Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MOSKAL v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, P1-1

NUMERO: 10373/05/2009
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 15/09/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; Remainder inadmissible ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF MOSKAL v. POLAND
(Application no. 10373/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
15 September 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Moskal v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Nebojša Vučinić, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 25 August 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 10373/05) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Polish national, Ms M. M. (“the applicant”), on 1 February 2005.
2. The applicant was represented by Ms R. S., a lawyer practising in Strzyżów. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the ex officio re-opening of the social security proceedings concerning her right to an early-retirement pension, which resulted in the quashing of the final decision granting her a right to a pension, was in breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. She also complained that the same facts had given rise to a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention. She alleged in this connection that the revocation of her acquired right to an early-retirement pension amounted to an unjustified deprivation of property and to discrimination on the grounds of her place of residence. Lastly, the applicant alleged an interference with her right to respect for her private and family life on account of the fact that she had been deprived of her sole source of income.
4. On 19 September 2006 a Chamber of the Fourth Section of the Court decided to give notice to the Government of the complaints under Articles 6 and 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention alone and read in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention. It was decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 3 of the Convention).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant, Ms M. M., is a Polish national who was born in 1955 and lives in Glinik Chorzewski.
6. The applicant is married with three children. She has a medium-level education. Prior to her early retirement she was employed for thirty-one years and had paid her social security contributions to the State. Her child, born in 1994, suffers from atopic bronchial asthma (atopowa astma oskrzelowa), various allergies and recurring sino-pulmonary infections.
A. Proceedings for early-retirement pension
7. On 6 August 2001 the applicant filed an application with the Rzeszów Social Security Board to be granted the right to an early-retirement pension for persons raising children who, due to the seriousness of their health condition, required constant care, the so-called “EWK” pension.
8. The particular type of pension sought by the applicant was at the relevant time regulated by the Cabinet's Ordinance of 15 May 1989 on the right to early retirement of employees raising children who require permanent care (Rozporządzenie Rady Ministrów z dn. 15 maja 1989 w sprawie uprawnień do wcześniejszej emerytury pracowników opiekujących się dziećmi wymagającymi stałej opieki) (“the 1989 Ordinance”).
9. Along with her application for a pension, the applicant submitted, among other documents, a medical certificate issued on 2 August 2001 by a specialist in allergy and pulmonology from the Health Service Institution in Strzyżów (Zespół Opieki Zdrowotnej). The certificate stated that the applicant's seven-year-old son had suffered from the age of three months from atopic bronchial asthma, various allergies, as well as frequent sino-pulmonary infections often accompanied by fever and bronchial constriction (spastyczne skurcze oskrzeli). Consequently, he was in need of his mother's constant care. It was further noted that the medical certificate had been issued in connection with the application for an early-retirement pension regulated by the 1989 Ordinance in view of the need to provide permanent care to the child from 31 December 1998 onwards.
10. On 29 August 2001 the Rzeszów Social Security Board (Zakład Ubezpieczeń Społecznych) issued a decision granting the applicant the right to an early-retirement pension in the amount of 1,683 Polish zlotys (PLN) gross (PLN 1,020 net), starting from 1 August 2001. In the same decision, however, the Social Security Board suspended the payment of the pension due to the fact that the applicant was still working on the date of the decision.
11. On 31 August 2001 the applicant resigned from her full-time job as a clerk at the Polish Telecommunications Company in Rzeszów, where she had been employed for the past thirty years.
12. Consequently, on an unspecified date, the Rzeszów Social Security Board issued a new decision authorising the payment of the previously awarded retirement pension starting from 1 September 2001.
13. Subsequently, the applicant was issued with a pensioner's identity card marked 'valid indefinitely' and for the following ten months she continued to receive her pension without interruption.
B. Re-opening of proceedings for early-retirement pension
14. On 25 June 2002 the Rzeszów Social Security Board issued two decisions. By virtue of the first decision, the payment of the applicant's pension was discontinued starting from 1 July 2002. By virtue of the second decision, the Board revoked the initial decision of 29 August 2001 and eventually refused to award the applicant the right to an early-retirement pension under the scheme provided for by the 1989 Ordinance. The latter decision stated that on 4 June 2002 the proceedings concerning the applicant's right to a pension had been re-opened ex officio and that, as a result, “the medical certificate attached to her application for a pension had been found to raise doubts [as to its accuracy]”. Furthermore, the following standard clause appeared in the decision:
“In the light of the medical documentation obtained concerning the child, it was established that the condition with which the child had been diagnosed was not enumerated in the [1989] Ordinance, and the analysis of the level of severity and the course [of the disease] did not indicate an impairment of bodily functions to such a degree as to justify the award of the pension [on account of] the necessity of permanent care of the child. It follows that the medical certificate serving as the basis for the award of the benefit is not supported by medical documentation. Consequently the right to a retirement pension is denied.”
15. The applicant appealed against the decision of 25 June 2002 divesting her of the right to an early-retirement pension. She submitted that she should receive the benefit because her son required her constant care, as confirmed by the medical certificate attached to the original application. Moreover, the applicant alleged that the revocation of her retirement pension was contrary to the principle of vested rights.
16. On 26 February 2003 the Rzeszów Regional Court (Sąd Okręgowy) dismissed the applicant's appeal.
17. A medical report by an expert in pulmonology was ordered by the Regional Court. Having examined the medical documentation concerning the applicant's son, as well as the child in person, the expert found that the applicant's son suffered from sporadic bronchial asthma and recurring sino-pulmonary infections. The expert concluded that the child did not require, as of 31 December 1998 or at the time of the proceedings, his mother's permanent care, her nursing or any further aid, since his bronchial asthma did not significantly impair his respiratory functions. He further observed that the applicant's care was needed only when the child's condition occasionally became more severe.
18. Relying on the above expert opinion, the Regional Court held that the applicant had been rightfully divested of the right to a pension under the scheme provided by the 1989 Ordinance as she did not satisfy the requirement of necessary permanent care. The Regional Court did not examine the case from the standpoint of the doctrine of vested rights.
19. On 16 October 2003 the Rzeszów Court of Appeal (Sąd Apelacyjny) dismissed the applicant's appeal against the aforementioned judgment. The Court of Appeal agreed with the findings of fact contained in the expert opinion produced in the course of the first-instance proceedings to the effect that the applicant's son did not require at the relevant time his mother's permanent care.
20. On the issue of the re-opening of the proceedings, the Court of Appeal observed that decisions concerning retirement and disability pensions were only of a declaratory character. Therefore, they could be quashed by a social security authority where new evidence had been submitted or relevant circumstances, which pre-existed the initial pension award but which had not been taken into consideration by the authority beforehand, had come to light.
21. Furthermore, the Court of Appeal observed that pension decisions could be verified even in the light of pre-existing circumstances which had not been taken into consideration as a result of the authority's own mistake or negligence. On the other hand, the Court of Appeal agreed with the applicant that the proceedings could not be re-opened as a consequence of a different assessment of the very same evidence which had accompanied the original application for a pension.
22. The Court of Appeal found that, in the instant case, the impugned pension proceedings had been re-opened because relevant circumstances pre-existing the initial pension award had been discovered by the authority in the course of a supplementary examination of the child's entire medical record by the Social Security Board's doctor (lekarz orzecznik).
23. Finally, the Court of Appeal stated that the doctrine of vested rights did not apply to rights acquired unjustly, for example when a person had been granted a right to a pension whereas in fact he or she had never met the requirements laid down in the relevant provisions. The Court of Appeal recalled that the purpose behind the 1989 Ordinance was to enable the carers of children with extremely severe disorders to take early retirement. It was aimed at providing a substitute source of income in cases where persons had lost their wages owing to the need to terminate their employment in order to take care of their sick children on a permanent basis. The Court of Appeal emphasised that, in such circumstances, it was necessary for the social security authorities to make a careful examination of whether or not persons applying for the right in question satisfied all the requirements.
24. On 7 May 2004 (decision served on 7 August 2004) the Supreme Court (Sąd Najwyższy) dismissed the applicant's cassation appeal, fully endorsing the Court of Appeal's findings of fact and law. Referring to the particular circumstances of the case, the Supreme Court held that the social security authority had lacked evidence as to the severity of the child's condition, since the medical certificate attached to the application did not specify those activities which the child could not perform due to his alleged impairment. The fact that the aforementioned evidence had been lacking at the date of the decision did not come to light until after the validation of the decision. Therefore, the impugned proceedings had been re-opened due to the discovery of new relevant circumstances and not on the basis of a re-examination of the very same evidence attached to the applicant's application for a pension.
25. The applicant was not ordered to return her early-retirement benefits paid by the Social Security Board from 1 September 2001 until 1 July 2002, despite the revocation of her right to the early-retirement pension.
C. The applicant's social security status after the revocation of the “EWK” pension
26. In the period from 1 July 2002 (the date on which the payment of the applicant's “EWK” pension was discontinued) to 25 October 2005 the applicant was not in receipt of any social benefits. The applicant submitted that in that period she had had no other income.
As a result of separate social security proceedings, which had been instituted by the applicant, the Strzyżów District Labour Office (Powiatowy Urząd Pracy) decided on 25 October 2005 to grant the applicant a pre-retirement benefit (zasiłek przedemerytalny) in the amount of 523 Polish zlotys (PLN) net. Because, under the applicable law, a three-year statute of limitations applies to social security claims the decision to grant the right had a retroactive effect, with a starting date of 25 October 2002.
As a result, on an unspecified date, presumably on 1 August 2004, the applicant received a pre-retirement benefit in the form of a lump-sum payment for the period between 25 October 2002 and 31 July 2004, without interest.
The benefit was at first paid by the Strzyżów Regional Labour Office (Powiatowy Urząd Pracy) and since 1 August 2004 it was paid by the Rzeszów Social Security Board. As of March 2008 the applicant's pre-retirement benefit amounts to 594 Polish zlotys (PLN) net.
27. In the light of the law as it now applies, it appears that the applicant will qualify for a regular retirement pension in 2015.
D. Additional information
28. Approximately 120 applications arising from a similar fact pattern have been brought to the Court. The applicant in the instant case and most of the other applicants form the Association of Victims of the Social Security Board (Stowarzyszenie Osób Poszkodowanych przez ZUS) (“the Association”), an organisation monitoring the practices of the Social Security Board in Poland, in particular in the Podkarpacki region.
29. The applicant submitted, according to the Association, that only 10% of the total number of “EWK” pension recipients had been subjected to review and re-opening under Section 114 of the 1998 Law.
30. The Government submitted that as of the end of 2006 approximately 76,600 individuals had been in receipt of the “EWK” pension. Although there were no statistics as to how many pensions had been revoked either countrywide or in each region, that number was very small.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. System of granting social security benefits in Poland
31. The system of social security in Poland is regulated by the Law of 13 October 1998 on the system of social insurance (Ustawa o systemie ubezpieczeń społecznych) and a number of other acts applying to specific occupational groups and regulating specific types of benefits.
Proceedings for granting welfare benefits are two-tier. First, an application for a benefit is made to the regional Social Security Board. The board makes an assessment of the eligibility criteria for each type of benefit and issues a decision. Then, in the event that an individual concerned appeals, the decision becomes subject to judicial review by a social security court, which is a specialised branch of a regional civil court. The Social Security Board is a State authority which carries out administrative functions and issues declaratory decisions. In the judicial review phase, the Board becomes a party to the proceedings before the social security court.
A judicial decision taken by the regional social security court may then be challenged by either party to the proceedings before a special social security branch of a court of appeal. Ultimately, a decision delivered by an appellate court may be appealed to the Supreme Court. This remedy is available irrespective of the amount of the claim.
B. The 1989 Ordinance
32. The 1989 Ordinance ceased to be in force on 31 December 1998. However, its provisions remained in operation with regard to persons who had met the requirements of an early-retirement pension before that date but had failed to apply for the benefit in due time. The conditions to be fulfilled by a person in order to qualify for an early-retirement pension were laid down by paragraph 1 of the 1989 Ordinance.
Paragraph 1.1 contained a reference to section 26 paragraph 1 point 2 of the Law of 14 December 1982 on retirement pensions of employees and their families. In the relevant part it provided that persons entitled to an early-retirement pension were those persons (both women and men) who had been employed for at least 20 or 25 years and who personally took care of a child.
Paragraph 1.2 provided that for children under the age of 16 it was not necessary to submit an official Social Security Board disability certificate. It was sufficient to present a medical certificate issued by a specialist medical clinic stating: “due to the health condition, caused by one of the diseases enumerated in paragraph 1.3, the child requires permanent care”.
Paragraph 1.3 provided that early retirement was justified by the following physical and/or mental conditions of the child:
“1. Complete dysfunction of upper or lower limbs, pareses and palsies, which prevent the child from independent movement and from controlling his or her physiological functions;
2. Mild, moderate and severe mental retardation, mental disorders, injury or disease of the central nervous system, making impossible autonomy in decisions or in daily activities;
3. Mild mental retardation with accompanying significant impairment of movement, sight, hearing or other chronic diseases significantly impairing bodily functions;
4. Other diseases impairing body effectiveness to a very serious degree.”
C. Law of 17 December 1998 on retirement and disability pensions paid from the Social Insurance Fund
33. The re-opening of the proceedings concerning the benefit in question is regulated in section 114 of the 1998 Law, which at the relevant time read as follows:
“114.1 The right to benefits or the amount of benefits will be re-assessed upon application by the person concerned or, ex officio, if, after the validation of the decision concerning benefits, new evidence is submitted or circumstances which had existed before issuing the decision and which have an impact on the right to benefits or on their amount are discovered.”
