Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF FOKAS v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 31206/02/2009
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 29/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

THIRD SECTION
CASE OF FOKAS v. TURKEY
(Application no. 31206/02)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
29 September 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Fokas v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Josep Casadevall, President,
Boštjan M. Zupančič,
Alvina Gyulumyan,
Ineta Ziemele,
Luis López Guerra,
Işıl Karakaş,
Ann Power, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 31206/02) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Greek nationals, Mr I. F. and Mr E. F. (“the applicants”), on 6 March 2002.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr D. G., Mr A. D. and Mr O. H., lawyers practising in Katerini (Greece), Nicosia (Cyprus), and Istanbul (Turkey) respectively. The Turkish Government (“the respondent Government”) were represented by their Agent.
3. Relying on Articles 6, 8, 13 and 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 the applicants complained that they had been deprived of their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions as a result of the national authorities’ refusal to recognise them as the legal heirs in respect of the immovable property which had been owned by the late P. P, their sister. They further alleged that they had been discriminated against on the basis of their ethnic origins and religious convictions.
4. On 11 June 2007 the President of the Third Section decided to give notice of the application to the Turkish Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
5. Third party comments were received from the Greek Government, who had exercised their right to intervene in the procedure (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b) of the Rules of Court). The respondent Government replied to those comments (Rule 44 § 5).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicants were born in 1945 and 1948 respectively and live in Katerini, Greece.
7. Ms P. F. was a Greek national who was born in 1943. In 1954 she was adopted by Mr A. P. and his wife Mrs E. P., who were both Turkish nationals of Greek origin. The adoption was made in accordance with the decisions of both the Greek and Turkish courts.
8. Following the death of Mr A. P. on 24 November 1981, all his property was inherited by his wife Mrs E. P.. Upon the death of the latter on 6 March 1987, P. P. (F.) was the sole heir to the property. The relevant property consisted of both immovable and movable property. In particular, it comprised three buildings in Istanbul and income from rent, deposits and valuable documents/deeds.
9. On 3 July 1987 the Istanbul 3rd Civil Court (Asliye Hukuk) decided that the total of the above-mentioned immovable and movable property of Mrs E. P. would be transferred by way of inheritance to Ms P. P. (F.).
10. On 15 July 1991 Ms P. P. (F.) was transported by the police to a hospital for treatment. She was admitted to the psychiatric department of the Balıklı Rum (Greek) hospital in Zeytinburnu, Istanbul, because she was not capable of taking care of her personal affairs. The authorities thus appointed a guardian for Ms P. P. despite the first applicant’s efforts to appoint a guardian of his choice.
11. On 31 July 1996 the Turkish authorities filed an application for the annulment of the decision by which Ms P. P. (F.) had inherited the above-mentioned property. This was due to, inter alia, Legislative Decree no. 1062 and Decisions no. 6/3706 of 25 September 1964 and no. 6/3801 of 2 November 1964, according to which a natural person holding Greek nationality has no right to inherit in Turkey and, also, because the Greek Government applied similar provisions to persons of Turkish origin living in Greece.
12. On 27 November 1997 the Istanbul 7th Civil Court annulled the decision on inheritance (decision no. 1197/1261), although Ms P. P. had already paid the inheritance tax which was due to the State. The Court of Cassation upheld this judgment by a decision of 2 February 1998. On 12 October 1998 the latter court also dismissed the request for rectification of its decision. As a result, the immovable property was transferred to the Treasury and Ms P.P (F.) was deprived of all her income and accounts and thus remained without resources in the psychiatric department of the Balıklı Rum hospital.
13. In the meantime, Ms P.P’s legal guardian had commenced two legal challenges against the above decision. In this connection on 10 March 1999 the legal guardian filed an action in the 7th Chamber of the Istanbul Magistrate’s Court for the re-opening of the proceedings. His request was dismissed on 27 May 1999. The appeal proceedings against this decision came to an end as a result of the death of Ms P.P. A further action in the 4th Chamber of the Ankara Administrative Court was also terminated for the same reason. It is to be noted that the applicants did not submit any document pertaining to the legal proceedings before the Ankara Administrative Court.
14. On 24 April 2000 Ms P.P died in Istanbul whilst she was under guardianship and confined in an institution due to psychiatric illness.
15. On 26 September 2000 the applicants, who are the sole heirs to the property of their sister, filed a petition with the Beyoğlu Magistrates’ Court for the issuance of a certificate of inheritance.
16. On 19 April 2001 the Beyoğlu Magistrates’ Court dismissed the applicants’ request to inherit their sister’s immovable property, but accepted it in respect of the movable property. In its decision, the court took into account the Ministry of Justice’s opinion concerning the practice of the Greek authorities in respect of the inheritance rights of the Turkish minority in Greece, which stated:
“...The Turkish nationals who are not of Greek origin are entitled to acquire property only by permission and within the limits of the law which regulates 55% of the total Greek territory. In practice, the condition of “permission” functions as a mechanism aimed at preventing the Turkish nationals to acquire property. In other areas, which are not covered by the said law, the Turkish nationals of non-Greek origin and the Greek nationals of Turkish origin are prevented by various means from acquiring immovable property either by purchasing or inheriting. These people are compelled to sell their immovable property. Yet the Turkish nationals of Greek origin are able to acquire immovable property in the areas covered by that law on the condition that they obtain the requisite permission. While there is information on the subject, it is not based on concrete evidence and therefore its assessment should be made by the courts...”
