Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BOCVARSKA v. THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 06, P1-1

NUMERO: 27865/02/2009
STATO: Macedonia
DATA: 17/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF BOÄŒVARSKA v. THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA
(Application no. 27865/02)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
17 September 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of BOÄŒVARSKA v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Renate Jaeger,
Karel Jungwiert,
Rait Maruste,
Mark Villiger,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 6 November 2007 and on 25 August 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the last-mentioned date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 27865/02) against the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Macedonian nationals, Ms N. B. and Mr A. K., on 29 April 2002.
2. By a decision of 6 November 2007, the Court declared the application partly admissible only in respect of Ms B. (“the applicant”).
3. The applicant was represented by Ms L. V., a lawyer practising in Skopje. The Macedonian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs R. Lazareska Gerovska.
4. The applicant alleged, in particular, that she had been deprived of the peaceful enjoyment of her possession and that the proceedings in question had been unreasonably lengthy.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1958 and lives in Skopje.
6. According to an official note of the Ministry of Finance of 1997, the applicant and Mr A. K. registered N. K.a STD (самостоен трговски дукан, “the undertaking”, as opposed to companies incorporated under company law) through which they pursued business activities. On 17 July 1992 they ceased trading through the undertaking. On 8 February 1993 the undertaking was re-registered in the name of the applicant. The undertaking operated until 22 February 1995, when its activities were voluntarily terminated.
A. Civil proceedings establishing the undertaking's claim
7. On 23 June 1993 the Skopje District Commercial Court (Окружен Стопански суд) upheld the undertaking's claim and ordered AD G. (“the debtor”) to pay a debt amounting to 1,393,377.70 old Macedonian denars (MKD) plus interest. The court found that the debtor and the undertaking had concluded a framework agreement under which the latter would produce paper products for the debtor. As the debtor had failed to pay for the products made, the court upheld the undertaking's claim.
8. On 10 September 1993 the Macedonia-Skopje Commercial Court (Стопански суд на Македонија), sitting as an appellate court, dismissed an appeal by the debtor and upheld the lower court's decision. On 22 March 1994 the Supreme Court dismissed an appeal on points of law (ревизија) by the debtor and upheld the lower courts' decisions.
B. Enforcement proceedings, as initially instituted by the undertaking
9. On 2 October 1993 the undertaking requested enforcement of the judgment debt, proposing the following means of enforcement: transfer of the money due from the debtor's account and an inventory, evaluation and public auction of the debtor's movable and immovable property. On 8 October 1993 the Skopje District Commercial Court granted the undertaking's request and ordered the debtor to pay the debt. On 3 November 1993 it dismissed an objection by the debtor.
10. On 26 November 1993 the District Commercial Court dismissed a request by the debtor for postponement of enforcement. On 25 December 1993 the Commercial Court dismissed an appeal by the debtor and upheld its decision.
11. On 9 June 1994 the District Commercial Court upheld an objection by the debtor and discontinued the enforcement proceedings in so far as they concerned interest.
12. On 2 September 1994 the District Commercial Court ordered the Public Payment Office to require the bank in which the debtor had had its foreign currency account to transfer the balance due to the undertaking's account. It also ordered the bank not to make any payments from the debtor's account to other parties until the undertaking's claim had been completely honoured. The court established that the undertaking had received part of the judgment debt. It further noted that, as there were no other funds available in the debtor's account, on 25 July 1994 the undertaking had requested the court to satisfy its claim from other accounts belonging to the debtor.
13. On 6 October 1994 the undertaking, represented by Mr A. K., and the debtor reached a court settlement (“the 1994 settlement”) concerning the means of securing payment of the remaining balance, which amounted to MKD 21,774,593.00 (844,631 German marks). The undertaking agreed to receive the balance in twelve equal instalments within a year.
14. As the debtor did not pay the debt as agreed, on 27 October 1994 the District Commercial Court ordered an inventory and public auction of the debtor's vehicles. On 30 November 1994 the Commercial Court dismissed an appeal by the debtor and upheld the lower court's decision.
15. On 12 January 1995 the District Commercial Court partly allowed a request by the debtor for postponement of the enforcement in respect of some heavy goods vehicles and a bus. On 29 January 1996 the court ordered the confiscated vehicles to be returned to the debtor as they were necessary for its work. On 29 August 1996 the Skopje Court of Appeal (Апелационен суд) upheld those decisions.
16. On 14 April 1997 the Skopje Court of First Instance (Основен суд) dismissed a request by the debtor to postpone enforcement of the 1994 settlement.
17. On 23 September 1997 the Court of First Instance upheld an objection by the debtor, who had argued that the undertaking had no legal capacity as a creditor in the proceedings as it had ceased to exist. It also stayed the enforcement proceedings and ordered the Public Payment Office to lift the charging orders on the debtor's accounts. It dismissed the applicant's arguments that she was a successor to the undertaking and that there had been a continuity of the undertaking's claims. On 30 April 1998 the Court of Appeal dismissed an appeal by the undertaking as inadmissible.
C. Enforcement proceedings regarding the 1994 settlement
18. Pending the proceedings described above, on 14 June 1996 the Skopje Municipal Court granted the undertaking's request of 10 January 1996 and issued a charging order on one of the debtor's shops (“the shop”). On 2 September 1996 the Skopje Court of First Instance dismissed an objection by the debtor. On 31 October 1996 the Court of Appeal quashed the lower court's decision and ordered a re-examination of the case. On 21 November 1996 the Skopje Court of First Instance suspended the charging order, as the shop had been exempted from enforcement since it was necessary for the debtor's work. On 24 January 1997 the Court of Appeal quashed that decision and ordered a re-examination of the case. On 7 July 1997 the Court of First Instance dismissed an objection by the debtor.
19. On 18 February 1997 the undertaking requested the court to enforce the claim as established by the 1994 settlement. On 24 February 1997 the Court of First Instance granted the undertaking's request for the sale of the debtor's shop in respect of the principal debt, which had amounted to DM 844,631, together with interest between 11 October 1994 until settlement, plus trial costs. On 19 March 1997 the Court of First Instance partly upheld an objection by the debtor and suspended the enforcement proceedings in so far as they concerned interest.
20. On 12 June 1997 the Court of Appeal allowed an appeal by the debtor and quashed the decision of 19 March 1997. It found that the lower court had failed to determine the debtor's objection as to whether other enforcement proceedings had already been pending between the same parties on the same subject.
21. On 8 July 1997 the Court of First Instance partly upheld an objection by the debtor and suspended the enforcement proceedings in so far as they concerned interest. The order for the sale of the shop remained unaffected.
22. On 12 September 1997 the Court of Appeal dismissed an appeal by the debtor and upheld the lower court's decision.
23. On 26 November 1997 the public prosecutor lodged with the Supreme Court a request for the protection of legality (барање за заштита на законитоста) (“legality review request”) challenging the legality of the lower courts' decisions of 8 July and 12 September 1997. It argued that the 1994 settlement could not be regarded as an enforcement order (извршна исправа) as it had been concluded while the enforcement proceedings were already pending and it had merely concerned the means of enforcing payment of the outstanding debt. The public prosecutor's office further contested, inter alia, the legal capacity of the undertaking in the enforcement proceedings as it had ceased to exist before it had lodged its application for enforcement on 18 February 1997. On 1 December 1997 the undertaking made submissions in reply.
24. On 29 January 1998 the Supreme Court upheld the public prosecutor's legality review request and quashed the impugned decisions. It found that the lower courts had wrongly considered the 1994 settlement to be an enforcement order that could validly be enforced. It instructed them, inter alia, to reconsider the undertaking's legal capacity as a creditor in the enforcement proceedings.
25. On 2 April 1998 the Skopje Court of First Instance upheld the debtor's objection concerning the undertaking's capacity to take part in the proceedings as a creditor. It dismissed the undertaking's application for enforcement and ordered the proceedings to be resumed in the name of the applicant as a creditor. It held that the applicant had been the last person who had pursued business activities through the undertaking before it had ceased to exist. As the undertaking did not have the capacity of a legal entity, all its rights and obligations, including its claim against the debtor, had to be considered to have been transferred to the applicant, as the physical person who had run it.
26. On 11 June 1998 the Skopje Court of Appeal upheld the lower court's decision, finding no grounds to depart from the reasons given.
27. On 22 September 1998 the public prosecutor submitted a fresh legality review request to the Supreme Court, challenging the legality of those decisions and claiming that the applicant lacked the legal capacity to replace the undertaking and take over the enforcement proceedings as a creditor. It further disputed that the 1994 settlement could not be regarded as an enforcement order, as the enforcement proceedings had already been pending at the time when it had been concluded. On or about 29 September 1998, the applicant, who was legally represented, made submissions in reply to the public prosecutor's legality review request.
28. On 11 November 1998 the Supreme Court upheld the public prosecutor's request and quashed the lower courts' decisions. It found that they had failed to establish whether the enforcement proceedings had been pending before the 1994 settlement was concluded. It further held it to be irrelevant that the undertaking had ceased to operate, as the undertaking's founders bore its rights and obligations and it had been their responsibility to establish their status before the courts.
