Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ADZHIGOVICH v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 34, P1-1

NUMERO: 23202/05/2009
STATO: Russia
DATA: 08/10/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF ADZHIGOVICH v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 23202/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
8 October 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Adzhigovich v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nina Vajić, President,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 17 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 23202/05) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Ukrainian national, Ms Y. G. A. (“the applicant”), on 21 June 2005.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr V. F., a lawyer practising in the Moscow Region. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were initially represented by Mr P. Laptev and Ms V. Milinchuk, former Representatives of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights, and subsequently by their Representative, Mr G. Matyushkin.
3. The applicant alleged in particular a violation of her property rights on account of confiscation of her money.
4. On 20 January 2006 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3 of the Convention).
5. The Ukrainian Government did not exercise their right to intervene in the proceedings (Rule 36 § 1 of the Convention).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1975 and lives in Moscow.
7. On 8 October 2004 the applicant travelled from Moscow to Simferopol in Ukraine through Sheremetyevo airport. She had on her 13,020 US dollars (USD), 31 Ukrainian hryvnyas (UAH) and 1,100 Russian roubles (RUB). However, she only reported USD 10,000 and UAH 31 in her customs declaration. The customs inspection uncovered the remaining USD 3,020, which the applicant claimed she had forgotten about. She was charged with smuggling, a criminal offence under Article 188 § 1 of the Criminal Code. The money was appended to the criminal case as physical evidence (вещественные доказательства).
8. On 9 December 2004 the Golovinskiy District Court of Moscow found the applicant guilty as charged and imposed a suspended sentence of one year's imprisonment, conditional on one year's probation. As regards the money, it referred to Article 81 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and held that:
“Physical evidence – USD 13,020 and UAH 31 held in the evidence storage room of the Sheremetyevo Customs Office – shall revert to the State.”
9. In his statement of appeal, counsel for the applicant contested the lawfulness of the confiscation measure. He submitted that the gravity of the offence should have been determined by reference to the amount the applicant had concealed from the customs, that is USD 3,020, rather than the entire amount she had carried. The money had been the object rather than the instrument of the offence and as such it should have been returned to the lawful owner because it had not been claimed that it had been criminally acquired.
10. On 25 January 2005 the Moscow City Court upheld the judgment by a succinct decision, without examining the counsel's arguments in detail.
11. Counsel for the applicant submitted several applications for supervisory review of the judgments. The applications were rejected by a judge of the Moscow City Court on 22 August 2005, the President of the Moscow City Court on 18 January 2006, and a judge of the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation on 12 April 2006. As regards the confiscation measure, the judicial authorities maintained that the measure had been lawful and compliant with Article 81 of the Code of Criminal Procedure.
12. On 26 April 2007 the Presidium of the Moscow City Court examined yet another application for supervisory review. It held that the applicant had been correctly found guilty of smuggling but amended the judgment in part concerning the confiscation measure, having found as follows:
“However, the decision that the authentically declared amount of USD 10,000 and UAH 31 should revert to the State was not founded on sufficient reasons.
In deciding that the foreign currency should revert to the State, the court posited that the currency transported by Ms A. was the object of the offence. However, since her criminal intent was directed at the breach of the procedure for transferring cash money (currency) across the customs border rather than at their unlawful misappropriation, the cash money (currency) was not the object of the offence and therefore not liable to confiscation under Article 81 [§ 3] (1) of the Code of Criminal Procedure.
Moreover, according to Article 81 [§ 3] (4) of the Code of Criminal Procedure, criminally acquired property, money or other valuables must revert to the State. The case file does not contain any evidence to the effect that Ms Adzhigovich obtained the above-mentioned money through criminal means or as the proceeds of criminal activity.
In such circumstances, the judgments in the part concerning the decision that the foreign currency should revert to the State may not be considered lawful or justified.”
The Presidium held that the judgments would be amended and that USD 10,000 and UAH 31 would be returned to the applicant.
13. On 5 July 2007 a writ of execution was issued and sent to the bailiffs' service for enforcement.
14. On 23 January 2008 the bailiffs determined that the enforcement was impossible because the cash money in the amount of USD 10,000 and UAH 31 was absent from the evidence storage room of the Sheremetyevo Customs Office. That money had been taken away on 4 October 2005 by the bailiffs of the Northern Administrative District of Moscow, which appeared to have made enforcement impossible.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
15. The Criminal Code of the Russian Federation provides that smuggling, that is movement of large amounts of goods or other objects across the customs border of the Russian Federation, committed by concealing such goods from the customs or combined with non-declaration or inaccurate declaration of such goods, carries a penal sanction of up to five years' imprisonment (Article 188 § 1).
