Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF HADJITHOMAS AND OTHERS v. TURKEY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 39970/98/2009
STATO: Turchia
DATA: 22/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF HADJITHOMAS AND OTHERS v. TURKEY
(Application no. 39970/98)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
22 September 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Hadjithomas and Others v. Turkey,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Işıl Karakaş, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 1 September 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 39970/98) against the Republic of Turkey lodged with the European Commission of Human Rights (“the Commission”) under former Article 25 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by nine Cypriot nationals, Mr T. G. H., Mrs I. Y. H., Mrs P. H.-H., Mr N. T. H., Mrs X. A.-H., Mr T. H., Mr C. H., Mr A. H. and S. H. (“the applicants”), on 2 February 1998.
2. The applicants, who had been granted legal aid, were represented by Mr K. C., a lawyer practising in Nicosia. The Turkish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr Z.M. Necatigil.
3. The applicants alleged that the Turkish occupation of the northern part of Cyprus had deprived them of their home and properties.
4. The application was transmitted to the Court on 1 November 1998, when Protocol No. 11 to the Convention came into force (Article 5 § 2 of Protocol No. 11).
5. By a decision of 11 January 2000 the Court declared the application admissible.
6. The applicants and the Government each filed observations on the merits (Rule 59 § 1). In addition, third-party comments were received from the Government of Cyprus, which had exercised its right to intervene (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 1 (b)).
7. On an unspecified date, the first applicant, Mr T. G.H., died. In a fax of 23 February 2003 the other applicants confirmed their wish to continue the application on his behalf in their capacity as his heirs.
THE FACTS
8. The applicants were born in 1930, 1936, 1958, 1961, 1959, 1983, 1985, 1987 and 1990 respectively. Their place of residence is not known. In a fax of 22 March 2002 the applicants' representative indicated that “the H. family had [had] to ... emigrate abroad”.
9. The first and second applicants (Mr T. G. H. and Mrs I. Y. H.) were a married couple. The third and fourth applicants (Mrs P. Ha.-H. and Mr N. T. H.) are their children. The fifth applicant (Mrs X. A.-H.) is the widow of the elder son of the family, X, whom she married in 1983. The remaining applicants are the children of X and the fifth applicant.
10. The first and second applicants alleged that they had lived with their children in Ayios Amvrosios, a village in the District of Kyrenia (northern Cyprus), where the first applicant owned several properties, including the family house. On 13 August 1974, as the Turkish troops were advancing, the applicants left Ayios Amvrosios and fled to the unoccupied part of Cyprus.
11. On 12 January 1996 the first applicant transferred the ownership of most of his properties, including the family house, to his three children: the third and fourth applicants and X. In November 1996 X died. His estate was inherited by the fifth applicant and their children (the sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth applicants). Detailed information about the properties at issue is contained in the file. In particular, in 1974 the first applicant was the owner of 33 plots of land, including woodlands; the family house (registered under no. 10920, plot no. 40-41-476/2); a garden; a non-descript “site”; a “ruined room”; a “ruined mill with one room”; and an orchard with 12 mulberry trees. These properties were located in the villages of Ayios Amvrosios, Klepini and Chartzia.
12. The applicants produced an affidavit from Mr G. M., the Kyrenia Deputy District Officer of the Department of Lands and Surveys of the Republic of Cyprus, stating that:
(a) for 18 of the properties (including the house) there existed original title deeds;
(b) for 6 other properties there existed the title deeds and “certificates of ownership of Turkish-occupied immovable properties” issued by the Republic of Cyprus; and
(c) for 15 other properties the original title deeds were lost in 1974 and only certificates of ownership were available.
All the above-mentioned documents have been produced by the applicants.
13. The applicants claimed that they had been informed that their house in Ayios Amvrosios had been destroyed by the Turkish army. This fact was denied by the respondent Government.
THE LAW
I. PRELIMINARY ISSUE
14. The Court notes at the outset that the first applicant died on an unspecified date after his application was lodged while the case was still pending before the Court. His heirs (the other applicants) informed the Court that they wished to pursue the application in his name also (see paragraph 7 above). Although the heirs of a deceased applicant cannot claim a general right to the continued examination of the deceased's application (see Scherer v. Switzerland, 25 March 1994, Series A no. 287), the Court has accepted on a number of occasions that close relatives of a deceased applicant are entitled to take his or her place (see Deweer v. Belgium, 27 February 1980, § 37, Series A no. 35, and Raimondo v. Italy, 22 February 1994, § 2, Series A no. 281-A).
15. For the purposes of the instant case, the Court is prepared to accept that the remaining applicants (the first applicant's wife, children, daughter-in-law and grandchildren) can pursue the application initially brought by Mr T. G. H. (see, mutatis mutandis, Kirilova and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 42908/98, 44038/98, 44816/98 and 7319/02, § 85, 9 June 2005, and Nerva and Others v. the United Kingdom, no. 42295/98, § 33, ECHR 2002-VIII).
II. THE GOVERNMENT'S PRELIMINARY OBJECTIONS
1. Objection of inadmissibility ratione temporis or ratione materiae
(a) The Government's objection
16. The Government submitted that the first applicant had lost his title to the properties in question after 1974 under Article 159 of the Constitution of the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (the “TRNC”). The remaining applicants did not claim to own any property in the northern part of Cyprus in 1974. The properties in question had purportedly been transferred to or inherited by them long after 1974. At no time after 1974 had the applicants been prevented by the Turkish authorities from returning to or using their properties. As a result, the application was incompatible either ratione materiae or ratione temporis with the provisions of the Convention.
(b) The applicants' arguments
17. The applicants observed that the Government did not deny that the first applicant had been the lawful owner of the properties in question in 1974. Subsequent acts of the “TRNC” could not deprive him of his title, as held by the Court in the Loizidou v. Turkey judgment ((merits), 18 December 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI). As she was the first applicant's wife, the second applicant had a proprietary interest in the properties. The remaining applicants had lawfully acquired their title directly or indirectly from the first applicant.
(c) The third party intervener's arguments
18. The Government of Cyprus recalled that in the case of Loizidou v. Turkey ((merits), cited above) the Court had found that Turkey had responsibility for securing human rights in the occupied area of Cyprus. They challenged the respondent Government's allegations that the “TRNC” was a State or an entity with effective authority, whose creation had interrupted the chain of any Turkish responsibility for the events in northern Cyprus. They also reiterated that the violations of the right of property which had occurred in the “TRNC” territory constituted a continuing situation and not an instantaneous act of deprivation of ownership.
(d) The Court's assessment
19. In its decision on the admissibility of the application, the Court considered that the Government's objection that the application was incompatible ratione materiae and ratione temporis were closely linked to the substance of the applicants' complaints and that they should be examined together with the merits of the application.
20. The Court observes that the Government did not contest the applicants' statement that in 1974 the first applicant was the owner of properties in Ayios Amvrosios. They argued, however, that the properties had subsequently been expropriated by the “TRNC” authorities. The Court notes that in the Loizidou judgment ((merits), cited above, §§ 44 and 46) it held that it could not attribute legal validity for the purposes of the Convention to the provisions of Article 159 of the “TRNC” fundamental law concerning the acquisition by the “TRNC” of the immovable properties considered to have been abandoned on 13 February 1975. It furthermore considered that Greek-Cypriots who, like Mrs L., had left their properties in the northern part of the island in 1974 could not be deemed to have lost title to their property. It follows that the first applicant had property rights since 1974. He was therefore capable of transmitting these rights to his children (X and the third and fourth applicants), which he did on 12 January 1996 (see paragraph 11 above). The fifth applicant and her children (the sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth applicants) inherited part of these properties from X on his death in November 1996 (see paragraph 11 above). Moreover, all the other applicants inherited the properties that the first applicant had not transferred to his children.