D. The Supreme Court's resolution of 5 June 2003
34. In its resolution of 5 June 2003 (no. III UZP 5/03), adopted by a bench of seven judges, the Supreme Court (Sąd Najwyższy) dealt with the question submitted by the Ombudsman (Rzecznik Praw Obywatelskich) as to whether a different assessment of the evidence attached to the application for a pension, carried out by a social security authority after validation of the decision concerning the pension, might constitute a ground for re-opening the proceedings leading to a review of the right to a pension in accordance with section 114 of the Law of 17 December 1998 on retirement and disability pensions paid from the Social Insurance Fund. The answer was in the negative. The Supreme Court held, inter alia:
“A different assessment of the [same] evidence as attached to the application for a retirement or disability pension, carried out by a social security authority after validation of the decision awarding the right to a pension, is not one of the circumstances justifying the ex officio re-opening of the proceedings for a review of the right to a pension in accordance with section 114 of the Law of 17 December 1998 on retirement and disability pensions paid from the Social Insurance Fund.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
35. The applicant complained that divesting her, in the circumstances of the case, of her acquired right to an early-retirement pension had amounted to an unjustified deprivation of property. This complaint falls to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. Government's preliminary objection on incompatibility ratione materiae
(a) The Government
36. The Government submitted that the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention did not extend to erroneously acquired rights to pensions and welfare benefits, rights which, in fact, had never arisen under the domestic law.
(b) The applicant
37. The applicant submitted that the provision in question applied in her case and that she had been unjustly deprived of her property.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) General principles on the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
38. The principles which apply generally in cases under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are equally relevant when it comes to social and welfare benefits. In particular, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not create a right to acquire property. This provision places no restriction on the Contracting State's freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security scheme, or to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under any such scheme. If, however, a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit-whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions-that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 54, ECHR 2005-...).
39. In the modern democratic State many individuals are, for all or part of their lives, completely dependent for survival on social security and welfare benefits. Many domestic legal systems recognise that such individuals require a degree of certainty and security, and provide for benefits to be paid – subject to the fulfilment of the conditions of eligibility – as of right. Where an individual has an assertable right under domestic law to a welfare benefit, the importance of that interest should also be reflected by holding Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to be applicable (see, among other authorities, Stec, cited above, § 51).
40. The mere fact that a property right is subject to revocation in certain circumstances does not prevent it from being a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, at least until it is revoked (Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 105, ECHR 2000-I).
On the other hand where a legal entitlement to the economic benefit at issue is subject to a condition, a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfilment of the condition cannot be considered to amount to “possesions” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, §§ 82-83, ECHR 2001-VIII, and Rasmussen v. Poland, no. 38886/05, §71, 28 April 2009).
(b) Application of the Convention principles to the instant case
41. The applicant in the instant case had been employed for thirty-one years and paid her social security contributions to the State. Because her minor child suffered from asthma, various allergies and recurring sino-pulmonary infections she wished to take early retirement under the “EWK” pension scheme in order to provide better care to her child (see paragraph 6 above).
42. The early-retirement pension in question, regulated by the 1989 Ordinance, was conditional on the existence of three elements (see paragraph 28 above). The first element was the duration of the pensioner's employment prior to his or her application for a pension. The second element was the requirement that the pensioner personally took care of the child concerned. These requirements, by their nature, were susceptible to an objective assessment. On the other hand, the third element, which concerned the health condition of the pensioner's child – severe enough to make it necessary for the child to be under the permanent care of the pensioner (the requirement of necessary permanent care) – was variable and uncertain, and in the instant case had indeed been a matter of contention.
43. The Court notes that the decision issued by the Rzeszów Social Security Board on 29 August 2001 conferred on the applicant the entitlement to receive the “EWK” pension of 1,683 Polish zlotys (PLN) gross as of 1 September 2001. In doing so the social security authority agreed that the applicant had satisfied all the statutory conditions and qualified for the pension. The applicant was issued with a pensioner's identity card marked as 'valid indefinitely'. The 2001 decision was enforced without any interruption for ten consecutive months, until 1 July 2002. On 25 June 2002 the Rzeszów Social Security Board quashed the 2001 decision and refused to award the applicant the right to the “EWK” pension, noting that she had not satisfied one of the conditions necessary to qualify for that type of welfare benefit, namely that her child's health condition was not severe enough to require, as of 31 December 1998 or at the time of the revocation, his mother's permanent care (see paragraphs 10-14 above).
44. In the light of the parties' submissions, the Court accepts that the applicant applied for the early-retirement pension in good faith and in compliance with the applicable law. Because her child was not yet sixteen years old, she was not required to have her son examined by a board of doctors appointed by the social security authority. Instead, she had to attach to her pension application a health certificate concerning her child, signed by a specialist doctor. By submitting her pension dossier to the Rzeszów Social Security Board the applicant subjected her case to the evaluation of the State authorities (see paragraphs 7 and 9 above). As described above, the grant of the benefit in question depended on a number of statutory conditions, assessment of which rested fully with the social security authority. Consequently, the applicant could not be certain of the outcome of her application. On the other hand, as soon as the authorities confirmed that the applicant qualified for the benefit, she was justified in considering that decision accurate and in acting upon it. She resigned from her job, which was necessary to trigger the pension payment (see paragraphs 10-11 above), and organised her family's life accordingly. She could not have realised that her pension right had been granted by mistake and was justified in thinking that unless there was a change in the condition of her child's health the decision would not lose its validity.
45. The Court finds that, in the instant case, a property right was generated by the favourable evaluation of the applicant's dossier attached to the pension application which had been lodged in good faith and by the Social Security Board's recognition of the right. The decision of the Rzeszów Social Security Board of 29 August 2001 provided the applicant with an enforceable claim to receive the so-called “EWK” early-retirement pension in a particular amount, payable as soon as she resigned from her job. Based on this decision the applicant was in receipt of the pension from 1 September 2001 until 1 July 2002.
In so far as the Government submitted that the applicant did not qualify for the “EWK” benefit, the Court will address this matter from the point of view of justification for the withdrawal of the benefit.
(c) Conclusion on admissibility
46. It follows that in the circumstances of the case considered as a whole, the Court finds that the applicant may be regarded as having a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
The Court also notes that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' general submissions
(a) The applicant
47. The applicant submitted that divesting her, in the circumstances of the case, of her acquired right to an early-retirement pension had amounted to an unjustified deprivation of property. She also argued that even if the right had indeed been granted erroneously, an individual who had applied for the right in good faith should not be expected to pay the price for the mistake of public authorities acting without due diligence.
(b) The Government
48. The Government claimed that the interference with the applicant's property rights had been lawful and justified. In particular, divesting the applicant of her right to the early-retirement pension had been provided for by law and was in the general interest. There was also a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the interference and the interests pursued.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) General principles
49. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that the States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws” (see The former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, §§ 79 and 82, ECHR 2000-XII).
50. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 also requires that a deprivation of property for the purposes of its second sentence be in the public interest and pursue a legitimate aim by means reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see, among others authorities, Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, §§ 81-94, ECHR 2005).
51. Moreover, the principle of “good governance” requires that where an issue in the general interest is at stake it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, in an appropriate manner and with utmost consistency (see Beyeler, cited above, § 120, and Megadat.com S.r.l. v. Moldova, no. 21151/04, § 72, 8 April 2008).
52. The requisite “fair balance” will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52, and Brumărescu, cited above, § 78).
(b) Application of the above principles in the present case
(i) Whether there has been an interference with the applicant's possessions
53. The parties agreed that the decisions of the Rzeszów Social Security Board of 25 June 2002, which deprived the applicant of the right to receive the “EWK” pension, amounted to an interference with her possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(ii) Lawfulness of the interference
(α) The parties' submissions
The applicant
54. The applicant submitted that the interference had not been in accordance with the law since the decision of the Rzeszów Social Security Board of 29 August 2001 had been quashed as a result of the review of the same evidence as attached to her original application for the pension. Such procedure was contrary to section 114 of the 1998 Law which, at the relevant time, allowed for the re-opening of pension proceedings only if new evidence was introduced or previously-existing circumstances came to light. The applicant also relied on the 2003 Resolution of the Supreme Court (see paragraph 30 above).
The Government
55. In the Government's submission, the interference had been in accordance with the law. They relied on the reasoning of the domestic courts which had reviewed the decision of 25 June 2002 (see paragraphs 16-24 above). The domestic courts found that the impugned re-opening had been triggered by the assessment of medical reports other than those attached to the applicant's pension application. That material had existed but had not been taken into account by the social security authority at the time when the applicant's right to a pension was being examined. This was considered to constitute newly-discovered circumstances within the meaning of section 114 of the 1998 Law.
(β) The Court
56. In the instant case the measure complained of was based on section 114 of the 1998 Law, which at the relevant time provided that the right to benefits could be re-assessed ex officio, if, after the validation of the decision concerning benefits, new evidence was submitted or relevant circumstances which had existed before the decision was issued were discovered. As previously observed, such a procedure is common to the legal systems of many member States.
The Court, giving due deference to the findings of the domestic courts, accepts that the proceedings in the applicant's case had been re-opened as a consequence of the discovery of the welfare authority's own mistake in its original assessment of the applicant's eligibility for the early-retirement pension under the 1989 Ordinance. The procedure was thus used to correct an error on the part of the social security board and to divest the applicant of the right to a pension which she had acquired unjustly (see paragraphs 88 and 89 below).
57. The Court therefore concludes that the interference with the applicant's property rights was provided for by law, as required by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(iii) Legitimate aim
58. The Court must now determine whether this deprivation of property pursued a legitimate aim, that is, whether it was “in the public interest”, within the meaning of the second rule under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(α) The parties' submissions
The applicant
59. The applicant made a general statement that the interference in question did not pursue a legitimate aim.
The Government
60. The Government submitted that the 1989 Ordinance had been put in place as part of the State's social policy aimed at assisting parents who, due to their child's health condition, could not reconcile their employment with the need to provide constant care to their child. Given the specific nature of the “EWK” pension, it was understandable why the requirements for eligibility for that benefit had to be defined rigidly and precisely. The applicant had been divested of her right to the early-retirement pension because, in fact, she did not satisfy the statutory requirements in order to qualify for this particular type of benefit. To continue the payment of the “EWK” pension to the applicant and other beneficiaries in a similar position would be accepting their unjust enrichment.
(β) The Court
61. Because of their direct knowledge of the society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures of deprivation of property. Here, as in other fields to which the safeguards of the Convention extend, the national authorities, accordingly, enjoy a certain margin of appreciation.
Furthermore, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive. The Court, finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, will respect the legislature's judgment as to what is “in the public interest” unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 46, Series A no. 98; The former King of Greece and Others, cited above, § 87; and Zvolský and Zvolská v. the Czech Republic, no. 46129/99, § 67 in fine, ECHR 2002-IX).
62. As already stated above, the aim of the interference in question was to correct a mistake of the social security authority, which resulted in the applicant unjustly acquiring a right to the “EWK” pension.
63. The Court considers that depriving the applicant of her early-retirement pension pursued a legitimate aim, namely to ensure that the public purse was not called upon to subsidise without limitation in time undeserving beneficiaries of the social welfare system.
(iv) Proportionality
64. Lastly, the Court must examine whether an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions strikes a fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights, or whether it imposes a disproportionate and excessive burden on the applicant (see, among many other authorities, Jahn and Others [GC], cited above, § 93). Despite the margin of appreciation given to the State, the Court must nevertheless, in the exercise of its power of review, determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the applicant's right to property (see Rosinski v Poland, no. 17373/02, § 78, 17 July 2007). The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention as a whole, including therefore the second sentence, which is to be read in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first sentence. In particular, there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measure depriving a person of his possessions (see Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, 20 November 1995, § 38, Series A no. 332, and The former King of Greece and Others, cited above, § 89). Thus the balance to be maintained between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of fundamental rights is upset if the person concerned has had to bear a “disproportionate burden” (see, among many other authorities, The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 December 1994, §§ 70-71, Series A no. 301-A).
(α) The parties' submissions
The applicant
65. In the applicant's view, there was no reasonable relationship between the interference and the interests pursued. In her submission, because the practice of reviewing applications for the “EWK” pension was limited to 10% of the total number of the benefit's recipients, the measure in question could not be regarded as having been of any significant financial advantage to the social security fund.
The applicant also claimed that she had borne an excessive burden in that the decision of 25 June 2002 had deprived her of her only source of income with immediate effect.
The Government
66. The Government submitted that the decision to divest the applicant of her right had not been disproportionate.
In the Polish social security system only retirement pensions granted under the general scheme, were, in principle, permanent and irrevocable. All other benefits, based on variable conditions, were subject to verification and possible rescission.
The Government also argued that the impugned measure had been applied on a small scale and equally throughout the entire country. The cases for review had been selected at random. The social security authority had the power to undertake the review at its own discretion within the limits provided by law, in particular by section 114 of the 1998 Law.
(β) The Court
67. The Court observes that in the instant case the Government did not justify the measure in question by the need to make savings in the interests of the social security fund (unlike in Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, no. 60669/00, § 43, ECHR 2004-IX). The State aimed primarily at achieving concordance between the factual situation of beneficiaries and their compliance with the statutory requirements for this type of pension.
68. In the instant case, a property right was generated by the favourable evaluation of the applicant's dossier attached to the application for a pension, which was lodged in good faith, and by the Social Security Board's recognition of the right (see also paragraph 45 above). Before being invalidated the decision of 29 August 2001 had undoubtedly produced effects for the applicant and her family (see in particular paragraph 11 above).
69. It must also be stressed that the delay with which the authorities reviewed the applicant's dossier was relatively long. The 2001 decision was left in force for ten months before the authorities became aware of their error. On the other hand, as soon as the error was discovered the decision to discontinue the payment of the benefit was issued relatively quickly and with immediate effect (see paragraph 14 above).
70. In the Court's opinion, the fact that the State did not ask the applicant to return the pension which had been unduly paid (see paragraph 25 above) did not mitigate sufficiently the consequences for the applicant flowing from the interference in her case.
71. Even though the applicant had an opportunity to challenge the Social Security Board's decision of 25 June 2002 in judicial review proceedings, her right to the pension was determined by the courts only two years later and during that time she was not in receipt of any welfare benefit (see paragraphs 15-24 and 26 above).
72. As stated above, in the context of property rights, particular importance must be attached to the principle of good governance. It is desirable that public authorities act with the utmost scrupulousness, in particular when dealing with matters of vital importance to individuals, such as welfare benefits and other property rights. In the instant case, the Court considers that having discovered their mistake the authorities failed in their duty to act in good time and in an appropriate and consistent manner.