16. The Code of Criminal Procedure of the Russian Federation (“CCrP”) provides as follows:
Article 81. Physical evidence
“1. Any object may be recognised as physical evidence -
(1) that served as the instrument of the offence or retained traces of the offence;
(2) that was the target of the criminal acts;
(3) any other object or document which may be instrumental for detecting a crime or establishing the circumstances of the criminal case.
...
3. On delivery of a conviction... the destiny of physical evidence must be decided upon. In such a case –
(1) instruments of the crime belonging to the accused are liable to confiscation, transfer to competent authorities or destruction;
(2) objects banned from circulation must be transferred to competent authorities or destroyed;
(3) non-reclaimed objects of no value must be destroyed...;
(4) criminally acquired money and other valuables must revert to the State by a judicial decision;
(5) documents must be kept with the case file...;
(6) any other objects must be returned to their lawful owners or, if the identity of the owner cannot be established, transferred to the State...”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
17. The applicant complained under Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that the confiscation measure did not have a sufficient and clear basis in domestic law. The Court considers that this complaint will be more appropriately examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
18. The Government firstly claimed that the Russian authorities had taken measures at the domestic level to remedy the alleged violations of the applicant's rights. They did not specify the nature of those measures.
19. The applicant replied that the Presidium's judgment of 26 April 2007 had only concerned the return of the amount of USD 10,000 and UAH 31. It had not specified the legal basis for the decision that the remaining USD 3,020 should revert to the State. Moreover, the amount to be returned had not been paid back to her.
20. In so far as the Government's submission may be understood as a challenge to the applicant's status as a “victim” of the alleged violation, the Court will deal with it in the admissibility part. It is recalled that a decision or measure favourable to an applicant is not in principle sufficient to deprive him of his status as a “victim” unless the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded redress for, the breach of the Convention (see Amuur v. France, 25 June 1996, § 36, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-III, and Dalban v. Romania [GC], no. 28114/95, § 44, ECHR 1999-VI). In the instant case the applicant complained that the legal basis for the confiscation measure was unclear. Even though the Presidium of the Moscow City Court acknowledged certain deficiencies in the confiscation order, its decision only extended to a part of the money that had been seized from the applicant. Furthermore, the amount to be returned was not repaid to the applicant because it was missing from the Sheremetyevo Customs Office. In these circumstances, the Court finds that the applicant was not afforded acknowledgement of, and redress for, the alleged violation of her property rights, and may still claim to be a “victim”.
21. The Government also claimed that the applicant had not applied to the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation for supervisory review of the judgments. The Court notes that counsel for the applicant made a number of applications for supervisory review to the Moscow City Court and the Supreme Court, all of which had been rejected before the case was communicated to the Government (see paragraph 11 above). In any event, it reiterates that applications for supervisory review are not a remedy to be made use of for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (see Tumilovich v. Russia (dec.), no. 47033/99, 22 June 1999, and Berdzenishvili v. Russia (dec.), no. 31697/03, 29 January 2004). Accordingly, the Government's objection as to the non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
22. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Submissions by the parties
23. The Government submitted that the applicant's property rights had been restricted as a result of her having committed a criminally reprehensible act. The money which she had illegally transported across the customs border had been confiscated in accordance with Article 81 § 3 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. According to existing judicial practice, the money was considered an “instrument” of the offence of smuggling and was covered by a broader notion of the “object” of the offence.
24. The applicant contended that the Government failed to specify the paragraph of Article 81 § 3 which had been applied in her case. The domestic courts had never indicated that the money was an “instrument” of the offence of smuggling. Their decisions justifying the application of the confiscation measure had been inconsistent and could not have amounted to established judicial practice.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) The applicable rule
25. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, as a recent authority, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 134, ECHR 2004-V).
26. The “possession” at issue in the present case was an amount of money in United States dollars and Ukrainian hryvnyas which was confiscated from the applicant by a judicial decision. It is not in dispute between the parties that the confiscation order amounted to an interference with the applicant's right to peaceful enjoyment of her possessions and that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is therefore applicable. It remains to be determined whether the measure was covered by the first or second paragraph of that Convention provision.
27. The Court reiterates its constant approach that a confiscation measure, even though it does involve a deprivation of possessions, constitutes nevertheless control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, in respect of a similar measure, Sun v. Russia, no. 31004/02, § 25, 5 February 2009, and Ismayilov v. Russia, no. 30352/03, § 30, 6 November 2008, with further references). Accordingly, it considers that the same approach must be followed in the present case.
(b) Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
28. The Court emphasises that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be “lawful”: the second paragraph recognises that the States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the foundations of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention. The issue of whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights only becomes relevant once it has been established that the interference in question satisfied the requirement of lawfulness and was not arbitrary (see, among other authorities, Baklanov v. Russia, no. 68443/01, § 39, 9 June 2005, and Frizen v. Russia, no. 58254/00, § 33, 24 March 2005).