21. In view of the above, the Court considers that since 1996 and/or since the first applicant's death, the other applicants had a right of property in the real estate which forms the object of the present application. At the relevant time, Turkey had already recognised the right of individual petition. It is also to be recalled that the Court duly examined and rejected the objection of inadmissibility by reason of lack of effective control over northern Cyprus raised by the Turkish Government in the case of Cyprus v. Turkey ([GC], no. 25781/94, §§ 69-81, ECHR 2001-IV). It sees no reason to depart from its reasoning and conclusions in the instant case.
22. It follows that the Government's objection of incompatibility ratione materiae or ratione temporis should be dismissed.
2. Objection of inadmissibility on the grounds of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies and lack of victim status
23. The Government also raised preliminary objections of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies and lack of victim status. The Court observes that these objections are identical to those raised in the case of Alexandrou v. Turkey (no. 16162/90, §§ 11-22, 20 January 2009), and should be dismissed for the same reasons.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
24. The applicants complained that since 1974, Turkey had prevented them from exercising their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
They invoked Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
25. The Government disputed this claim.
A. The arguments of the parties
1. The Government
26. The Government argued that any interference with the applicants' property rights had been justified. The properties claimed by the applicants had been expropriated in accordance with the laws of the “TRNC”. Owing to the relocation of the populations, it had been necessary to facilitate the rehabilitation of Turkish-Cypriot refugees and to renovate and put to better use abandoned Greek-Cypriot property. The Greek-Cypriot side had taken similar measures in respect of abandoned Turkish-Cypriot properties in the southern part of the island. There was a public interest in not undermining the inter-communal talks concerning freedom of movement and right of property. The status of the UN buffer zone had also rendered it necessary to regulate the right of access to possessions until a settlement of the political problem could be achieved. In the light of all the above, it would have been unrealistic to grant individual applicants a right of access to property in isolation from the political situation.
2. The applicants
27. The applicants argued that the policies of the “TRNC” could not furnish a legitimate aim since the establishment of the “TRNC” was an illegitimate act that had been condemned by the UN Security Council. For the same reason, the interference could not be found to have been in accordance with the law and the general principles of international law. Nor had it been proportionate. The need to rehouse displaced Turkish-Cypriots could not justify the complete negation of their property rights.
3. The third-party intervener
28. The Government of Cyprus observed that the “TRNC” authorities were in possession of all the records of the Department of Lands and Surveys relating to title to properties in northern Cyprus. It was therefore their duty to produce them.
29. They further noted that the present case was similar to that of Loizidou (cited above), where the Court had found that the loss of control of property by displaced persons had arisen as a consequence of the occupation of the northern part of Cyprus by Turkish troops and the establishment of the “TRNC” and that the denial of access to property in occupied northern Cyprus constituted a continuing violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
B. The Court's assessment
30. The Court notes, firstly, that the documents submitted by the applicants (see paragraph 12 above) provide prima facie evidence that the first applicant had title to the properties at issue. As the respondent Government have failed to produce convincing evidence to rebut this, the Court considers that these properties were “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It reiterates its conclusion that the other applicants received or inherited the properties described in paragraph 11 above from the first applicant (see paragraphs 20-21 above).
31. The Court observes that in the aforementioned Loizidou case ((merits), cited above, §§ 63-64), it reasoned as follows:
“63. As a consequence of the fact that the applicant has been refused access to the land since 1974, she has effectively lost all control over, as well as all possibilities to use and enjoy, her property. The continuous denial of access must therefore be regarded as an interference with her rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such an interference cannot, in the exceptional circumstances of the present case to which the applicant and the Cypriot Government have referred, be regarded as either a deprivation of property or a control of use within the meaning of the first and second paragraphs of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. However, it clearly falls within the meaning of the first sentence of that provision as an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. In this respect the Court observes that hindrance can amount to a violation of the Convention just like a legal impediment.
64. Apart from a passing reference to the doctrine of necessity as a justification for the acts of the 'TRNC' and to the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks, the Turkish Government have not sought to make submissions justifying the above interference with the applicant's property rights which is imputable to Turkey.
It has not, however, been explained how the need to rehouse displaced Turkish Cypriot refugees in the years following the Turkish intervention in the island in 1974 could justify the complete negation of the applicant's property rights in the form of a total and continuous denial of access and a purported expropriation without compensation.
Nor can the fact that property rights were the subject of intercommunal talks involving both communities in Cyprus provide a justification for this situation under the Convention. In such circumstances, the Court concludes that there has been and continues to be a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.”
32. In the case of Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above) the Court confirmed the above conclusions (§§ 187 and 189):
“187. The Court is persuaded that both its reasoning and its conclusion in the Loizidou judgment (merits) apply with equal force to displaced Greek Cypriots who, like Mrs Loizidou, are unable to have access to their property in northern Cyprus by reason of the restrictions placed by the 'TRNC' authorities on their physical access to that property. The continuing and total denial of access to their property is a clear interference with the right of the displaced Greek Cypriots to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
...
189. there has been a continuing violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by virtue of the fact that Greek-Cypriot owners of property in northern Cyprus are being denied access to and control, use and enjoyment of their property as well as any compensation for the interference with their property rights.”
33. The Court sees no reason in the instant case to depart from the conclusions which it reached in the Loizidou and Cyprus v. Turkey cases (op. cit.; see also Demades v. Turkey (merits), no. 16219/90, § 46, 31 July 2003).
34. Accordingly, it concludes that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by virtue of the fact that the applicants were denied access to and the control, use and enjoyment of their properties as well as any compensation for the interference with their property rights.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
35. The applicants submitted that in 1974 their home had been in Ayios Amvrosios. As they had been unable to return there, they had been the victims of a violation of Article 8 of the Convention.
This provision reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
36. The Government disputed this claim.
37. The applicants submitted that, contrary to the applicant in the Loizidou case, they had had their principal residence in Ayios Amvrosios. They claimed that any interference with their Article 8 rights had not been justified under the second paragraph of this provision.
38. The Government of Cyprus submitted that where the applicants' properties constituted their home, there was a violation of Article 8 of the Convention.
39. The Court first observes that the sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth applicants were born in 1983, 1985, 1987 and 1990 respectively (see paragraph 8 above). They could not, therefore, have resided in Ayios Amvrosios before 1974. It follows that there has been no interference with their right to respect for their home. The same applies to the fifth applicant, who married the elder son of the H. family in 1983, after the Turkish invasion. In this connection, the Court notes that the sole fact of being the heir of someone who had a “home” in a particular location cannot, in itself, entitle the person concerned to a right under Article 8 of the Convention.
40. As to the remaining applicants, the Court notes that the Government failed to produce any evidence capable of casting doubt upon their statement that, at the time of the Turkish invasion, they were regularly residing in Ayios Amvrosios and that this house was treated by them and their family as a home (see paragraph 10 above).
41. Accordingly, the Court considers that in the circumstances of the present case, the house of the first, second, third and fourth applicants qualified as “home” within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention at the time when the acts complained of took place.
42. The Court observes that the present case differs from the Loizidou case ((merits), cited above) since, unlike Mrs Loizidou, the first, second, third and fourth applicants actually had a home in Ayios Amvrosios. In this connection, it points out that, in its judgment in the case of Cyprus v. Turkey (cited above, §§ 172-175), it concluded that the complete denial of the right of Greek-Cypriot displaced persons to respect for their homes in northern Cyprus since 1974 constituted a continuing violation of Article 8 of the Convention. The Court reasoned as follows:
“172. The Court observes that the official policy of the 'TRNC' authorities to deny the right of the displaced persons to return to their homes is reinforced by the very tight restrictions operated by the same authorities on visits to the north by Greek Cypriots living in the south. Accordingly, not only are displaced persons unable to apply to the authorities to reoccupy the homes which they left behind, they are physically prevented from even visiting them.
