte d'appello, avendo dato debitamente avviso delle udienze alle parti avversarie, vale a dire il Ministero di Affari Esteri la Commissione di Tirana, il Ministero delle Finanze e l'Ambasciata italiana in Albania dichiarò prive di valore legale le decisioni della Commissione del 18 marzo 1996 e del 14 dicembre 1999. Sostenne che a tutti i richiedenti fu concesso di ricevere il risarcimento al posto della proprietà originale in una delle forme previste dalla legge a riguardo dell'area di terreno che misurava 1,456 metri quadrati. Di conseguenza, tutti i richiedenti dovettero ricevere il risarcimento in conformità con l’Atto delle Proprietà per la totalità dei 1,637 metri quadrati di terreno. Inoltre, la Corte d'appello trovò che, dal momento che la proprietà era una parte integrante dei locali dell'Ambasciata italiana, non poteva essere considerata un'area vacante di terreno all'interno del significato della sezione 4 dell’Atto delle Proprietà (vedere paragrafo 31 sotto).
25. Il 15 giugno 2004 la Corte Suprema che aveva sostituito la Corte di Cassazione dopo l'entrata in vigore della Costituzione albanese il 28 novembre 1998 a seguito di un ricorso da parte dei richiedenti, sostenne il ragionamento della sentenza della Corte d'appello del 29 ottobre 2002.
26. In una data non specificata nel 2004 i richiedenti depositarono un ricorso presso la Corte Costituzionale sotto l’Articolo 131 (f) della Costituzione, dibattendo che la sentenza della Corte d'appello di Tirana del 29 ottobre 2002 e la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 erano incostituzionali.
27. Il ricorso fu dichiarato inammissibile dalla Corte Costituzionale il 13 gennaio 2005 da un consiglio di tre giudici. Trovò che l'azione di reclamo costituzionale dei richiedenti riguardava la valutazione delle prove che rientravano all'interno della giurisdizione dei tribunali inferiori ma era fuori dalla sua propria giurisdizione.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ED INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. diritto internazionale Attinente
28. Le disposizioni internazionali attinenti sono state in Treska c. Albania e Italia (dec.), n. 26937/04, ECHR 2006 -... estratti) e Manoilescu e Dobrescu c. Romania e Russia (dec.), n. 60861/00,
§§ 38-39, ECHR 2005-VI.
B. diritto nazionale Attinente
1. La Costituzione
29. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione albanese si leggono come segue:
Articolo 41
“1. Il diritto alla proprietà privata è protetto dalla legge.
2. La proprietà può essere acquisita tramite donazione, eredità, acquisto o qualsiasi altro mezzo ordinario previsto dal Codice civile.
3. La legge può prevedere solamente delle espropriazioni o delle limitazioni nell'esercizio di un diritto di proprietà nell'interesse pubblico.
4. Espropriazioni, o limitazioni ad un diritto alla proprietà equivalenti all'espropriazione, saranno permesse solamente contro risarcimento equo.
5. Un reclamo può essere presentato da un tribunale per chiarire controversie riguardo all'importo o alla misura del risarcimento dovuto.”
Articolo 42 § 2
“Nella protezione dei suoi diritti costituzionali e legali, delle libertà e degli interessi, e nel difendere un'accusa criminale, ad ognuno viene concessa un’equa udienza pubblica, all'interno di un termine ragionevole da parte di un tribunale indipendente imparziale stabilito dalla legge.”
Articolo 142 § 3
“I Corpi statali approveranno le decisioni giudiziali.”
Articolo 131
“La Corte Costituzionale deciderà su: ...
(f) azioni di reclamo definitive da parte di individui che adducono una violazione dei loro diritti costituzionali ad un'udienza corretta, dopo che sono state esaurite tutte le vie di ricorso legali per la protezione di quei diritti.”
Articolo 181
“1. Entro da due a tre anni dalla data in cui questa Costituzione entra in vigore, l’Assemblea, guidata dalle disposizioni dell’ Articolo 41 decreterà leggi per la decisione equa di problemi diversi riferiti alle espropriazioni ed ai sequestri eseguiti prima dell'approvazione di questa Costituzione.
2. Leggi e gli altri atti normativi che si riferiscono alle espropriazioni ed ai sequestri eseguiti prima dell'entrata in vigore di questa Costituzione saranno applicati purché siano compatibili con quest’ultima.”