29. Moreover, the Court reiterates that a norm cannot be regarded as a “law” within the meaning of the Convention unless it is formulated with sufficient precision to enable the citizen to regulate his conduct; an individual must be able - if need be with appropriate advice - to foresee, to a degree that is reasonable in the circumstances, the consequences which a given action may entail. A law may still satisfy the requirement of foreseeability even if the person concerned has to take appropriate legal advice to assess, to a degree that is reasonable in the circumstances, the consequences which a given action may entail (see, for example, Chauvy and Others v. France, no. 64915/01, §§ 43-45, ECHR 2004-VI).
30. Turning to the case before it, the Court observes that the money which had been discovered on the applicant was recognised as physical evidence in the criminal case. In ordering confiscation of the entire amount, the first-instance court mentioned Article 81 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, without, however, indicating the part of that provision which was applicable in the applicant's particular case. The appeal court and three supervisory-review decisions did nothing to fill the lacuna, as they referred generally to Article 81 rather to a specific ground or grounds for the confiscation measure of the many such foreseen in part 3 of that Article.
31. In accordance with paragraph 3 of Article 81, only instruments of the criminal offence mentioned in sub-paragraph 1 and criminally acquired valuables referred to in sub-paragraph 4 were liable to confiscation or reversion to the State. All other objects which were not banned from circulation had to be returned to their lawful owners pursuant to sub-paragraph 6 of Article 81 § 3. Examining the applicant's request for supervisory review, on 26 April 2007 the Presidium of the Moscow City Court determined that the money which the applicant had carried across the customs border had been neither the object of the offence of smuggling nor proceeds from any criminal activities. It was therefore not liable to confiscation under either sub-paragraph 1 or sub-paragraph 4 of Article 81 § 3. It is remarkable in this connection that, in making such a finding in a general manner, the Presidium's decision could only be read as being applicable to the entire amount of money carried by the applicant. However, for unexplained reasons it only ordered the return of USD 10,000 and UAH 31 to the applicant, whereas it upheld the confiscation order in respect of the remaining USD 3,020.
32. Since the Presidium held that the object of the offence was the procedure of customs declaration rather than the money as a physical object and also found on the facts that the applicant's money had not been criminally obtained, it remains unclear what legal provision could be applied to the maintenance of the confiscation order in respect of the remaining amount. In fact, as regards that amount, the Presidium's decision did nothing to remedy the lacunae in the legal reasoning of the first-instance, appeal and supervisory-review courts. In this connection the Court emphasises that the existence of public-interest considerations for the contested measure, however relevant or appropriate they might have appeared, did not dispense the domestic authorities from the obligation to cite a specific legal basis for such decision (see Frizen, cited above, § 34).
33. As regards the amount which the Presidium determined should be returned to the applicant, the Court notes that the authorities did not invoke any legal grounds for its continued retention beyond a reference to the fact that it was “missing from the evidence storage room at the Sheremetyevo airport”.
34. Having regard to the Russian authorities' consistent failure to indicate a legal provision that could be construed as the basis for the confiscation of the applicant's property and their refusal to return the money which the Presidium determined should be repaid to the applicant, the Court finds the impugned interference with the applicant's property rights cannot be considered “lawful” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This finding makes it unnecessary to examine whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights.
35. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
36. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
37. The applicant claimed USD 13,020 and UAH 31 in respect of pecuniary damage, representing the confiscated amount. She also claimed USD 10,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
38. The Government considered that the claim should be rejected because it was not the Court's task to review to national authorities' decision to bring criminal charges against the applicant.
39. As regards the claim for the pecuniary damage, the Court has found that the amount claimed was confiscated from the applicant in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Furthermore, despite the Presidium of the Moscow City Court's decision of 25 April 2007 to return part of the money to the applicant, the enforcement thereof appears to have been made impossible. The Court therefore accepts the claim in respect of the pecuniary damage in its entirety and awards the applicant EUR 10,240, plus any tax that may be chargeable. It considers, however, that the claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage is excessive. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant EUR 1,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on it.
B. Costs and expenses
40. The applicant also claimed RUB 61,000 for legal fees and RUB 2,660.90 for postal expenses. She submitted a copy of a legal services agreement and postal receipts.
41. The Government did not make any comments.
42. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 1,500 for costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant.
C. Default interest
43. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 10,240 (ten thousand two hundred forty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(i) EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 1,500 (one thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 8 October 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Nina Vajić
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the concurring opinion of Judge Kovler is annexed to this judgment.
N.A.V.
A.M.W.

CONCURRING OPINION OF JUDGE KOVLER
I agree with the conclusions reached by the Chamber. Nevertheless, I feel I should clarify the reasons for my decision.