173. The Court further notes that the situation impugned by the applicant Government has obtained since the events of 1974 in northern Cyprus. It would appear that it has never been reflected in 'legislation' and is enforced as a matter of policy in furtherance of a bi-zonal arrangement designed, it is claimed, to minimise the risk of conflict which the intermingling of the Greek and Turkish-Cypriot communities in the north might engender. That bi-zonal arrangement is being pursued within the framework of the inter-communal talks sponsored by the United Nations Secretary-General ...
174. The Court would make the following observations in this connection: firstly, the complete denial of the right of displaced persons to respect for their homes has no basis in law within the meaning of Article 8 § 2 of the Convention (see paragraph 173 above); secondly, the inter-communal talks cannot be invoked in order to legitimate a violation of the Convention; thirdly, the violation at issue has endured as a matter of policy since 1974 and must be considered continuing.
175. In view of these considerations, the Court concludes that there has been a continuing violation of Article 8 of the Convention by reason of the refusal to allow the return of any Greek-Cypriot displaced persons to their homes in northern Cyprus.”
43. The Court sees no reason in the instant case to depart from the above reasoning and findings (see also Demades (merits), cited above, §§ 36-37).
44. Accordingly, it concludes that there has been a continuing violation of Article 8 of the Convention on account of the complete denial of the first, second, third and fourth applicants' right to respect for their home and that there has been no violation of this provision with respect to the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth applicants.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION, READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
45. The applicants complained of a violation under Article 14 of the Convention on account of discriminatory treatment against them in the enjoyment of their rights under Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
46. The Court recalls that in the Alexandrou case (cited above, §§ 38-39) it has found that it was not necessary to carry out a separate examination of the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention. The Court does not see any reason to depart from that approach in the present case (see also, mutatis mutandis, Eugenia Michaelidou Ltd and Michael Tymvios v. Turkey, no. 16163/90, §§ 37-38, 31 July 2003).
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
47. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage
1. The parties' submissions
(a) The applicants
48. In their just satisfaction claims of 21 April 2000, the applicants requested 820,719 Cypriot pounds (CYP – approximately 1,402,280 euros (EUR)) in respect of pecuniary damage. They relied on an expert's report assessing the value of their losses which included the loss of annual rent collected or expected to be collected from renting out their properties, plus interest from the date on which such rents were due until the date of payment. The rent claimed was for the period dating back to January 1987, when the respondent Government accepted the right of individual petition, until September 1999. The applicants did not claim compensation for any purported expropriation since they were still the legal owners of the properties. The valuation report contained a description of the villages of Ayios Amvrosios, Klepini and Chartzia, of their development perspectives and of the applicants' properties.
49. The expert classified the properties into two broad categories: those with prospects and potential for immediate development and those whose immediate or foreseeable prospects were limited to agricultural use. For the first category of properties, the ground rent was calculated as a percentage (varying from 4% to 6%) of their market value; for the second category the rent obtainable in 1974 was calculated on the basis of the rent payable for similar agricultural lands (between CYP 2 and 5 per decare per annum for standard plots and between CYP 25 and 35 per decare per annum for groves). According to the expert, the 1974 market value of the applicants' house was CYP 19,000 (approximately EUR 32,463) and the annual rent obtainable from it was CYP 760 (approximately EUR 1,298). Other properties had a market value ranging from CYP 19,991 to CYP 940. Their total 1974 rental value was estimated at CYP 5,028.55 (approximately EUR 8,591). The following annual increases were applied: 12% for ground rents, 7% for agricultural properties and 5% for groves and houses. Moreover, compound interest for delayed payment was applied at a rate of 8% per annum.
50. On 25 January 2008, following a request from the Court for an update on developments in the case, the applicants submitted updated claims for just satisfaction, which were meant to cover the period of loss of use of property from 1 January 1987 to 31 December 2007. They produced a revised valuation report, which, on the basis of the criteria adopted in the previous report, concluded that the whole sum due for the loss of use was CYP 1,135,126 plus CYP 921,023 for interest. The total sum claimed under this head was thus CYP 2,056,149 (approximately EUR 3,513,136).
51. In their just satisfaction claims of 21 April 2000, the applicants further claimed compensation in respect of non-pecuniary damage. They left it to the Court's discretion to determine the amount, noting, however, that they considered the sum of CYP 100,000 (approximately EUR 170,860) for each of them hardly sufficient.
(b) The Government
52. The Government filed comments on the applicants' updated claims for just satisfaction on 30 June 2008 and 15 October 2008. They pointed out that the present application was part of a cluster of similar cases raising a number of problematic issues and maintained that the claims for just satisfaction were not ready for examination. They said they had in fact encountered serious problems in identifying the properties and their present owners. The information provided by the applicants in this regard was not based on reliable evidence. Moreover, owing to the lapse of time since the lodging of the applications, new situations might have arisen: the properties could have been transferred, donated or inherited within the legal system of southern Cyprus. These facts would not have been known to the respondent Government and could be certified only by the Greek-Cypriot authorities, who, since 1974, had reconstructed the registers and records of all properties in northern Cyprus. Applicants should be required to provide search certificates issued by the Department of Lands and Surveys of the Republic of Cyprus. Moreover, in cases where the original applicant had passed away or the property had changed hands, questions might arise as to whether the new owners had a legal interest in the property and whether they were entitled to pecuniary and/or non-pecuniary damages.
53. The Government further noted that some applicants had shared properties and that it was not proven that their co-owners had agreed to the partition of the possessions. Nor, when claiming damages based on the assumption that the properties had been rented after 1974, had the applicants shown that the rights of the said co-owners under domestic law had been respected.
54. The Government further submitted that as an annual increase of the value of the properties had been applied, it would be unfair to add compound interest for delayed payment, and that Turkey had recognised the jurisdiction of the Court on 21 January 1990, and not in January 1987. In any event, the alleged 1974 market value of the properties was exorbitant, highly excessive and speculative; it was not based on any real data with which a comparison could be drawn and made insufficient allowance for the volatility of the property market and its susceptibility to influences both domestic and international. The report submitted by the applicants had instead proceeded on the assumption that the property market would have continued to flourish with sustained growth during the whole period under consideration.
55. The Government produced a valuation report prepared by the Turkish-Cypriot authorities, which they considered to be based on a “realistic assessment of the 1974 market values, having regard to the relevant land records and comparative sales in the areas where the properties [were] situated”. This report contained two proposals, assessing, respectively, the sum due for the loss of use of the properties and their present value. The second proposal was made in order to give the applicants the option to sell the property to the State, thereby relinquishing title to and claims in respect of it.
56. The report prepared by the Turkish-Cypriot authorities specified that it would be possible to envisage, either immediately or after the resolution of the Cyprus problem, restitution of most of the properties described in paragraph 11 above, including the applicants' house. The other immovable property referred to in the application was possessed by refugees; it could not form the object of restitution but could give entitlement to financial compensation, to be calculated on the basis of the loss of income (by applying a 5% rent on the 1974 market values) and increase in value of the property between 1974 and the date of payment. Had the applicants applied to the Immovable Property Commission, the latter would have offered CYP 191,757.61 (approximately EUR 327,637) to compensate for the loss of use from January 1996 onwards and CYP 310,872.77 (approximately EUR 531,157) for the value of the properties. According to an expert appointed by the “TRNC” authorities, the 1974 open-market value of the applicants' house described in paragraph 11 above was CYP 4,661.02 (approximately EUR 7,963). Upon fulfilment of certain conditions, the Immovable Property Commission could also have offered the applicants an exchange of their properties with Turkish-Cypriot properties located in the south of the island.