In view of this opinion, the court held that the applicants were not entitled to the right of inheritance for immovable property in Turkey on account of their nationality and in view of the principle of reciprocity between Greece and Turkey. The applicants appealed against this judgment.
17. On 14 September 2001 the Court of Cassation rejected the appeal. By a decision of 20 November 2001 it also dismissed the applicants’ request for rectification of its decision.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
18. Relevant domestic law and practice can be found in the judgments of Apostolidi and Others v. Turkey (no. 45628/99, §§ 49-56, 27 March 2007), and Nacaryan and Deryan v. Turkey (nos. 19558/02 and 27904/02, §§ 17-24, 8 January 2008).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
19. The applicants complained that they had been deprived of their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions as a result of the national authorities’ refusal to recognise them as the legal heirs in respect of the immovable property which had been owned by the late P.P. They alleged a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
20. The respondent Government invited the Court to dismiss the application for failure to observe the six-month rule. They noted that the Court of Cassation’s decision of 12 October 1998 was the final domestic decision for the purposes of the running of six months, since on that date the late P.P’s title to the immovable property had already been revoked.
21. The applicants disputed the respondent Government’s argument. They claimed that the final domestic decision in respect of their claims had been rendered on 20 November 2001 by the Court of Cassation, which had rejected their request for an inheritance certificate in respect of the immovable property owned by the late P.P. They further pointed out that, following the Court of Cassation’s decision confirming the lower court’s judgment to revoke Ms P.’s status as the heir in respect of the immovable property, her legal guardian had pursued the proceedings by challenging the impugned decision. Therefore, the respondent Government’s contention concerning the date on which the six months should start running could not be accepted.
22. The Court notes that the applicants’ complaint mainly concerns the national authorities’ refusal to issue them an inheritance certificate in respect of the immovable property owned by P.P. Given that the final domestic decision on the dispute was given on 20 November 2001 by the Court of Cassation, which re-examined the question of ownership of the immovable property in the proceedings (see paragraph 16 above), and that the application was submitted to the Court on 6 March 2002, it is clear that the six-month time-limit was observed by the applicants in compliance with Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
23. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Parties’ submissions
a. The respondent Government
24. The Government submitted that the applicants did not have possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They maintained that this provision applied to a person’s existing possessions and that it did not guarantee the right to acquire possessions. In the circumstances of the present case, given that the deceased did not own the immovable property in question, it could not be transferred to the inheritors, namely, to the applicants.
25. The Government also asserted that under Article 35 of Law no. 2644 on Land Registry non-Turkish persons were entitled to acquire property by way of inheritance under two conditions. Firstly, there should be reciprocity between their country and Turkey. Secondly, foreign nationals should act within the restrictive legal provisions. The principle of reciprocity, which could be de jure or de facto, required that foreign nationals could acquire immovable property in Turkey provided that the same right was accorded in their country to Turkish nationals under the same conditions. Furthermore, Article 1 of Law no. 1062 on Reciprocity provided that the property of foreign nationals could be confiscated by a decree of the Council of Ministers if Turkish nationals were treated in the same way in their country of origin. At the material time, the Greek legislation and practice did not allow Turkish nationals to acquire immovable property in Greece. Thus, the restriction applied to the Greek nationals on their right of inheritance of immovable property was in conformity with the principle of reciprocity between Turkey and Greece.
26. The Government thus concluded that the applicants had neither had existing possessions nor a legitimate expectation of acquiring the immovable property in question by way of inheritance since the above-mentioned conditions had not been met.
b. The applicants
27. The applicants contended that, contrary to the respondent Government’s assertions, the deceased, Ms P.P, had owned the immovable property in question since the Turkish courts had issued her a certificate of inheritance and all three buildings had been registered in her name at the local land registry office upon payment of the requisite tax. P. had only been deprived of her property following unlawful confiscation by the Turkish authorities on the basis of a secret Government decree of 1964 which had already been annulled in 1988. Thus, the confiscation of the property of P. had been illegal, arbitrary and abusive even under the domestic law of Turkey. Furthermore, the annulment of the certificate of inheritance had not met the requirements of precision and foreseeability implied by the concept of law within the meaning of the Convention. Had it not been for this unlawful act and the respondent Government’s continuous reliance on reciprocity, the applicants would have inherited the property in question as the sole heirs of Polikseni.
28. The applicants claimed that the question of reciprocity raised by the Government had already been addressed by the Court in its judgments in the cases of Apostolidi and Others and Nacaryan and Deryan (both cited above) where it found a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 when a validly granted certificate of inheritance had later been revoked on the basis of alleged lack of “reciprocity”.
29. In view of the above, the applicants claimed that there had been a violation of their right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
c. The Greek Government
30. The Greek Government contended that the applicants had possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. In their opinion, the Turkish courts’ reliance on reciprocity and their ill-founded and unproven finding that this principle was not applied in Greece constituted a clear interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. Furthermore, they claimed that the principle of reciprocity did not apply in matters of protection of human rights and that, in any event, in Greek law there was no provision prohibiting Turkish citizens from inheriting immovable property in any place or region in Greece.
31. The Greek Government maintained that the Turkish courts had recognised the relation between the applicants and the deceased and their undisputed capacity as her heirs. Thus the applicants had at least a legitimate expectation of acquiring a hereditary right not only to the movable but also the immovable assets of the estate of their predecessor in title.
32. The Greek Government noted also that the national courts’ interpretation and application of the domestic law, particularly Article 35 of the Law on Land Registry, was arbitrary and had lacked legal security and foreseeability. They thus concluded that the impugned interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions had not been prescribed by law, had violated the principle of the rule of law and had upset the fair balance required by the principle of proportionality.