Unlike in some similar cases (for example, Baklanov v. Russia, no. 68443/01, 9 June 2005, and Ismaylov v. Russia, no. 30352/03, 6 November 2008), where the national courts admitted all money carried across the customs border without a customs declaration as physical evidence in the criminal case, ordering the confiscation of the entire amount (as did the first-instance court in the present case), the Presidium of the Moscow City Court, after examining the applicant's request for supervisory review, again found her guilty of smuggling, but declared that the amount of 10,000 United States dollars (USD) and 31 Ukrainian hryvnias (UAH) should be returned to her (see paragraph 12 of the judgment) because this part of the sum had been declared to the customs authorities.
I disagree, in view of this evident fact, with the contradictory conclusions of the Chamber in paragraphs 31-32 of the judgment, especially with the statement that “on 26 April 2007 the Presidium of the Moscow City Court determined that the money which the applicant had carried across the customs border had been neither the object of the offence of smuggling (sic! – A.K.) nor proceeds from any criminal activities” (§ 31). The Moscow City Court's order to return “only” USD 10,000 and UAH 31 to the applicant was not based on “unexplained reasons”, but instead was logical because it separated the “smuggled” part of the total amount (USD 3,020), which was not declared to the customs authorities and consequently was confiscated, from the “legally carried” part of the amount, which was declared to the customs authorities and was thus confiscated illegally. This judgment was in line with the decision (определение) of the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation of 8 July 2004, in which money smuggling was qualified as a criminal offence in the light of the Council of Europe Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime (8 November 1990). I regret that the present judgment did not mention the provisions of that instrument.
But I accepted the final decision of the Chamber because of the truly outrageous fact of the “mysterious” disappearance of the money confiscated from the evidence storage room of the Sheremetyevo Customs Office by the bailiffs long before the final judgment of the national court! For this reason I also agree with the amount awarded for pecuniary damage.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; danno Materiale e morale - assegnazione
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA ADZHIGOVICH C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 23202/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
8 ottobre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Adzhigovich c. Russia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima la Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Nina Vajić, Presidente, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
ed André Wampach, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 17 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 23202/05) contro la Federazione russa depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino ucraino, la Sig.ra Y. G. A. (“la richiedente”), il 21 giugno 2005.
2. La richiedente è stata rappresentata dal Sig. V. F., un avvocato che pratica nella Regione di Mosca. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato inizialmente dal Sig. P. Laptev ed dalla Sig.ra V. Milinchuk, Rappresentanti precedenti della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani e successivamente dal suo Rappresentante, il Sig. G. Matyushkin.
3. La richiedente addusse in particolare una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà a causa del sequestro dei suoi soldi.
4. Il 20 gennaio 2006 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione).
5. Il Governo ucraino non esercitò il suo diritto ad intervenire nei procedimenti (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. La richiedente nacque nel 1975 e vive a Mosca.
7. L’ 8 ottobre 2004 la richiedente viaggiò da Mosca a Simferopol in Ucraina attraverso l'aeroporto di Sheremetyevo. Lei aveva con sé 13,020 dollari degli Stati Uniti (USD), 31 hryvnya ucraini (UAH) e 1,100 rubli russi (RUB). Comunque denunciò solamente, USD 10,000 ed UAH 31 nella sua dichiarazione doganale. L'ispezione doganale scoprì i USD 3,020 rimanenti che la richiedente dichiarò di aver dimenticato. Lei fu accusata di contrabbandando, un reato penale sotto l’Articolo 188 § 1 del Codice Penale. I soldi furono allegati alla causa penale come prova fisica (вещественные доказательства).
8. Il 9 dicembre 2004 la Corte distrettuale di Golovinskiy di Mosca trovò la richiedente colpevole come da accusa ed impose una sentenza sospesa di un anno di reclusione, condizionale alla prova di un anno. Riguardo ai soldi, si riferì all’ Articolo 81 del Codice di procedura penale e sostenne che:
“La Prova fisica -USD 13,020 ed UAH 31 custodita nella stanza di deposito delle prove dell’Ufficio Dogana di Sheremetyevo –verrà restituita allo Stato.”
9. Nella sua dichiarazione di ricorso, il consigliere della richiedente contestò la legalità della misura di sequestro. Lui presentò che la gravità del reato avrebbe dovuto essere determinata in riferimento all'importo che la richiedente aveva nascosto alla dogana cioè USD 3,020 piuttosto che l'intero importo che aveva portato. I soldi erano stato l’oggetto piuttosto che lo strumento del reato e come tale sarebbe avrebbero dovuto essere restituiti al legittimo proprietario perché non era stato stabilito che fosse stato acquisito criminalmente.
10. Il 25 gennaio 2005 la Corte Urbana di Mosca sostenne la sentenza con una decisione succinta, senza esaminare gli argomenti del consigliere in dettaglio.