57. Finally, the Government did not comment on the applicants' submissions under the head of non-pecuniary damage.
(c) The third party intervener
58. The Government of Cyprus fully supported the applicants' updated claims for just satisfaction.
2. The Court's assessment
59. The Court first notes that the Government's submission that doubts might arise as to the applicants' title of ownership over the properties at issue (see paragraph 52 above) is, in substance, an objection of incompatibility ratione materiae with the provisions of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such an objection should have been raised before the application was declared admissible or, at the latest, in the context of the parties' observations on the merits. In any event, the Court cannot but confirm its finding that the properties described in paragraph 11 above constituted the applicants' “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 30 above).
60. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage is not ready for decision. It observes, in particular, that the parties have failed to provide reliable and objective data pertaining to the prices of land and real estate in Cyprus at the date of the Turkish intervention. This failure renders it difficult for the Court to assess whether the estimate furnished by the applicants of the 1974 market value of their properties is reasonable. The question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed with due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicants (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
B. Costs and expenses
61. In their just satisfaction claims of 21 April 2000, relying on bills from their representative, the applicants sought CYP 4,250 (approximately EUR 7,261) and 1,750 pounds sterling (approximately EUR 2,200) for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court. They further claimed CYP 3,000 (approximately EUR 5,125) for the expenses pertaining to the valuation report. They stated that they had received legal aid in the amount of 4,100 French Francs (approximately EUR 625). In their updated claims for just satisfaction of 25 January 2008, the applicants submitted additional bills of costs for the new valuation report and for legal fees amounting to EUR 690 and EUR 2,000 respectively. The total sum sought for cost and expenses was thus approximately EUR 17,276.
62. The Government did not comment on this point.
63. In the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 in respect of costs and expenses is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed with due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicants.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Holds unanimously that the second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth applicants have standing to continue the present proceedings also in the first applicant's stead;
2. Dismisses by six votes to one the Government's preliminary objections;
3. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention with respect to the first, second, third and fourth applicants;
5. Holds unanimously that there has been no violation of Article 8 of the Convention with respect to the other applicants;
6. Holds unanimously that it is not necessary to examine whether there has been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
7. Holds unanimously that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Karakaş is annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
F.A.






DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE KARAKAÅž
Unlike the majority, I consider that the objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies raised by the Government should not have been rejected. Consequently, I cannot agree with the finding of violations of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 8 of the Convention, for the same reasons as those mentioned in my dissenting opinion in the case of Gavriel v. Turkey (no. 41355/98, 20 January 2009).

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA HADJITHOMAS ED ALTRI C. TURCHIA
(Richiesta n. 39970/98)
SENTENZA
(meriti)
STRASBOURG
22 settembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Hadjithomas ed Altri c. Turchia,
La Corte europea dwi Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, Işıl Karakaş, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 1 settembre 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 39970/98) contro la Repubblica di Turchia depositata presso la Commissione europea dei Diritti umani (“la Commissione”) sotto il precedente Articolo 25 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da nove cittadini ciprioti, il Sig. T. G. H., la Sig.ra I. Y. H., la Sig.ra P. H. - H., il Sig. N. T. H. la Sig.ra X. A. - H., il Sig. T. H., il Sig. C. H., il Sig. A. H. e S. H. (“i richiedenti”), il 2 febbraio 1998.
2. I richiedenti a cui era stato accordato il patrocinio gratuito sono stati rappresentati dal Sig. K. C., un avvocato che pratica a Nicosia. Il Governo turco (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. Z.M. Necatigil.
3. I richiedenti addussero che l'occupazione turca della parte settentrionale di Cipro li aveva spogliati della loro casa e proprietà.
4. La richiesta fu trasmessa alla Corte il 1 novembre 1998, quando Protocollo N.ro 11 alla Convenzione entrò in vigore (Articolo 5 § 2 di Protocollo N.ro 11).
5. Con una decisione dell’ 11 gennaio 2000 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta ammissibile.
6. I richiedenti ed il Governo entrambi registrarono osservazioni sui meriti (Articolo 59 § 1). Inoltre, furono ricevuti di una terza parte intervenuta dal Governo di Cipro che aveva esercitato il suo diritto ad intervenire (Articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione e Decide 44 § 1 (b)).
7. In una data non specificata, il primo richiedente, il Sig. T. G.H., morì. In un fax del 23 febbraio 2003 gli altri richiedenti confermarono il loro desiderio di continuare la richiesta per suo conto nella loro veste di suoi eredi.
I FATTI
8. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1930, 1936, 1958 1961, 1959 1983, 1985 1987 e 1990. La loro residenza non è conosciuta. In un fax del 22 marzo 2002 il rappresentante dei richiedenti indicò che “la famiglia H. [era] ... emigrata all'estero.”
9. Il primo e il secondo richiedente (il Sig. T. G. H. e la Sig.ra I. Y. H.) erano una coppia sposata. Il terzo e il quarto richiedente (la Sig.ra P. H. - H. ed il Sig. N. T. H.) sono i loro figli. Il quinto richiedente (la Sig.ra X. A. - H.) è la vedova del figlio più vecchio della famiglia, X che lei si sposò nel 1983. I rimanenti richiedenti sono i figli di X e del quinto richiedente.
10. Il primo e il secondo richiedente addussero di aver vissuto coi loro figli a Ayios Amvrosios, un villaggio nel Distretto di Kyrenia ( Cipro settentrionale), dove il primo richiedente possedeva molte proprietà, incluso l'alloggio di famiglia. Il 13 agosto 1974, siccome stavano avanzando le truppe turche, i richiedenti lasciarono Ayios Amvrosios e fuggirono nella parte non occupata della Cipro.
11. Il 12 gennaio 1996 il primo richiedente trasferì la proprietà della maggior parte delle sue proprietà, incluso l'alloggio di famiglia, ai suoi tre figli: i terzo e il quarto richiedente e X. Nel novembre 1996 X è morto. Il suo appezzamento di terreno fu ereditato dalla quinta richiedente e dai loro figli (il sesto, il settimo l’ ottavo e il nono richiedente). Informazioni particolareggiate delle proprietà in questione sono contenute nell'archivio. In particolare, nel 1974 il primo richiedente era il proprietario di 33 aree di terreno, inclusi terreni boscosi; l'alloggio di famiglia (registrato sotto il n. 10920, area n. 40-41-476/2); un giardino; un “luogo”non descritto; una “ stanza rovinata”; un “ mulino rovinato con una stanza”; ed un frutteto con 12 alberi di gelso. Queste proprietà erano localizzate nei villaggi di Ayios Amvrosios, Klepini e Chartzia.
12. I richiedenti produssero un affidavit dal Sig. G. M., l’ Ufficiale Aggiunto del Distretto di Kyrenia del Dipartimento dei Terreni e delle Indagini della Repubblica di Cipro, che affermava che :
(a) per 18 delle proprietà (incluso l'alloggio) esistevano atti di titolo originali;
(b) per 6 altre proprietà esistevano gli atti di titolo di proprietà e “certificati di proprietà dei patrimoni immobiliari occupati dai turchi” emessi dalla Repubblica di Cipro; e
(c) per 15 altre proprietà gli atti di titolo di proprietà originali sono stati persi nel 1974 ed erano disponibili solamente certificati di proprietà.
Tutti i documenti summenzionati sono stati prodotti dai richiedenti.
13. I richiedenti affermarono di essere stati informati che il loro alloggio a Ayios Amvrosios era stato distrutto dall'esercito turco. Questo fatto fu negato dal Governo rispondente.