2. The Court’s assessment
a. Applicable principles
33. The Court reiterates that an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions related to his “possessions” within the meaning of this provision. Furthermore, the concept of “possessions” in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is independent from the formal classification in domestic law (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000-I). “Possessions” can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right. By way of contrast, the hope of recognition of a property right which it has been impossible to exercise effectively cannot be considered a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, nor can a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfilment of the condition (see Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, §§ 82-83, 2001-VIII, and Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 39794/98, ECHR 2002-VII).
b. Whether there were “possessions”
34. In the instant case, the Court notes that the national courts did not recognise the applicants’ right to inherit the immovable property in question. Nor did the applicants acquire inheritance rights automatically after the death of P.P, since the national courts considered that at the relevant time non-Turkish nationals’ right to acquire immovable property by way of inheritance was subject to the condition of “reciprocity” in accordance with Article 35 of the Law on Land Registry and that this condition had not been met in the case of Greek nationals. Accordingly, the immovable property in question was never transferred to the applicants because of the domestic courts’ perception of the national law then in force. As a result, the applicants did not have existing possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Nacaryan and Deryan, cited above, § 45).
35. In view of the above finding, the Court will next ascertain whether there was an “asset” by virtue of which the applicants could claim to have a legitimate expectation of being recognised as heirs in respect of the immovable property.
36. In this connection, the Court reiterates that a claim may be regarded as an “asset” only where it has a sufficient basis in national law (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 52, ECHR 2004-IX). Accordingly, the essential question which needs to be determined is whether there was a sufficient legal basis in domestic law, as interpreted and applied by the domestic courts, in order to qualify the applicants’ claim as an asset within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. To that end, it must be ascertained whether the applicants have fulfilled the condition of “reciprocity” laid down in Article 35 of the Law on Land Registry.
c. The Court’s findings in the case of Nacaryan and Deryan
37. The Court recalls that in the above-mentioned Nacaryan and Deryan case, which also concerned the national courts’ refusal to recognise the applicants’ status as heirs in respect of immovable property, it examined the question whether the manner in which the reciprocity principle was applied in the applicants’ case had complied with the Convention (see Nacaryan and Deryan, cited above, §§ 47-57).
38. In this context, the Court examined how the application of the principle of “reciprocity” in Turkish law had affected the applicants’ rights under the Convention. It found that, unlike the national courts’ conclusions based on the report of the Ministry of Justice, Turkish nationals could inherit immovable property in Greece, including in regions where restrictions were imposed by the Law of 1990 concerning the purchase and sale of immovable property (see Nacaryan and Deryan, cited above, §§ 52 and 53).
39. Furthermore, having examined the relevant legislation then in force, the Court found that there was no legal obstacle preventing Greek nationals from acquiring immovable property in Turkey since the Council of Ministers had issued a decree on 3 February 1988 abolishing the decree dated 2 November 1964 which had prohibited the acquisition of immovable property by Greek nationals. Article 35 of the Law on Land Registry had also been modified with a view to allowing non-nationals to inherit immovable property in Turkey. The Court thus concluded that the applicants, whose lineage had been established with the deceased, could legitimately have believed that they had satisfied all the conditions for inheriting immovable property, as was the case in respect of the movable property. In those circumstances, the applicants could not have foreseen that the national courts would consider that the condition of “reciprocity” had not been met.
40. Thus, the Court held that the applicants had had a “legitimate expectation” of being recognised as heirs to the immovable property of the deceased and, consequently, their right to peaceful enjoyment of their “possessions” and that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 applied in the circumstances. In the Court’s opinion, there had therefore been an interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions as a result of the national courts’ refusal to recognise their status as heirs in respect of the immovable property. This interference fell to be examined in light of the principle laid down in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 Protocol No. 1.
41. Finally, as regards the lawfulness of the interference, the Court concluded that the impugned interference had been incompatible with the principle of lawfulness and had therefore contravened Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 because the manner in which Article 35 of the Law on Land Registry had been interpreted and applied by the national courts was not foreseeable for the applicants (see Nacaryan and Deryan, cited above, §§ 58-60).
d. Whether the applicants had “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right
42. In the instant case, the Court sees no reason to depart from its findings in the above-mentioned Nacaryan and Deryan case. It notes that in dismissing the applicants’ claims to the immovable property in question, the national courts erred in their consideration that reciprocity was a primary condition to be met. They then concluded that the requisite condition had not been met between Greece and Turkey (see paragraphs 11, 12, 16 and 38 above). Furthermore, in annulling the inheritance certificate of P.P in respect of the immovable property, the domestic courts had wrongly relied on the legislative decree dated 2 November 1964, whereas that decree had already been abolished by the Council of Minister’s decree of 3 February 1988, which was well before the annulment of the inheritance certificate in 1996, and therefore was not applicable at the time of the impugned decision (see paragraphs 11, 12 and 38).
43. This being so, in the circumstances of the present case, the applicants could legitimately have believed that they had satisfied all conditions to inherit immovable property as well as the movable property of the deceased. They could not have foreseen that the national courts would consider that the condition of “reciprocity” had not been met. Accordingly, the applicants had a “legitimate expectation” of being recognised as heirs to the immovable property inherited by their sister P.P (see paragraph 42 above). Therefore the national courts’ refusal to recognise the applicants’ status as heirs in respect of the immovable property constituted an interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
44. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that the impugned interference was incompatible with the principle of lawfulness and therefore contravened Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 because the manner in which Article 35 of the Law on Land Registry had been interpreted and applied by the national courts was not foreseeable for the applicants (see Nacaryan and Deryan, cited above, §§ 58-60).
45. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
46. The applicants further complained of violations of Articles 6, 8, 13 and 14 of the Convention. In this connection, they alleged that they had been denied a fair trial as a result of the national courts’ decisions based on the opinion of the Ministry of Justice. The interference in question had also constituted a breach of their right to family life protected by Article 8 of the Convention. Furthermore, the applicants claimed to have been denied an effective remedy for their grievances in breach of Article 13. Finally, they alleged that the violations in question had occurred as a result of their Greek ethnic origin and their Christian Orthodox faith.
47. The Government contested these arguments.
48. The Court notes that these complaints are linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
49. Having regard to the facts of the case, the parties’ submissions and its finding of a violation under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that it has examined the main legal question raised in the present application. It therefore concludes that there is no need to make a separate ruling under this head (see, as an example of this practice, Mehmet and Suna Yiğit v. Turkey, no. 52658/99, § 43, 17 July 2007, and K.Ö. v. Turkey, no. 71795/01, § 50, 11 December 2007).
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
50. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
51. The applicants claimed 18,913,083 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage resulting from the loss of use of the three buildings in question. In addition to this amount and in case the respondent Government is unable or refuses to deliver vacant possession of the three buildings, they claimed EUR 5,459,026 for the value of the property in question.
52. Furthermore, the applicants each claimed EUR 100,000 for non-pecuniary damage. They noted in this connection that they had not only lost their sister but had been prevented from looking after her. The respondent Government’s insensitivity and unlawfulness in handling this matter had also caused them stress and distress.
53. As regards the costs and expenses, the applicants contended that the amount of EUR 44,244.43 would be an appropriate amount to be awarded by the Court. They asserted that the seriousness of the case had required the services of a Cypriot lawyer as well as Greek and Turkish lawyers.
54. The Government submitted that the amounts claimed by the applicants were speculative and unsubstantiated.
55. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and must be reserved, due regard being had to the possibility of an agreement between the respondent State and the applicants.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that there is no need to examine the complaints under Articles 6, 8, 13 and 14 of the Convention;
4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final according to Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Josep Casadevall
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

TERZA SEZIONE
CAUSA FOKAS C. TURCHIA
(Richiesta n. 31206/02)
SENTENZA
(i meriti)
STRASBOURG
29 settembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Fokas c. Turchia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Josep Casadevall, Presidente, Boštjan M. Zupančič, Alvina Gyulumyan, Ineta Ziemele, Luis López Guerra, Işıl Karakaş, l'Ann Power, giudici,
e Stanley Naismith, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato l’ 8 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 31206/02) contro la Repubblica della Turchia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini greci, il Sig. I. F. ed il Sig. E. F.(“i richiedenti”), 6 marzo 2002.
2. I richiedenti sono stati rappresentati dal Sig. D. G., il Sig. A. D. ed il Sig. O. H., avvocati che praticano rispettivamente a Katerini (Grecia), Nicosia (la Cipro), ed Istanbul (Turchia). Il Governo turco (“il Governo rispondente”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente.
3. Appellandosi agli Articoli 6, 8 13 e 14 della Convenzione ed all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 i richiedenti si sono lamentati di essere stati privati del loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà come risultato del rifiuto delle autorità nazionali di riconoscere loro come gli eredi legittimi riguardo al patrimonio immobiliare che era stato posseduto alla fine da P. P., loro sorella. Loro addussero inoltre di essere stati discriminati sulla base delle loro origini etniche e delle convinzioni religiose.
4. L’ 11 giugno 2007 il Presidente della terza Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo turco. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
5. Commenti di una terza parte furono ricevuti dal Governo greco che aveva esercitato il suo diritto ad intervenire nel procedimento (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Articolo 44 § 1 (b) dell’Ordinamento della Corte). Il Governo rispondente rispose a quei commenti (Articolo 44 § 5).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1945 e 1948 e vivono a Katerini, Grecia.
7. La Sig.ra P. F. era una cittadina greca che nacque nel 1943. Nel 1954 fu adottata dal Sig. A. P. e da sua moglie la Sig.ra E. P. che erano entrambi cittadini turchi di origine greca. L'adozione fu fatta in conformità con le decisioni sia dei tribunali grechi che turchi.
8. A seguito della morte del Sig. A. P. il 24 novembre 1981, tutta la sua proprietà fu ereditata da sua moglie la Sig.ra E. P.. Alla morte di quest’ultima il 6 marzo 1987, P. P. (F.) era la sola erede della proprietà. La proprietà attinente consisteva sia di proprietà immobili che mobili. In particolare, comprendeva tre edifici a Istanbul e redditi da affitti, depositi e documenti/atti di valore.
9. Il 3 luglio 1987 la 3a Corte Civile di Istanbul (Asliye Hukuk) decise che il totale della proprietà immobile e mobile summenzionata della Sig.ra E. P. venisse trasferito tramite eredità alla Sig.ra P. P. (F.).
10. Il 15 luglio 1991 la Sig.ra P. P. (F.) fu trasportata dalla polizia ad un ospedale per trattamento. Lei fu ammessa al reparto psichiatrico dell’ospedale Rum Balýklý (greco) a Zeytinburnu, Istanbul, perché lei non era capace di prendersi cura dei suoi affari personali. Le autorità nominarono così un tutore per la Sig.ra P. P. nonostante gli sforzi del primo richiedente di nominare un tutore di sua scelta.