11. Il Consigliere per la richiedente presentò molte richieste di revisione direttiva delle sentenze. Le richieste furono respinte da un giudice della Corte della città di Mosca il 22 agosto 2005, dal Presidente della Corte della città di Mosca il 18 gennaio 2006, e da un giudice della Corte Suprema della Federazione russa il 12 aprile 2006. Riguardo alla misura di sequestro, le autorità giudiziali sostennero che la misura era stata legale e conforme all’Articolo 81 del Codice di procedura penale.
12. Il 26 aprile 2007 il Presidium della Corte Urbana Mosca esaminò ancora un’altra richiesta di revisione direttiva. Sostenne che la richiedente era stata trovata correttamente colpevole di contrabbando ma era stato corretto in parte il giudizio riguardo alla misura di sequestro, avendo trovato ciò che segue:
“Comunque, la decisione che l'importo autenticamente dichiarato di USD 10,000 ed UAH 31 dovrebbe essere ridato allo Stato non è stata basata su ragioni sufficienti.
Nel decidere che la valuta estera avrebbe dovuto essere ridata allo Stato, la corte ha postulato che la valuta trasportata dalla Sig.ra A. era l'oggetto del reato. Comunque, poiché la sua intenzione penale era diretta alla violazione della procedura per il trasferimento di soldi in contanti (la valuta) attraverso il confine doganale piuttosto che alla loro appropriazione indebita illegale, i soldi in contanti (la valuta) non erano l’oggetto del reato e perciò non passibili di sequestro sotto l’Articolo 81 [§ 3] (1) del Codice di Procedura penale.
Inoltre, secondo l’Articolo 81 [§ 3] (4) del Codice Procedura penale, la proprietà criminalmente acquisita, soldi o altri valori devono ritornare allo Stato. L'archivio della causa non contiene qualsiasi prova all'effetto che la Sig.ra A. abbia ottenuto i soldi summenzionati per mezzo di crimini o come incassi di attività penale.
In simili circostanze, i giudizi nella parte riguardo alla decisione che la valuta estera dovrebbe essere ridata allo Stato non possono essere considerati legali o giustificati.”
Il Presidium sostenne che le sentenze sarebbero state corrette e che USD 10,000 ed UAH 31 sarebbero stati ridati alla richiedente.
13. Il 5 luglio 2007 un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza fu emesso e spedito al servizio degli ufficiali giudiziari per l’esecuzione.
14. Il 23 gennaio 2008 gli ufficiali giudiziari determinarono che l'esecuzione era impossibile perché i soldi in contanti nell'importo di USD 10,000 ed UAH 31 non erano presenti nella stanza di deposito delle prove dell’Ufficio Dogane di Sheremetyevo. Quei soldi erano stati portati via il 4 ottobre 2005 dagli ufficiali giudiziari del Distretto Amministrativo Settentrionale di Mosca che sembrò avere reso l’esecuzione impossibile.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
15. Il Codice Penale della Federazione russa prevede che il contrabbando, che è un movimento di grandi importi di beni o di altri oggetti attraverso le dogane confinanti con la Federazione russa, commesso nascondendo simili beni alle dogane o combinato con la non-dichiarazione o la dichiarazione imprecisa di simile beni, porta a una sanzione penale fino alla reclusione di cinque anni (Articolo 188 § 1).
16. Il Codice di procedura penale della Federazione russa (“CCrP”) prevede ciò che segue:
Articolo 81. Prova fisica
“1. Qualsiasi oggetto può essere riconosciuto come prova fisica -
(1) se è servito come strumento del reato o contiene tracce del reato;
(2) se era l'obiettivo degli atti penali;
(3) qualsiasi altro oggetto o documento che possa essere utile a scoprire un crimine o stabilire le circostanze della causa penale.
...
3. Alla consegna di una condanna... il destino della prova fisica deve essere deciso. In tali casi-
(1) strumenti del crimine appartenenti all'accusato sono passibili di sequestro, di trasferimento ad autorità competente o di distruzione;
(2) oggetti proibiti alla circolazione devono essere trasferiti all’ autorità competente o devono essere distrutti;
(3) oggetti non rivendicati di nessun valore devono essere distrutti...;
(4) i soldi criminalmente acquisiti e gli altri valori devono ritornare allo Stato tramite una decisione giudiziale;
(5) i documenti devono essere tenuti nell'archivio di causa...;
(6) qualsiasi altro oggetto deve essere restituito al loro proprietario legittimo o, se l'identità del proprietario non può essere stabilita, trasferito allo Stato...”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
17. La richiedente si lamentò sotto l’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo sotto N.ro 1 che la misura di sequestro non aveva una base sufficiente e chiara in diritto nazionale. La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo sarà esaminata più propriamente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:

“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
18. Il Governo affermò in primo luogo che le autorità russe avevano preso delle misure al livello nazionale per rimediare alle violazioni addotte dei diritti della richiedente. Non specificò la natura di quelle misure.