2. Atto sulla Restituzione della Proprietà e il Risarcimento (Legge n. 7698 del 15 aprile 1993, come corretta dalle Leggi N. 7736 e 7765 di 1993, Leggi N. 7808 e 7879 di 1994, Legge n. 7916 del 1995, Legge n. 8084 di 1996 ed abrogata dalla Legge n. 9235 del 29 luglio 2004 e recentemente corretta dalla Legge. n. 9388 di 2005 e dalla Legge n. 9583 di 2006)
30. Le sezioni attinenti dell’Atto sulla Restituzione ( della Proprietà ed il Risarcimento) è stato descritto in Beshiri ed Altri c. Albania (n. 7352/03, §§ 21-29 22 agosto 2006), Driza c. Albania (n. 33771/02, §§ 36-43 ECHR 2007 -...) e Ramadhi ed Altri c. Albania (n. 38222/02, §§ 23-30 13 novembre 2007).
31. La Sezione 4 dell’Atto sulla Proprietà del 1993, corretto e come era in vigore al tempo attinente, prevede che aree vacanti di terreno vengano assegnate e vengano ripristinate ai precedenti padroni o ai loro eredi, salvo se previsto altrimenti.
3. Codice di Procedura Civile
32. La disposizione attinenti del Codice di Procedura Civile si leggono come segue:
Articolo 39
“Membri di rappresentanze consolare e diplomatiche che risiedono nella Repubblica dell'Albania non sono soggetti alla giurisdizione dei tribunali albanesi, eccetto:
(a) dove loro lo accettano volontariamente;
(b) nelle cause e nelle condizioni previste nella Convenzione di Vienna sui Rapporti diplomatici.”
LA LEGGE
I. RIUNIONE DELLE RICHIESTE
33. Dato che le due richieste riguardano gli stessi fatti, le stesse azioni di reclamo ed gli stessi procedimenti dei tribunali nazionali, la Corte decide che saranno congiunte facendo seguito all’Articolo 42 § 1 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
II. AMMISSIBILITÀ
A. Compatibilità ratione personae
34. I richiedenti si lamentarono contro l'Italia di una violazione sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione dal momento che la proprietà sine titulo dell'Ambasciata italiana in Albania della proprietà assegnata loro in virtù dell’Atto sulla Proprietà ha corrisposto ad un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
35. La Corte deve determinare se i fatti di cui i richiedenti si lamentano sono tali da impegnare la responsabilità dell'Italia sotto la Convenzione. Come ha sostenuto costantemente, la responsabilità di un Stato è impegnata se una violazione di uno dei diritti e delle libertà definite nella Convenzione è il risultato di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 con cui “[le] Alti Parti Contraenti garantiranno ad ognuno all'interno della loro giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definiti nella Sezione I [della] Convenzione” (vedere Costello-Roberts c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 25 marzo 1993 Serie A n. 247-C, p. 57, §§ 25-26).
36. La Corte deve determinare perciò se i richiedenti erano “all'interno della giurisdizione” dell’Italia all'interno del significato di quella disposizione. In altre parole, deve essere stabilito, se, nonostante il fatto che i procedimenti in questione non ebbero luogo sul suolo dello Stato, l’Italia ancora può essere ritenuta responsabile per il loro risultato e per l'impossibilità addotta di eseguire le decisioni delle autorità albanesi a favore dei richiedenti.
37. La Corte si riferisce alla sua giurisprudenza sull'esercizio della giurisdizione territoriale ed extraterritoriale da parte di un Stato Contraente (vedere, per esempio, Drozd e Janousek c. Francia e Spagna, sentenza del 26 giugno 1992 Serie A n. 240; Banković ed Altri c. Belgio ed altri 16 Stati Contraenti (dec.) [GC], n. 52207/99, ECHR 2001-XII; Ilaşcu ed Altri c. Moldavia e Russia [GC], n. 48787/99, ECHR 2004-VII; McElhinney c. Irlanda ed Regno Unito (dec.) [GC], n. 31253/96, 9 febbraio 2000).
38. I procedimenti in questione furono condotti esclusivamente sul territorio albanese. I tribunali albanesi avevano autorità suprema nella causa dei richiedenti e le autorità italiane non avevano nessuna influenza diretta o indiretta su quelle decisioni e sentenze consegnate in Albania. L'obbligo di attenersi alla sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 che infine decise sull'assegnazione del risarcimento a riguardo dei richiedenti rimane sulle autorità albanesi.