11. Il 31 luglio 1996 le autorità turche introdussero un0istanza per l'annullamento della decisione con cui la Sig.ra P.P (F.) aveva ereditato la proprietà summenzionata. Questo era dovuto , inter alia, al Decreto Legislativo n. 1062 e alle Decisioni n. 6/3706 del 25 settembre 1964 e n. 6/3801 del 2 novembre 1964 secondo i quali una persona fisica che mantiene la nazionalità greca non ha nessuno diritto di ereditare in Turchia e, anche, perché il Governo greco aveva applicato delle disposizioni simili a persone di origine turca che vivevano in Grecia.
12. Il 27 novembre 1997 la 7a Corte Civile di Istanbul annullò la decisione sull’ eredità (la decisione n. 1197/1261), benché la Sig.ra P.P avesse già pagato la tassa di eredità che era dovuta allo Stato. La Corte di Cassazione sostenne questa sentenza con una decisione di 2 febbraio 1998. 12 ottobre 1998 la corte seconda respinse anche la richiesta per rettifica della sua decisione. Di conseguenza, il patrimonio immobiliare fu trasferito alla Tesoreria e la Sig.ra P.P (F.) fu privata di tutto il suo reddito e dei conti e così rimase senza risorse nel reparto psichiatrico dell'ospedale di Rum Balıklı.
13. Nel frattempo, il tutore legale della Sig.ra P.P aveva iniziato due istanze legali contro la decisione sopra. In questo collegamento il 10 marzo 1999 il tutore legale registrò un'azione presso la 7a Camera della Corte del Magistrato a Istanbul per la riapertura dei procedimenti. La sua richiesta fu respinta il 27 maggio 1999. I procedimenti di ricorso contro questa decisione finirono a causa della morte della Sig.ra P.P. Anche un'ulteriore azione presso la 4a Camera della Corte amministrativa di Ankara fu terminata per la stessa ragione. Si noterà che i richiedenti non presentarono nessun documento concernente procedimenti legali di fronte alla Corte amministrativa di Ankara.
14. Il 24 aprile 2000 la Sig.ra P.P morì ad Istanbul mentre era sotto tutela e confinata in un'istituzione a causa di una malattia psichiatrica.
15. Il 26 settembre 2000 i richiedenti che sono i soli eredi alla proprietà di loro sorella, introdussero un ricorso presso la Corte dei Magistrati di Beyoğlu per l'emissione di un certificato di eredità.
16. Il 19 aprile 2001 la Corte dei Magistrati di Beyoğlu respinse l’istanza dei richiedenti di ereditare il patrimonio immobiliare di loro sorella, ma l'accettò a riguardo della proprietà mobile. Nella sua decisione la corte prese in considerazione l’opinione del Ministero di Giustizia riguardo alla pratica delle autorità greche nei confronti dei diritti di eredità della minoranza turca in Grecia che affermava:
“... Ai cittadini turchi che non sono di origine greca viene concesso di acquisire proprietà solamente tramite permesso ed all'interno dei limiti della legge che regola il 55% del totale del territorio greco . In pratica, la condizione del “permesso” funziona come un meccanismo che mira ad impedire ai cittadini turchi di acquisire proprietà. Nelle altre aree che non sono coperte dalla detta legge ai cittadini turchi di origine non-greca ed ai cittadini greci di origine turca viene impedito con vari mezzi di acquisire patrimoni immobiliare tramite acquisto od eredità. Queste persone sono obbligate a vendere il loro patrimonio immobiliare. Ancora i cittadini turchi di origine greca sono in grado acquisire patrimoni immobiliari nelle aree coperte da questa legge a condizione che di ottenere il permesso richiesto. Se ci sono informazioni sulla questione, non sono basate su prove concrete e perciò la sua valutazione dovrebbe essere fatta dai tribunali...”
In prospettiva di questa opinione, la corte sostenne, che ai richiedenti non era concesso il diritto di eredità per il patrimonio immobiliare in Turchia a causa della loro nazionalità ed in prospettiva del principio di reciprocità fra Grecia e Turchia. I richiedenti fecero appello contro questa sentenza.
17. Il 14 settembre 2001 la Corte di Cassazione respinse il ricorso. Con una decisione del 20 novembre 2001 respinse anche l’istanza dei richiedenti di rettifica della sua decisione.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
18. Diritto nazionale attinente e pratica possono essere trovati nelle sentenze Apostolidi ed Altri c. Turchia (n. 45628/99, §§ 49-56 27 marzo 2007), e Nacaryan e Deryan c. Turchia (N. 19558/02 e 27904/02, §§ 17-24 8 gennaio 2008).
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
19. I richiedenti si lamentarono di essere stati privati del loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà come risultato del rifiuto delle autorità nazionali di riconoscere loro come eredi legittimi a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare che era stato posseduto per ultimo da P.P. Loro addussero una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
20. Il Governo rispondente ha invitato la Corte a respingere la richiesta per mancata osservanza della regola dei sei mesi. Notò che la decisione della Corte di Cassazione del 12 ottobre 1998 era la decisione nazionale definitiva ai fini della gestione dei sei mesi, poiché in quella data l’ultimo titolo di P.P sul patrimonio immobiliare era già stato revocato.