19. La richiedente rispose che la sentenza del Presidium del 26 aprile 2007 aveva riguardato solamente la restituzione dell'importo di USD 10,000 ed UAH 31. Non aveva specificato la base legale per la decisione per cui i rimanenti USD 3,020 sarebbero dovuti ritornare allo Stato. L'importo da ritornare inoltre non le era stato restituito.
20. Per ciò che riguarda l'osservazione del Governo che può essere intesa per impugnare lo status della richiedente come “vittima” della violazione addotta, la Corte tratterà con questa nella parte dell’ammissibilità. Si ricorda che una decisione o una misura favorevole ad un richiedente non è in principio sufficiente a spogliarlo del suo status di “ vittima” a meno che le autorità nazionali abbiano ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, e poi riconosciuto una compensazione, la violazione della Convenzione (vedere Amuur c. Francia, 25 giugno 1996 § 36, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-III e Dalban c. Romania [GC], n. 28114/95, § 44 ECHR 1999-VI). Nella presente causa la richiedente si lamentò che la base legale per la misura di sequestro era poco chiara. Anche se il Presidium della Corte Urbana di Mosca ha riconosciuto certe deficienze nell’ordine di sequestro, la sua decisione si estendeva solamente ad una parte dei soldi che erano stati sequestrati dalla richiedente. Inoltre, l'importo da restituire non fu rimborsato alla richiedente perché era stato perso dall’Ufficio Dogane di Sheremetyevo. In queste circostanze, la Corte costata che alla richiedente non fu riconosciuto il riconoscimento, e la compensazione per la violazione addotta dei suoi diritti di proprietà, ed ancora può pretendere di essere una “ vittima.”
21. Il Governo affermò anche che la richiedente non aveva fatto domanda alla Corte Suprema della Federazione russa per una revisione direttiva delle sentenze. La Corte nota che il consigliere della richiedente introdusse un numero di richieste per revisione direttiva presso la Corte della Città di Mosca e presso la Corte Suprema che erano state tutte respinte prima che la causa venisse comunicata al Governo (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra). In qualsiasi caso, reitera che le richieste per revisione direttiva non sono una via di ricorso di cui fare uso ai fini dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Tumilovich c. Russia (dec.), n. 47033/99, 22 giugno 1999, e Berdzenishvili c. Russia (dec.), n. 31697/03, 29 gennaio 2004). Di conseguenza, l'obiezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
22. La Corte nota che l'azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarato perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Osservazioni delle parti
23. Il Governo presentò che i diritti di proprietà della richiedente erano stati ristretti come risultato del fatto di aver commesso un atto criminalmente biasimevole. I soldi che lei aveva trasportato illegalmente attraverso il confine doganale erano stati confiscati in conformità con l’Articolo 81 § 3 del Codice di procedura penale. Secondo la pratica giudiziale esistente, i soldi furono considerato, uno “strumento” del reato di contrabbando e furono rivestiti di una nozione più ampia dell’ “oggetto” del reato.
24. La richiedente contese che il Governo andò a vuoto nello specificare il paragrafo dell’ Articolo 81 § 3 che era stato applicato nella sua causa. I tribunali nazionali non avevano mai indicato che i soldi erano uno “strumento” del reato di contrabbando. Le loro decisioni che giustificavano l’applicazione della misura di sequestro erano state incoerenti e non potevano corrispondere alla pratica giudiziale stabilita.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) L'articolo applicabile
25. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo della proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo ricopre la privazione della proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti viene concesso, inter alia, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono distinti nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano i casi particolari di interferenza col diritto a godimento tranquillo della proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo (vedere, come recente autorità, Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 134 il 2004-V di ECHR).
26. La “proprietà” in questione nella presente causa era un importo di soldi in dollari degli Stati Uniti ed ucraini hryvnyas che è stato confiscato dalla richiedente con una decisione giudiziale. Non è in controversia fra le parti che l'ordine di sequestro ha corrisposto ad un'interferenza col diritto della richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà e che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è perciò applicabile. Rimane da determinare se la misura era coperta dal primo o dal secondo paragrafo di quella disposizione della Convenzione.
27. La Corte reitera il suo approccio continuo che una misura di sequestro, anche se comporta una privazione di proprietà, costituisce ciononostante un controllo dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 dl Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, a riguardo di una misura simile, Sun c. Russia, n. 31004/02, § 25, 5 febbraio 2009, ed Ismayilov c. Russia, n. 30352/03, § 30, 6 novembre 2008 con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Di conseguenza, considera che lo stesso approccio deve essere seguito nella presente causa.
(b) Ottemperanza con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
28. La Corte enfatizza che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo della proprietà dovrebbe essere “legale”: il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto al controllo dell'uso della proprietà stabilendo “le leggi.” Inoltre, la preminenza del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione. La questione se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo diviene attinente solamente una volta che è stato stabilito che l'interferenza in oggetto ha soddisfatto il requisito della legalità e non era arbitraria (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Baklanov c. Russia, n. 68443/01, § 39, 9 giugno 2005, e Frizen c. Russia, n. 58254/00, § 33 24 marzo 2005).