LA LEGGE
I. QUESTIONE PREGIUDIZIALE
14. La Corte nota all'inizio che il primo richiedente è morto in una data non specificata dopo che la sua richiesta fu depositata mentre la causa era ancora pendente di fronte alla Corte. I suoi eredi (gli altri richiedenti) hanno informato la Corte che loro desideravano proseguire anche la richiesta a suo nome (vedere paragrafo 7 sopra). Benché gli eredi di un richiedente deceduto non possano chiedere un diritto generale all'esame continuato della richiesta del defunto (vedere Scherer c. Svizzera, 25 marzo 1994 Serie A n. 287), la Corte ha accettato in numerose occasioni che ai parenti prossimi di un richiedente deceduto venga concesso di prendere il suo posto (vedere Deweer c. Belgio, 27 febbraio 1980, § 37 Serie A n. 35, e Raimondo c. Italia, 22 febbraio 1994, § 2 Serie A n. 281-a).
15. Ai fini della presente causa, la Corte è preparata ad accettare che i rimanenti richiedenti (la moglie del primo richiedente, i figli, la nuora e i nipoti) possano intraprendere la richiesta inizialmente introdotta dal Sig. T. G. H. (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kirilova ed Altri c. Bulgaria, N. 42908/98, 44038/98, 44816/98 e 7319/02, § 85, 9 giugno 2005, e Nerva ed Altri c. Regno Unito, n. 42295/98, § 33 ECHR 2002-VIII).
II. LE OBIEZIONI PRELIMINARI DEL GOVERNO
1. Obiezione di inammissibilità ratione temporis o ratione materiae
(a) L’obiezione del Governo
16. Il Governo presentò che il primo richiedente aveva perso il suo titolo alle proprietà in oggetto dopo il 1974 sotto l’Articolo 159 della Costituzione della “Repubblica turca di Cipro Settentrionale” (il “TRNC”). I rimanenti richiedenti non hanno rivendicato di possedere alcuna proprietà nella parte settentrionale di Cipro nel 1974. Le proprietà in oggetto sono state trasferite volontariamente o ereditate da loro molto dopo il 1974. In nessun periodo dopo il 1974 i richiedenti erano stati ostacolati dalle autorità turche dal ritornare o dall’ usare le loro proprietà. Di conseguenza, la richiesta era incompatibile o ratione materiae o ratione temporis con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
(b) Gli argomenti dei richiedenti
17. I richiedenti osservarono che il Governo non ha negato che il primo richiedente era stato il proprietario legale delle proprietà in oggetto nel 1974. Atti susseguenti della “TRNC” non potevano spogliarlo del suo titolo, come sostenuto dalla Corte nella sentenza Loizidou c. Turchia (meriti), 18 dicembre 1996, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI). Siccome lei era la moglie del primo richiedente, la seconda richiedente aveva un interesse di proprietà riservato nelle proprietà. I rimanenti richiedenti avevano acquisito legalmente direttamente o indirettamente il loro titolo dal primo richiedente.
(c) gli argomenti della terza parte intervenuta
18. Il Governo di Cipro richiamò che nella causa Loizidou c. Turchia ((meriti), citata sopra) la Corte aveva trovato che la Turchia aveva la responsabilità per garantire i diritti umani nell'area occupata di Cipro. Impugnò le dichiarazioni del Governo rispondente per le quali la “TRNC” era uno Stato o un'entità con autorità effettiva la cui creazione aveva interrotto la catena di qualsiasi responsabilità turca per gli eventi nella Cipro settentrionale. Reiterò anche che le violazioni del diritto di proprietà che erano accadute nel territorio della “TRNC” costituivano una situazione continua e non un atto istantaneo di privazione di proprietà.
(d) La valutazione della Corte
19. Nella sua decisione sull'ammissibilità della richiesta, la Corte considerò, che l'obiezione del Governo che la richiesta era incompatibile ratione materiae e ratione temporis era collegata da vicino alla sostanza delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti e che avrebbe dovuto essere esaminata insieme coi meriti della richiesta.
20. La Corte osserva che il Governo non contestò la dichiarazione dei richiedenti per cui nel 1974 il primo richiedente era il proprietario di proprietà a Ayios Amvrosios. Comunque, dibatté che le proprietà erano state espropriate successivamente dalle autorità della “TRNC”. La Corte nota che nella sentenza i Loizidou ((meriti), citata sopra, §§ 44 e 46) sostenne di non poter attribuire la validità legale ai fini della Convenzione alle disposizioni dell’ Articolo 159 della legge fondamentale della “TRNC” riguardo all'acquisizione da parte della “TRNC” dei patrimoni immobiliari considerati abbandonati il 13 febbraio 1975. Considerò inoltre che i Greco -Ciprioti che, come la Sig.ra L. avevano lasciato le loro proprietà nella parte settentrionale dell'isola nel 1974 non potevano essere ritenuti di avere perso il titolo alla loro proprietà. Ne segue che il primo richiedente aveva diritti di proprietà dal 1974. Lui era perciò in grado di trasmettere questi diritti ai suoi figli (X ed il terzo e quarto richiedente) il che lui fece il 12 gennaio 1996 (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra). La quinta richiedente ed i suoi figli (il sesto, settimo ottavo e nono richiedente) ereditarono parte di queste proprietà da X alla sua morte nel novembre 1996 (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra). Inoltre, tutti gli altri richiedenti ereditarono le proprietà che il primo richiedente non aveva trasferito ai suoi figli.
21. In prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte considera, che dal 1996 e/o dalla morte del primo richiedente, gli altri richiedenti avevano un diritto di proprietà nei beni immobili che sono oggetto della presente richiesta. Al tempo attinente, la Turchia aveva già riconosciuto il diritto di ricorso individuale. Sarà ricordato anche che la Corte esaminò debitamente e respinse l'obiezione d'inammissibilità in ragione di mancanza di controllo effettivo sulla Cipro settentrionale sollevata dal Governo turco nella causa Cipro c. Turchia ([GC], n. 25781/94, §§ 69-81 ECHR 2001-IV). Non vede nessuna ragione di abbandonare il suo ragionamento e le sue conclusioni nella presente causa.
22. Ne segue che l'obiezione del Governo di incompatibilità ratione materiae o ratione temporis dovrebbe essere respinta.
2. Obiezione dell'inammissibilità per motivi di non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali e mancanza di status di vittima
23. Il Governo sollevò anche obiezioni preliminari di non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali e di mancanza di status di vittima. La Corte osserva che queste obiezioni sono identiche a quelle sollevati nella causa Alexandrou c. Turchia (n. 16162/90, §§ 11-22 20 gennaio 2009), e dovrebbero essere respinte per le stesse ragioni.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
24. I richiedenti si lamentarono che dall’ agosto 1974, la Turchia aveva impedito loro di esercitare il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà.
Loro invocarono l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
25. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
A. Gli argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
26. Il Governo dibatté che qualsiasi interferenza coi diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti era stata giustificata. Le proprietà rivendicate dai richiedenti erano state espropriate in conformità con le leggi della “TRNC.” A causa del dislocamento delle popolazioni, era stato necessario facilitare la riabilitazione dei rifugiati turco-ciprioti e rinnovare e mettere in miglio uso le proprietà greco- cipriote abbandonate. La parte greco- cipriota aveva preso misure simili riguardo alle proprietà turco-cipriote abbandonate nella parte meridionale dell'isola. C'era un interesse pubblico nel non minare i discorsi inter-comunali riguardo alla libertà di circolazione e di diritto di proprietà. Lo status della zona cuscinetto dell’i ONU aveva reso anche necessario regolare il diritto di accesso alle proprietà fino a che un accordo sulla questione politica avrebbe potuto essere realizzato. Alla luce di quanto sopra, sarebbe stato irreale accordare ai richiedenti individuali un diritto di accesso alla proprietà isolatamente dalla situazione politica.