21. I richiedenti contestarono l'argomento del Governo rispondente. Loro dissero che la decisione nazionale definitiva a riguardo delle loro rivendicazioni era stata resa il 20 novembre 2001 dalla Corte di Cassazione che aveva respinto la loro richiesta per un certificato di eredità a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare posseduto da ultimo da P.P. Loro indicarono inoltre che, a seguito della decisione della Corte di Cassazione che confermava la sentenza della corte inferiore di revocare lo status della Sig.ra P. come erede a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare, il suo tutore legale aveva intrapreso i procedimenti impugnando la decisione contestata. Perciò, l’obiezione del Governo rispondente riguardo alla data in cui i sei mesi avrebbero dovuto iniziare a decorrere non poteva essere accettata.
22. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti riguarda principalmente il rifiuto delle autorità nazionali di emettere loro un certificato di eredità a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare posseduto da P.P. Dato che la decisione nazionale definitiva sulla controversia fu data il 20 novembre 2001 dalla Corte di Cassazione che riesaminò la questione della proprietà del patrimonio immobiliare nei procedimenti (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra), e che la richiesta fu presentata alla Corte il 6 marzo 2002, è chiaro che il tempo-limite dei sei- mesi fu osservato dai richiedenti in ottemperanza con l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
23. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
a. Il Governo rispondente
24. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non avevano proprietà all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Sostenne che questa disposizione si applicava ad una proprietà esistente di una persona e che non garantiva il diritto ad acquisire proprietà. Nelle circostanze della presente causa, dato che il defunto non possedeva il patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto, non poteva essere trasferito agli eredi, vale a dire ai richiedenti.
25. Il Governo asserì anche che sotto l’Articolo 35 della Legge n. 2644 sulla Registrazioni di Terreni di non-turchi alle persone fu concesso di acquisire proprietà tramite eredità a due condizioni. Ci dovrebbe essere in primo luogo, reciprocità fra il loro paese e la Turchia. In secondo luogo, i cittadini esteri dovrebbero agire all'interno di restrittive disposizioni legali. Il principio di reciprocità che avrebbe potuto essere de jure o de facto, richiedeva che i cittadini esteri avrebbero potuto acquisire patrimonio immobiliare in Turchia ammesso che lo stesso diritto fosse stato concesso nel loro paese a cittadini turchi sotto le stesse condizioni. Inoltre, l’Articolo 1 della Legge n. 1062 sulla Reciprocità prevedeva che la proprietà di cittadini esteri avrebbe potuto essere confiscata tramite un decreto del Consiglio dei Ministri se cittadini turchi fossero stati trattati allo stesso modo nel loro paese di origine. Al tempo attinente, la legislazione greca e la pratica non permettevano a cittadini turchi di acquisire patrimonio immobiliare in Grecia. Così, l’applicazione alla restrizione ai cittadini greci sul loro diritto di eredità del patrimonio immobiliare era in conformità al principio della reciprocità fra Turchia e Grecia.
26. Il Governo concluse così che i richiedenti non avevano avuto né proprietà esistenti né un'aspettativa legittima di acquisire il patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto tramite eredità poiché le condizioni summenzionate non erano state soddisfatte.
b. I richiedenti
27. I richiedenti contesero che, contrariamente alle asserzioni del Governo rispondente, il defunto, la Sig.ra P.P aveva posseduto il patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto poiché i tribunali turchi le avevano emesso un certificato di eredità e tutti i tre edifici erano stati registrati a suo nome presso il locale di registrazione dei terreni contro pagamento della tassa richiesta. P. era stata privata solamente della sua proprietà a seguito del sequestro illegale da parte delle autorità turche sulla base di un decreto Statale segreto del 1964 che era già stato annullato nel 1988. Così, il sequestro della proprietà di P. era stato illegale, arbitrario ed abusivo addirittura sotto il diritto nazionale della Turchia. Inoltre, l'annullamento del certificato di eredità non aveva soddisfatto i requisiti di precisione e prevedibilità impliciti nel concetto di legge all'interno del significato della Convenzione. Se non fosse stato per questo atto illegale e l'affidamento continuo del Governo rispondente sulla reciprocità, i richiedenti avrebbero ereditato la proprietà in oggetto come soli eredi di P..
28. I richiedenti sostennero che la questione della reciprocità sollevata dal Governo era già stata affrontata dalla Corte nelle sue sentenze nelle cause dApostolidi ed Altri e Nacaryan e Deryan (entrambe citate sopra) dove trovò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 quando un certificato di eredità validamente concesso era stato revocato più tardi sulla base di addotta mancanza di “reciprocità.”
29. In prospettiva di quanto sopra, i richiedenti affermarono, che c'era stata una violazione del loro diritto protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
c. Il Governo greco
30. Il Governo greco sostenne che i richiedenti avevano una proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Nella loro opinione, l’affidamento del tribunale turco sulla reciprocità e la sua malfondata e non comprovata costatazione che questo principio non veniva applicato in Grecia ha costituito un'interferenza chiara col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà. Inoltre, ha detto che il principio della reciprocità non si applicava alle questioni di protezione dei diritti umani e che in qualsiasi caso, nella legge greca non vi era nessuna disposizione che proibiva ai cittadini turchi di ereditare un patrimonio immobiliare in qualsiasi posto o regione della Grecia.
31. Il Governo greco sostenne che i tribunali turchi avevano riconosciuto la relazione fra i richiedenti ed la defunta e la loro veste incontrastata come suoi eredi. Così i richiedenti avevano almeno un'aspettativa legittima non solo di acquisire un diritto ereditario sui beni mobili ma anche sui beni immobili del patrimonio del loro predecessore in titolo.