29. On 17 March 1999 the Court of First Instance ordered the enforcement of the 1994 settlement by sale of the shop in favour of the applicant. It held that the enforcement proceedings, which had been instituted before the 1994 settlement, had ended with the first-instance court's decision of September 1997. It further recognised the applicant's capacity to take over the undertaking's claim and to be given the status of a creditor.
30. On 13 May 1999 the Court of Appeal upheld the lower court's decision and dismissed an appeal by the debtor, which had submitted, inter alia, that the applicant had failed to establish that she had taken over the undertaking's claim.
31. On 9 June 1999 the public prosecutor lodged a third legality review request with the Supreme Court. The public prosecutor's office reiterated its earlier allegations that the 1994 settlement could not be regarded as an enforcement order and that the applicant could not automatically be considered to have taken over the undertaking's claim.
32. On 17 February 2000 the Supreme Court quashed the lower courts' decisions. It found that they had erroneously established that the applicant had taken over the undertaking's claims ipso jure as she had been the last proprietor of the undertaking. It further instructed them to verify whether there had been a valid certificate by which the undertaking's claim had been transferred to the applicant.
33. On 23 June 2000 the Court of First Instance requested the applicant to provide, in accordance with section 22 of the Enforcement Act (see paragraph 51 below), written evidence that the undertaking's claim had been transferred to her. On 29 June 2000 the applicant submitted documents to the court, including a balance sheet (биланс на приходи и расходи), bank account details, a receipt (признаница) and a certificate issued by a bank.
34. On 6 October 2000 the Court of First Instance dismissed the applicant's application for enforcement of the claim as established by the 1994 settlement. Following the Supreme Court's instructions, it held that there had been no valid certificate by which the undertaking's claim had been transferred to the applicant. It therefore concluded that the latter could not claim to have the status of a creditor.
35. On 1 March 2001 the Court of Appeal quashed the decision as the lower court had failed to establish whether the applicant had owned and run the undertaking as a sole proprietor.
36. On 15 June 2001 the Court of First Instance dismissed the applicant's request as ill-founded. It found that the documents submitted to the court on 29 June 2000 could not be regarded as a valid certificate by which the undertaking's claim had been transferred to the applicant. It concluded that the applicant could not ipso jure have taken over the undertaking's claim.
37. On 6 September 2001 the Court of Appeal overturned the decision and partly allowed the applicant's application for enforcement of the principal debt indicated in the 1994 settlement. It dismissed the applicant's request for payment of the interest. It found, inter alia:
“...it is irrefutable that the creditor, Ms B., owned the undertaking ..., which had no legal capacity... The fact that Ms B. carried out transactions on the market through the undertaking at the time when the latter still operated implied that she was responsible for all the rights and obligations arising from it... the lack of legal capacity of the undertaking ..., whose proprietor was the creditor [the applicant], means that it was not a separate legal entity, but that its capacity, regarded as a pool of rights and obligations, is vested solely in the creditor, Ms B. ... there is no transfer of the undertaking's claims to Ms B., as the former does not have legal capacity, but the creditor [the applicant] was ... liable for the undertaking's obligations...”
38. On or about 15 January 2002 the public prosecutor lodged a fourth legality review request with the Supreme Court in respect of the Court of Appeal's decision.
39. At the public prosecutor's request, on 28 January 2002 the Court of First Instance postponed the enforcement of the order until the Supreme Court had determined the legality review request.
40. On the same date, the applicant made submissions to the Court of First Instance in reply to the public prosecutor's request.
41. On 30 May 2002 the Supreme Court upheld the public prosecutor's request, overturned the Court of Appeal's decision and upheld the first-instance court's decision of 15 June 2001. It found, inter alia, that the lower courts had established the following facts:
“...the enforcement proceedings were pending before the District Commercial Court between the [undertaking] and [the debtor]. On 6 October 1994 they concluded a court settlement on the basis of which the enforcement proceedings were instituted... on 23 September 1997 the Skopje Court of First Instance stayed the proceedings... on 30 April 1998 the Court of Appeal rejected the [undertaking's] appeal as inadmissible [these decisions concern the enforcement proceedings instituted before the 1994 settlement was concluded]... on 8 February 1993 the [undertaking] was registered in the name of Ms B..... On 22 February 1995 [the undertaking]... ceased to exist. Ms B. was the last sole proprietor of the [undertaking], which had been set up by her funds and her labour force.”
42. The court went on to conclude that the Court of Appeal had wrongly applied the substantive law for the following reasons:
“In the present case, the requirements of the provision cited above [referring to section 22 of the Enforcement Proceedings Act], for the granting of enforcement at the request of a person not indicated as a creditor in the enforcement order, were not satisfied. There is no written certificate attesting that the claim was transferred from [the undertaking] to Ms B., as a creditor. The termination of the undertaking's operations does not ipso jure entail the transfer of its claims to the last proprietor who ran it. Indeed, the Entrepreneurship Act did not contain a provision providing for ipso jure transfer of the undertaking's claims to the last proprietor who ran it ... Moreover, the court settlement of 6 October 1994 cannot be regarded as an enforcement order as it resulted from the enforcement proceedings already pending between the same creditor [meaning the undertaking] and the debtor... the subject of this settlement was the means of enforcing the outstanding debt...”
43. The decision was served on the applicant on 25 July 2002.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
1. The Constitution
44. Article 101 of the Constitution provides that the Supreme Court is the highest court and that it ensures the uniform application of the laws by the courts.
2. Entrepreneurship Act (Закон за самостојно вршење дејност со личен труд) of 1989
45. Section 3 (1 and 3) of the Entrepreneurship Act provided that an entrepreneur could set up an undertaking (дуќан), in order to pursue business activities. The undertaking could have a legal personality.
46. Section 10 provided that an entrepreneur could set up an undertaking by submitting an application to the relevant municipal administrative body.
47. In accordance with section 16 § 1 (1) of that Act, an undertaking would cease to exist if the above application had been withdrawn.
3. Enforcement Proceedings Act (Закон за извршната постапка) of 1997
48. Section 7 (6) of the Enforcement Proceedings Act (“the Act”), as applicable at that time, provided that a decision given on an appeal was regarded as final.
49. Under section 8 of the Act, an appeal on points of law and a request for reopening of the proceedings could not be lodged in respect of a final decision given in the enforcement proceedings.
50. Section 13 of the Act provided that the provisions of the 1998 Act applied, mutatis mutandis, to enforcement and security proceedings, unless otherwise provided for by law.
51. Under section 15 (2), an enforceable court decision and a court settlement were regarded as an enforcement order.
52. Section 22 (1) of the Act provided that enforcement might be granted at the request of a person not indicated as a creditor in an enforcement order only if that person proved, by a public or otherwise legally certified order, that the claim had been transferred to him or her. Should that be impossible, the transfer of the claim was to be proved by a final decision given in civil proceedings.
4. Civil Proceedings Act (Закон за парничната постапка) of 1998
53. Section 319 of the Civil Proceedings Act (“the 1998 Act”), which was in force at the material time, provided that a decision became final when an appeal could no longer be lodged against it.
54. In accordance with section 380 (1) of the 1998 Act, in case of substantial procedural flaws, the Supreme Court quashed the first- and the second-instance decision or the second-instance decision only and referred the case back for reconsideration.
55. Section 381 of the 1998 Act provided that where the substantive law had been applied incorrectly, the Supreme Court upheld the appeal on points of law and overturned the impugned decision. In cases where the facts were erroneously established because of the incorrect application of the substantive law and where there were no grounds for overturning the impugned decision, the Supreme Court upheld the appeal on points of law and referred the case back for fresh consideration.
56. In accordance with section 387 of the 1998 Act, the public prosecutor could submit, within three months, a request for the protection of legality in respect of a final decision. When the request was lodged in respect of a second-instance decision, this term started to run from the date on which the last party was served with the decision. Where the parties concerned had lodged an appeal on points of law against the second-instance decision, the public prosecutor could submit a request for the protection of legality in respect of that decision within thirty days of the date of service of the appeal on points of law.
57. In accordance with section 390, a legality review request could be lodged either in respect of a substantial procedural flaw or an incorrect application of the substantive law. It could not be lodged where the impugned decision went beyond the scope of the claim or where the facts had been erroneously or incompletely established.
58. Section 394(2) of the Act provided, inter alia, that sections 370, 373 to 381 and 383 to 385 applied, mutatis mutandis, to proceedings concerning a legality review request.
5. Civil Proceedings Act of 2005
59. The Act, which repealed the 1998 Act, does not contain any provisions concerning the legality review proceedings.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
60. The applicant complained that the length of the enforcement proceedings had been incompatible with the “reasonable time” requirement laid down in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal...”
1. The parties' submissions
61. The applicant submitted that the enforcement proceedings were to be regarded as a single set and that the excessive use of the extraordinary legality review request had affected their length. She further stated that the case had not been of a complex nature and that she could not be held responsible for the repeated use of available remedies by the debtor and public prosecutor.