2. I richiedenti
27. I richiedenti dibatterono che le politiche della “TRNC” non poteva fornire uno scopo legittimo poiché la costituzione della “TRNC” era un atto illegittimo che era stato condannato dal Consiglio di Sicurezza dell'ONU. Per la stessa ragione, l'interferenza non poteva essere considerata in conformità con la legge ed i principi generali di diritto internazionale. Né era stata proporzionata. Il bisogno di rialloggio dei Turchi -Ciprioti espatriati non poteva giustificare la negazione completa dei loro diritti di proprietà.
3. La terza parte intervenuta
28. Il Governo della Cipro osservò che le autorità della “TRNC” erano in proprietà di tutti i documenti del Dipartimento dei Terreni e delle Indagini relativi ai titoli di proprietà nella Cipro settentrionale. Era perciò loro dovere produrli.
29. Notò inoltre che la presente causa era simile a quella di Loizidou (citata sopra), dove la Corte aveva trovato che la perdita di controllo di proprietà da parte degli espatriati era sorta come conseguenza dell'occupazione della parte settentrionale dia Cipro dalle truppe turche e della costituzione della “TRNC” e che il rifiuto di accesso alla proprietà nella Cipro settentrionale occupata costituiva una violazione continua dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
30. La Corte nota, in primo luogo, che i documenti presentarono dai richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra) offrivano prova prima facie che il primo richiedente aveva titolo di proprietà sulle proprietà in questione. Siccome il Governo rispondente andò a vuoto nel produrre prova convincente per confutazione, la Corte considera che le richiedenti avevano una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Reitera la sua conclusione che gli altri richiedenti hanno ricevuto o ereditato le proprietà descritte nel paragrafo 11 sopra dal primo richiedente (vedere paragrafi 20-21 sopra).
31. La Corte osserva che nella causa Loizidou summenzionata ((meriti), citata sopra, §§ 63-64), ragionò come segue:
“63. ... come conseguenza del fatto che alla richiedente è stato rifiutato l’accesso al terreno dal 1974, lei ha perso effettivamente ogni controllo sulla sua proprietà, così come tutte le possibilità di usarla e goderne. Il rifiuto continuo di accesso deve essere considerato perciò un'interferenza coi suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Tale interferenza non può, nelle circostanze eccezionali della presente causa a cui la richiedente ed il Governo cipriota hanno fatto riferimento , essere considerata o una privazione di proprietà o un controllo dell’ uso all'interno del significato dei primo e del secondo paragrafo di Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Chiaramente rientra comunque, all'interno del significato della prima frase di questo provvedimento come un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo della proprietà. A questo riguardo la Corte osserva che l’ostacolo può corrispondere ad una violazione della Convenzione proprio come un impedimento legale.
64. A parte un riferimento passeggero alla dottrina della necessità come giustificazione per gli atti del 'TRNC' ed al fatto che diritti di proprietà erano la materia di discorsi intercomunali, il Governo turco non ha cercato di fare osservazioni che giustificavano l'interferenza sopra coi diritti di proprietà della richiedente che sono imputabili alla Turchia.
Comunque, non è stato spiegato come il bisogno di ridare una sistemazione ai rifugiati ed espatriati ciprioti turchi negli anni seguenti l'intervento turco nell'isola nel 1974 potrebbe giustificare la negazione completa dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente nella forma di un rifiuto totale e continuo di accesso ed un'espropriazione stabilita senza risarcimento.
Neanche il fatto che i diritti di proprietà erano la materia dei discorsi di intercomunali che coinvolgono ambo le comunità a Cipro non può offrire una giustificazione per questa situazione sotto la Convenzione. In simili circostanze, la Corte conclude, che c'è stato e continua ad esserci una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.”
32. Nella causa di Cipro c. Turchia ([GC], n. 25781/94, ECHR 2001-IV) la Corte confermò le conclusioni sopra (§§ 187 e 189):
“187. La Corte è persuasa che sia il suo ragionamento sia la sua conclusione nella sentenza Loizidou ( meriti) si applica con la stessa forza a Ciprioti greci espatriati che, come la Sig.ra L., non è in grado di avere accesso alla loro proprietà nella Cipro del nord in ragione delle restrizioni attuate dalle autorità 'TRNC' sul loro accesso fisico a quella proprietà. Il rifiuto totale e continuo di accesso alla loro proprietà è un'interferenza chiara col diritto degli espatriati Ciprioti greci al godimento tranquillo della proprietà all'interno del significato della prima frase dl’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
...
189. .. c'è stata una violazione continua dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in virtù del fatto che ai proprietari greco- ciprioti di proprietà nella Cipro settentrionale viene negato l’ accesso ed il controllo, l’ uso e il godimento della loro proprietà così come qualsiasi risarcimento per l'interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà.”
33. La Corte non vede ragione nella causa presente di scostarsi dalle conclusioni alle quali è giunta nelle cause Loizidou e Cipro c. Turchia (op. cit.; vedere anche Demades c. Turchia (meriti), n. 16219/90, § 46 31 luglio 2003).
34. Di conseguenza, conclude che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in virtù del fatto che alla richiedente fu negato l’accesso ed il controllo, l’uso e il godimento della sua proprietà così come qualsiasi risarcimento per l'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà.

IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE

35. I richiedenti presentarono che nel 1974 la loro dimora era a Ayios Amvrosios. Siccome non erano più stati in grado di ritornarvi , loro erano vittime di una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
Questa disposizione si legge come segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso fosse in conformità con la legge e necessaria in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
36. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione.
37. I richiedenti presentarono che, contrariamente alla richiedente nella causa Loizidou, loro avevano la loro residenza principale a Ayios Amvrosios. Loro dissero che qualsiasi interferenza coi loro diritti dell’ Articolo 8 diritti non era giustificata sotto il secondo paragrafo di questa disposizione.
38. Il Governo di Cipro presentò che dove le proprietà del richiedente costituivano la dimora della persona, c'era una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
39. La Corte prima osserva che il sesto, il settimo l’ ottavo e il nono richiedente sono nati rispettivamente nel 1983, 1985 1987 e 1990 (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra). Loro non potevano, perciò, aver risieduto a Ayios Amvrosios prima del 1974. Ne segue che non c'è stata interferenza col loro diritto al rispetto per la loro dimora. Lo stesso si applica al quinto richiedente che sposò il figlio più vecchio della famiglia H. nel 1983 dopo l'invasione turca. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che il solo fatto di essere l'erede di qualcuno che aveva una “dimora” in una particolare ubicazione non dà , di per sé , titolo alla persona riguardata ad un diritto sotto l’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
40. Riguardo ai rimanenti richiedenti, la Corte nota, che il Governo andò a vuoto nel produrre qualsiasi prova in grado di gettare dubbio sulla loro dichiarazione per la quale, al tempo dell'invasione turca, loro risiedevano regolarmente a Ayios Amvrosios e che questo alloggio era trattato da loro e dalla loro famiglia come una dimora (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra).
41. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che nelle circostanze della causa presente, l'alloggio del primo, secondo terzo e quarto richiedente si qualificava come “dimora” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 8 della Convenzione al tempo in cui gli atti di cui ci si lamenta accaddero.