32. Il Governo greco notò anche che l'interpretazione dei tribunali nazionali e l’applicazione del diritto nazionale, in particolare l’ Articolo 35 della Legge sulla Registrazione dei Terreni erano arbitrarie ed mancavano di sicurezza legale e di prevedibilità. Concluse così che l'interferenza contestata col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà non era stato previsto dalla legge, aveva violato il principio della preminenza del diritto ed aveva sconvolto l'equilibrio equo richiesto dal principio della proporzionalità.
2. La valutazione della Corte
a. Principi applicabili
33. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente nel momento in cui le decisioni contestate riferite alla sua “ proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. Inoltre, il concetto di “proprietà” nella prima parte dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che è indipendente dalla classificazione formale nel diritto nazionale (vedere Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 100 ECHR 2000-I). “La proprietà” può essere una “proprietà esistente” o dei beni, incluse le rivendicazioni a riguardo delle quali il richiedente può dibattere di avere almeno un’ “aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà. Per contrasto, la speranza di riconoscimento di un diritto di proprietà che non è stato possibile esercitare non può essere considerata effettivamente, una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, nemmeno può esserlo una rivendicazione condizionale che scaturisce come risultato del non-adempimento della condizione (vedere Principe Hans-Adam II del Liechtenstein c. Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, §§ 82-83, 2001-VIII, e Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 39794/98, ECHR 2002-VII).
b. Se c'era “le proprietà”
34. Nella presente causa, la Corte nota, che i tribunali nazionali no hanno riconosciuto ai richiedenti il diritto di ereditare il patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto. Né i richiedenti acquisirono automaticamente i diritti di eredità dopo la morte di P.P, poiché i tribunali nazionali hanno considerato che al tempo attinente il diritto dei cittadini non turchi di acquisire un patrimonio immobiliare tramite eredità era soggetto alla condizione di “reciprocità” in conformità con l’Articolo 35 della Legge sulla Registrazione dei Terreni a e che questa condizione non era stata soddisfatta nel caso di cittadini greci. Di conseguenza, il patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto non fu mai trasferito ai richiedenti a causa dell’interpretazione dei tribunali nazionali della legge nazionale in vigore. Di conseguenza, i richiedenti non avevano proprietà esistenti all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Nacaryan e Deryan, citata sopra, § 45).
35. In prospettiva della costatazione sopra, la Corte accerterà in seguito, se c'era un “bene” in virtù del quale i richiedenti avrebbero potuto pretendere di avere un'aspettativa legittima di venir riconosciuti come eredi a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare.
36. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che una rivendicazione può essere riguardata come un “bene” solamente dove ha una base sufficiente nella legge nazionale (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 52 ECHR 2004-IX). Di conseguenza, la questione essenziale che bisogna determinare è se c'era una base legale sufficiente in diritto nazionale, come interpretato e applicato dai tribunali nazionali per qualificare la rivendicazione dei richiedenti come un bene all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. A questo fine, si deve accertare se i richiedenti hanno adempiuto alla condizione di “reciprocità” stabilita nell’ Articolo 35 della Legge sulla Registrazione dei Terreni.
c. Le costatazioni della Corte nella causa Nacaryan e Deryan
37. La Corte richiama che nella causa summenzionata Nacaryan e Deryan che riguardava anche il rifiuto dei tribunali nazionali di riconoscere ai richiedenti lo status di eredi a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare, esaminò la questione se il modo in cui il principio di reciprocità fu applicato nel caso dei richiedenti si era attenuta alla Convenzione (vedere Nacaryan e Deryan, citata sopra, §§ 47-57).
38. In questo contesto, la Corte esaminò, come l’applicazione del principio di “reciprocità” nella legge turca aveva colpito i diritti dei richiedenti sotto la Convenzione. Trovò che, diversamente dalle conclusione dei tribunali nazionali basate sul rapporto del Ministero di Giustizia, i cittadini turchi avrebbero potuto ereditare un patrimonio immobiliare in Grecia, incluso nelle regioni in cui delle restrizioni sono state imposte dalla Legge del 1990 riguardo all'acquisto e alla vendita di un patrimonio immobiliare (vedere Nacaryan e Deryan, citata sopra, §§ 52 e 53).
39. Inoltre, avendo esaminato poi la legislazione attinente in vigore, la Corte trovò che non c'era nessun ostacolo legale che impediva ai cittadini greci di acquisire un patrimonio immobiliare in Turchia poiché il Consiglio dei Ministri aveva emesso un decreto il 3 febbraio 1988 che aboliva il decreto datato 2 novembre 1964 che aveva proibito l'acquisizione di un patrimonio immobiliare da parte di cittadini greci. L’Articolo 35 della Legge sulla Registrazione dei Terreni era stato cambiato anche nella prospettiva di permettere ai non-cittadini di ereditare un patrimonio immobiliare in Turchia. La Corte concluse così che i richiedenti il cui lignaggio era stato stabilito dalla defunta, legittimamente avrebbero potuto credere di aver soddisfatto tutte le condizioni per ereditare il patrimonio immobiliare, come era il caso riguardo alla proprietà mobile. In queste circostanze, i richiedenti non potevano prevedere, che i tribunali nazionali avrebbero considerato che la condizione di “reciprocità” non era stata soddisfatta.