62. The Government submitted that the case had in fact been of a complex nature as it had required determination of difficult legal issues: the applicant's capacity to act; whether other enforcement proceedings had already been pending between the same parties at the time when the undertaking had requested enforcement of the 1994 settlement; and whether the latter should be regarded as an enforcement order.
63. They further argued that the applicant had contributed to the length of the proceedings by failing to submit any written evidence in support of her allegations that the undertaking's claim had been transferred to her until June 2000. They referred also to the extensive use of all available remedies by the debtor and its poor economic situation.
64. As regards the conduct of the authorities, the Government maintained that the courts had taken all reasonable steps to avoid unnecessary delays.
2. The Court's assessment
65. The Court notes that the enforcement proceedings were instituted on 2 October 1993, when the undertaking sought enforcement of the Skopje District Commercial Court's decision dated 23 June 1993. As established by the national courts, these proceedings ended on 30 April 1998 (see paragraph 17 above). On 18 February 1997 another set of enforcement proceedings was instituted in respect of the 1994 settlement. These two sets of proceedings concerned the same parties and means of enforcement. The applicant was party to both sets, either as the undertaking's proprietor and representative or in person. She can accordingly be regarded as being entitled to complain about the proceedings from their inception (see Cocchiarella v. Italy [GC], no. 64886/01, § 113, ECHR 2006).
66. The enforcement proceedings ended on 25 July 2002, when the Supreme Court decision was served on the applicant. They thus lasted for nearly eight years and ten months, of which five years, three months and fifteen days fall within the Court's jurisdiction ratione temporis (since the ratification of the Convention by the respondent State on 10 April 1997) at three court levels. The Court further observes that, in order to determine the reasonableness of the period in question, regard must also be had to the state of the case on the date of ratification (see Atanasovic and Others v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 13886/02, § 26, 22 December 2005) and notes that on 10 April 1997 the enforcement proceedings complained of had already been pending for over three years and two months.
67. The Court reiterates that the “right to a court” would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. Execution of a judgment given by any court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6. The State has an obligation under Article 6 to organise a system for the enforcement of judgments that is effective both in law and in practice and ensures their enforcement without undue delay (see Jankulovski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 6906/03, §§ 33 and 37, 3 July 2008).
68. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicant and the relevant authorities and what was at stake for the applicant in the dispute (see Atanasovic and Others, cited above, § 33, which also concerned enforcement proceedings).
69. In the present case, the Court observes that although the case was of some legal complexity, that factor alone cannot justify the length of the proceedings.
70. It also considers that there were no delays attributable to the applicant. The latter cannot be held responsible for the procedural conduct of the debtor and public prosecutor (see Graberska v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 6924/03, § 61, 14 June 2007, and Stojanov v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 34215/02, § 57, 31 May 2007).
71. As regards the conduct of the authorities, the Court notes that, during the period under consideration, the applicant's case was reconsidered on five occasions. The domestic courts cannot therefore be said to have been inactive. However, the Court notes that repetition of remittal orders within one set of proceedings discloses a serious deficiency in the judicial system (see Pavlyulynets v. Ukraine, no. 70767/01, § 51, 6 September 2005, and Wierciszewska v. Poland, no. 41431/98, § 46, 25 November 2003). The main reason for the numerous remittals was the different legal opinion of the domestic courts regarding legal matters indicated by the Government (see paragraph 60 above). It was those issues that affected the length of the enforcement proceedings.
72. Having examined all the material submitted to it, the Court considers that in the instant case the length of the enforcement proceedings was excessive and failed to meet the “reasonable time” requirement of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
73. There has accordingly been a breach of that provision.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 OF THE CONVENTION
74. The applicant complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that she had been prevented from obtaining payment of the undertaking's debt, although she had been its last sole proprietor. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
1. The parties' submissions
75. The applicant maintained that she had a possession within the meaning of the provision relied on. She stated that the undertaking should not be regarded as a legal entity, but as a physical person whose business activities had been registered with the authorised Ministry. Indeed, its proprietors were personally liable for the undertaking's debts and obligations vis-à-vis third parties. She further submitted that the public prosecutor's interference in the proceedings had not been in the public interest for the following reasons: he had been biased; he had represented the private interests of only one of the parties concerned; and the substantive law had been incorrectly applied.
76. The Government submitted that contrary to the undertaking's claim, which could have fallen within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the applicant could not be considered to have had a “possession” within the meaning of this Article, since she had failed to establish that the undertaking's claim had been transferred to her. They averred that the applicant had not been granted the status of a creditor by an irreversible decision. Although she had been established as a creditor by three final decisions of the Court of Appeal, the latter had been reviewed by the Supreme Court, which, in accordance with the principle of legality, had upheld the prosecutor's legality review requests.
77. They further stated that the applicant, even assuming that she might have been regarded as having had a “possession” under this provision, had been deprived of it in the public interest and in accordance with the conditions provided for by law. The alleged deprivation was based on the public prosecutor's legality review request, an extraordinary remedy aimed at ensuring the uniformity of the legal system and the principle of legality. Furthermore, the State had, through that remedy, exercised its power of review in cases where a law or an international agreement had been infringed by a final court decision.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) Whether there was a possession
78. The Court of Appeal, by its decision of 6 September 2001, conferred on the applicant an enforceable claim by establishing that the undertaking's capacity was vested solely in her. This decision became final as no ordinary appeal lay against it (see paragraphs 48 and 49 above). That claim may be regarded as a “possession” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, judgment of 9 December 1994, Series A no. 301-B, p. 84, § 59; Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 40, ECHR 2002-III; Roşca v. Moldova, no. 6267/02, § 31, 22 March 2005; and Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 61, ECHR 2003-IX).
(b) Whether there was interference
79. It is the established jurisprudence of this Court that the quashing of a final and binding judgment that conferred a “possession” on the applicant constitutes an interference with the applicant's right to that property (see Tregubenko v. Ukraine, no. 61333/00, § 51, 2 November 2004, and Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 74, ECHR 1999-VII). The Court sees no reason to depart from this approach in the present case.
(c) Whether the interference was justified
80. The Court recalls that the Preamble to the Convention declares, among other things, the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States (see Brumărescu, cited above, § 61).
81. As to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court has established that a deprivation of property can only be justified if it is shown, inter alia, to be “in the public interest” and “subject to the conditions provided for by law”. Moreover, any interference with property must also satisfy the requirement of proportionality. The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an “individual and excessive burden” (see Tregubenko, cited above, § 53).
82. In the present case, the Court notes that the State's interference with the applicant's property rights was made by the Supreme Court's decision of 30 May 2002. This decision was given upon the public prosecutor's legality review request under the then applicable rules of civil proceedings (see paragraphs 52-58 above). The interference was made pursuant to a remedy requested by a State organ, which was not a party to the proceedings (see Roseltrans v. Russia, no. 60974/00, §§ 13 and 27, 21 July 2005). In addition, the public prosecutor had full discretion in deciding whether to lodge the legality review request with the Supreme Court (see Lepojić v. Serbia, no. 13909/05, § 54, 6 November 2007, and Dimitrovska v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (dec.), no. 21466/03, 30 September 2008). For these reasons, the Court considers that legal effects of the legality review proceedings under the 1998 Act – the quashing by the Supreme Court of the decision of 6 September 2001 - were comparable to those of the supervisory review system existing in some Contracting States, since the Supreme Court set at naught an entire judicial process which had ended in a judicial decision that was “irreversible” and thus res judicata (see Brumărescu, cited above, § 62; Roşca v. Moldova, no. 6267/02, § 27, 22 March 2005; Svetlana Naumenko v. Ukraine, no. 41984/98, § 92, 9 November 2004 and Ryabykh v. Russia, no. 52854/99, § 53, ECHR 2003-IX).
83. The Court finds that the quashing of the decision of 6 September 2001 was not compatible with the rule of law, which is inherent in all Articles of the Convention (see, a contrario, Protsenko v. Russia, no. 13151/04, § 33, 31 July 2008, in which the Court found that the failure to take into account the interests of third persons whose rights were considerably affected by the final decision was a legitimate ground for reopening the proceedings upon a supervisory review request)..
84. Having regard to the above considerations, the Court considers that the “fair balance” was upset by the situation brought about by the Supreme Court's decision and that the applicant bore an individual and excessive burden. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
85. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
86. The applicant claimed MKD 21,774,593 with statutory interest from 11 October 1994 until the settlement in respect of pecuniary damage sustained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This figure refers to the amount specified in the 1994 settlement (see paragraph 13 above). The applicant also claimed 1,000,000 euros (EUR) for living costs due to “destroyed business and lost jobs”. She alleged that the debtor had been declared insolvent and that she could not recover her claim. Lastly, she claimed EUR 30,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage for anxiety and emotional suffering sustained as a consequence of the excessive length of proceedings.
87. The Government contested these claims as unsubstantiated. As regards the pecuniary damage they stated that: a) there was no ground for awarding the amount established in the 1994 settlement, given the last decision of the Supreme Court dismissing the applicant's claim and b) there was no causal link between the alleged violations and the “living costs” claimed.