73. The Court, being mindful of the importance of social justice, considers that, as a general principle, public authorities should not be prevented from correcting their mistakes, even those resulting from their own negligence. Holding otherwise would be contrary to the doctrine of unjust enrichment. It would also be unfair to other individuals contributing to the social security fund, in particular those denied a benefit because they failed to meet the statutory requirements. Lastly, it would amount to sanctioning an inappropriate allocation of scarce public resources, which in itself would be contrary to the public interest.
Notwithstanding these important considerations, the Court must, nonetheless, observe that the above general principle cannot prevail in a situation where the individual concerned is required to bear an excessive burden as a result of a measure divesting him or her of a benefit.
If a mistake has been caused by the authorities themselves, without any fault of a third party, a different proportionality approach must be taken in determining whether the burden borne by an applicant was excessive.
74. In this connection it should be observed that as a result of the impugned measure, the applicant was faced, practically from one day to the next, with the total loss of her early-retirement pension, which constituted her sole source of income. Moreover, the Court is aware of the potential risk that, in view of her age and the economic reality in the country, particularly in the undeveloped Podkarpacki region, the applicant might have considerable difficulty in securing new employment.
75. In addition, the Court notes that, despite the fact that under the applicable law the applicant qualified for another type of pre-retirement benefit from the State as soon as she lost her entitlement to the “EWK” pension, her right to the new benefit was not recognised until the decision of 25 October 2005, which finally brought an end to proceedings which had lasted three years. The amount of the applicant's pre-retirement benefit is approximately 50 % lower that her “EWK” pension (see paragraph 26 above). Even though the decision to grant the benefit was backdated, the benefit due for the period between 25 October 2002 and 31 July 2004 was paid without any interest (see paragraph 26 above). The mistake of the authorities left the applicant with 50% of her expected income, and it was only after proceedings lasting three years that she was able to obtain the new benefit.
Lastly, the fact that the applicant retained her full right to receive, as of 2015, an ordinary old-age pension from the pension fund is immaterial since this would have been the case even if she had continued to receive her “EWK” pension.
76. In view of the above considerations, the Court finds that a fair balance has not been struck between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights and that the burden placed on the applicant was excessive.
It follows that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
A. As regards the principle of legal certainty
77. The applicant also complained that the ex-officio re-opening of the social security proceedings, which had resulted in the quashing of the final decision granting her a right to a pension, was in breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in its relevant part reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
1. The parties' submissions
(a) The applicant
78. The applicant argued that the decision of 29 August 2001 of the social security authority granting her a right to an early-retirement pension was final. She submitted that the durability of social security decisions was crucial for the stability of the legal effects produced by such decisions. The principle of finality of such decisions corresponded to the principle of legal certainty of administrative decisions. In civil law that principle was referred to as res judicata and it resulted in the impossibility to institute new proceedings with the same subject matter involving the same parties.
79. The applicant referred to the Supreme Court's resolution of 2003 in which it had been observed that section 114 of the 1998 Law did not allow for a new assessment of the same evidence accompanying the original application for a pension. The right to a pension could be reviewed only on the basis of new evidence or newly-revealed circumstances.
The applicant maintained that her right to an early-retirement pension had been revoked solely as a result of a new assessment of the evidence which had been attached to the original application for a pension in 2001.
(b) The Government
80. The Government submitted that a social security decision did not benefit from the protection of the principle of legal certainty, construed as the principle of res judicata. They also argued that the notion of legal certainty was not absolute and that in the instant case there had been relevant and sufficient reasons to depart from that principle in order to secure respect for social justice and fairness. In particular, the Government submitted that section 114 of the 1998 Law enumerated the instances when a re-assessment of a right to a benefit or the amount of the benefit was required. Any such re-assessment implied that administrative or social security proceedings could be re-opened and a new decision – replacing the previous one – issued.
Moreover, the Government relied on the principle, stated in a Supreme Court judgment of 2001 and resolution of 2003, that a party to proceedings was not entitled to claim a right to benefits which had been established on the basis of an erroneous and subsequently revoked decision of an administrative authority.
81. The Government also drew attention to the fact that in the instant case the decision of 25 June 2002 to divest the applicant of the right to the early-retirement pension in question had been the subject of judicial control, with all guarantees derived from Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
They argued that if social security decisions were to benefit from the protection of a strictly applied principle of res judicata, administrative authorities would have no possibility to correct their decisions not to grant benefits to persons who were legitimately entitled to receive them.
Lastly, the Government observed that even if applied in the case of a social security decision, the principle of legal certainty, as defined in the Court's case-law, should not prevent a domestic authority from revoking an administrative decision by which a welfare authority had erroneously granted a never-existing right to a pension. Such revocation should be regarded as a legitimate departure from the principle of legal certainty.
2. The Court's assessment
82. The Court considers that the principle of legal certainty applies to a final legal situation, irrespective of whether it was brought about by a judicial act or an administrative or, as in the instant case, a social security decision which, on the face of it, is final in its effects.
It follows that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention or inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
83. However, having regard to the reasons which led the Court to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the Court finds that the applicant's complaint under Article 6 regarding the principle of legal certainty of the Convention does not require a separate examination.
B. As regards the alleged unfairness of the proceedings
84. The applicant also made a general complaint that the proceedings in her case had been unfair. In particular, she alleged that the domestic courts had wrongly assessed the evidence.
85. This complaint falls to be examined under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
However, pursuant to Article 35 § 3 of the Convention:
“The Court shall declare inadmissible any individual application submitted under Article 34 which it considers incompatible with the provisions of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, manifestly ill-founded ...”
86. The Court has no jurisdiction under Article 6 of the Convention to substitute its own findings of fact for the findings of domestic courts. The Court's only task is to examine whether the proceedings, taken as a whole, were fair and complied with the specific safeguards stipulated by the Convention.
87. In this connection, the Court notes that the applicant submitted that, contrary to the findings of the domestic courts, the impugned proceedings had been instituted as a result of a review of the same evidence as attached to her original application for a pension, and therefore not in compliance with the domestic law which stipulated the grounds for the re-opening of pension proceedings.
88. Assessing the circumstances of the instant case as a whole, the Court finds no indication that the impugned proceedings were conducted unfairly.
The applicant failed to submit any evidence that the national judicial authorities had in any way breached her rights or reached arbitrary conclusions. The national courts held hearings on the merits of the case, heard statements from all necessary witnesses, including the applicant, and examined and assessed all the evidence before them, including the medical records of the applicant's child submitted by both parties and the reports of an independent medical expert. Moreover, the factual and legal reasons for the national courts' findings were set out at length in the judgments of the Regional Court of 26 February 2003 and the Court of Appeal of 16 October 2003, as well as in the judgment of the Supreme Court of 7 May 2004. In their judgments the national judicial authorities gave a very persuasive and detailed analysis of all the relevant circumstances of the case and provided relevant and sufficient reasons for their decisions (see paragraphs 15-24 above).
89. It follows that the applicant's complaint under Article 6 § 1, concerning the alleged unfairness of the proceedings is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
A. As regards the loss of the “EWK” pension
90. The applicant complained of an interference with her right to respect for her private and family life in that by divesting her of the “EWK” pension the authorities had deprived her of her sole source of income and financial resources indispensable for her livelihood.
This complaint falls to be examined under Article 8 of the Convention, which in its relevant part reads as follows:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life...
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
1. The parties' submissions
(a) The applicant
91. The applicant submitted that prior to her early retirement her salary from the Polish Telecommunications Company had been an essential part of her family budget. Her husband's salary was low and they had to maintain three minor children, including the one who was chronically ill. In the first years of her son's life the applicant received regular help from her elderly mother. Afterwards, however, her mother could no longer be relied on because of her old age. This was when it became necessary for the applicant to take early retirement to stay at home with her son. The applicant submitted that in order to trigger the payment of the benefit granted in 2001 she had completely terminated her employment contract. She claimed that she had little prospect of finding a new job in the region, which had a high rate of unemployment. She also submitted that as a result of a legal loophole, having acquired the right to the “EWK” retirement pension she was considered to have waived indefinitely her right to other social security benefits.
(b) The Government
92. The Government submitted that the applicant was now in receipt of a pre-retirement benefit paid at first by the Strzyżów Regional Labour Office and currently, by the Rzeszów Social Security Board. Therefore, the applicant's argument that she was considered to have waived her right to any social benefit was untrue.
The Government also stated that a right to work was not guaranteed by the Convention. In any event, there was no link between the decision divesting the applicant of her early-retirement pension and the fact that she stood little chance of finding a new job.
2. The Court's assessment
93. The “EWK” pension is a social security benefit aimed at enabling parents to stop working in order to look after their seriously sick children. Moreover, in the instant case, the pension in question constituted the basis of the applicant's family budget.
In these circumstances, the Court accepts that divesting the applicant of the “EWK” pension must constitute an interference with her right to respect for her family life, given that the measure in question entails severe consequences for the quality and enjoyment of the applicant's family life and necessarily affects the way in which the latter is organised (see Petrovic v. Austria, 27 March 1998, § 27, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-II).
It follows that the instant complaint falls within the scope of Article 8 of the Convention. The Court notes that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
94. However, having regard to the reasons which led the Court to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, it finds that the applicant's complaint under Article 8 of the Convention does not require a separate consideration.
B. As regards the domestic proceedings
95. The applicant also complained that Article 8 of the Convention had been breached because her child's health condition had been the subject of an open dispute before the domestic courts during the pension proceedings. Moreover, the applicant claimed that her son had been examined in person by a court-appointed medical expert, which had caused him considerable stress. Lastly, the applicant complained that the report produced by the expert had been transferred to the Rzeszów Social Security Board.
96. The Court observes that the applicant instituted judicial proceedings to review the decision of the Rzeszów Social Security Board of 25 June 2005. As the Court has noted in the preceding paragraphs, in order to qualify for the “EWK” pension the applicant had to prove that her son's health was fragile enough to make him dependent on the applicant's permanent care.
97. In these circumstances, the Court finds it natural that the domestic courts examined all relevant evidence, which comprised various medical documents. Ordering a report on the child's health to be prepared by an independent doctor was both in compliance with the domestic law and legitimate in view of the subject matter of the proceedings. Finally, the Court does not consider that the applicant's son could have been particularly distressed by the medical check-up carried out by the court-appointed doctor. The child was about eight years old at the relevant time and used to medical personnel since he had received regular medical treatment from a very young age.
98. In view of the above, the Court finds that the applicant's complaint does not disclose any appearance of lack of respect for the privacy of the applicant's child or of interference with his rights protected by Article 8 of the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
99. Lastly, the applicant complained under Article 14 of the Convention, in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, of discrimination based on her place of residence. In particular, she alleged that limiting the practice of reviewing applications for the “EWK” pension to the Podkarpacki region had led to unjustified discrimination of “EWK” pensioners from that location. Without referring to any official statistics, the applicant submitted that the majority of the recipients of the “EWK” pension who had been subjected to a re-examination of their initial pension claims, had come from the Podkarpacki region.
This complaint falls to be examined under Article 14 of the Convention, in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
100. Noting that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention has been found to apply in the instant case (see paragraph 46 above) and assuming that a place of residence applied as a criterion for the differential treatment of citizens in the grant of State pensions is a ground falling within the scope of Article 14 of the Convention, the Court observes that in the instant case the applicant failed to submit precise data to substantiate her allegation of discrimination. In any event, the Court observes that the law on the re-opening of pension proceedings was at the relevant time implemented universally throughout the country. The contested measure was general and aimed at an unspecified group of persons benefiting from public funds in accordance with the principle of equality.
Even if there had been a difference in the treatment of “EWK” pensioners in the Podkarpacki region, and particularly the applicant, the Court observes that it cannot be excluded that such difference may have resulted from the more efficient practices implemented by the local social security authority for verifying pension applications as compared to other regions. In particular, there is no evidence which would indicate that persons in receipt of the “EWK” pensions in the Podkarpacki region were deliberately targeted by the State authorities.
101. In consequence, this complaint must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
102. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
1. Pecuniary damage
103. The applicant claimed 78,209 Polish zlotys (PLN) (currently corresponding to approximately 18,000 euros (EUR)) in respect of pecuniary damage. This amount comprised: (1) an equivalent of the “EWK” pension, which was not paid to her in the period from June until September 2002, (2) the difference between the “EWK” pension, which she did not receive and the special pre-retirement benefit, paid to her from October 2002 until March 2007, and (3) the difference between the “EWK” pension which she did not receive and the special pre-retirement benefit due for the period from April 2007 until October 2015, when the applicant qualified for a retirement pension under the general scheme.
The applicant also claimed 25,000 Polish zlotys (PLN) in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
104. The Government submitted that there was no causal link between the alleged violation and the pecuniary damage claimed. In respect of the claim for non-pecuniary damage, the Government observed that it was exorbitant. If the Court were to find a violation in the present case, the Government requested it to rule that that finding constituted in itself sufficient just satisfaction.
105. The Court finds that the applicant was deprived of her income in connection with the violation found and must take into account the fact that she undoubtedly suffered some pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage (see Koua Poirrez, cited above, § 70). Making an assessment on an equitable basis, as is required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards the applicant EUR 15,000 to cover all heads of damage.
B. Costs and expenses
106. The applicant did not make a claim for any costs and expenses incurred.
C. Default interest
107. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the complaint under Article 6 of the Convention concerning the principle of legal certainty, the complaint under Article 8 of the Convention concerning the loss of the “EWK” pension, and the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds unanimously that it is not necessary to examine separately the applicant's complaints under Article 6 of the Convention concerning the principle of legal certainty and under Article 8 of the Convention concerning the loss of the “EWK” pension;
3. Holds by four votes to three that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds by four votes to three
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 15,000 (fifteen thousand euros), in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
5. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 September 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the joint partly dissenting opinion of Judges Bratza, Hirvelä and Bianku is annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
F.A.

JOINT PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGES BRATZA, HIRVELÄ AND BIANKU
1. The case is one of considerable importance, raising as it does an issue common to a number of applications against Poland which are currently pending before the Court. It concerns primarily the compatibility with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the revocation of the grant to the applicant of an early-retirement pension (the “EWK” pension) on the grounds that her son's health condition was not such as to require permanent care and that accordingly she had not been entitled to the pension at the time it was granted. To our regret, we are unable to join the majority of the Chamber in finding that the revocation of the EWK pension violated the applicant's rights under the Protocol.