42. La Corte osserva che la causa presente differisce dalla causa Loizidou ((meriti), citata sopra) poiché, diversamente dalla Sig.ra L, il primo, il secondo il terzo e il quarto richiedente davvero avevano una casa a Ayios Amvrosios. In questo collegamento, indica, che, nella sua sentenza nella causa Cipro c. Turchia (citata sopra, §§ 172-175), concluse che il rifiuto completo del diritto degli espropriati greco -ciprioti al rispettare per le loro case nella Cipro settentrionale dal 1974 costituivauna violazione continua dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione. La Corte ragionò come segue:
“172. La Corte osserva che la politica ufficiale delle autorità della'TRNC' di negare il diritto degli espatriati di ritornare alle loro case viene eseguita con delle restrizioni molto rigide operate dalle stesse autorità sulle visite al nord da parte di ciprioti greci che vivono a sud. Di conseguenza, non solo gli espatriati non sono in grado di richiedere alle autorità di rioccupare le case che si sono lasciati alle spalle, ma a loro viene fisicamente impedito di farvi visita.
173. La Corte nota inoltre che la situazione contestata dal Governo richiedente è stata ottenuta dagli eventi del 1974 nella parte settentrionale di Cipro. Sembrerebbe che non è stata mai riflessa nella ' legislazione' e è stata eseguita come una questione di politica in appoggio di una disposizione bi-zonale configurata, si sostiene, per minimizzare il rischio di conflitto che la mescolanza delle comunità greche e turco-cipriote potrebbe creare nel nord. Questa disposizione bi-zonale viene intrapresa all'interno della struttura dei discorsi inter-comunali patrocinati dal Segretario Generale delle Nazioni Unite...
174. La Corte farebbe le seguenti osservazioni i in questo collegamento: in primo luogo, il rifiuto completo del diritto degli espatriati al rispetto delle loro case non ha base legale all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 8 § 2 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 173 sopra); in secondo luogo, i discorsi inter-comunali non possono essere invocati per legittimare una violazione della Convenzione; in terzo luogo, la violazione in questione resiste come questione politica dal 1974 e deve essere considerata continua.
175. In prospettiva di queste considerazioni, la Corte conclude, che c'è stata una violazione continua dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione in ragione del rifiuto di concedere il ritorno di qualsiasi espatriato greco- cipriota alla sua casa nella parte settentrionale di Cipro.”
43. La Corte non vede alcuna ragione nella presente causa per abbandonare il ragionamento e le costatazioni sopra (vedere anche Demades (meriti), citata sopra, §§ 36-37).
44. Di conseguenza, conclude che c'è stata una violazione continua dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione a causa del rifiuto completo del diritto del primo, del secondo, del terzo ed del quarto richiedente al rispetto per la loro casa e che non c'è stata nessuna violazione di questa disposizione riguardo al quinto, sesto, settimo, ottavo e nono richiedente.
V. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE, PRESO IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE E L’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
45. I richiedenti si lamentarono di una violazione sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione a causa di un trattamento discriminatorio contro loro nel godimento dei loro diritti sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Loro addussero che questa discriminazione era stata basata sulla loro origine nazionale e sule loro credenze religiose.
L’Articolo 14 della Convenzione si legge come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione sarà garantito senza discriminazione su alcuna base come il sesso,la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà,la nascita o altro status.”
46. La Corte che nella causa Alexandrou (citata sopra, §§ 38-39) ha trovato che non era necessario eseguire un esame separato dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione. La Corte non vede alcuna ragione di abbandonare questo approccio nella presente causa (vedere anche, mutatis mutandis, Eugenia Michaelidou Ltd e Michael Tymvios c. Turchia, n. 16163/90, §§ 37-38 del 31 luglio 2003).

VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE

47. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno Materiale e morale
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) I richiedenti
48. Nelle loro rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa del 21 aprile 2000, i richiedenti richiesero 820,719 lire cipriote (CYP- approssimativamente 1,402,280 euro (EUR)) riguardo al danno materiale. Si appellarono al rapporto di un esperto che valutava il valore delle loro perdite che includevano la perdita di affitto annuale percepito o che ci si aspettava di percepire dall’affitto delle loro proprietà, più interesse dalla data in cui simili affitti erano dovuti sino alla data di pagamento. L'affitto chiesto era per il periodo risalente al gennaio 1987, quando il Governo rispondente accettò il diritto di ricorso individuale, sino al settembre 1999. I richiedenti non chiesero il risarcimento per qualsiasi espropriazione stabilita poiché loro erano ancora i proprietari legittimi delle proprietà. Il rapporto di valutazione conteneva una descrizione dei villaggi di Ayios Amvrosios, Klepini e Chartzia, delle loro prospettive di sviluppo e delle proprietà dei richiedenti.
49. L'esperto classificò le proprietà in due ampie categorie : quelli con prospettive e potenziale di sviluppo immediato e quelli le cui prospettive immediate o prevedibili erano limitate ad uso agricolo. Per la prima categoria di proprietà, l'affitto base fu calcolato come una percentuale (variante dal 4% al 6%) del loro valore di mercato; per la seconda categoria l'affitto ottenibile nel 1974 fu calcolato sulla base dell'affitto pagabile per terreni agricoli simili (fra CYP 2 e 5 per decara all'anno per le aree standard e fra CYP 25 e 35 per decara all'anno per i boschetti). Secondo l'esperto, il valore di mercato del 1974 dell'alloggio dei richiedenti era CYP 19,000 (circa EUR 32,463) e l'affitto annuale ottenibile da questo era CYP 760 (circa EUR 1,298). Le altre proprietà avevano un valore di mercato che variava da CYP 19,991 a CYP 940. Il loro valore totale nel 1974 di affitto fu valutato a CYP 5,028.55 (circa EUR 8,591). Furono applicati seguenti aumenti annuali : 12% per affitti di base, 7% per proprietà agricole e 5% per boschetti ed alloggi. Fu inoltre applicato l’interesse composto per pagamento ritardato ad un tasso dell’ 8% all’anno.
50. Il 25 gennaio 2008, a seguito di una richiesta dalla Corte per un aggiornamento sugli sviluppi nella causa, i richiedenti presentarono rivendicazioni aggiornate per soddisfazione equa allo scopo di coprire il periodo di perdita d’uso di proprietà dal 1 gennaio 1987 al 31 dicembre 2007. Loro produssero un rapporto di valutazione riveduto che, sulla base dei criteri adottati nel rapporto precedente, concluse che la somma intera dovuta per la perdita d’ uso era CYP 1,135,126 più CYP 921,023 per interesse. La somma totale chiesta sotto questo capo era così CYP 2,056,149 (circa EUR 3,513,136).
51. Nelle loro rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa del 21 aprile 2000, i richiedenti chiesero inoltre il risarcimento riguardo il danno morale. Loro lasciarono a discrezione della Corte la determinazione dell'importo, notando, comunque che consideravano la somma di CYP 100,000 (circa EUR 170,860) per ognuno di loro appena sufficiente.
(b) Il Governo
52. Il Governo registrò commenti sulle rivendicazioni aggiornate delle richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa il 30 giugno 2008 e d il 15 ottobre 2008. Indicò che la presente richiesta era parte di un gruppo di cause simili che sollevavano un numero di questioni problematiche e sostenne che le rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa non erano pronte per un esame. Il Governo aveva infatti incontrato dei problemi seri nell'identificare le proprietà ed i loro attuali proprietari. Le informazioni fornite dai richiedenti a questo riguardo non erano basate su prove affidabili. Inoltre, a causa del tempo trascorso dal deposito delle richieste, è probabile che siano potute sorgere nuove situazioni: le proprietà avrebbero potuto essere trasferite, avrebbero potuto essere donate o avrebbero potuto essere ereditate all'interno dell'ordinamento giuridico della Cipro meridionale. Questi fatti non sarebbero stati conosciuti al Governo rispondente e avrebbero potuto essere certificati solamente dalle autorità greco- cipriote che, dal 1974, avevano ricostruito i registri e i documenti di tutte le proprietà nella Cipro settentrionale. Si potrebbe richiedere alle richiedenti di fornire certificati di ricerca emessi dal Dipartimento dei Terreni e delle Indagini della Repubblica della Cipro. In casi in cui il richiedente originale se ne fosse andato o la proprietà avesse cambiato mani, è probabile che sorgano delle questioni riguardo a se i nuovi proprietari avevano un interesse legale nella proprietà e se a loro stati concessi danno morali e/o materiali .