88. Concerning the pecuniary damage sought under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court observes that the applicant did not present any evidence that the debtor, at the time when the Supreme Court rendered its decision, had been State-controlled, which would entail direct State liability for the judgment debt created by the Court of Appeal's decision of 6 September 2001. Furthermore, from the case-file, as it stands, the Court cannot establish as to whether, at the same point in time, the debtor had sufficient assets to comply with the 1994 settlement. In this connection, the Court notes that no evidence has been presented as to whether or when the debtor was declared insolvent or how any such insolvency affected the applicant's ability to recover the debt. In these circumstances, the Court finds no causal link between the pecuniary damage claimed and the violation found. It therefore rejects the applicant's claim for the amount specified in the 1994 settlement. For the same reasons, it also rejects the applicant's claim that interest be paid on this amount.
89. The Court further notes that the applicant did not provide any evidence that would enable it to determine whether and to what extent the violations found had any negative impact on the applicant's standard of living, as alleged: it therefore rejects this claim.
90. Lastly, the Court accepts that the applicant has suffered some non-pecuniary damage which would not be sufficiently compensated by the finding of the violations alone (see, mutatis mutandis, Teltronic-CATV v. Poland, no. 48140/99, § 70, 10 January 2006). Making its assessment on an equitable basis and having regard to the circumstances of the case, the Court awards the applicant EUR 1,600 under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
91. The applicant claimed MKD 2,334,100 (approximately EUR 38,100) plus interest from 30 May 2002 until settlement for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts. These included the courts' and legal fees. The applicant provided an itemised list of costs. No evidence was provided as regards court fees. Lastly, she claimed EUR 5,000 for the costs and expenses incurred in the proceedings before the Court. No document was submitted in support of this latter claim.
92. The Government contested these claims as unsubstantiated.
93. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum (see Editions Plon v. France, no. 58148/00, § 64, ECHR 2004-IV). The Court points out that under Rule 60 of the Rules of Court “the applicant must submit itemised particulars of all claims, together with any relevant supporting documents failing which the Chamber may reject the claim in whole or in part” (see Parizov v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 14258/03, § 71, 7 February 2008).
94. Having regard to the fee note submitted by the applicant, the Court finds that only EUR 1,000 related to lawyer's fees which post-dated the ratification of the Convention by the respondent State and were expended with a view to seek prevention before the national courts of the violations found by the Court (see, mutatis mutandis, Stoimenov v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 17995/02, § 56, 5 April 2007).
95. In these circumstances, the Court is unable to award the totality of the sums claimed in respect of the costs and expenses incurred in the domestic proceedings. It considers that the applicant is entitled to be reimbursed under this head the sum of EUR 1,000, plus any tax that may be chargeable to her.
96. Lastly, the Court notes that the applicant did not submit any supporting documents or particulars in respect of her claim for the costs and expenses incurred in the proceedings before it. Accordingly, it does not award any sum under this head (see Parizov, cited above, § 72).
C. Default interest
97. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds that there has been a violation of Articles 6 § 1 of the Convention as regards the length of the proceedings in question;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the national currency of the respondent State, at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 1,600 (one thousand six hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses incurred domestically;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 17 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell' Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; danno Materiale - rivendicazione respinta; danno morale - assegnazione
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA BOÄŒVARSKA C. PRECEDENTE REPUBBLICA IUGOSLAVA E DI MACEDONIA
(Richiesta n. 27865/02)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
17 settembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa BOÄŒVARSKA c. la precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Renate Jaeger Karel Jungwiert, Rait Maruste il Mark Villiger, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 6 novembre 2007 e il 25 agosto 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata nell’ultima data menzionata:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 27865/02) contro la precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini macedoni, la Sig.ra N. B. ed il Sig. A. K., il 29 aprile 2002.
2. Con una decisione del 6 novembre 2007, la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente ammissibile solamente a riguardo della Sig.ra B. (“la richiedente”).
3. La richiedente è stato rappresentato dalla Sig.ra L. V., un avvocato che pratica a Skopje. Il Governo macedone (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra R. Lazareska Gerovska.
4. La richiedente addusse, in particolare, di essere stata privata del pacifico godimento o della sua proprietà e che i procedimenti in oggetto erano stati irragionevolmente lunghi.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. La richiedente è nata nel 1958 e vive a Skopje.
6. Secondo una nota ufficiale del Ministero delle Finanze di 1997, la richiedente ed il Sig. A. K. registrarono N. K. STD (дукан di трговски di самостоен, l’“impresa”, in opposizione alle società incorporate sotto diritto azionario) tramite la quale portavano avanti attività commerciali. Il 17 luglio 1992 cessarono l’attività tramite l'impresa. L’8 febbraio 1993 l'impresa fu re-registrata a nome della richiedente. L'impresa operò sino al 22 febbraio 1995, quando le sue attività furono terminate volontariamente.
A. Procedimenti civili che stabiliscono il credito dell'impresa
7. Il 23 giugno 1993 il Tribunale del commercio del Distretto di Skopje (Окружен Стопански суд) sostenne il credito dell'impresa ed ordinò ad A. G. (“il debitore”) di pagare un debito corrispondente a 1,393,377.70 vecchi denar macedoni (MKD) più interesse. Il tribunale trovò che il debitore e l'impresa avevano concluso un accordo di struttura sotto il quale quest’ultima avrebbe fabbricato prodotti cartacei per il debitore. Siccome il debitore non era riuscito a pagare i prodotti fatti, il tribunale sostenne il credito dell'impresa.
8. Il 10 settembre 1993 il Tribunale di commercio di Macedonia-Skopje (на di суд di Стопански Македонија), riunendosi in una corte d’appello, respinse un ricorso da parte del debitore e sostenne la decisione del tribunale inferiore . Il 22 marzo 1994 la Corte Suprema respinse un ricorso su questioni di diritto (ревизија) da parte del debitore e sostenne le decisioni dei tribunali inferiori.
B. Procedimenti di Esecuzione come inizialmente avviati dall'impresa
9. Il 2 ottobre 1993 l'impresa richiese l’esecuzione del debito di sentenza, proponendo il seguente mezzo di esecuzione: trasferimento del denaro dovuto dal conto del debitore ed un inventario, una valutazione ed un’ asta pubblica del patrimonio mobile e immobiliare del debitore. L’8 ottobre 1993 il Tribunale del commercio del Distretto di Skopje accordò la richiesta dell'impresa ed ordinò che il debitore pagasse il debito. Il 3 novembre 1993 respinse un'obiezione da parte del debitore.
10. Il 26 novembre 1993 il Tribunale del commercio di Distretto respinse una richiesta da parte del debitore per una proroga dell’ esecuzione. Il 25 dicembre 1993 il Tribunale di commercio respinse un ricorso da parte del debitore e sostenne la sua decisione.
11. Il 9 giugno 1994 il Tribunale del commercio di Distretto sostenne un'obiezione da parte del debitore e cessò i procedimenti di esecuzione per quanto riguardavano l’ interesse.
12. Il 2 settembre 1994 il Tribunale del commercio di Distretto ordinò all’Ufficio Pubblico di Pagamento di richiedere la banca in cui il debitore aveva avuto il suo conto in valuta estera per trasferire il saldo dovuto al conto dell'impresa. Ordinò anche alla banca per di non effettuare nessun pagamento dal conto del debitore alle altre parti finché il credito dell'impresa fosse stata completamente onorata. Il tribunale stabilì che l'impresa aveva ricevuto parte del debito di sentenza. Notò inoltre che, siccome no vi erano altri finanziamenti disponibili sul conto del debitore, il 25 luglio 1994 l'impresa aveva richiesto al tribunale di soddisfare il suo credito dagli altri conti appartenenti al debitore.
13. Il 6 ottobre 1994 l'impresa, rappresentata dal Sig. A. K. ed il debitore giunsero ad un accordo di tribunale (“l'accordo del 1994”) riguardo ai mezzi per garantire il pagamento del saldo rimanente che corrispondeva a MKD 21,774,593.00 (844,631 marchi tedeschi). L'impresa fu d'accordo a ricevere il saldo in dodici rate uguali entro un anno.
14. Siccome il debitore non pagò il debito come concordato, il 27 ottobre 1994 il Tribunale del commercio di Distretto ordinò un inventario ed un’ asta pubblica dei veicoli del debitore. Il 30 novembre 1994 il Tribunale di commercio respinse un ricorso da parte del debitore e sostenne la decisione del tribunale inferiore.
15. Il 12 gennaio 1995 il Tribunale del commercio di Distretto accolse parzialmente una richiesta da parte del debitore per una proroga dell'esecuzione a riguardo di dei veicoli di mezzi pesanti ed un autobus. Il 29 gennaio 1996 il tribunale ordinò che i veicoli confiscati venissero restituiti al debitore siccome erano necessari per il suo lavoro. Il 29 agosto 1996 la Corte d'appello di Skopje (Апелационен суд) sostenne quelle decisioni.