29. Inoltre, la Corte reitera che una norma non può essere considerata come “ legge” all'interno del significato della Convenzione a meno che non sia formulata con precisione sufficiente da permettere al cittadino di regolare la sua condotta; un individuo deve essere in grado – all’occorrenza con debito avviso - prevedere, ad un grado che sia ragionevole nelle circostanze, le conseguenze che può comportare una determinata azione. Una legge ancora può soddisfare il requisito di prevedibilità anche se la persona riguardata deve prendere una consulenza legale appropriata per valutare, ad un grado che sia ragionevole nelle circostanze, le conseguenze che può comportare una determinata azione (vedere, per esempio, Chauvy ed Altri c. Francia, n. 64915/01, §§ 43-45 ECHR 2004-VI).
30. Rivolgendosi alla causa di fronte a sé, la Corte osserva che i soldi che erano stati scoperti addosso alla richiedente sono stati riconosciuti come prova fisica nella causa penale. Nell'ordinare il sequestro dell'intero importo , la corte di prima -istanza menzionò l’Articolo 81 del Codice di procedura penale, senza, comunque, indicare la parte di questa disposizione che era applicabile nella particolare causa della richiedente. Il tribunale di ricorso e tre decisioni di revisione direttiva non hanno affatto colmato la lacuna, siccome hanno fatto generalmente riferimento piuttosto all’ Articolo 81 che ad una specifica base o ai motivi per la misura di sequestro dei molti previsti nella parte 3 di quell'Articolo.
31. In conformità con il paragrafo 3 dell’ Articolo 81, solamente strumenti del reato penale menzionati nel sub -paragrafo 1 e i valori criminalmente acquisiti a cui si fa riferimento nel sub -paragrafo 4 erano passibili di sequestro o di restituzione allo Stato. Tutti gli altri oggetti a cui non era proibita la circolazione dovevano essere restituiti ai loro proprietari legittimi facendo seguito al sub-paragrafo 6 dell’ Articolo 81 § 3. Esaminando la richiesta della richiedente per la revisione direttiva, il 26 aprile 2007 il Presidium della Corte della Città di Mosca determinò che i soldi che la richiedente aveva portato attraverso il confine doganale non era stati né l'oggetto del reato di contrabbando né erano provenuti da qualsiasi attività penale. Non erano perciò passibili di sequestro sotto il sub-paragrafo 1 o sub-paragrafo 4 dell’ Articolo, 81 § 3. È straordinario in questo collegamento che, nel emettere tale sentenza in modo generale, la decisione del Presidium potrebbe essere letta solamente come applicabile all' intero importo dei soldi portati dalla richiedente. Per ragioni inspiegate ordinò solamente comunque, la restituzione alla richiedente di USD 10,000 e di UAH 31, sostenendo l'ordine di sequestro a riguardo dei rimanenti USD 3,020.
32. Poiché il Presidium sostenne che l'oggetto del reato era la procedura di dichiarazione doganale piuttosto che i soldi come oggetto fisico e trovò anche che i soldi della richiedente non erano stati ottenuti criminalmente, rimane poco chiaro quale disposizione legale potrebbe essere applicata al mantenimento dell'ordine di sequestro a riguardo dell'importo rimanente. Infatti, riguardo a questo importo, la decisione del Presidium non faceva niente per rimediare alle lacune nel ragionamento giuridico del tribunale di ricorso e della corte di prima –istanza e di revisione direttiva. In questo collegamento la Corte enfatizza che l'esistenza delle considerazioni di interesse pubblico per la misura contestata, benché attinenti o appropriate potrebbero sembrare, non dispensa le autorità nazionali dall'obbligo di citare una specifica base legale per simile decisione (vedere Frizen, citata sopra, § 34).
33. Riguardo all'importo determinati dal Presidium che dovrebbe essere restituito alla richiedente, la Corte nota che le autorità non invocarono alcun motivo legittimo per la sua ritenuta continua se non un riferimento al fatto che “era mancante dalla stanza di deposito delle prove all'aeroporto di Sheremetyevo.”
34. Avendo riguardo all'insuccesso coerente delle autorità russe nell’ indicare una disposizione legale che avrebbe potuto costituire la base per il sequestro della proprietà della richiedente ed il loro rifiuto di restituire i soldi che secondo il Presidium avrebbero dovuto essere rimborsati alla richiedente, la Corte trova che l'interferenza contestata coi diritti di proprietà della richiedente non può essere considerata “legale” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Questa sentenza non rende necessario esaminare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo.
35. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
36. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
37. La richiedente chiese USD 13,020 ed UAH 31 a riguardo del danno materiale, che rappresentavano l'importo confiscato. Lei chiese anche USD 10,000 a riguardo del danno morale.