2. It is not disputed by the parties, and we accept, that the decision of the Rzeszów Social Security Board of 25 June 2002 which deprived the applicant of the right to receive the EWK pension amounted to an interference with her possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. We also agree that the revocation served a legitimate aim, namely to ensure that the public purse was not required to continue to bear the cost of providing a benefit to which the applicant had never been entitled. Where we part company with the majority of the Chamber is on the question whether the revocation was in the circumstances of the case proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued and, more particularly, whether a fair balance was preserved between the demands of the general interest of the public and the requirement of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights.
3. The factors to be weighed on the applicant's side of the scale are undeniably powerful. In August 2001 the applicant lodged her application for the EWK pension in good faith and attached to it, as required, a medical certificate which was signed by a specialist on allergies and pulmonology and which certified that her son suffered from atopic bronchial asthma, various allergies and recurring sino-pulmonary infections which required his mother's constant care. After examining the application, the Social Security Board granted the applicant the right to an EWK pension as from 1 August 2001 but suspended payment of the pension since the applicant was still working. Shortly thereafter, the applicant resigned from her full-time employment and a new decision was issued by the Board authorising payment of the pension from 1 September 2001. The applicant was subsequently issued with a pensioner's identity card marked “valid indefinitely” and for the following 10 months continued to receive the pension without interruption. Until payment of the pension was discontinued and the decision to grant it was revoked in July 2002, the applicant had no reason to believe that she was not entitled to the pension and no reason to doubt that she would continue to receive it as long as there was no change in her child's medical condition. It is clear that the loss of the EWK pension had serious financial consequences for the applicant, who appears to have had no other source of income at the time and who is likely to have faced considerable difficulty in finding new employment. It is clear, too, that the blame for what had occurred lay not with the applicant but exclusively with the Social Security authorities who had erroneously approved the grant of the pension on the grounds that her son's health condition qualified the applicant to receive it.
4. We could readily accept that, in these circumstances, it would have been disproportionate had the authorities sought to recover from the applicant the EWK pension sums which they had erroneously paid. But this was not the case. Where we differ from the majority is in their view, which is confirmed by the award of just satisfaction, that a fair balance required that the applicant should continue to be paid the pension which she had mistakenly been awarded but to which she had no legal entitlement until the date of her retirement in 2015, or at least until her son attained the age of majority in 2012. In our view, it would, on the contrary, upset any fair balance if, once having discovered their mistake, the authorities were precluded from ever redressing its effects and were required to perpetuate the error by continuing to pay the pension which had been wrongly granted. This would, as the judgment expressly recognises, not only lead to the unjust enrichment of the recipient but would have an unfair impact on other individuals contributing to the Social Security fund, in particular those who were denied benefits because they failed to meet the statutory requirements; it would also amount to sanctioning an improper allocation of scarce public resources.
5. In this respect, the case is clearly distinguishable from that of Stretch v. the United Kingdom (No. 25543/02, judgment of 24 June 2003) in which the Court found to be a disproportionate interference with the applicant's property rights a local authority's refusal to permit the applicant to exercise an option to renew a lease on the expiry of the initial term, on the grounds that the original grant of the option had been ultra vires the local authority. The Court in that case observed that the lease agreement between the applicant and the local authority was one of a private law nature, that the local authority had received the agreed rent for the lease and that, on exercise of the option to renew, it had the possibility of negotiating an increase in the ground rent. In these circumstances, there was no ground for holding that the local authority had acted against the public interest in the way in which it had disposed of the property under its control or that any third party interests would have been prejudiced by giving effect to the renewal option and there was nothing per se objectionable in the inclusion of such a term in lease agreements. The Court further noted that there was no unjust enrichment of the applicant, who had the expectation of deriving a future return from his investment in the lease, the option to renew having been an important part of the lease for a person such as the applicant who had undertaken building obligations.
6. The majority in the present case place emphasis on the principle of good governance in the context of property rights and criticise the authorities for an alleged failure to act in good time and in an appropriate and consistent manner once having discovered their mistake. While we accept the importance of the principle of good governance, we cannot find that the principle was breached in the present case; the review of the award of the EWK pension took place, in our view, with reasonable promptness and, once having discovered the error, the authorities acted both properly and without any undue delay.
7. It is further argued that where, as here, a mistake has been caused by the authorities themselves without any fault of a third party, a “different proportionality approach” is called for when determining whether the burden borne by an applicant was excessive. It is unclear to us in what respect the approach to be adopted in such a case is said to differ from that in other cases. However, even accepting that a more stringent test may be required where the national authorities are responsible for the error which resulted in the original grant of the EWK pension, we do not find that the revocation of the grant imposed on the applicant an individual and excessive burden. We are confirmed in this view by four factors. In the first place, although the EWK pension awarded to the applicant was expressed to be valid indefinitely, it was not in any event a benefit which was permanent or immutable; the payment of the pension was subject to periodic review and was liable to be discontinued if, inter alia, the medical condition of the applicant's child was found no longer to require permanent care. Moreover, it was as the domestic courts found liable to be discontinued where new evidence had been submitted or where relevant circumstances, which pre-existed the initial pension award but which had not been taken into consideration by the authorities, had subsequently come to light. Secondly, the decision of the Social Security Board to revoke the grant of the pension was itself subjected to careful examination at three levels of jurisdiction by the domestic courts, which examined fresh medical evidence concerning the applicant's son before concluding that the applicant had been rightfully divested of the right to a pension under the scheme provided by the 1989 Ordinance as she did not satisfy the requirement of necessary permanent care. Thirdly, as noted above, despite the fact that the revocation was retrospective, the applicant was never required to repay the sums which had been mistakenly paid to her. Fourthly, when the applicant lost her entitlement to the EWK pension, she qualified for another form of pre-retirement benefit from the State, albeit one of significantly less value than the EWK pension. It is true that, for reasons which are unclear but may have been related to the fact that the applicant was concurrently pursuing proceedings in the domestic courts to challenge the revocation of the EWK pension, the proceedings to obtain the alternative pre-retirement benefits were not concluded until 25 October 2005. However, the award of these benefits was backdated to 25 October 2002, with the consequence that the applicant received a lump sum equivalent to 3 years' pension payments.
8. In these circumstances, we are unable to conclude that a fair balance was not struck between the competing public and private interests or that the applicant's rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 were violated.
9. As to Article 6 of the Convention, the reasons which we have relied on above serve also to answer the applicant's complaint that the revocation of the decision to award the EWK pension offended against the principle of legal certainty. Thus, like the majority of the Chamber, we do not consider that the applicant's complaint under that Article requires a separate examination.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; Resto inammissibile; danno Materiale e morale - assegnazione
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA MOSKAL C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 10373/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
15 settembre 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Moskal c. Polonia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, Päivi Hirvelä, Ledi Bianku, Nebojša Vučinić, giudici,
e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 25 agosto 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 10373/05) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino polacco, la Sig.ra M. M. (“il richiedente”), il 1 febbraio 2005.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato col Sig.ra R. S., un avvocato praticante a Strzyżów. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wołąsiewicz del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che la riapertura ex officio dei procedimenti di previdenza sociale concernenti il suo diritto ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento che diede luogo all’annullamento della decisione definitiva che gli accordava un diritto ad una pensione era in violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Si lamentò anche che gli stessi fatti avevano generato una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione da solo ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Addusse in questo collegamento che la revoca del suo diritto acquisito ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento ha corrisposto ad una privazione ingiustificata di proprietà ed alla discriminazione per motivi della sua residenza. Infine, il richiedente addusse un'interferenza con il suo diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare a causa del fatto che lei era stata privata della sua sola fonte di reddito.
4. Il 19 settembre 2006 una Camera della quarta Sezione della Corte decise di dare avviso al Governo delle azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6 e 8 della Convenzione e del’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione da solo e letto in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Fu deciso di decidere sull'ammissibilità e i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente, la Sig.ra M. M. è una cittadina polacco nata nel 1955 e che vive a Glinik Chorzewski.
6. Il richiedente è sposata con tre figli. Ha un'istruzione livello medio. Prima del suo primo pensionamento ha avuto un lavoro per trentun anni ed aveva pagato i suoi contributi di previdenza sociale allo Stato. Suo figlio, nato nel 1994, soffre di asma bronchiale atopica (atopowa astma oskrzelowa), di varie allergie ed infezioni sino-polmonari ricorrenti.
A. Procedimenti per la pensione di pre-pensionamento
7. Il 6 agosto 2001 il richiedente registrò una richiesta presso il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów perché le si accordasse il diritto ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento per persone che allevavano figli che, a causa della serietà della loro condizione di salute, richiedevano cure continue, la così definita pensione “EWK”.
8. Il particolare tipo di pensione chiesta dalla richiedente era al tempo attinente regolata dall'Ordinanza del Gabinetto del15 maggio 1989 sul diritto al pensionamento anticipato di impiegati che allevavano figli che richiedevano cure permanenti (Rozporządzenie Rady Ministrów z dn. 15 maja 1989 w sprawie uprawnień do wcześniejszej emerytury pracowników opiekujących się dziećmi wymagającymi stałej opieki) (“l'Ordinanza del 1989”).
9. Insieme alla sua richiesta per una pensione, fra gli altri documenti,la richiedente presentò, un certificato medico emesso il 2 agosto 2001 da un specialista in allergie e pneumologia dall'Istituzione del Servizio di Sanità a Strzyżów (Zespół Opieki Zdrowotnej). Il certificato affermò che il figlio di sette anni della richiedente aveva sofferto all'età di tre mesi de asma bronchiale atopica, di varie allergie così come spesso di infezioni sino-polmonari frequentemente accompagnate da febbre e da costrizione bronchiale (spastyczne skurcze oskrzeli). Di conseguenza, aveva bisogno delle cure continue di sua madre. Si notò inoltre che il certificato medico era stato emesso in collegamento con la richiesta di una pensione di pre-pensionamento regolata dall'Ordinanza del 1989 in prospettiva del bisogno di offrire cure permanenti al figlio dal 31 dicembre 1998 in avanti.
10. Il 29 agosto 2001 il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów (Zakład Ubezpieczeń Społecznych) emise una decisione che accordava alla richiedente il diritto ad una pensione di presto-pensionamento nell'importo di 1,683 zloty polacchi (PLN) lordi (PLN 1,020 netti), a partire dal 1 agosto 2001. Nella stessa decisione, comunque il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale sospese il pagamento della pensione per il fatto che la richiedente stava ancora lavorando in data della decisione.
11.Il 31 agosto 2001 la richiedente si dimise dal suo lavoro a tempo pieno come impiegata alla Società di Telecomunicazioni polacca a Rzeszów, dove lei lavorava da trenta anni.
12. In una data non specificata, il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów emise di conseguenza, un decisione che autorizzava il nuovo pagamento della pensione di pensionamento anticipato assegnata a partire dal 1 settembre 2001.
13. Successivamente, alla richiedente fu emessa una carta d’ identità di pensionata contrassegnata come 'valida a tempo indeterminato' e per i seguenti dieci mesi ha continuato a ricevere la sua pensione senza interruzione.
B. Riapertura dei procedimenti per pensione di pre-pensionamento
14. Il 25 giugno 2002 il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów emise due decisioni. In virtù della prima decisione, il pagamento della pensione del richiedente fu cessato a partire dal 1 luglio 2002. In virtù della seconda decisione, il Consiglio revocò la decisione iniziale del 29 agosto 2001 e rifiutò infine di assegnare il diritto alla richiedente ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento sotto lo schema previsto dall'Ordinanza del 1989. La seconda decisione affermò che il 4 giugno 2002 i procedimenti riguardanti il diritto del richiedente ad una pensione erano stati riaperti ex officio e che, di conseguenza, “il certificato medico allegato alla sua richiesta per una pensione aveva sollevato dubbi [riguardo alla sua accuratezza].” Inoltre, la seguente clausola standard comparve nella decisione:
“Alla luce della documentazione medica ottenuta riguardo al figlio, fu stabilito, che la condizione che era stata diagnosticata al figlio non era enumerata nell’ Ordinanza[del 1989], e l'analisi del livello della gravità ed il corso [della malattia] non indicava un danneggiamento delle funzioni fisiche al punto da giustificare l'assegnazione della pensione [a causa ] della necessità di cure permanenti del figlio. Ne segue che il certificato medico presentato come base per l'assegnazione del beneficio non è sostenuto da documentazione medica. Di conseguenza il diritto ad una pensione di pensionamento è negato.”
15. Il richiedente fece appello contro la decisione del 25 giugno 2002 che la spossessa del diritto ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento. Lei presentò che avrebbe dovuto ricevere il beneficio perché suo figlio richiedeva le sue cure continue, come confermato dal certificato medico allegato alla richiesta originale. Inoltre, il richiedente addusse che la revoca della sua pensione di pensionamento era contraria al principio dei diritti acquisiti.
16. Il 26 febbraio 2003 la Corte Regionale di Rzeszów (Sąd Okręgowy) respinse il ricorso del richiedente.
17. Un referto medico da parte di un esperto in pneumologia fu ordinato dalla Corte Regionale. Avendo esaminato la documentazione medica riguardo al figlio della richiedente, così come il figlio in persona, l'esperto trovò che il figlio della richiedente soffriva di asma bronchiale e di sporadiche infezioni sino-polmonari ricorrenti. L'esperto concluse che il figlio non richiedeva, al 31 dicembre 1998 o al tempo dei procedimenti, le cura permanenti di sua madre, la sua assistenza o qualsiasi ulteriore aiuto, poiché la sua asma bronchiale non danneggiava significativamente le sue funzioni respiratorie. Lui osservò inoltre che si necessitavano di tanto in tanto delle cure da parte del richiedente solamente quando la condizione del figlio diveniva più grave.
18. Appellandosi all'opinione competente sopra, la Corte Regionale sostenne che il richiedente era stato spossessato giustamente del diritto ad una pensione sotto lo schema previsto dall'Ordinanza del 1989 siccome lei non soddisfaceva il requisito di cura permanente necessaria. La Corte Regionale non esaminò la causa dal punto di vista della dottrina dei diritti acquisiti.