16. Il 14 aprile 1997 il Giudice di prima istanza di Skopje (Основен суд) respinse una richiesta da parte del debitore per posticipare l’esecuzione dell'accordo del 1994.
17. Il 23 settembre 1997 il Giudice di prima istanza sostenne un'obiezione da parte del debitore che aveva dibattuto che l'impresa non aveva qualità giuridica come creditore nei procedimenti siccome aveva cessato di esistere. Sospese anche i procedimenti di esecuzione ed ordinò l’Ufficio Pubblico del Pagamento di togliere gli ordini di addebito sui conti del debitore. Respinse gli argomenti della richiedente per i quali lei era un successore dell'impresa e che c'era stata una continuità delle rivendicazioni dell'impresa. Il 30 aprile 1998 la Corte d'appello respinse un ricorso da parte dell'impresa come inammissibile.
C. Procedimenti d’esecuzione riguardo all'accordo del 1994
18. Durante i procedimenti descritti sopra, il 14 giugno 1996 Il Tribunale Municipale di Skopje accordò l’istanza dell'impresa del 10 gennaio 1996 ed emise un ordine di addebito su uno dei negozi del debitore (“il negozio”). Il 2 settembre 1996 il Giudice di prima istanza di Skopje respinse un'obiezione da parte del debitore. Il 31 ottobre 1996 la Corte d'appello annullò la decisione del tribunale inferiore ed ordinò un riesame della causa. Il 21 novembre 1996 il Giudice di prima istanza di Skopje sospese l'ordine di addebito, siccome il negozio era stato esentato dall’ esecuzione poiché era necessario per il lavoro del debitore. Il 24 gennaio 1997 la Corte d'appello annullò questa decisione ed ordinò un riesame della causa. Il 7 luglio 1997 il Giudice di prima istanza respinse un'obiezione da parte del debitore.
19. Il 18 febbraio 1997 l'impresa richiese al tribunale di eseguire il credito come stabilito con l'accordo del 1994. Il 24 febbraio 1997 il Giudice di prima istanza accordò l’istanza dell'impresa per la vendita del negozio del debitore a riguardo del debito principale che corrispondeva a DM 844,631, insieme con interesse fra l’ 11 ottobre 1994 sino ad accordo, più costi di processo. Il 19 marzo 1997 il Giudice di prima istanza sostenne parzialmente un'obiezione da parte del debitore e sospese i procedimenti d’esecuzione per quanto concerneva l’ interesse.
20. Il 12 giugno 1997 la Corte d'appello concedette un ricorso da parte del debitore ed annullò la decisione del 19 marzo 1997. Trovò che il tribunale inferiore era andato a vuoto nel determinare l'obiezione del debitore in merito a se gli altri procedimenti di esecuzione già erano pendenti fra le stesse parti sulla stessa materia.
21. L’8 luglio 1997 il Giudice di prima istanza sostenne parzialmente un'obiezione da parte del debitore e sospese i procedimenti di esecuzione per quanto concernevano l’ interesse. L'ordine per la vendita del negozio rimase invariato.
22.Il 12 settembre 1997 la Corte d'appello respinse un ricorso da parte del debitore e sostenne la decisione del tribunale inferiore.
23. Il 26 novembre 1997 l’accusatore pubblico depositò presso la Corte Suprema una richiesta per la protezione della legalità (барање за заштита на законитоста) (“richiesta di revisione della legalità”) impugnando la legalità delle decisioni dei tribunali inferiori dell’ 8 luglio e del 12 settembre 1997. Dibatté che l'accordo del 1994 non poteva essere considerato un ordine di esecuzione (извршна исправа) siccome era stato concluso mentre i procedimenti di esecuzione erano già pendenti ed aveva riguardato soltanto i mezzi di esecuzione del pagamento della pendenza debitoria. L'ufficio dell'accusatore pubblico contestò inoltre, inter alia, la qualità giuridica dell'impresa nei procedimenti d’esecuzione siccome aveva cessato esistere prima di aver depositato la sua richiesta per l’ esecuzione il 18 febbraio 1997. Il 1 dicembre 1997 l'impresa fece delle osservazioni in replica.
24. Il 29 gennaio 1998 la Corte Suprema sostenne la richiesta di revisione di legalità dell'accusatore pubblico ed annullò le decisioni contestate. Trovò che i tribunali inferiori avevano considerato erroneamente che l'accordo del 1994 fosse un ordine di esecuzione che avrebbe potuto essere eseguito validamente. Diede loro delle istruzioni, inter alia, per riconsiderare la qualità giuridica dell'impresa come creditore nei procedimenti d’esecuzione.
25. Il 2 aprile 1998 il Giudice di prima istanza di Skopje sostenne l'obiezione del debitore riguardo alla qualità dell'impresa di prendere parte ai procedimenti come creditore. Respinse la richiesta dell'impresa per l’esecuzione ed ordinò che i procedimenti venissero ripresi a nome della richiedente come un creditore. Sostenne che la richiedente era stata l’ultima persona che aveva intrapreso attività commerciali per l'impresa prima di aver cessato di esistere. Siccome l'impresa non aveva la qualità di una persona giuridica, tutti i suoi diritti ed obblighi, incluso il suo credito contro il debitore si dovevano considerare trasferiti alla richiedente, come persona fisica che l'aveva gestita.
26. L’ 11 giugno 1998 la Corte d'appello di Skopje sostenne la decisione del tribunale inferiore, non trovando nessun motivo per scostarsi da date ragioni .
27. Il 22 settembre 1998 l'accusatore pubblico presentò una nuova richiesta di revisione di legalità alla Corte Suprema, impugnando la legalità di quelle decisioni e sostenendo che alla richiedente mancava la qualità giuridica per sostituire l'impresa e intraprendere i procedimenti di esecuzione come creditore. Contestò inoltre che l'accordo del 1994 non poteva essere considerato un ordine di esecuzione, siccome i procedimenti di esecuzione erano già pendenti al tempo in cui era stato concluso. Approssimativamente verso il 29 settembre 1998, la richiedente che era legalmente rappresentata presentò delle osservazioni rese in replica alla richiesta di revisione di legalità dell'accusatore pubblico.
28. L’11 novembre 1998 la Corte Suprema sostenne la richiesta dell'accusatore pubblico ed annullò le decisioni dei tribunali inferiori. Trovò che non erano riusciti a stabilire se i procedimenti di esecuzione erano pendenti prima che l'accordo del 1994 fosse concluso. Sostenne inoltre che fosse irrilevante che l'impresa avesse cessato di operare, siccome i fondatori dell'impresa mantenevano i loro diritti ed obblighi ed era stata la loro responsabilità a stabilire il loro status di fronte ai tribunali.
29. Il 17 marzo 1999 il Giudice di prima istanza ordinò l'esecuzione dell'accordo del 1994 tramite la vendita del negozio a favore del richiedente. Sostenne che i procedimenti d’esecuzione che erano stati avviati prima dell'accordo del 1994 erano terminati con la decisione della corte di prima -istanza nel settembre 1997. Riconobbe inoltre la qualità della richiedente per assumersi il credito dell'impresa e farsi concedere lo status di creditore.
30. Il 13 maggio 1999 la Corte d'appello sostenne la decisione del tribunale inferiore e respinse un ricorso da parte del debitore che aveva presentato inter alia che la richiedente non era riuscita a stabilire di aver preso il credito dell'impresa.
31. Il 9 giugno 1999 l'accusatore pubblico depositò una terza richiesta di revisione di legalità presso la Corte Suprema. L'ufficio dell'accusatore pubblico reiterò le sue precedenti dichiarazioni per cui l'accordo del 1994 non poteva essere considerato un ordine d’esecuzione e che non si poteva considerare che la richiedente avesse preso automaticamente il credito dell'impresa.
32. Il 17 febbraio 2000 la Corte Suprema annullò le decisioni dei tribunali inferiori. Trovò che loro avevano stabilito erroneamente che la richiedente aveva preso il credito dell’impresa ipso jure siccome era stata l’ultimo proprietario dell'impresa. Li esortò inoltre a verificare se c'era un certificato valido col quale il credito dell'impresa era stato trasferito alla richiedente.
33. Il 23 giugno 2000 il Giudice di prima istanza richiese alla richiedente di fornire , i n conformità con la sezione 22 dell'Atto d’ Esecuzione a (vedere paragrafo 51 sotto), una prova scritta il credito dell'impresa era stato trasferito a lei. Il 29 giugno 2000 la richiedente presentò documenti alla corte, incluso un rendiconto patrimoniale (биланс на приходи и расходи), un conto bancario dettagliato, una ricevuta (ïðèçíàíèöà) ed un certificato emesso da una banca.
34. Il 6 ottobre 2000 il Giudice di prima istanza respinse la richiesta della richiedente per l’esecuzione del credito come stabilito con l'accordo del 1994. Seguendo le istruzioni della Corte Suprema, sostenne che non c'era stato nessun certificato valido col quale il credito dell'impresa era stato trasferito al richiedente. Concluse perciò che la seconda non potesse pretendere di avere lo status di creditore.