40. Così, la Corte sostenne che i richiedenti avevano avuto una “aspettativa legittima” di essere riconosciuti come eredi al patrimonio immobiliare della defunta e, di conseguenza, il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro “proprietà” e che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 si applicava nelle circostanze. C'era stata perciò un'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà nell'opinione della Corte, come risultato del rifiuto dei tribunali nazionali di riconoscere il loro status come eredi a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare. Questa interferenza deve essere esaminata alla luce del principio stabilito nella prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
41. Infine, riguardo alla legalità dell'interferenza, la Corte concluse che l'interferenza contestata era incompatibile col principio di legalità ed aveva contravvenuto perciò all’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 perché il modo in cui l’Articolo 35 della Legge sulla Registrazione dei Terreni era stato interpretato ed era stato applicato dai tribunali nazionali non era prevedibile per i richiedenti (vedere Nacaryan e Deryan, citata sopra, §§ 58-60).
d. Se i richiedenti avevano un’ “aspettativa legittima” di ottenere godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà
42. Nella presente, causa la Corte non vede nessuna ragione di abbandonare le sue costatazioni nella summenzionata causa Nacaryan e Deryan. Nota che nel respingere le rivendicazione dei richiedenti del patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto, i tribunali nazionali errarono nella loro considerazione che la reciprocità fosse stata una condizione primaria da rispettare. Conclusero poi che la condizione richiesta non era stata soddisfatta fra Grecia e Turchia (vedere paragrafi 11, 12 16 e 38 sopra). Nell'annullare il certificato di eredità di P.P a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare, inoltre i tribunali nazionali si erano appellati erroneamente, sul decreto legislativo datato 2 novembre 1964, mentre questo decreto era già stato abolito dal Consiglio del decreto del Ministro del 3 febbraio 1988 che era ben prima dell'annullamento del certificato di eredità nel 1996 e perciò non era applicabile al tempo della decisione contestata (vedere paragrafi 11, 12 e 38).
43. Essendo così, nelle circostanze della presente causa, i richiedenti avrebbero legittimamente potuto credere, di aver soddisfatto tutte le condizioni per ereditare il patrimonio immobiliare così come la proprietà mobili della defunta. Loro non potevano prevedere che i tribunali nazionali avrebbero considerato che la condizione di “ reciprocità” non fosse stato rispettata. Di conseguenza, i richiedenti avevano una “aspettativa legittima” di essere riconosciuti come eredi al patrimonio immobiliare ereditato da loro sorella P.P (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra). Perciò il rifiuto dei tribunali nazionali di riconoscere ai richiedenti lo status di eredi a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare costituì un'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
44. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per abilitare la Corte a concludere che l'interferenza contestata era incompatibile col principio di legalità e perciò contravvenne all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 perché il modo in cui l’Articolo 35 della Legge sulla Registrazione dei Terreni era stato interpretato ed era stato applicato dai tribunali nazionali non era prevedibile per i richiedenti (vedere Nacaryan e Deryan, citata sopra, §§ 58-60).
45. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
46. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre delle violazioni degli Articoli 6, 8, 13 e 14 della Convenzione. In questo collegamento, loro addussero, che a loro era stato negato un processo equo come un risultato delle decisioni dei tribunali nazionali basate sull'opinione del Ministero di Giustizia. L'interferenza in oggetto aveva costituito anche una violazione del diritto alla loro vita famigliare protetto dall’Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Inoltre, i richiedenti sostennero di essere stato negato loro una via di ricorso effettiva per i loro danni in violazione dell’Articolo 13. Infine, loro addussero che le violazioni in oggetto era accadute come risultato della loro origine etnica greca e della loro fede Ortodossa cristiana.
47. Il Governo contestò questi argomenti.
48. La Corte nota che queste azioni di reclamo sono collegate a quella esaminata sopra e devono essere dichiarate perciò similmente ammissibili.
49. Avendo riguardo ai fatti della causa, alle osservazioni delle parti e alla sua costatazione di una violazione sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che ha esaminato il quesito legale principale sollevato nella presente richiesta. Conclude perciò che non c'è nessun bisogno di fare un’analisi separata sotto questo capo (vedere, come un esempio di questa pratica, Mehmet e Suna Yiğit c. Turchia, n. 52658/99, § 43, 17 luglio 2007, e K.Ö. c. Turchia, n. 71795/01, § 50 dell’ 11 dicembre 2007).
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
50. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
51. I richiedenti chiesero 18,913,083 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno materiale che è il risultato della perdita d’ uso dei tre edifici in oggetto. Oltre a questo importo ed in caso il Governo rispondente sia incapace o si rifiuti di consegnare le proprietà vacanti dei tre edifici, chiesero EUR 5,459,026 per il valore della proprietà in oggetto.
52. Inoltre, ciascuno dei richiedenti chiese EUR 100,000 per danno morale. Loro notarono in questo collegamento che non solo di aver perso loro sorella ma era stato impedito loro di prendersi cura di lei. L'insensibilità del Governo rispondente e l'illegalità nell'occuparsi di questa questione avevano provocato loro anche stress ed angoscia.
53. Riguardo ai costi e spese, i richiedenti sostennero che l'importo di EUR 44,244.43 sarebbe stato un importo appropriato da assegnare da parte della Corte. Loro asserirono che la serietà della causa aveva richiesto i servizi di un avvocato cipriota così come di avvocati grechi e turchi.
54. Il Governo presentò che gli importi chiesti dai richiedenti erano speculativi e non comprovati.
55. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione e deve essere riservata, avendo riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo fra lo Stato rispondente ed i richiedenti.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non c'è nessun bisogno di esaminare le azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6, 8, 13 e 14 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva secondo l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissare la stessa all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 29 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Josep Casadevall
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.