19. Il 16 ottobre 2003 la Corte d'appello di Rzeszów (Sąd Apelacyjny) respinse il ricorso del richiedente contro la sentenza summenzionata. La Corte d'appello si confece alle sentenze di fatto contenute nell'opinione competente prodotta nel corso dei procedimenti di prima - istanza in quanto il figlio del richiedente non richiedeva al tempo attinente la cura permanente di sua madre.
20. Sul problema della riapertura dei procedimenti, la Corte d'appello osservò, che le decisioni riguardo al pensionamento e a pensioni di invalidità erano solamente di carattere dichiaratorio. Perciò, potevano essere annullate da un'autorità di previdenza sociale nel caso in cui nuove prove erano state presentate o erano venute alla luce circostanze attinenti preesistenti l'assegnazione della pensione iniziale ma che non erano state prese anteriormente in esame dall'autorità,.
21. Inoltre, la Corte d'appello osservò che le decisioni riguardo alle pensioni potrebbero essere verificate anche alla luce di circostanze preesistenti che non erano state prese in esame come risultato del proprio errore dell'autorità o della sua negligenza. D'altra parte la Corte d'appello concordò col richiedente sul fatto che i procedimenti non potevano essere riaperti come conseguenza di una valutazione diversa della stessa prova che aveva accompagnato la richiesta originale per una pensione.
22. La Corte d'appello trovò che, nella presente causa, i procedimenti di pensione contestati erano stati riaperti, perché le circostanze attinenti preesistenti l'assegnazione di pensione iniziale erano state scoperte dall'autorità nel corso di un esame supplementare dell’intero documento medico del figlio da parte del dottore del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale (lekarz orzecznik).
23. Infine, la Corte d'appello affermò che la dottrina dei diritti acquisiti non si applicava a diritti ingiustamente acquisiti, per esempio quando ad una persona era stato accordato un diritto ad una pensione mentre difatti non aveva mai soddisfatto i requisiti stabiliti nelle disposizioni attinenti. La Corte d'appello richiamò che il fine che risiedeva nell'Ordinanza del 1989 era permettere a coloro che si prendevano cura di figli con disturbi estremamente gravi di fruire di un pensionamento anticipato. Aveva il fine di offrire una fonte di reddito di sostituto in casi in cui persone avevano perso i loro salari a causa della necessità di cessare il loro lavoro per prendersi cura dei loro figli ammalati su base permanente. La Corte d'appello enfatizzò che, in simili circostanze, era necessario per le autorità di previdenza sociale fare un esame accurato se le persone richiedenti il diritto in oggetto soddisfacevano o meno tutti i requisiti.
24. Il 7 maggio 2004 (decisione notificata il 7 agosto 2004) la Corte Suprema (Sąd Najwyższy) respinse il ricorso di cassazione del richiedente, concordando pienamente con le sentenze della Corte d'appello di fatto e diritto. Riferendosi alle particolari circostanze della causa, la Corte Suprema sostenne che l'autorità di previdenza sociale non aveva dato prova riguardo alla gravità della condizione del figlio, poiché il certificato medico allegato alla richiesta non specificava quali attività il figlio non poteva compiere a causa della sua addotta invalidità. Il fatto che la prova summenzionata mancava in data della decisione non venne alla luce sino a dopo la convalidazione della decisione. Perciò, i procedimenti contestati erano stati riaperti a causa alla scoperta di nuove circostanze attinenti e non sulla base di un riesame della stessa prova allegata alla richiesta del richiedente per una pensione.
25. Al richiedente non fu ordinato di restituire i suoi benefici di pre-pensionamento pagati dal Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale dal 1 settembre 2001 sino al 1 luglio 2002, nonostante la revoca del suo diritto alla pensione di pre-pensionamento.
C. Lo status di previdenza sociale del richiedente dopo la revoca della pensione“EWK”
26. Nel periodo dal 1 luglio 2002 (la data in cui il pagamento della pensione“EWK” alla richiedente fu cessato) al 25 ottobre 2005 la richiedente non aveva ricevuto nessun beneficio sociale. La richiedente presentò che in quel periodo non aveva avuto altro reddito.
Come risultato di procedimenti di previdenza sociale separati che erano stati avviati dalla richiedente L’Ufficio del Lavoro del Distretto di Strzyżów (Powiatowy Urząd Pracy) decise il 25 ottobre 2005 di accordare alla richiedente un beneficio di pre-pensionamento (zasiłek przedemerytalny) nell'importo di 523 zloty polacchi (PLN) netti. Poiché , sotto la legge applicabile, si applicava una prescrizione di tre anni a rivendicazioni di previdenza sociale, la decisione per accordare il diritto aveva un effetto retroattivo, con una data iniziale del 25 ottobre 2002.
Di conseguenza in una data non specificata, presumibilmente il 1 agosto 2004 la richiedente ricevette un beneficio di pre-pensionamento nella forma di un unico pagamento per il periodo fra il 25 ottobre 2002 e il 31 luglio 2004, senza interesse .
Il beneficio fu pagato da prima dall’Ufficio Regionale del Lavoro di Strzyżów (Powiatowy Urząd Pracy) e dal 1 agosto 2004 è stato pagato dal Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów. Al marzo 2008 il beneficio di pre-pensionamento della richiedente ammontava a 594 zloty polacchi (PLN) netti.
27. Alla luce della legge come applicabile attualmente, sembra che la richiedente avrà la qualifica per una pensione di pensionamento regolare nel 2015.
D. Informazioni supplementari
28. Approssimativamente 120 richieste che nascono da un modello di fatti simili sono state portate alla Corte. Il richiedente nella presente causa e la maggior parte degli altri richiedenti formano l'Associazione di Vittime del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale (Stowarzyszenie Osób Poszkodowanych przez ZUS) (“l'Associazione”), un'organizzazione che esamina le pratiche del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale in Polonia, in particolare nella regione di Podkarpacki.
29. Il richiedente presentò, secondo l'Associazione che solamente il 10% del numero totale dei destinatari della pensione “EWK” erano stati sottoposti ad una revisione o a una riapertura sotto la Sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 s.
30. Il Governo presentò che dalla fine del 2006 approssimativamente 76,600 individui avevano ricevuto la pensione“EWK”. Benché non c'erano statistiche riguardo a quante pensioni erano state revocate in tutto il paese o in ogni regione , quel numero era molto piccolo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Sistema per accordare benefici di previdenza sociale in Polonia
31. Il sistema della previdenza sociale in Polonia è regolato dalla Legge del 13 ottobre 1998 sul sistema di previdenza sociale (Ustawa o systemie ubezpieczeń społecznych) ed un numero di altri atti che si applicano a specifici gruppi professionali e che regolano specifici tipi di benefici.
I procedimenti per accordare benefici di welfare sono divisi in due. Prima, una richiesta per un beneficio viene fatta al Consiglio regionale di Previdenza sociale. Il consiglio fa una valutazione del criterio di eleggibilità di ogni tipo di beneficio ed emette una decisione. Poi, nel caso in cui è coinvolto un interesse individuali, la decisione diviene soggetto a controllo giurisdizionale da parte di un tribunale di previdenza sociale che è un ramo specializzato di una tribunale civile regionale. Il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale è un'autorità Statale che esegue funzioni amministrative ed emette decisioni dichiaratorie. Nella fase di controllo giurisdizionale, il Consiglio diviene una parte ai procedimenti di fronte al tribunale di previdenza sociale.
Una decisione giudiziale presa dal tribunale di previdenza sociale regionale può essere impugnata poi da entrambe le parti ai procedimenti di fronte ad un ramo di previdenza sociale speciale di un tribunale d'appello. Infine, si può fare ricorso contro una decisione consegnata da un tribunale di appello presso la Corte Suprema. Questa via di ricorso è disponibile a prescindere dall'importo della rivendicazione.
B. L'Ordinanza del 1989
32. L'Ordinanza del 1989 cessò di essere in vigore il 31 dicembre 1998. Comunque, le sue disposizioni rimasero operative riguardo a persone che avevano soddisfatto precedentemente i requisiti di una pensione di pre-pensionamento prima di questa data ma non era riuscito a fare domanda per il beneficio in tempo dovuto. Le condizioni da adempiere da parte di una persona per avere la qualifica per una pensione di pre-pensionamento furono esposte nel paragrafo 1 dell'Ordinanza del 1989.
Il paragrafo 1.1 conteneva un riferimento alla sezione 26 paragrafo 1 punto 2 della Legge del 14 dicembre 1982 sulle pensioni di pensionamento di impiegati e le loro famiglie. Nella parte attinente prevedeva che le persone a cui veniva concessa una pensione di pre-pensionamento erano quelle persone (donne ed uomini) che avevano un lavoro da almeno 20 o 25 anni e che personalmente si prendevano cura di un figlio.
Il paragrafo 1.2 prevedeva che per figli sotto l'età dei 16 non era necessario presentare un certificato ufficiale d’ invalidità del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale. Era sufficiente presentare un certificato medico emesso da una clinica medica specialistica che affermava: “a causa della condizione di salute, causata da una delle malattie enumerate nel paragrafo 1.3, il figlio richiede cure permanenti.”
Il paragrafo 1.3 prevedeva che il pensionamento anticipato era giustificato dalle successive condizioni fisiche e/o menatali del figlio:
“1. La disfunzione completa degli arti superiori o inferiori, paresi e paralisi che impediscono al figlio il movimento indipendente e il controllo delle sue funzioni fisiologiche;
2. Ritardo mentale lieve, moderato o grave, turbe psichiche, danni o malattie del sistema nervoso centrale, che rendono impossibile l'autonomia nelle decisioni o nelle attività quotidiane;
3. Lieve, moderato o grave ritardo mentale accompagnato da significativi problemi di movimento, di vista o di udito o altre malattie croniche che danneggiano significativamente le funzioni fisiche;
4. Altre malattie che danneggiano la funzionalità del corpo ad un grado molto grave.”
C. Legge del 17 dicembre 1998 sul pensionamento e pensioni di invalidità pagate dal Fondo di Previdenza Sociale
33. La riapertura dei procedimenti riguardo al beneficio in oggetto è regolato nella sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 che al tempo attinente si leggeva come segue:
“114.1 il diritto a benefici o l'importo dei benefici sarà rivalutato su richiesta della persona riguardata o, ex officio, se, dopo la convalidazione della decisione riguardo ai benefici, delle nuove prove vengono presentate, o se vengono scoperte circostanze che erano esistite prima di emettere la decisione e aventi un impatto sul diritto ai benefici o sul loro importo.”
D. La decisione della Corte Suprema del 5 giugno 2003
34. Nella sua decisione del 5 giugno 2003 (n. III UZP 5/03), adottata da un consiglio di sette giudici, la Corte Suprema (Sąd Najwyższy) trattò con la questione presentata dal Difensore civile (Rzecznik Praw Obywatelskich) riguardo a se una valutazione diversa della prova allegata alla richiesta per una pensione, eseguita da un'autorità di previdenza sociale dopo convalidazione della decisione riguardo alla pensione avrebbe costituito un fatto per riaprire i procedimenti che conducevano ad una revisione del diritto ad una pensione in conformità con la sezione 114 della Legge del 17 dicembre 1998 sul pensionamento e sulle pensioni di invalidità pagati dal Fondo di Previdenza Sociale. La risposta era nel negativo. La Corte Suprema sostenne, inter alia:
“Una valutazione diversa della [stessa] prova come allegata alla richiesta per un pensionamento o pensione di invalidità, eseguita da un'autorità di previdenza sociale dopo convalidazione della decisione che assegnava il diritto ad una pensione non è nessuna delle circostanze che giustificano la riapertura ex officio dei procedimenti per una revisione del diritto ad una pensione in conformità con la sezione 114 della Legge del 17 dicembre 1998 su pensionamento e pensioni di invalidità pagate dal Fondo di Previdenza Sociale.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
35. La richiedente si lamentò che spossessarla, nelle circostanze del caso, del suo diritto acquisito ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento corrispondeva ad una privazione ingiustificata di proprietà. Questa azione di reclamo deve essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'obiezione preliminare del governo sull’ incompatibilità ratione materiae
(a) Il Governo
36. Il Governo presentò che la sfera dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non si estendeva a diritti erroneamente acquisiti a pensioni e benefici di welfare, diritti che, infatti, non erano mai stati sollevati sotto il diritto nazionale.
(b) Il richiedente
37. Il richiedente presentò che la disposizione in oggetto si applicava alla sua causa e che lei ingiustamente era stata privata della sua proprietà.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Principi Generali sull'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
38. I principi che si applicano generalmente in cause sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sono ugualmente attinenti quando si tratta di benefici sociali e di welfare. In particolare, l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non crea il diritto di acquisire una proprietà. Questa disposizione non mette restrizione sulla libertà dello Stato Contraente di decidere se mettere in opera o meno una qualsiasi forma di schema di previdenza sociale, o scegliere il tipo o l’ importo dei benefici da prevedere sotto un qualsiasi schema simile. Comunque, se un Stato Contraente ha una legislazione in vigore che prevede di pieno diritto il pagamento di un beneficio di welfare -sia condizionale o meno al pagamento precedente dei contributi-questa legislazione deve essere considerata come generante un interesse di proprietà che rientra all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 per le persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (vedere Stec ed Altri c. Regno Unito (dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 54 ECHR 2005 -...).
39. Nello Stato democratico e moderno molti individui sono, per tutta o parte delle loro vite, completamente dipendenti per la sopravvivenza dalla previdenza sociale e dai benefici di welfare. Molti ordinamenti giuridici nazionali riconoscono che simili individui richiedono un grado di certezza e di sicurezza, e prevedono benefici da essere pagati -soggetti all'adempimento delle condizioni di eleggibilità-di pieno diritto. Dove un individuo ha un diritto rivendicabile sotto il diritto nazionale ad un beneficio di welfare, l'importanza di questo interesse dovrebbe essere riflessa anche sostenendo che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sia applicabile (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Stec, citata sopra, § 51).