39. Risulta chiaro dalle circostanze della presente causa che i richiedenti non erano all'interno della giurisdizione dell'Italia. Questo Stato non esercitava giurisdizione sui richiedenti. Non c'è nessun fattore che giustifichi il portare le richieste all'interno della giurisdizione dell'Italia ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 della Convenzione (vedere Treska, citata sopra; Manoilescu e Dobrescu, citata sopra, §§ 104–105).
40. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è ratione personae incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 § 4.
B. Ottemperanza con la regola dei sei mesi
41. Il 6 giugno 2006 il richiedente a riguardo della richiesta n. 35720/04 presentò una nuova azione di reclamo alla Corte della mancanza di argomentazione nella decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 13 gennaio 2005.
42. La Corte reitera che, riguardo alle azioni di reclamo non incluse nella richiesta iniziale, la gestione del tempo-limite dei sei mesi non viene interrotta sino alla data in cui l'azione di reclamo viene per la prima volta presentata ad un organo della Convenzione (vedere Allan c. Regno Unito (dec.), n. 48539/99, decisione del 28 agosto 2001).
43. Ne segue che l'azione di reclamo in mancanza di motivazioni fu introdotta più di sei mesi dopo la data della decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 13 gennaio 2005 ed è stata respinta perciò facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4.
C. Altri questioni
44. I richiedenti si lamentarono di un rifiuto di accesso ad un tribunale a causa della loro incapacità intraprendere procedimenti contro una rappresentanza diplomatica, vale a dire l'Ambasciata della Repubblica d’Italia in Albania.
45. L’ Articolo 6 § 1 garantisce ad ognuno il diritto di portare qualsiasi rivendicazione relativa ai suoi diritti ed obblighi civili di fronte ad un tribunale (vedere Golder c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 21 febbraio 1975 Serie A n. 18, § 36). Il diritto di accesso ad un tribunale non è, comunque, assoluto, ma può essere soggetto a limitazioni; questi sono permesse per implicazione poiché il diritto di accesso per sua stessa natura richiama la regolamentazione da parte dello Stato (vedere Ashingdane c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 28 maggio 1985 Serie A n. 93, § 57).
46. La Corte reitera che norme generalmente riconosciute di diritto internazionale sull’ immunità Statale non possono essere considerate come se imponessero una restrizione sproporzionata sul diritto di accesso ad un tribunale come stabilito nell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Siccome il diritto di accesso ad un tribunale è una parte inerente della garanzia ad un processo equo nell’ Articolo, così delle restrizioni all’ accesso devono essere riguardate similmente come inerenti, essendo un esempio quelle limitazioni generalmente accettata dalle comunità delle nazioni come parte della dottrina dell'immunità Statale (vedere McElhinney c. Irlanda [GC], n. 31253/96, § 37 ECHR 2001-XI; Manoilescu e Dobrescu, (dec.), citata sopra, § 80, ECHR 2005-VI; e, Treska, citata sopra).
47. Non c'è niente nella presente causa che permette di abbandonare queste conclusioni. In queste circostanze, i fatti di cui ci si lamenta non rivela una restrizione ingiustificata sul diritto dei richiedenti di accesso ad un tribunale. L'azione di reclamo è perciò inammissibile come manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta sotto l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
48. I richiedenti addussero che c'erano state molte violazioni sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, principalmente a causa della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti nazionali e dell'insuccesso nell’ eseguire la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004.
L’Articolo 6 della Convenzione, nella sua parte attinente, si legge come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
A. Non- esecuzione della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004
1. Ammissibilità
49. I richiedenti si lamentarono dell'insuccesso delle autorità nell’ eseguire in pratica la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 che ordinò il pagamento del risarcimento a loro riguardo dell'area di terreno del loro antenato.
50. Il Governo sostenne che i richiedenti non avevano esaurito le nuove vie di ricorso nazionali introdotte dall’Atto sulla Proprietà del 2004 riguardo a questa azione di reclamo.
51. La Corte reitera il principio enunciato in Driza (citata sopra, § 57), e considera che la questione dell'efficacia delle vie di ricorso offerte dall’Atto sulla Proprietà è centrale ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Sostiene che entrambe le questioni dovrebbero essere esaminate insieme ai meriti. Questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata inoltre, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Trova che nessun altro motivo per dichiarare questa azione di reclamo inammissibile è stato stabilito e perciò la dichiara ammissibile.