35. Il 1 marzo 2001 la Corte d'appello annullò la decisione siccome il tribunale inferiore era andato a vuoto nello stabilire se la richiedente aveva posseduto ed aveva gestito l'impresa come unico proprietario.
36. Il 15 giugno 2001 il Giudice di prima istanza respinse la richiesta della richiedente come mal-fondata. Trovò che i documenti presentati alla corte il 29 giugno 2000 non potevano essere considerati un certificato valido col quale il credito dell'impresa era stato trasferito alla richiedente. Concluse che la richiedente non poteva aver preso ipso jure il credito dell'impresa.
37. Il 6 settembre 2001 la Corte d'appello rovesciò la decisione ed in parte ammise la richiesta del richiedente per l’ esecuzione del debito principale indicato nell'accordo del 1994. Respinse la richiesta della richiedente per il pagamento dell'interesse. Trovò, inter alia:
“... è inconfutabile che il creditore, la Sig.ra B. possedeva l'impresa... che non aveva qualità giuridica... Il fatto che la Sig.ra B. eseguiva operazioni sul mercato tramite l'impresa al tempo in cui questa ancora operava implica che lei fosse responsabile di tutti i diritti ed obblighi che sorgevano da questa... la mancanza di qualità giuridica dell'impresa... il cui proprietario era il creditore [la richiedente], vuole dire che non era una persona giuridica separata, ma che la sua qualità, considerata un pool di diritti ed obblighi viene conferita legalmente solamente al creditore, la Sig.ra B.... non c'è nessun trasferimento dei crediti dell'impresa alla Sig.ra B, siccome la prima non ha qualità giuridica, ma il creditore [la richiedente] era... responsabile per gli obblighi dell'impresa...”
38. Approssimativamente il 15 gennaio 2002 l'accusatore pubblico depositò una quarta richiesta di revisione di legalità presso la Corte Suprema a riguardo della decisione della Corte d'appello.
39. Il 28 gennaio 2002 il Giudice di prima istanza posticipò l'esecuzione dell'ordine su richiesta dell'accusatore pubblico, finché la Corte Suprema non avesse determinato la richiesta di revisione di legalità.
40. La richiedente fece delle osservazioni al Giudice di prima istanza in replica alla richiesta dell'accusatore pubblico nella stessa data.
41. Il 30 maggio 2002 la Corte Suprema sostenne la richiesta dell'accusatore pubblico, rovesciò la decisione della Corte d'appello e sostenne la decisione della corte di prima -istanza del 15 giugno 2001. Trovò, inter alia, che i tribunali inferiori avevano stabilito i seguenti fatti:
“... i procedimenti di esecuzione erano pendenti di fronte al Tribunale del commercio di Distretto fra [l’impresa] e [il debitore]. Il 6 ottobre 1994 conclusero un accordo di corte sulla base del quale furono avviati i procedimenti di esecuzione... il 23 settembre 1997 il Giudice di prima istanza di Skopje sospese i procedimenti... il 30 aprile 1998 la Corte d'appello respinse il ricorso [dell’impresa] come inammissibile [queste decisioni riguardavano i procedimenti di esecuzione avviati prima che l'accordo del 1994 fosse concluso]... l’8 febbraio 1993 [l’impresa] fu registrata al nome della Sig.ra B..... il 22 febbraio 1995 [l'impresa]... cessò di esistere. La Sig.ra B. era l’ultimo solo proprietario dell’ [impresa] che era stata rilevata tramite i suoi fondi e la sua forza lavoro.”
42. La corte proseguì e arrivò a concludere che la Corte d'appello aveva applicato erroneamente il diritto sostanziale per le seguenti ragioni:
“Nella presente causa, i requisiti della disposizione citati sopra [riferendosi alla sezione 22 dell'Atto dei Procedimenti d’Esecuzione], per accordare l’ esecuzione su richiesta di una persona non indicata come creditore nell'ordine di esecuzione, non erano stati soddisfatti. Non c'è nessun certificato scritto che attesta che il credito era stato trasferito dall’ [impresa] alla Sig.ra B., come creditore. La conclusione delle operazioni dell'impresa non comportano ipso jure il trasferimento dei suoi crediti all’ultimo proprietario che l’ha gestita. Effettivamente, l'Atto dell’ Imprenditorialità non conteneva una disposizione che prevedeva un trasferimento ipso jure dei crediti dell'impresa all’ultimo proprietario che l’aveva gestita... Inoltre, l'accordo di corte del 6 ottobre 1994 non può essere considerato un ordine di esecuzione come risultò dai procedimenti di esecuzione già pendenti fra lo stesso creditore [intendendo l'impresa] ed il debitore... il soggetto di questo accordo erano i mezzi di esecuzione della pendenza debitoria...”
43. La decisione fu notificata alla richiedente il 25 luglio 2002.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
1. La Costituzione
44. L’Articolo 101 della Costituzione prevede che la Corte Suprema è la corte più alta e che assicura l’applicazione uniforme delle leggi da parte dei tribunali.
2. Atto dell’ Imprenditorialità (Закон за самостојно вршење дејност со личен труд) del 1989
45. La sezione 3 (1 e 3) dell' Atto dell’ Imprenditorialità prevedeva che un imprenditore potesse fondare un'impresa (дуќан) per intraprendere attività commerciali. L'impresa avrebbe potuto avere una personalità legale.
46. La Sezione 10 prevedeva che un imprenditore potesse fondare un'impresa presentando una richiesta all’ attinente corpo amministrativo municipale.
47. In conformità con la sezione 16 § 1 (1) di questo Atto, un'impresa cesserebbe esistere se la richiesta sopra fosse stata ritirata.
3. Atto dei procedimento d’ Esecuzione (Закон за извршната постапка) del 1997
48. La Sezione 7 (6) dell'Atto dei Procedimenti d'Esecuzione (“l'Atto”), come applicabile a quel tempo, prevedeva che una data decisione su un ricorso venisse considerata definitiva.
49. Sotto la sezione 8 dell'Atto, un ricorso su questioni di diritto ed una richiesta per la riapertura dei procedimenti non poteva essere depositata a riguardo di una data decisione definitiva nei procedimenti d’esecuzione.
50. La Sezione 13 dell'Atto prevedeva che le disposizioni dell'Atto del 1998 si applicassero, mutatis mutandis, a procedimenti d’ esecuzione e di garanzia a meno che altrimenti previsto dalla legge.
51. Sotto la sezione 15 (2), una decisione esecutiva della corte ed un accordo di corte venivano considerati un ordine di esecuzione.
52. La Sezione 22 (1) dell'Atto prevedeva che era probabile che l’esecuzione venisse accordata su richiesta di una persona non indicata come creditore in un ordine di esecuzione solamente se questa persona provava, con un ordine pubblico o altrimenti legalmente certificato che il credito le era stato trasferito. Se ciò fosse stato impossibile, il trasferimento del credito doveva essere provato da una data decisione definitivo in procedimenti civili.
4. Atto di Procedimento civile (Закон за парничната постапка) del 1998
53. La Sezione 319 dell’Atto di Procedura Civile (“l'Atto del 1998”) che era in vigore al tempo attinente prevedeva che una decisione divenisse definitiva quando non si sarebbe più potuto depositare un ricorso contro questa.
54. In conformità con la sezione 380 (1) dell'Atto del 1998, in caso di vizi procedurali sostanziali la Corte Suprema annullava solamente la decisione della corte di prima e seconda istanza ed assegnava di nuovo la causa per una revisione.
55. La Sezione 381 dell'Atto del 1998 prevedeva che dove il diritto sostanziale era stato applicato erroneamente, la Corte Suprema sosteneva il ricorso su questioni di diritto e rovesciava la decisione contestata. In casi dove i fatti erano stati stabiliti erroneamente a causa dell’applicazione incorretta del diritto sostanziale e dove non c'erano motivi per rovesciare la decisione contestata, la Corte Suprema sosteneva il ricorso su questioni di diritto ed assegnava di nuovo la causa per una nuova considerazione.
56. In conformità con la sezione 387 dell'Atto del 1998, l'accusatore pubblico potrebbe presentare, entro tre mesi, una richiesta per la protezione della legalità a riguardo di una decisione definitiva. Quando la richiesta era stata depositata a riguardo di una decisione di seconda -istanza, questo termine iniziava a decorrere dalla data in cui è stata notificata la decisione all’ultima parte. Dove le parti riguardate avevano depositato un ricorso su questioni di diritto contro la decisione di seconda -istanza, l'accusatore pubblico potrebbe presentare una richiesta per la protezione della legalità a riguardo di quella decisione entro trenta giorni dalla data di notifica del ricorso su questioni di diritto.
57. In conformità con la sezione 390, una richiesta di revisione di legalità potrebbe essere depositata o a riguardo di un vizio procedurale sostanziale o di un’applicazione incorretta del diritto sostanziale. Non si poteva depositare dove la decisione contestata andava oltre la sfera della rivendicazione o dove erano stati erroneamente o incompletamente stabiliti i fatti.