40. Il mero atto che un diritto di proprietà è soggetto a revoca in certe circostanze non gli impedisce di essere una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, almeno finché viene revocato (Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 105 ECHR 2000-I)
Dall’altra parte dove un diritto legale al beneficio economico in questione è soggetto ad una condizione, una rivendicazione condizionale che nasce come risultato del non-adempimento della condizione non può essere considerata corrispondente alla “proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Principe Hans-Adamo II del Liechtenstein c. Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, §§ 82-83, ECHR 2001-VIII, e Rasmussen c. Polonia, n. 38886/05, §71 28 aprile 2009).
(b) Applicazione dei principi della Convenzione alla presente causa
41. La richiedente nella presente causa aveva un lavoro da trentun anni e aveva pagato i suoi contributi di previdenza sociale allo Stato. In quanto suo figlio minore soffriva di asma, di varie allergie ed infezioni sino-polmonari ricorrenti desiderava prendere un pensionamento anticipato sotto lo schema di pensione “EWK” per prestare una cura migliore a suo figlio (vedere paragrafo 6 sopra).
42. La pensione di pre-pensionamento in oggetto, regolata dall'Ordinanza del 1989, era condizionale all'esistenza di tre elementi (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra). Il primo elemento era la durata del lavoro del pensionato prima della sua richiesta di una pensione. Il secondo elemento era il requisito che il pensionato si prendesse personalmente cura del figlio riguardato. Questi requisiti, per la loro natura erano suscettibili ad una valutazione obiettiva. D'altra parte il terzo elemento che riguardava la condizione di salute del figlio del pensionato-grave abbastanza da rendere necessario al figlio di essere sotto la cura permanente del pensionato (il requisito di cura permanente necessaria)-era variabile ed incerto, e nella presente causa era stato davvero una questione della contesa.
43. La Corte nota che la decisione emessa dal Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów il 29 agosto 2001 ha conferito al richiedente il diritto di ricevere la pensione “EWK” di 1,683 zloty polacchi (PLN) lordi al 1 settembre 2001. Nel fare così l'autorità di previdenza sociale concordò che il richiedente aveva soddisfatto tutte le condizioni legali ed era qualificato per la pensione. Al richiedente fu emessa una carta d’ identità da pensionato contrassegnata come 'valida indefinitamente.' La decisione del 2001 fu eseguita senza alcuna interruzione per dieci mesi consecutivi, sino al 1 luglio 2002. Il 25 giugno 2002 il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów annullò la decisione del 2001 e rifiutò di assegnare al richiedente il diritto alla pensione “EWK”, notando che lei non aveva soddisfatto una delle condizioni necessarie per qualificarsi per quel tipo di beneficio di welfare, vale a dire che la condizione di salute di suo figlio non era abbastanza grave da richiedere, ali 31 dicembre 1998 o al tempo della revoca, la cura permanente di sua madre (vedere paragrafi 10-14 sopra).
44. Alla luce delle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte accetta, che il richiedente ha fatto domanda per la pensione di pre-pensionamento in buona fede ed in ottemperanza con la legge applicabile. Poiché suo figlio non aveva ancora sedici anni, lei non era costretta a fare esaminare suo figlio da un consiglio di dottori nominato dall'autorità di previdenza sociale. Invece, doveva allegare alla sua richiesta di pensione un certificato di salute riguardante suo figlio, firmato da un dottore specialista. Presentando il suo incartamento di pensione al Consigli di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów il richiedente sottopose la sua causa alla valutazione delle autorità Statali (vedere paragrafi 7 e 9 sopra). Come descritto sopra, la concessione del beneficio in oggetto dipendeva da un numero di condizioni legali, la cui valutazione era pienamente a carico dell'autorità di previdenza sociale. Di conseguenza, il richiedente non poteva essere sicuro del risultato della sua richiesta. D'altra parte appena le autorità confermarono che il richiedente era qualificato per il beneficio, era giustificata nel considerare questa decisione accurata e nell'agire sulla base di questa. Si è dimessa dal suo lavoro che era necessario per provocare il pagamento della pensione (vedere paragrafi 10-11 sopra), e ha organizzato la vita della sua famiglia di conseguenza. Lei non poteva comprendere che il suo diritto di pensione era stato accordato per errore ed era stata giustificata nel pensare che a meno che ci fosse stato un cambiamento nella condizione di salute del suo figlio la decisione non avrebbe perso la sua validità.
45. I La Corte costata che, nella presente causa, un diritto di proprietà è stato generato dalla valutazione favorevole dell'incartamento del richiedente allegato alla richiesta di pensione che era stata depositata in buon fede e col riconoscimento del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale del diritto. La decisione del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów del 29 agosto 2001 forniva al richiedente con una rivendicazione esecutiva per ricevere la così definita pensione “EWK” di pre-pensionamento in un particolare importo, pagabile appena si dimetteva dal suo lavoro. Sulla base di questa decisione il richiedente ricevette la pensione dal 1 settembre 2001 sino al 1 luglio 2002.
Dal momento che il Governo ha presentato che la richiedente non era qualificata per il beneficio “EWK” , la Corte si rivolgerà a questa questione dal punto di vista della giustificazione per la sospensione del beneficio.
( c) Conclusione sull’ ammissibilità
46. Ne segue che nelle circostanze della causa considerate nell'insieme, la Corte costata che la richiedente può essere considerata come avente un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
La Corte nota anche che questa parte della richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni generali delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
47. Il richiedente presentò che spossessandola, nelle circostanze della causa, del suo diritto acquisito ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento aveva corrisposto ad una privazione ingiustificata della proprietà. Lei dibatté anche che anche se il diritto era stato accordato davvero erroneamente, un individuo che aveva fatto domanda per il diritto in buon fede non avrebbe dovuto aspettarsi di pagare il prezzo per l'errore di autorità pubbliche agenti senza la dovuta diligenza.
(b) Il Governo
48. Il Governo affermò che l'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente era stata legale ed giustificata. In particolare, spossessare la richiedente del suo diritto alla pensione di pre-pensionamento era previsto dalla legge ed era nell'interesse generale. C'era anche una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra l'interferenza e gli interessi perseguiti.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) principi di Generale
49. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col pacifico godimento di proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza solamente una privazione di proprietà “soggetta alle condizioni previste dalla legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso della proprietà eseguendo “ leggi” (vedere Il Re precedente della Grecia ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, §§ 79 e 82, ECHR 2000-XII).
50. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 richiede anche che una privazione di proprietà ai fini della sua seconda frase è nell'interesse pubblico ed insegue uno scopo legittimo con mezzi ragionevolmente proporzionati allo scopo che si cerca di realizzare (vedere, fra altre autorità, Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, §§ 81-94 ECHR 2005).
51. Inoltre, il principio di “ buon governo” richiede che dove è in pericolo una questione nell'interesse generale spetta alle autorità pubbliche agire in tempo, in una maniera appropriata e con la massima consistenza (vedere Beyeler, citata sopra, § 120, e Megadat.com S.r.l. c. Moldavia, n. 21151/04, § 72 8 aprile 2008).
52. Il richiesto “giusto equilibrio” non sarà mantenuto dove la persona riguardata sopporta un carico individuale eccessivo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74 Serie A n. 52, e Brumărescu, citata sopra, § 78).
(b) Applicazione dei principi sopra nella presente causa
(i) Se c'è stata un'interferenza con la proprietà della richiedente
53. Le parti concordarono che le decisioni del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów del25 giugno 2002 che hanno privato il richiedente del diritto di ricevere la la pensione “EWK”, corrispose ad un'interferenza con la sua proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(ii) Legalità dell'interferenza
(α) Le osservazioni delle parti
La richiedente
54. La richiedente presentò che l'interferenza non era stata in conformità con la legge in quanto la decisione del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów del 29 agosto 2001 era stata annullata come risultato della revisione della stessa prova come allegata alla sua richiesta originale per la pensione. Simile procedura era contraria alla sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 che, al tempo attinente, lasciava spazio alla riapertura di procedimenti di pensione solamente se una nuova prova fosse stata introdotta o se fossero venute alla luce circostanze preesistenti. Il richiedente si appellò anche alla Decisione del 2003 della Corte Suprema (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra).
Il Governo
55. Nell'osservazione del Governo, l'interferenza era stata in conformità con la legge. Si appellò al ragionamento dei tribunali nazionali che avevano fatto una revisione della decisione del 25 giugno 2002 (vedere paragrafi 16-24 sopra). I tribunali nazionali trovarono che la riapertura contestata era stata provocati dalla valutazione di referti medici differenti da quelli allegati alla richiesta di pensione del richiedente. Questo materiale esisteva ma non era stato preso in considerazione dall'autorità di previdenza sociale al tempo in cui il diritto del richiedente ad una pensione veniva esaminato. Considerava che ciò costituisse delle circostanze recentemente scoperte all'interno del significato della sezione 114 della Legge del 1998.
(β) La Corte
56. Nella presente causa la misura di cui ci si lamenta era basata sulla sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 che al tempo attinente prevedeva che il diritto a benefici avrebbe potuto essere rivalutato ex officio, se, dopo la convalidazione della decisione riguardo a benefici, venivano presentante nuove prove, o se fossero state scoperte delle circostanze attinenti che erano esistite prima che la decisione venisse emessa. Da prima osservò che tale procedura è comune agli ordinamenti giuridici di molti Stati membro .
La Corte, dando dovuto riguardo alle sentenze dei tribunali nazionali, accetta che i procedimenti nella causa del richiedente erano stati riaperti come conseguenza della scoperta del proprio errore dell'autorità di welfare nella sua valutazione originale dell'eleggibilità del richiedente per la pensione di pre-pensionamento sotto l'Ordinanza del 1989. La procedura fu usata così per correggere un errore da parte del consiglio di previdenza sociale e spossessare il richiedente del diritto ad una pensione che lei ingiustamente aveva acquisito (vedere paragrafi 88 e 89 sotto).
57. La Corte conclude perciò che l'interferenza col diritto di proprietà del richiedente era prevista per legge, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(iii) Scopo legittimo
58. La Corte ora deve determinare se questa privazione di proprietà ha perseguito uno scopo legittimo e se era “nell'interesse pubblico”, all'interno del significato del secondo articolo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(α) Le osservazioni delle parti
Il richiedente
59. Il richiedente fece una dichiarazione generale che l'interferenza in oggetto non perseguiva uno scopo legittimo.
Il Governo
60. Il Governo presentò che l'Ordinanza del 1989 era stata messa in posto come parte della politica sociale dello Stato mirata ad assistere dei genitori che, a causa delle condizioni di salute di un loro figlio, non potevano conciliare il loro lavoro col bisogno di offrire cure continue a loro figlio. Dato la specifica natura della pensione “EWK” , era comprensibile perché i requisiti per l'eleggibilità per questo beneficio dovevano essere definiti rigidamente e precisamente. La richiedente era stata spossessata del suo diritto alla pensione di pre-pensionamento perché, infatti, lei non soddisfaceva i requisiti legali per essere qualificata per questo particolare tipo di beneficio. Continuare il pagamento della pensione “EWK” alla richiedente e ad altri beneficiari in una posizione simile equivarrebbe ad accettare il loro arricchimento ingiusto.
(β) La Corte
61. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono in principio meglio poste rispetto al giudice internazionale per valutare ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico.” Sotto il sistema di protezione stabilito dalla Convenzione, spetta alle autorità nazionali r fare la valutazione iniziale riguardo all'esistenza di un problema di preoccupazione pubblica che autorizza misure di privazione di proprietà. Qui, come negli altri campi ai quali si estendono le salvaguardie della Convenzione, le autorità nazionali, godono di conseguenza di un certo margine di valutazione.
Inoltre, la nozione di “interesse pubblico” necessariamente è ampia. La Corte, trovandolo naturale che il margine di valutazione disponibile alla legislatura nell’implementare politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio, rispetterà la sentenza della legislatura riguardo a ciò che è “nell'interesse pubblico” a meno che questa sentenza sia manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole (vedere James ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 46 Serie A n. 98; Il Re precedente della Grecia ed Altri, citata sopra, § 87; e Zvolský e Zvolská c. Repubblica ceca, n. 46129/99, § 67 in fine ECHR 2002-IX).
62. Come già affermato sopra, lo scopo dell'interferenza in oggetto era correggere un errore dell'autorità di previdenza sociale che diede luogo all’acquisizione da parte della richiedente di un diritto alla pensione “EWK”.
63. La Corte considera che spogliare la richiedente della sua pensione di pre-pensionamento ha perseguito uno scopo legittimo, vale a dire assicurare che il denaro pubblico non fosse coinvolto per sovvenzionare senza limitazione nel tempo dei beneficiari immeritevoli del sistema di welfare sociale.
(iv) La proporzionalità
64. Infine, la Corte deve esaminare se un'interferenza col pacifico godimento di proprietà infrange il giusto equilibrio fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, o se impone un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo sul richiedente (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Jahn ed Altri [GC], citata sopra, § 93). Nonostante il margine di valutazione dato allo Stato, la Corte deve ciononostante, nell'esercizio del suo potere di revisione, determinare se l'equilibrio richiesto è stato mantenuto in modo conforme col diritto del richiedente alla proprietà (vedere Rosinski v Polonia, n. 17373/02, § 78 17 luglio 2007). La preoccupazione di realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nell'insieme, inclusa perciò la seconda frase che sarà letta nella luce del principio generale enunciato nella prima frase. In particolare, ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo perseguito con qualsiasi misura che spoglia una persona delle sue proprietà (vedere Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri c. Belgio, 20 novembre 1995, § 38 Serie A n. 332, ed Il Re precedente della Grecia ed Altri, citata sopra, § 89). Così l'equilibrio da mantenere fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti dei diritti essenziali si sconvolge se la persona riguardata ha dovuto sopportare un “carico sproporzionato” (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, I Santi Monasteri c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, §§ 70-71 Serie A n. 301-a).
(α) Le osservazioni delle parti
Il richiedente
65. Nella prospettiva della richiedente, non vi era relazione ragionevole fra l'interferenza e gli interessi perseguiti. Nella sua osservazione, poiché la pratica di revisionare le richieste per la pensione “EWK” era limitata a l10% del numero totale dei destinatari del beneficio, la misura in oggetto non poteva essere riguardata come di qualsiasi vantaggio finanziario significativo al finanziamento della previdenza sociale.