38. Il Governo considerò che la rivendicazione avrebbe dovuto essere respinta perché non era il compito della Corte fare una revisione alla decisione delle autorità nazionali di portare accuse criminali contro la richiedente.
39. Riguardo alla rivendicazione per il danno materiale, la Corte ha trovato che l'importo chiesto è stato confiscato dalla richiedente in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Inoltre, nonostante la decisione del 25 aprile 2007 del il Presidium della Corte Urbana di Mosca di restituire parte dei soldi alla richiedente, l'esecuzione al riguardo sembra essere stata resa impossibile. La Corte accetta perciò la rivendicazione riguardo al danno materiale nella sua interezza ed assegna alla richiedente EUR 10,240, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile. Comunque, considera che la rivendicazione riguardo al danno morale sia eccessiva. Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna alla richiedente EUR 1,000 a riguardo del danno morale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su questa.
B. Costi e spese
40. La richiedente ha anche chiesto RUB 61,000 per le parcelle legali e RUB 2,660.90 per le spese postali. Lei presentò una copia di un accordo di servizi legali e delle ricevute postali.
41. Il Governo non ha fatto alcun commento.
42. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso un rimborso di costi e spese solamente se viene dimostrato che questi sono stati davvero e necessariamente sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa, bisogna avere riguardo alle informazioni in sua proprietà ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 1,500 per costi e spese, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico della richiedente.
C. Interesse di mora
43. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare la richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire in rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 10,240 (dieci mila duecento quaranta euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno materiale;
(i) EUR 1,000 (mille euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno morale;
(l'ii) EUR 1,500 (mille cinquecento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico della richiedente, a riguardo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
4. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l’ 8 ottobre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento della Corte.
André Wampach Nina Vajić
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’ordinamento della Corte, l'opinione concordante del Giudice Kovler è annessa a questa sentenza.
N.A.V.
A.M.W.

OPINIONE CONCORDANTE DEL GIUDICE KOVLER
Io concordo con le conclusioni a cui è giunta la Camera. Ciononostante, sento di dove chiarire le ragioni per la mia decisione.
Diversamente che in cause simili (per esempio, Baklanov c. Russia, n. 68443/01, 9 giugno 2005, ed Ismaylov c. Russia, n. 30352/03, 6 novembre 2008), dove i tribunali nazionali ammisero tutti i soldi portati attraverso il confine doganale senza una dichiarazione doganale come prova fisica nella causa penale, ordinando il sequestro dell'intero importo (come ha fatto la corte di prima -istanza nella presente causa), il Presidium della Corte della Città di Mosca, dopo avere esaminato la richiesta della richiedente per revisione direttiva la trovò di nuovo colpevole di contrabbando, ma dichiarò che l'importo di 10,000 dollari degli Stati Uniti (USD) e di 31 hryvnia ucraini (UAH) avrebbero dovuti esserle restituiti (vedere paragrafo 12 della sentenza) perché questa parte della somma era stata dichiarata alle autorità doganali.
Non sono d'accordo, nella prospettiva di questo fatto evidente, con le conclusioni contraddittorie della Camera nei paragrafi 31-32 della sentenza specialmente con la dichiarazione che “il 26 aprile 2007 il Presidium della Corte della Città di Mosca determinò che i soldi che la richiedente aveva portato attraverso il confine doganale non erano né stati oggetto del reato di contrabbando (sic! -A.K.) né incassati da qualsiasi attività penale” (§ 31). L'ordine della Corte della Città di Mosca di restituire alla richiedente “solamente” USD 10,000 ed UAH 31 non è stato basato su “ragioni inspiegate”, ma invece era logico perché separava la parte dell'importo totale (USD 3,020) di “contrabbandò” che non fu dichiarata alle autorità doganali e di conseguenza fu confiscato, dalla parte dell'importo “portato legalmente” che fu dichiarata alle autorità doganali e fu confiscata così illegalmente. Questa sentenza era in linea con la decisione (определение) della Corte Costituzionale della Federazione russa dell’ 8 luglio 2004 nella quale i soldi di contrabbandando furono qualificati come un reato penale alla luce del Consiglio della Convenzione Europea sul Riciclaggio, la Ricerca, la Confisca ed il Sequestro degli Incassi provenienti dal Crimine (8 novembre 1990). Mi spiace che la presente sentenza non ha menzionato le disposizioni di quello strumento.
Ma ho accettato la decisione definitiva della Camera a causa del fatto veramente oltraggioso della “misteriosa” scomparsa dei soldi confiscati dalla stanza di deposito delle prova dell’Ufficio Doganale di Sheremetyevo da parte degli ufficiali giudiziari ben prima della sentenza definitiva della corte nazionale! Per questa ragione io concordo anche con l'importo assegnato per danno materiale.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.