2. Meriti
(a) Le osservazioni delle parti
52. Il Governo ripeté che le autorità non potevano essere ritenute responsabili per la non-esecuzione della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 poiché la sua esecuzione dipendeva dall’intraprendere da parte dei richiedenti i passi appropriati, vale a dire introdurre un'azione per chiedere la sua esecuzione. Il Governo si riferì ai suoi precedenti argomenti sull'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali.
53. I richiedenti contestarono l'argomento del Governo.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
54. Il diritto di accesso ad un tribunale garantito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di un Stato Contraente permettesse che una decisione giudiziale definitiva e vincolante, rimanga non operativa a danno di una parte. L’esecuzione di una sentenza resa da qualsiasi tribunale deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del “processo” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 (vedere, inter alia, Beshiri ed Altri, citata sopra, § 60).
55. La Convenzione non può essere interpretata come se imponesse un qualsiasi obbligo generale sugli Stati Contraenti di ripristinare le proprietà trasferite a loro prima di aver ratificato la Convenzione (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35, e von Maltzan ed Altri c. Germania (dec.) [GC], N. 71916/01, 71917/01 e 10260/02, § 74 il 2005-V di ECHR). Né vi è un qualsiasi obbligo generale sotto la Convenzione di stabilire procedure legali in cui può essere chiesta la restituzione di una proprietà. Comunque, una volta che uno Stato Contraente decide di stabilire procedure legali di qualsiasi genere, non può essere esentato dall'obbligo di onorare tutte le garanzie attinenti previste dalla Convenzione, in particolare dall’ Articolo 6 § 1.
56. La Corte richiama il suo giudizio nel paragrafo 38 sopra. La sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 che sostenne la sentenza della Corte d'appello del 29 ottobre 2002 può essere interpretata come se ordinasse alle autorità di offrire una forma di risarcimento che indennizzerebbe i richiedenti al posto della restituzione della loro proprietà originale.
57. La Corte osserva che a seguito della consegna della sentenza nel 2004 le autorità andarono a vuoto nell’ offrire la scelta di ottenere il risarcimento appropriato ai richiedenti (per contrasto Užkurėlienė ed Altri c. Lituania, n. 62988/00, § 36 del 7 aprile 2005). I richiedenti non avevano così neanche la possibilità di prendere in considerazione un'offerta di risarcimento al posto della restituzione della proprietà che prima era stata assegnata a loro (vedere Driza, citata sopra, § 90.)
58. Inoltre, il Governo non ha previsto qualsiasi chiarimento riguardo al perché la sentenza del 15 giugno 2004 non è stata ancora eseguita più di cinque anni dopo essere stata consegnata. Non sembra che le autorità amministrative abbiano preso qualsiasi misura per eseguire la sentenza.
59. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che il problema persiste e rimane irrisolto, nonostante le indicazioni date in Beshiri ed Altri per le quali “nell'esecuzione di sentenze in cui allo Stato è stato ordinato di fare un pagamento, una persona che ha ottenuto un debito di sentenza contro lo Stato non dovrebbe essere costretta a introdurre procedimenti di esecuzione per recuperare la somma dovuta” (vedere § 108).
60. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per permettere alla Corte di concludere che, non riuscendo a prendere le misure necessarie per attenersi con la sentenza del 15 giugno 2004, le autorità albanesi spogliarono le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione di ogni effetto utile.
61. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a questo riguardo.
B. Lunghezza dei procedimenti
1. Ammissibilità
62. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo sotto questo capo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Trova inoltre che nessun altro motivo per dichiarare questa parte dell'azione di reclamo inammissibile è stato stabilito e perciò la dichiara ammissibile.
2. Meriti
(a) Le osservazioni delle parti
63. I richiedenti si lamentarono della lunghezza irragionevole dei procedimenti nazionali che erano durati pressoché otto anni per nove livelli di giurisdizione. Loro attribuirono questo ritardo alle autorità nazionali che avevano consegnato conclusioni diverse ai vari livelli di giurisdizione ed alla posizione sostenuta dal Ministero albanese degli Affari Esteri riguardante il suo diritto di proprietà.