58. La Sezione 394(2) l'Atto prevedeva, inter alia che le sezioni 370, 373 a 381 e 383 a 385 si applicassero, mutatis mutandis, a procedimenti riguardo ad una richiesta di revisione di legalità.
5. Atto di Procedimento civile del 2005
59. L'Atto che abrogò l'Atto del 1998 non contiene qualsiasi approvvigiona riguardo ai procedimenti di revisione di legalità.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
60. La richiedente si lamentò che la lunghezza dei procedimenti di esecuzione era stata incompatibile col “ termine ragionevole” requisito stabilito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, si legge come segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ad ognuno viene concessa un’... udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole da parte di [un]... tribunale...”
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
61. La richiedente presentò che i procedimenti di esecuzione sarebbero stati considerati come un solo set e che l'uso eccessivo de3ll’applicazione della revisione di legalità straordinaria aveva influenzato la loro lunghezza. Lei affermò inoltre che la causa non era stata di natura complessa e che lei non poteva essere ritenuta per responsabile dell'uso ripetuto delle vie di ricorso disponibili da parte del debitore ed accusatore pubblico.
62. Il Governo presentò che la causa era stata di fatti di natura complessa in quanto aveva richiesto la determinazione di difficili problemi legali: la qualità della richiedente per agire; se degli altri procedimenti di esecuzione erano già pendenti fra le stesse parti al tempo in cui l'impresa aveva richiesto l’esecuzione dell'accordo del 1994; e se questi ultimi avrebbero dovuto essere considerati un ordine di esecuzione.
63. Dibatté inoltre che la richiedente aveva contribuito alla lunghezza dei procedimenti non riuscendo a presentare una qualsiasi prova scritta in appoggio alle sue dichiarazioni per cui il credito dell'impresa era stato trasferito a lei sino al giugno 2000. Fece anche riferimento all'uso esteso di tutte le vie di ricorso disponibili da parte del debitore e la sua precaria situazione economica.
64. Riguardo alla condotta delle autorità, il Governo sostenne che i tribunali avevano preso tutti i passi ragionevoli per evitare ritardi non necessari.
2. La valutazione della Corte
65. La Corte nota che i procedimenti di esecuzione furono avviati il 2 ottobre 1993, quando l'impresa chiese l’esecuzione della decisione del Tribunale del commercio del Distretto di Skopje datata 23 giugno 1993. Come stabilito dai tribunali nazionali, questi procedimenti terminarono il 30 aprile 1998 (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra). Il 18 febbraio 1997 un altro set di procedimenti di esecuzione fu avviato a riguardo dell'accordo del 1994. Questi due set di procedimenti riguardavano le stesse parti e mezzi di esecuzione. La richiedente era parte ad entrambi i set, o come proprietario dell'impresa e rappresentante o di persona. Può di conseguenza essere considerata come abilitata per lamentarsi dei procedimenti dal loro inizio (vedere Cocchiarella c. Italia [GC], n. 64886/01, § 113 ECHR 2006).
66. I procedimenti di esecuzione terminarono il 25 luglio 2002, quando la decisione della Corte Suprema fu notificata alla richiedente. Durarono così quasi otto anni e dieci mesi dei quali cinque anni, tre mesi e quindici giorni rientrano all'interno della giurisdizione della Corte ratione temporis (dalla ratifica della Convenzione dello Stato rispondente il 10 aprile 1997) a tre livelli di corte. La Corte osserva inoltre che per determinare la ragionevolezza del periodo in oggetto, bisogna tenere anche in considerazione lo stato della causa in data della ratifica (vedere Atanasovic ed Altri c. precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia, n. 13886/02, § 26 22 dicembre 2005) e nota che il 10 aprile 1997 i procedimenti di esecuzione di cui ci si lamenta erano già pendente da più di tre anni e due mesi.
67. La Corte reitera che il “diritto ad un tribunale ” sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di uno Stato Contraente concedesse una decisione giudiziale definitiva e vincolante di rimanere non operativa a danno di una parte. L’esecuzione di una data sentenza da parte di un qualsiasi tribunale deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante del “ processo” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6. Lo Stato ha un obbligo sotto l’Articolo 6 di organizzare un sistema per l'esecuzione delle sentenze che sia effettivo sia in diritto che in pratica e che assicuri la loro esecuzione senza ritardo indebito (vedere Jankulovski c. precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia, n. 6906/03, §§ 33 e 37, 3 luglio 2008).
68. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti deve essere valutata alla luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento ai seguenti criteri: la complessità della causa, la condotta del richiedente e delle autorità attinenti e cosa era in gioco per la richiedente nella controversia (vedere Atanasovic ed Altri, citata sopra, § 33 che anche riguarda procedimenti di esecuzione).
69. Nella presente causa, la Corte osserva che benché la causa presentasse qualche complessità legale, questo fattore da solo non può giustificare la lunghezza dei procedimenti.
70. Considera anche che non c'erano ritardi attribuibili alla richiedente. Quest’ ultima non può essere ritenuta responsabile per la condotta procedurale del debitore e dell’ accusatore pubblico (vedere Graberska c. precedente Repubblica iugoslava e della Macedonia, n. 6924/03, § 61, 14 giugno 2007, e Stojanov c. precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia, n. 34215/02, § 57 31 maggio 2007).
71. Riguardo alla condotta delle autorità, la Corte nota che, durante il periodo sotto considerazione, la causa della richiedente fu riconsiderata in cinque occasioni. Non si può dire perciò che i tribunali nazionali siano stati inattivi. Comunque, la Corte nota che la ripetizione di ordini di rinvio all'interno di uno set di procedimenti rivela una deficienza seria nel sistema giudiziale (vedere Pavlyulynets c. Ucraina, n. 70767/01, § 51, 6 settembre 2005, e Wierciszewska c. la Polonia, n. 41431/98, § 46 25 novembre 2003). La ragione principale per i numerosi rinvii era l'opinione giuridica diversa dei tribunali nazionali riguardante le questioni legali indicate dal Governo (vedere paragrafo 60 sopra). Era quei problemi che hanno influenzato la lunghezza dei procedimenti di esecuzione.
72. Avendo esaminato tutto il materiale presentato di fronte a sé, la Corte considera che nella presente causa la lunghezza dei procedimenti di esecuzione è stata eccessiva e non ha rispettato il requisito del “termine ragionevole” dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
73. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di questa disposizione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
74. La richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo s N.ro 1 che le era stato impedito di ottenere pagamento il debito dell'impresa, benché fosse stata il suo solo ultimo proprietario. L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
75. La richiedente sosteneva di avere una proprietà all'interno del significato della disposizione a cui si è appellata . Lei affermò che l'impresa non avrebbe dovuto essere considerata una persona giuridica, ma come una persona fisica i cui esercizi d'impresa erano stati registrati dal Ministero autorizzato. Effettivamente, i suoi proprietari erano personalmente responsabili per i debiti ed obblighi dell'impresa vis-à-vis di terze parti. Lei presentò inoltre che l'interferenza dell'accusatore pubblico nei procedimenti non era stata nell'interesse pubblico per le seguenti ragioni: era stato influenzato; aveva rappresentato gli interessi privati solamente di una delle parti riguardate; ed il diritto sostanziale era stato applicato erroneamente.
76. Il Governo presentò che contrariamente al debito dell'impresa che sarebbe potuto rientrate all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, non si poteva considerare che la richiedente avesse avuto, una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato di questo Articolo, poiché lei non era riuscita a stabilire che il credito dell'impresa era stato trasferito a lei. Asserì che alla richiedente non era stata accordato lo status di creditore con una decisione irreversibile. Benché lei fosse stata riconosciuta come creditore da tre decisioni definitive della Corte d'appello, queste ultime erano state revisionate dalla Corte Suprema che, in conformità col principio della legalità, aveva sostenuto le richieste di revisione di legalità dell'accusatore.
77. Affermò inoltre che la richiedente, presumendo anche che avrebbe potuto essere considerata come se avesse avuto una “ proprietà” sotto questa disposizione, era stata privata di questa nell'interesse pubblico e in conformità con le condizioni previste dalla legge. La privazione addotta fu basata sulla richiesta di revisione di legalità dell'accusatore pubblico, una via di ricorso straordinaria mirata ad assicurare l'uniformità dell'ordinamento giuridico ed il principio della legalità. Inoltre, lo Stato aveva, tramite questa via di ricorso, esercitato il suo potere di revisione in cause in cui una legge o un accordo internazionale erano stati infranti da una decisione definitiva di corte.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Se c'era una proprietà
78. La Corte d'appello, con la sua decisione del 6 settembre 2001 conferì al richiedente un credito esecutiva stabilendo che la qualità dell'impresa era assegnata legalmente solamente a lei. Questa decisione divenne definitiva siccome non fu fatta nessuna disposizione di ricorso ordinaria contro questa (vedere paragrafi 48 e 49 sopra). Questo credito può essere riguardato come una “proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, sentenza del 9 dicembre 1994 Serie A n. 301-B, p. 84, § 59; Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 40 ECHR 2002-III; Roşca c. Moldavia, n. 6267/02, § 31 22 marzo 2005; e Ryabykh c. Russia, n. 52854/99, § 61 ECHR 2003-IX).