La richiedente affermò anche che aveva sopportato un carico eccessivo in quanto la decisione del 25 giugno 2002 l'aveva spogliata della sua sola fonte di reddito con effetto immediato.
Il Governo
66. Il Governo presentò che la decisione di spossessare la richiedente del suo diritto non era stata sproporzionata.
Nel sistema di previdenza sociale polacco solamente pensioni di pensionamento accordate sotto lo schema generale, erano, in principio, permanenti ed irrevocabili. Tutti gli altri benefici, basati su condizioni variabili, erano soggetti a verifica e alla possibile rescissione.
Il Governo dibatté anche che la misura contestata era stata applicata su una scala ridotta ed ugualmente in tutto l’intero paese . Le cause per la revisione erano state selezionate a caso. L'autorità di previdenza sociale aveva il potere di intraprendere la revisione a sua propria discrezione all'interno dei limiti previsti dalla legge, in particolare con la sezione 114 della Legge del 1998.
(β) La Corte
67. La Corte osserva che nella causa immediata il Governo non giustificava la misura in oggetto col bisogno di fare risparmi negli interessi del fondo di previdenza sociale (diversamente da Kjartan Ásmundsson c. Islanda, n. 60669/00, § 43 ECHR 2004-IX). Lo Stato mirava primariamente a realizzare l'armonia fra la situazione di fatto che riguardava i beneficiari e la loro ottemperanza coi requisiti legali per questo tipo di pensione.
68. Nella presente causa, un diritto di proprietà è stato generato dalla valutazione favorevole dell'incartamento del richiedente allegato alla richiesta per una pensione che fu depositata in buon fede e col riconoscimento del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale del diritto (vedere anche paragrafo 45 sopra). Prima di essere invalidata la decisione del 29 agosto 2001 aveva prodotto indubbiamente effetti per la richiedente e la sua famiglia (vedere in particolare paragrafo 11 sopra).
69. Si deve sottolineare anche che il ritardo col quale le autorità fecero una revisione dell'incartamento della richiedente era relativamente lungo. La decisione del 2001 fu lasciata in vigore per dieci mesi prima che autorità divenissero consapevoli del loro errore. D'altra parte appena l'errore è stato scoperto la decisione di cessare il pagamento del beneficio fu emessa relativamente rapidamente e con effetto immediato (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra).
70. Nell'opinione della Corte, il fatto che lo Stato non chiese al richiedente di restituire la pensione che era stata pagata impropriamente (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra) non attenua sufficientemente le conseguenze per la richiedente che scaturiscono dall'interferenza nella sua causa.
71. Anche se la richiedente aveva un'opportunità di impugnare la decisione del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale del 25 giugno 2002 in procedimenti di controllo giurisdizionale, il suo diritto alla pensione fu determinato solamente due anni più tardi dai tribunali e durante quel tempo lei non riceveva alcun beneficio di welfare (vedere paragrafi 15-24 e 26 sopra).
72. Come affermato sopra, nel contesto di diritti di proprietà, particolare importanza deve essere data al principio di buon governo. È desiderabile che le autorità pubbliche agiscano con la massima scrupolosità, in particolare quando trattano questioni d'importanza vitale per gli individui, come i benefici di welfare e gli altri diritti di proprietà. Nella presente causa , la Corte considera, che avendo scoperto il loro errore le autorità andarono a vuoto nel loro dovere di agire nel buon tempo ed in una maniera appropriata e coerente.
73. La Corte, essendo attenta all'importanza della giustizia sociale, considera che, come principio generale, alle autorità pubbliche non dovrebbe essere impedito di correggere i loro errori, anche quelli che sono il risultato della loro propria negligenza. Sostenere altrimenti sarebbe contrario alla dottrina dell'arricchimento ingiusto. Sarebbe anche ingiusto verso altri individui che contribuiscono al finanziamento della previdenza sociale, in particolare quelli a cui è stato negato un beneficio perché non riuscirono a soddisfare i requisiti legali. Infine, corrisponderebbe a sanzionare un’assegnazione impropria di scarse risorse pubbliche che di per sé sarebbe contrario all'interesse pubblico.
Ciononostante queste importanti considerazioni, la Corte deve, nondimeno, osservare che il principio generale sopra non può prevalere in una situazione dove l'individuo riguardato è costretto a sopportare un carico eccessivo come un risultato di una misura che lo spossessa di un beneficio.
Se un errore è stato causato dalle autorità senza alcuna colpa di una terza parte, un approccio di proporzionalità diverso deve essere preso nel determinare se il carico sopportato da un richiedente era eccessivo.
74. In questo collegamento dovrebbe essere osservato che come risultato della misura contestata, il richiedente fu messo di fronte, praticamente da un giorno all’altro, alla perdita totale della sua pensione di pre-pensionamento che costituiva la sola fonte di reddito. Inoltre, la Corte è consapevole del rischio potenziale che, in prospettiva della sua età e la realtà economica nel paese, particolarmente nella regione non sviluppata di Podkarpacki, la richiedente avrebbe avuto delle considerevoli difficoltà nel trovare un nuovo lavoro .
75. Inoltre, la Corte nota che, nonostante il fatto che sotto la legge applicabile la richiedente era qaualificata per un altro tipo di beneficio di pre-pensionamento dallo Stato appena lei perse il suo diritto alla pensione “EWK”, il suo diritto al nuovo beneficio non fu riconosciuto sino alla decisione del 25 ottobre 2005 che infine mise fine a procedimenti che erano durati tre anni. L'importo del beneficio di pre-pensionamento del richiedente è approssimativamente il 50% inferiore alla sua pensione “EWK” (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). Anche se la decisione di accordare il beneficio è stata retrodatata, il beneficio dovuto per il periodo fra il 25 ottobre 2002 e il 31 luglio 2004 fu pagato senza alcun interesse (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). L'errore delle autorità lasciò la richiedente con il 50% del suo aspettato reddito, e solamente dopo procedimenti durati tre anni è stata in grado ottenere il nuovo beneficio.
Infine, il fatto che il richiedente trattenne il suo pieno diritto di ricevere, nel 2015, una pensione di anzianità ordinaria dal fondo pensioni è irrilevante poiché questo sarebbe stato il caso anche se lei avesse continuato a ricevere la pensione “EWK”.
76. In prospettiva delle considerazioni sopra, la Corte costata che un equilibrio equo non è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo e che il carico messo sulla richiedente era eccessivo.
Ne segue che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Riguardo al principio di certezza legale
77. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che la riapertura ex-officio dei procedimenti di previdenza sociale che aveva dato luogo all’annullamento della decisione definitiva che le accordava un diritto ad una pensione era in violazione dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
L’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione nella sua parte attinente si legge come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
78. Il richiedente dibatté che la decisione del 29 agosto 2001 dell'autorità di previdenza sociale che le accordava un diritto ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento era definitiva. Lei presentò che la durabilità delle decisioni di previdenza sociale era cruciale per la stabilità degli effetti legali prodotti da simili decisioni. Il principio della finalità di simili decisioni corrispose al principio di certezza legale di decisioni amministrative. In diritto civile si è fatto riferimento a questo principio come res judicata e ha dato luogo all'impossibilità per avviare nuovi procedimenti con lo stesso argomento che coinvolgono le stesse parti.
79. Il richiedente si riferì alla decisione della Corte Suprema del 2003 nella quale era stato osservato che la sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 non lasciava spazio ad una nuova valutazione della stessa prova che accompagnava la richiesta originale per una pensione. Il diritto ad una pensione potrebbe essere revisionato solamente sulla base di prove nuove o circostanze di recente rivelate.
La richiedente sostenne che il suo diritto ad una pensione di pre-pensionamento era stato revocato solamente come risultato di una nuova valutazione della prova che era stata allegata alla richiesta originale per una pensione nel 2001.
(b) Il Governo
80. Il Governo presentò che una decisione di previdenza sociale non traeva profitto dalla protezione del principio di certezza legale, costruito come il principio di res judicata. Dibatté anche che la nozione di certezza legale non era assoluta e che nella presente causa c’erano state ragioni attinenti e sufficienti di scostarsi da questo principio per garantire rispetto della giustizia sociale e l'equità. In particolare, il Governo presentò che la sezione 114 della Legge del 1998 enumerava i casi in cui una rivalutazione di un diritto ad un beneficio o l'importo del beneficio veniva richiesta. Qualsiasi simile rivalutazione implicava procedimenti amministrativi o di previdenza sociale avrebbero potuto essere riaperti ed una decisione nuova-che sostituiva la precedente- essere emessa.
Inoltre, il Governo si appellò al principio, determinato in una sentenza della Corte Suprema del 2001 e nella decisione del 2003, che a una parte a procedimenti non era concesso chiedere un diritto a benefici che erano stati stabiliti sulla base una decisione erronea e successivamente revocata di un'autorità amministrativa.
81. Il Governo attrasse anche l’attenzione sul fatto che nella presente causa la decisione del 25 giugno 2002 di spossessare la richiedente del diritto alla pensione di pre-pensionamento in oggetto era stata materia di controllo giudiziale, con tutte le garanzie derivate dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Dibatté che se le decisioni di previdenza sociale dovessero trarre profitto dalla protezione di un principio applicato strettamente di res judicata, le autorità amministrative non avrebbero nessuna possibilità di correggere le loro decisioni di non accordare benefici a persone alle quali legittimamente fu concesso di riceverli.
Infine, il Governo osservò che anche se applicato nel caso di una decisione di previdenza sociale, il principio della certezza legale come definito nella giurisprudenza della Corte, non dovrebbe impedire ad un'autorità nazionale di revocare una decisione amministrativa con la quale un'autorità di welfare aveva accordato erroneamente un diritto mai-esistito ad una pensione. Simile revoca dovrebbe essere considerata una partenza legittima dal principio della certezza legale.
2. La valutazione della Corte
82. La Corte considera che il principio di certezza legale si applica ad una situazione legale definitiva, a prescindere se è stata provocata da un atto giudiziale o da uno amministrativo o, come nella presente causa, da una decisione di previdenza sociale che, nella sua facciata, è definitiva nei suoi effetti.
Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione o inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
83. Comunque, avendo riguardo alle ragioni che hanno condotto la Corte a trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, la Corte costata che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 riguardo al principio della certezza legale della Convenzione non richiede un esame separato.
B. Riguardo all'iniquità addotta dei procedimenti
84. Il richiedente fece anche un'azione di reclamo generale per cui i procedimenti nella sua causa erano stati ingiusti. In particolare, lei addusse che i tribunali nazionali avevano valutato erroneamente le prove.
85. Questa azione di reclamo deve essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Comunque, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione:
“La Corte dichiarerà inammissibile qualsiasi richiesta individuale presentata sotto l’Articolo 34 che considera incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione o i Protocolli, manifestamente mal-fondata...”
86. La Corte non ha giurisdizione sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione per sostituire le sue proprie sentenze di fatto con le sentenze dei tribunali nazionali. Il solo compito della Corte è esaminare se i procedimenti, presi nell'insieme sono stati equi e si sono attenuti con le specifiche salvaguardie convenute dalla Convenzione.
87. In questo collegamento, la Corte nota, che la richiedente presentò che, contrariamente alle sentenze dei tribunali nazionali, i procedimenti contestati erano stati avviati come risultato di una revisione della stessa prova come allegata alla sua richiesta originale per una pensione, e perciò non in ottemperanza col diritto nazionale che stipulava i motivi per la riapertura di procedimenti di pensione.
88. Valutando le circostanze della presente causa nell'insieme, la Corte non trova nessuna indicazione che i procedimenti contestati sono stati condotti ingiustamente.
Il richiedente non riuscì a presentare qualsiasi prova che le autorità giudiziali nazionali avevano in qualche modo violato i suoi diritti o sono giunte a conclusioni arbitrarie. I tribunali nazionali hanno sostenuto udienze sui meriti della causa, ascoltato dichiarazioni da tutti i testimoni necessari, incluso il richiedente ed esaminato e valutato ogni prova di fronte a loro, incluso i documenti medici del figlio della richiedente presentati da entrambe le parti ed i rapporti di un esperto medico indipendente. Per ciò che riguarda i fatti e le ragioni legali per le sentenze dei tribunali nazionali furono inoltre esposte a lungo, nelle sentenze della Corte Regionale del 26 febbraio 2003 e della Corte d'appello del 16 ottobre 2003, così come nella sentenza della Corte Suprema del 7 maggio 2004. Nelle loro sentenze le autorità giudiziali e nazionali fecero un’analisi molto persuasiva e dettagliata di tutte le circostanze attinenti alla causa e fornirono ragioni attinenti e sufficienti per le loro decisioni (vedere paragrafi 15-24 sopra).
89. Ne segue che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1, riguardo all'iniquità addotta dei procedimenti è manifestamente mal-fondato e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Riguardo la perdita della pensione “EWK”
90. Il richiedente si lamentò di un'interferenza con il suo diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare in quanto spossessandola della pensione “EWK” le autorità l'avevano spogliata della sua sola fonte di reddito e delle risorse finanziarie indispensabili per il suo sostentamento.
Questa azione di reclamo deve essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione che nelle sue parti attinenti si legge come segue:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare...
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto ad eccezione che sia in conformità con la legge e sia necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o il crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Il richiedente
91. La richiedente presentò che prima del suo primo pensionamento il suo salario dalla Società di Telecomunicazioni polacca era stato una parte essenziale del suo bilancio famigliare. Il salario di suo marito era basso e loro dovevano mantenere tre figli minorenni, incluso quello che era cronicamente malato. Nei primi anni della vita di suo figlio la richiedente ricevette aiuto regolare dalla sua madre anziana. In seguito però non poté più fare affidamento su sua madre a causa della sua anzianità. In questo momento fu necessario per la richiedente per prendere un pre-pensionamento per restare a casa con suo figlio. La richiedente presentò che per ottenere il pagamento del beneficio accordato nel 2001 lei aveva terminato completamente il suo contratto di lavoro. Lei disse di avere poche prospettive di trovare un nuovo lavoro nella regione che aveva un tasso alto di disoccupazione. Lei presentò anche che come risultato di una scappatoia legale, avendo acquisito il diritto alla pensione “EWK” di pensionamento si considerava che avesse rinunciato indefinitamente al suo diritto ad altri benefici di previdenza sociale.