64. Il Governo presentò che i procedimenti erano stati complessi a causa dei cambi nei diritti di proprietà e nella valutazione di questi in periodi diversi ed a causa del fatto che una rappresentanza diplomatica riconosciuta in Albania è stata coinvolta. Aggiunse che la complessità dei fatti combinata con la mancanza di giurisprudenza aveva dato luogo a frequenti rinvii della causa per un nuovo esame. Sostenne che la lunghezza dei procedimenti non influenzò direttamente il diritto dei richiedenti siccome non mai avevano posseduto effettivamente la loro proprietà.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
65. La Corte nota che tutti i procedimenti in questione interessavano la questione dei diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti. Il periodo da prendere in considerazione dovrebbe coprire l’intera lunghezza dei procedimenti che cominciarono in una data non specificata nel 1997 e terminarono con la decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 13 gennaio 2005. Inoltre la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 non è stata ancora eseguita. Ad oggi, i procedimenti durano da più di undici anni.
66. Comunque, la Corte considera che alla luce della sua costatazione di una violazione sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione della non-esecuzione della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004, non deve decidere separatamente sui meriti della lunghezza dell’ azione di reclamo dei procedimenti (vedere Lizanets c. Ucraina, n. 6725/03, § 48 31 maggio 2007).
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
67. I richiedenti si lamentarono che l'insuccesso nell’ accordare loro il risarcimento, in virtù della sentenza definitiva del 15 giugno 2004 aveva comportato una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
68. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Trova inoltre che non è stato stabilito nessun altro motivo per dichiararla inammissibile e perciò la dichiara ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
69. Il Governo presentò che il diritto dei richiedenti alla proprietà non era stato violato poiché la sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 aveva sostenuto il loro diritto al risarcimento in una delle forme sotto la legge. Dibatté che i richiedenti non si erano ancora attenuti alle norme stabilite dall’Atto sulla Proprietà per stabilire la forma di quel risarcimento. Aggiunse che il processo di risarcimento era stato impedito dalla sua durata prolungata che era stata anche il risultato di circostanze obiettive come la mancanza di finanziamenti e gli interessi generali della comunità.
70. I richiedenti sostennero che c'era stata una violazione del loro diritto alla proprietà.
2. La valutazione della Corte
71. La Corte reitera i principi stabiliti nella sua giurisprudenza sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35; von Maltzan ed Altri c. Germania (dec.) [GC], N. 71916/01, 71917/01 e 10260/02, § 74 il 2005-V di ECHR; e Beshiri ed Altri, citata sopra).
72. “La proprietà” può essere delle “proprietà esistenti” o dei beni, inclusi, in certe situazioni ben definite, delle rivendicazioni. Perché una rivendicazione sia capace di essere considerata un “bene” rientrante all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, il rivendicatore deve stabilire che ha una base sufficiente in legge nazionale, per esempio dove c’è un riconoscimento nella giurisprudenza dei tribunali nazionali che lo conferma, o dove c'è una sentenza definitiva di corte a favore del rivendicatore. Dove questo è stato fatto, il concetto di “aspettativa legittima” può entrare in gioco (vedere Draon c. Francia [GC], n. 1513/03, § 68, 6 ottobre 2005, ECHR 2005-IX, e Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 40 ECHR 2002-III).
73. La Corte osserva che i richiedenti furono riconosciuti come detentori di un diritto al risarcimento in virtù della sentenza definitiva della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004 (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra). Perciò, i richiedenti avevano rivendicazioni esecutive derivanti dalla sentenza in oggetto.
74. Nota che questa azione di reclamo è collegata a quella esaminata sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 in relazione all'insuccesso nell’esecuzione di una decisione definitiva (vedere paragrafi 54–61 sopra).
75. La Corte considera che l'insuccesso delle autorità nell’esecuzione della sentenza del 15 giugno 2004 per un tempo così prolungato corrisponde ad un'interferenza col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
76. Riguardo alla giustificazione avanzata dal Governo per questa interferenza, la Corte reitera, che una mancanza di finanze non può giustificare un insuccesso nell’esecuzione del pagamento di un debito di sentenza definitivo e vincolante dovuto dallo Stato (vedere Driza, citata sopra, § 108; Pasteli ed Altri c. Moldavia, N. 9898/02, 9863/02 6255/02 e 10425/02, § 30 15 giugno 2004; Voytenko c. Ucraina, n. 18966/02, § 55 29 giugno 2004; e Shmalko c. Ucraina, n. 60750/00, § 57 20 luglio 2004).
77. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione a questo riguardo .
C. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
78. I richiedenti si lamentarono della mancanza di vie di ricorso effettive con cui ottenere una determinazione definitiva dei loro diritti di proprietà. Loro si appellarono all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
A . Ammissibilità
79. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Trova inoltre che non è stato stabilito nessun altro motivo per dichiararla inammissibile e perciò deve essere dichiarata ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
80. I richiedenti presentarono che non c'erano vie di ricorso effettive con cui chiedere il risarcimento al posto della restituzione della proprietà. Loro dibatterono che a causa delle osservazioni del Governo della mancanza di finanziamenti e dell'indisponibilità di aree di terreno vacanti, loro non potevano ottenere alcun risarcimento facendo seguito alla sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004.
81. Il Governo sollevò le stesse eccezioni riguardo all'insuccesso addotto nell’ esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali (vedere paragrafo 52 sopra). Ha richiamato l’attenzione sulle vie di ricorso introdotte dall’Atto sulla Proprietà del 2004 che sarebbero state considerate effettive ai fini dell’ Articolo 13.
2. La valutazione della Corte
82. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo 1 alla Convenzione era indiscutibilmente “difendibile.” Al richiedente era concessa perciò una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
83. Inoltre, “l'autorità” a cui si fa riferimento nell’ Articolo 13 non deve essere necessariamente in tutte i casi un'autorità giudiziale nel senso stretto. Ciononostante, i poteri e le garanzie procedurali che un'autorità possiede sono pertinenti nel determinare da prima se la via di ricorso che è effettivo (vedere Klass ed Altri c. Germania, sentenza del 6 settembre 1978 Serie A n. 28, p. 30, § 67). La via di ricorso richiesta dall’Articolo 13 deve essere “effettiva” in pratica così come in legge, in particolare, nel senso che il suo esercizio non deve essere impedito ingiustificabilmente dagli atti o dalle omissioni delle autorità dello Stato rispondente (vedere Aksoy c. Turchia, sentenza del 18 dicembre 1996, Relazioni 1996-VI, p. 2286, § 95 in fine).
84. La Corte si riferisce alle sue costatazioni in Driza, citata sopra, §§ 117-120. Il Governo non ha fornito qualsiasi informazione riguardo al fatto se furono adottate delle qualsiasi particolari misure o prese delle azioni dalla consegna della sentenza di Driza. Non c'è niente nella presente causa che permette di scostarsi da quelle sentenze. Ne segue che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
85. Per questo, l'eccezione preliminare del Governo basata sul non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DEGLI ARTICOLI 46 E 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Articolo 46 della Convenzione
86. Articolo 46 della Convenzione prevede:
“1. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa in cui sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione.”
87. La Corte reitera le sue costatazioni in Driza (citata sopra, §§ 122-126) a riguardo dell’ Articolo 46 della Convenzione. Esorta lo Stato rispondente ad adottare misure generali come indicato nel paragrafo 126 della detta sentenza.
B. Articolo 41 della Convenzione
88. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
89. I richiedenti chiesero un totale di 2,719,500 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno materiale e EUR 200,000 a riguardo del danno morale. Riguardo alla rivendicazione del danno materiale, i richiedenti presentarono una valutazione competente della proprietà che valutava il suo valore ad EUR 2,184,000 e valutava la perdita di profitti fra il 1996 ed il 2006 ad EUR 535,500.
90. Il Governo non presentò alcun commento.
91. La Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione. La questione deve essere di conseguenza riservata e l'ulteriore procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo alla possibilità di accordo a cui potrebbero giungere il Governo albanese ed i richiedenti.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere le richieste;
2. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione riguardo al rifiuto di accesso ad un tribunale e la mancanza di motivazioni nella decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 13 gennaio 2005 inammissibile;
3. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nella misura in cui era diretta contro l'Italia incompatibile ratione personae;
4. Congiunge ai meriti l'eccezione preliminare del Governo riguardante l'insuccesso dei richiedenti nell’esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali e dichiara ammissibile il resto delle richieste;
5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione riguardo alla non-esecuzione della sentenza della Corte Suprema del 15 giugno 2004;
6. Sostiene che non considera necessario esaminare l'azione di reclamo della lunghezza dei procedimenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
7. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
8. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e respinge di conseguenza l'eccezione preliminare del Governo;
9. Sostiene che la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione per intero;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro i tre mesi successivi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale possono giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 29 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’ordinamento della Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.