(b) Se c'era interferenza
79. È giurisprudenza stabilita di questa Corte che l’annullamento di una sentenza definitiva e vincolante che ha conferito una “ proprietà” al richiedente costituisce un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente a quella proprietà (vedere Tregubenko c. Ucraina, n. 61333/00, § 51, 2 novembre 2004, e Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 74 ECHR 1999-VII). La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di scostarsi da questo approccio nella presente causa.
(c) Se l'interferenza è stata giustificata
80. La Corte richiama che il Preambolo alla Convenzione dichiara, fra le altre l’ordinamento come parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti (vedere Brumărescu, citata sopra, § 61).
81. Riguardo all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte ha stabilito che una privazione di proprietà può essere giustificata solamente se viene mostrato, inter alia,di essere “nell'interesse pubblico” e “soggetta alle condizioni previste dalla legge.” Inoltre qualsiasi interferenza con la proprietà deve soddisfare anche il requisito della proporzionalità. L'equilibrio richiesto non sarà previsto dove la persona riguardata sopporta un “carico individuale eccessivo” (vedere Tregubenko, citata sopra, § 53).
82. Nella presente causa, la Corte nota che l'interferenza dello Stato coi diritti di proprietà della richiedente è stata fatta con la decisione della Corte Suprema del 30 maggio 2002. Questa decisione fu fatta su richiesta di revisione di legalità dell'accusatore pubblico sotto le regole allora applicabili dei procedimenti civili (vedere paragrafi 52-58 sopra). L'interferenza fu fatta facendo seguito ad una via di ricorso richiesta da un organo Statale che non era una parte ai procedimenti (vedere Roseltrans c. Russia, n. 60974/00, §§ 13 e 27, 21 luglio 2005). Inoltre, l'accusatore pubblico aveva la piena discrezione nel decidere se depositare la richiesta di revisione di legalità presso la Corte Suprema (vedere Lepojić c. Serbia, n. 13909/05, § 54, 6 novembre 2007, e Dimitrovska c. precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia (dec.), n. 21466/03, 30 settembre 2008). Per queste ragioni, la Corte considera, che gli effetti legali della revisione di legalità dei procedimenti sotto l'Atto del 1998-l'annullamento da parte della Corte Suprema della decisione del 6 settembre 2001 - erano comparabili a quelli del sistema di revisione direttivo esistente in alcuni Stati Contraenti, poiché la Corte Suprema annullò un intero processo giudiziale che era terminato con una decisione giudiziale che era “irreversibile” e così res judicata (veda Brumărescu, citata sopra, § 62; Roşca c. Moldavia, n. 6267/02, § 27 22 marzo 2005; Svetlana Naumenko c. Ucraina, n. 41984/98, § 92, 9 novembre 2004 e Ryabykh c. Russia, n. 52854/99, § 53 ECHR 2003-IX).
83. La Corte costata che l'annullamento della decisione del 6 settembre 2001 non era compatibile con l’ordinamento che è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere, a contrario, Protsenko c. Russia, n. 13151/04, § 33 del 31 luglio 2008 nel quale la Corte trovò che l'insuccesso nel prendere in considerazione gli interessi di una terza persona i cui diritti furono colpiti notevolmente dalla decisione definitiva era una base legittima per riaprire i procedimenti su richiesta di revisione direttiva)..
84. Avendo riguardo alle considerazioni sopra, la Corte considera, che il “giusto equilibrio” è stato sconvolto dalla situazione provocata dalla decisione della Corte Suprema e che la richiedente ha sopportato un carico individuale eccessivo. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
85. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
86. La richiedente chiese MKD 21,774,593 con interesse legale dall’ 11 ottobre 1994 sino all'accordo a riguardo del danno materiale subito sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Questa cifra si riferisce all'importo specificato nell'accordo del 1994 (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). La richiedente ha chiesto anche 1,000,000 euro (EUR) per i costi della vita dovuti agli “affari distrutti e ai lavori perduti.” Lei addusse che il debitore era stato dichiarato insolvente e che lei avrebbe potuto recuperare il suo credito. Infine, chiese EUR 30,000 a riguardo del danno morale per l'ansia e la sofferenza emotiva subite come conseguenza della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti.
87. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni come non comprovate. Riguardo al danno materiale affermò che : a) non c'era nessuna base per assegnare l'importo stabilito nell'accordo del 1994, data la scorsa decisione della Corte Suprema che respingeva il credito della richiedente e b) non c'era collegamento causale fra le violazioni addotte ed i “costi della vita” chiesti.
88. Riguardo al danno materiale chiesto sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte osserva che la richiedente non ha presentato nessuna prova che il debitore, al tempo in cui la Corte Suprema rese la sua decisione, era stato controllato dallo Stato il che comporterebbe la diretta responsabilità Statale per il debito di sentenza creato dalla decisione della Corte d'appello del 6 settembre 2001. Inoltre, dall’archivio della causa, così com’è, la Corte non può stabilire se, allo stesso punto nel tempo, il debitore aveva i beni sufficienti per attenersi all'accordo del 1994. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che nessuna prova è stata presentata riguardo a se o a quando il debitore fu dichiarato insolvente o a come simile insolvenza abbia colpito la capacità della richiedente di recuperare il debito. In queste circostanze, la Corte non trova collegamento causale fra il danno materiale chiesto e la violazione trovata. Respinge perciò la rivendicazione della richiedente per l'importo specificato nell'accordo del 1994. Per le stesse ragioni, respinge anche la rivendicazione della richiedente per cui l’ interesse dovrebbe essere pagato su questo importo.
89. La Corte nota inoltre che la richiedente non ha fornito nessuna prova che le permetterebbe di determinare se ed in che misura le violazioni trovate abbiano avuto un qualsiasi impatto negativo sullo standard di vita della richiedente, come addotto: respinge perciò questa rivendicazione.
90. Infine, la Corte accetta che la richiedente ha sofferto di un danno morale che sufficientemente non sarebbe compensato da solo con la costatazione delle violazioni (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Teltronic-CATV c. Polonia, n. 48140/99, § 70 10 gennaio 2006). Facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa ed avendo riguardo alle circostanze della causa, la Corte assegna EUR 1,600 alla richiedente sotto questo capo.
B. Costi e spese
91. La richiedente ha chiesto MKD 2,334,100 (circa EUR 38,100) più interesse dal 30 maggio 2002 sino ad accordo per i costi e le spese incorsi di fronte ai tribunali nazionali. Questi includevano parcelle legali e dei tribunali. La richiedente ha fornito un elenco particolareggiato dei costi. Nessuna prova è stata offerta riguardo alle parcelle di corte. Infine, ha chiesto EUR 5,000 per i costi e le spese incorsi nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte. Nessun documento è stato presentato in appoggio a questa seconda rivendicazione.
92. Il Governo ha contestato queste rivendicazioni come non comprovate.
93. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso un rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente se è stato mostrato che questi sono stati davvero e necessariamente sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum (vedere Edizioni Plon c. Francia, n. 58148/00, § 64 ECHR 2004-IV). La Corte indica che sotto l’Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte “la richiedente deve presentare dettagli particolareggiati di tutte le rivendicazioni, insieme con qualsiasi documento attinente di supporto in mancanza di cui la Camera può respingere la rivendicazione interamente o in parte” (vedere Parizov c. precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia, n. 14258/03, § 71 7 febbraio 2008).
94. Avendo riguardo alla nota di parcella presentata dal richiedente, la Corte costata che solamente EUR 1,000 relativi alle parcelle dell’ avvocato che è post-datata rispetto alla ratifica della Convenzione dello Stato rispondente e sono stati spesi nella prospettiva di chiedere la difesa di fronte ai tribunali nazionali dalle violazioni trovate dalla Corte (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Stoimenov c. precedente Repubblica iugoslava e di Macedonia, n. 17995/02, § 56 5 aprile 2007).
95. In queste circostanze, la Corte non è in grado di assegnare la totalità della somma chiesta riguardo i costi e le spese incorsi nei procedimenti nazionali. Considera che si possa concedere alla richiedente un rimborso sotto questo capo pari alla somma di EUR 1,000, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a suo carico.
96. Infine, la Corte nota che la richiedente non ha presentato alcun documento di sostegno o alcun dettaglio riguardo alla sua rivendicazione per i costi e le spese incorsi nei procedimenti di fronte a sé. Di conseguenza, non assegna alcuna somma sotto questo capo (vedere Parizov, citata sopra, § 72).
C. Interesse di mora
97. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articoli 6 § 1 della Convenzione riguardo alla lunghezza dei procedimenti in oggetto;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare la richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi, da convertire nella valuta nazionale dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 1,600 (mille seicento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, riguardo al danno morale;
(ii) EUR 1,000 (mille euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico della richiedente, riguardo ai costi e alle spese incorsi a livello nazionale;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
4. Respinge all’unanimità il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 17 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento della Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.