53. Il Governo notò inoltre che alcuni richiedenti avevano diviso le proprietà e che non era provato che i loro comproprietari avessero accettato la sezione delle proprietà. Né, chiedendo i danni basati sull'assunzione che le proprietà erano state affittate dopo il 1974, i richiedenti avevano mostrato che i diritti dei detti comproprietari sotto il diritto nazionale erano stati rispettati.
54. Il Governo presentò che siccome era stato applicato un aumento annuale del valore delle proprietà, sarebbe ingiusto aggiungere un interesse composto per pagamento ritardato, e che la Turchia aveva riconosciuto la giurisdizione della Corte il 21 gennaio 1990, e non nel gennaio 1987. In qualsiasi caso, il valore di mercato addotto del 1974 delle proprietà era esorbitante, estremamente eccessivo e speculativo; non era basato su nessun dato vero con cui fare un paragone e ha considerato in modo insufficiente la volatilità del mercato delle proprietà e la sua suscettibilità alle influenze sia nazionale che internazionali. Il rapporto presentato dalle richiedenti aveva proceduto invece all'assunzione che il mercato delle proprietà avrebbe continuato a fiorire con crescita economica continua durante l’intero periodo preso in considerazione.
55. Il Governo produsse un rapporto di valutazione preparato dalle autorità turco-cipriote che considerava essere basato su una “valutazione realistica dei valori di mercato del 1974, avendo riguardo ai documenti dei terreni attinenti e alle vendite comparative nelle aree in cui le proprietà [erano] situate.” Questo rapporto conteneva due proposte, valutando, rispettivamente la somma dovuta per la perdita d’uso delle proprietà ed il loro valore attuale. La seconda proposta fu fatta per dare al richiedente la scelta di vendere la proprietà allo Stato, abbandonando con ciò il titolo di proprietà e qualsiasi rivendicazione riguardo a questo.
56. Il rapporto preparato dalle autorità turco -cipriote specificava che sarebbe stato possibile prevedere, o immediatamente o dopo la decisione della questione di Cipro, la restituzione della maggior parte delle proprietà descritte nel paragrafo 11 sopra, incluso l'alloggio dei richiedenti. L'altro patrimonio immobiliare a cui si fa riferimento nella richiesta era posseduto dai rifugiati; non poteva essere oggetto di restituzione ma avrebbe potuto dare diritto al risarcimento finanziario, da calcolare sulla base della perdita di utili (applicando un tasso del 5% sui valori di mercato del 1974) e dell’ aumento di valore della proprietà fra il 1974 e la data di pagamento. Se i richiedenti avessero fatto domanda alla Commissione del Patrimonio immobiliare, quest’ultima avrebbe offerto CYP 191,757.61 (circa EUR 327,637) per compensare per la perdita d’uso dal gennaio 1996 in avanti e CYP 310,872.77 (circa EUR 531,157) per il valore delle proprietà. Secondo un esperto nominato dalle autorità della “TRNC”, il valore del libero mercato del 1974 dell'alloggio dei richiedenti descritto nel paragrafo 11 sopra era CYP 4,661.02 (circa EUR 7,963). Contro l’adempimento di certe condizioni, la Commissione del Patrimonio immobiliare avrebbe potuto offrire anche alla richiedente il cambio della sua proprietà con delle proprietà turco-cipriote localizzate nel sud dell'isola.
57. Contro l’adempimento di certe condizioni, la Commissione del Patrimonio immobiliare avrebbe potuto offrire anche alla richiedente il cambio della sua proprietà con delle proprietà turco-cipriote localizzate nel sud dell'isola.
(c) La terza parte intervenuta
58. Il Governo di Cipro sostenne pienamente le rivendicazioni aggiornate dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
2. La valutazione della Corte
59. La Corte prima nota che l'osservazione del Governo per cui è probabile che sorgano dei dubbi riguardo al titolo di proprietà dei richiedenti sulle proprietà in questione (vedere paragrafo 52 sopra) è, in sostanza, un'obiezione di incompatibilità ratione materiae con le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Tale obiezione avrebbe dovuto essere sollevata prima che la richiesta venisse dichiarata ammissibile o, al più tardi , nel contesto delle osservazioni delle parti sui meriti. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte non può che confermare la sua costatazione che le proprietà descritte nel paragrafo 11 sopra costituivano la “proprietà” dei richiedenti all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra).
60. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 riguardo al danno materiale e morale non è pronta per una decisione. Osserva, in particolare, che le parti non sono riuscite ad offrire dati affidabili ed obiettivi concernenti i prezzi dei terreni e dei beni immobili a Cipro in data dell'intervento turco. Questo insuccesso rende difficile per la Corte valutare se la stima fornita dal richiedente del valore di mercato del 1974 della sue proprietà sia ragionevole. La questione deve essere di conseguenza riservata e la susseguente procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo ad un qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere il Governo rispondente e la richiedente(Articolo 75 § 1 dell’ordinamento di Corte).

B. Costi e spese

61. Nelle loro rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa del 21 aprile 2000, appellandosi ai conti dal loro rappresentante, i richiedenti chiesero CYP 4,250 (circa EUR 7,261) e 1,750 sterline (circa EUR 2,200) per i costi e le spese sostenute di fronte alla Corte. Loro chiesero inoltre CYP 3,000 (circa EUR 5,125) per le spese concernenti il rapporto di valutazione. Loro affermarono di aver ricevuto il patrocinio gratuito nell'importo di 4,100 Franco francesi (circa EUR 625). Nelle loro rivendicazioni aggiornate per la soddisfazione equa del 25 gennaio 2008, i richiedenti presentarono note spese supplementari per il nuovo rapporto di valutazione e per le parcelle legali corrispondenti rispettivamente ad EUR 690 ed EUR 2,000. La somma totale chiesta per costi e spese era così circa EUR 17,276.
62. Il Governo non fece commenti su questo punto.
63. Nelle circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 riguardo ai costi ed alle spese non è pronta per una decisione. La questione deve essere di conseguenza riservata e la susseguente procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo ad un qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere il Governo rispondente e le richiedenti.

PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE

1. Sostiene all’unanimità che il secondo, il terzo il quarto, il quinto il sesto, il settimo l’ ottavo e il nono richiedente hanno i requisiti per continuare i presenti procedimenti anche al posto del primo richiedente;
2. Respinge per sei voti ad uno le obiezioni preliminari del Governo;
3. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione riguardo al primo, al secondo, al terzo e quarto richiedente;
5. Sostiene all’unanimità che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione riguardo agli altri richiedenti;
6. Sostiene all’unanimità che non è necessario esaminare se c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione letto in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
7. Sostiene all’unanimità che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
a) riserva la questione detta in intero;
(a) riserva la detta questione per intero;
(b) invita il Governo ed la richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 22 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’articolo 74 § 2 dell’ordinamento, l'opinione separata di Giudice Karakaş è annessa a questa sentenza.
N.B.
F.A.





OPINIONE DISSIDENTE DEL GIUDICE KARAKAÅž
Diversamente dalla maggioranza, considero, che l'obiezione del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sollevata dal Governo non avrebbe dovuto essere respinte. Di conseguenza, non posso concordare con la costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e dell’Articolo 8 della Convenzione, per le stesse ragioni di quelle menzionate nella mia opinione dissidente nella causa di Alexandrou c. Turchia (n. 16162/90, 20 gennaio 2009).


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.