(b) Il Governo
92. Il Governo presentò che la richiedente ora riceveva un beneficio di pre-pensionamento pagato prima dall’Ufficio Regionale del Lavoro di Strzyżów ed attualmente, dal Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów. Perciò, l'argomento della richiedente per cui si considerava che lei avesse rinunciato al suo diritto a qualsiasi beneficio sociale era falso.
Il Governo affermò anche che un diritto al lavoro non era garantito dalla Convenzione. In qualsiasi caso, non c'era collegamento fra la decisione che spossessava la richiedente della sua pensione di pre-pensionamento ed il fatto che lei avrebbe avuto poche opportunità di trovare un lavoro nuovo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
93. La pensione “EWK” è un beneficio di previdenza sociale che mirava ad abilitare dei genitori a smettere di lavorare per accudire i loro figli seriamente ammalati. Inoltre, nella presente causa, la pensione in oggetto costituiva la base del bilancio famigliare della richiedente.
In queste circostanze, la Corte accetta, che spossessare la richiedente della pensione “EWK” pensione deve costituire un'interferenza con il suo diritto al rispetto della sua vita famigliare, dato che la misura in oggetto comporta conseguenze severe per la qualità e il godimento della vita famigliare della richiedente e necessariamente colpisce il modo in cui viene organizzato la seconda (vedere Petrovic c. Austria, 27 marzo 1998, § 27 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-II).
Ne segue che la presente azione di reclamo rientra all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione. La Corte nota che questa parte della richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
94. Comunque, avendo riguardo alle ragioni che hanno condotto la Corte a trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, trova che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione non richiede una considerazione separata.
B. Riguardi i procedimenti nazionali
95. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione era stato violato perché la condizione di salute di suo figlio era stata la materia di una controversia aperta di fronte ai tribunali nazionali durante i procedimenti della pensione. Inoltre, la richiedente affermò che suo figlio era stato esaminato di persona da un esperto medico e nominato dal tribunale che gli aveva provocato uno stress considerevole. Infine, la richiedente si lamentò che il rapporto prodotto dall'esperto era stato trasferito al Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów.
96. La Corte osserva che il richiedente avviò procedimenti giudiziali per fare una revisione della decisione del Consiglio di Previdenza Socuale di Rzeszów del 25 giugno 2005. Come la Corte ha notato nei paragrafi precedenti per qualificarsi per la pensione “EWK” il richiedente doveva provare che la salute di suo figlio era abbastanza fragile da renderlo dipendente dalle cure permanenti della richiedente.
97. In queste circostanze, la Corte trova naturale che i tribunali nazionali abbiano esaminato ogni prova attinente che comprendevano vari documenti medici. Ordinare che venisse preparato un rapporto sulla salute del figlio da parte di un dottore indipendente era sia in ottemperanza col diritto nazionale che legittimo in prospettiva dell'argomento dei procedimenti. Infine, la Corte non considera che il figlio della richiedente avrebbe potuto essere particolarmente angosciato dal controllo medico eseguito dal dottore nominato dal tribunale. Il figlio aveva circa otto anni al tempo attinente ed abituato al personale medico poiché lui aveva ricevuto un trattamento medico regolare da un'età molto giovane.
98. In prospettiva di quanto sopra, la Corte costata che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente non rivela nessuna comparizione di mancanza di riguardo per la privacy del figlio della richiedente o di interferenza coi suoi diritti protetti dall’Articolo 8 della Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
99. La richiedente si lamentò infine sotto l’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione, in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, della discriminazione basata sulla sua residenza. In particolare, lei addusse che limitare la pratica di fare una revisione delle richieste per la pensione “EWK” nella regione Podkarpacki aveva condotto ad una discriminazione ingiustificata dei pensionati “EWK” i pensionati che abitavano lì. Senza far riferimento a nessuna statistica ufficiale, la richiedente presentò che la maggioranza dei destinatari della pensione “EWK” che era stata sottoposta ad un riesame delle loro rivendicazioni di pensione iniziali, proveniva dalla regione di Podkarpacki.
Questa azione di reclamo deve essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione, in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
L’Articolo 14 della Convenzione legge come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà insorse davanti [alla] Convenzione sarà garantito senza alcuna discriminazione basata qualsiasi fatto come il sesso, la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altra, cittadinanza o od origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà, la nascita o altro status.”
100. Notando che si è trovato che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione si applica nella presente causa (vedere paragrafo 46 sopra) e presumendo che la residenza si applica come un criterio per il trattamento differenziale di cittadini nella concessione di pensioni Statali è un terreno che ricade all’interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione, la Corte osserva che nella presente causa la richiedente non è riuscita presentare dati precisi per provare la sua dichiarazione di discriminazione. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte osserva che la legge sulla riapertura di procedimenti di pensione era al tempo attinente implementato universalmente in tutto il paese. La misura contestata era generale e era mirata ad un gruppo non specificato di persone che traenti profitto da finanziamenti pubblici in conformità col principio dell'uguaglianza.
Anche se c'era stata una differenza nel trattamento dei pensionati “EWK” nella regione Podkarpacki, ed in particolare il richiedente, la Corte osserva che non può essere escluso che simile differenza abbia potuto essere il risultato di pratiche più efficienti implementate dall'autorità di previdenza sociale locale per verificare le richieste di pensione in confronto ad altre regioni. In particolare, non c'è nessuna prova che indicherebbe che le persone che ricevevano delle pensioni “EWK” nella regione Podkarpacki sono state designate intenzionalmente come bersaglio dalle autorità Statali.
101. Di conseguenza, questa azione di reclamo deve essere respinta come essendo manifestamente mal-fondata facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
C. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
102. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
1. Danno materiale
103. Il richiedente ha chiesto 78,209 zloty polacchi (PLN) (corrispondenti attualmente ad approssimativamente 18,000 euro (EUR)) a riguardo del danno materiale. Questo importo comprendeva: (1) un equivalente della pensione “EWK” che non le è stata pagata nel periodo da giugno sino a settembre 2002 (2) la differenza fra la pensione “EWK” che lei non ha ricevuto ed il beneficio di pre-pensionamento speciale, pagatole dall’ ottobre 2002 sino a marzo 2007, e (3) la differenza fra la pensione “EWK” che lei non ha ricevuto ed il beneficio di pre-pensionamento speciale dovuto per il periodo dall’ aprile 2007 sino all’ ottobre 2015, quando la richiedente si qualificò per una pensione di pensionamento sotto lo schema generale.
La richiedente chiese anche 25,000 zloty polacchi (PLN) a riguardo del danno morale.
104. Il Governo presentò che non c'era collegamento causale fra la violazione addotta ed il danno materiale chiesto. A riguardo della rivendicazione per danno morale, il Governo osservò, che era esorbitante. Se la Corte avesse trovato una violazione nella presente causa, il Governo ha chiesto di decidere che una costatazione della violazione costituiva di per sé una soddisfazione equa sufficiente.
105. La Corte costata che la richiedente è stata privata del suo reddito in collegamento con la violazione trovata e deve prendere in considerazione il fatto che ha sofferto indubbiamente di un danno materiale e morale (vedere Koua Poirrez, citata sopra, § 70). Facendo una valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna alla richiedente EUR 15,000 per coprire tutti i capi di danno.
B. Costi e spese
106. La richiedente non ha fatto alcuna rivendicazione per qualsiasi costi e spese sostenuti.
C. Interesse di mora
107. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui si dovrebbero aggiungere tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione riguardo al principio della certezza legale, l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione riguardo alla perdita della pensione “EWK”, e l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione ammissibili ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene all’unanimità che non è necessario esaminare separatamente le azioni di reclamo della richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione riguardo al principio della certezza legale e sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione riguardo alla perdita della pensione “EWK”;
3. Sostiene per quattro voti a tre che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene per quattro voti a tre
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare alla richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 15,000 (quindici mila euro), a riguardo del danno materiale e morale, da convertire nella valuta dello Stato rispondente al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
5. Respinge all’unanimità il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 15 settembre 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento.
Fatoş Aracı Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento, viene annesso a questa sentenza l’opinione in parte dissidente dei Giudici Bratza Hirvelä e Bianku.
N.B.
F.A.

OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSIDENTE DEI GIUDICI BRATZA, HIRVELÄ E BIANKU
1. La causa è d'importanza considerevole, sollevando come fa un problema comune ad un numero di richieste contro la Polonia che sono attualmente pendenti di fronte alla Corte. Riguarda primariamente la compatibilità dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 con la revoca della concessione alla richiedente di una pensione di pre-pensionamento (la pensione “EWK”) al motivo che la condizione di salute di suo figlio non era tale da richiedere cure permanenti e che di conseguenza non le doveva essere concessa la pensione al tempo che è stata accordata. Con nostro rammarico, noi non siamo capaci concordare con la maggioranza della Camera nel trovare che la revoca della pensione di EWK ha violato i diritti del richiedente sotto il Protocollo.
2. Non è contestato dalle parti, e noi accettiamo, che la decisione del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di Rzeszów del 25 giugno 2002 che privava la richiedente del diritto a ricevere la pensione di EWK ha corrisposto ad un'interferenza con la sua proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Noi concordiamo anche che la revoca perseguiva uno scopo legittimo, vale a dire assicurare che il denaro pubblico non fosse costretto a continuare a sopportare il costo di offrire un beneficio che non era mai stato concesso alla richiedente. Dove ci scostiamo dalla maggioranza della Camera è sulla questione se la revoca era nelle circostanze della causa proporzionata allo scopo legittimo perseguito e, più particolarmente, se un equilibrio equo è stato preservato fra le richieste dell'interesse generale del pubblico ed il requisito della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo.
3. I fattori da essere ponderato da parte della richiedente della scala sono innegabilmente potenti. Nell’ agosto 2001 la richiedente ha depositato la sua richiesta per la concessione della pensione EWK in buon fede e ha allegato a questa come richiesto, un certificato medico firmato da uno specialista in allergie e pneumologia e che certificava che suo figlio soffriva asma bronchiale atopica, di varie allergie ed infezioni sino-polmonari ricorrenti che richiedevano le cure continue di sua madre. Il Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale accordò alla richiedente il diritto ad una pensione EWK dopo avere esaminato la richiesta, dall’ 1 agosto 2001 ma sospese il pagamento della pensione poiché la richiedente stava ancora lavorando. Dopo poco, ls richiedente si dimise dal suo lavoro a tempo pieno ed una nuova decisione fu emessa dal Consiglio che autorizzava la pensione dal 1 settembre 2001. Alla richiedente è stata successivamente emessa la carta d’ identità di pensionata contrassegnata con “valida indefinitamente” e per i seguenti 10 mesi continuò a ricevere la pensione senza interruzione. Sino a che il pagamento della pensione fu sospeso e la decisione di concederla fu revocata nel luglio 2002, la richiedente non aveva nessuna ragione di credere che non le sarebbe stata concessa la pensione e non aveva nessuna ragione di dubitare che avrebbe continuato a riceverla in quanto fintanto non ci fosse stato un cambiamento nella condizione medica di suo figlio. È chiaro che la perdita della pensione EWK aveva conseguenze finanziarie gravi per la richiedente che sembra non abbia avuto altra fonte di reddito al tempo e che probabilmente avrà affrontato delle difficoltà considerevoli nel trovare un nuovo lavoro. Inoltre, è chiaro che il biasimo per ciò che non è accaduto non risiede nella richiedente ma esclusivamente nelle autorità di Previdenza Sociale che avevano approvato erroneamente la concessione della pensione al motivo che la condizione di salute di suo figlio qualificava la richiedente a riceverla.
4. Noi potremmo accettare prontamente che, in queste circostanze, sarebbe stato sproporzionato se le autorità avessero cercato di recuperare dalla richiedente le somme della pensione EWK che loro avevano pagato erroneamente. Ma questa non era il caso. Dove noi differiamo dalla maggioranza è nella sua prospettiva che è confermata dall'assegnazione di soddisfazione equa che un equilibrio equo avrebbe richiesto che si continuasse a pagare alla richiedente la pensione che le era stata assegnata erroneamente ma a cui lei non aveva diritto legale sino alla data del suo pensionamento nel 2015, o almeno finché suo figlio avesse raggiunto la maggiore età nel 2012. Nella nostra prospettiva, può, al contrario, sconvolgerebbe un qualsiasi equilibrio equo se, avendo una volta scoperto il loro errore, le autorità fossero precluse dal compensare mai i suoi effetti e fossero costrette a perpetuare l'errore continuando a pagare la pensione che le era stata accordata erroneamente. Questo può, come la sentenza espressamente riconosce, non solo condurre all'arricchimento indebito del destinatario ma avrebbe un impatto ingiusto su altri individui che contribuiscono al finanziamento della Previdenza Sociale, in particolare quelli a cui sono stati negati dei benefici perché non sono riusciti a soddisfare i requisiti legali; corrisponderebbe anche a sanzionare una concessione impropria di scarse risorse pubbliche.
5. A questo riguardo, la causa chiaramente è distinguibile da quella di Stiramento c. Regno Unito (N.ro 25543/02, sentenza del 24 giugno 2003) in cui la Corte trovò che fosse un'interferenza sproporzionata coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente il rifiuto di un'autorità locale di permettere al richiedente di esercitare una scelta per rinnovare un contratto d'affitto alla scadenza del termine iniziale, al motivo che la concessione originale della scelta era stata ultra vires l'autorità locale. La Corte in questa causa osservò che l'accordo di contratto d'affitto fra il richiedente e l'autorità locale era di natura di legge privata, che l'autorità locale aveva ricevuto l'affitto convenuto per il contratto d'affitto e che, esercitando il diritto di rinnovo, aveva la possibilità di negoziare un aumento sulla base dell’affitto. Non c’era in queste circostanze, nessuna base per sostenere che l'autorità locale aveva agito contro l'interesse pubblico nel modo in cui aveva disposti della proprietà sotto il suo controllo o che qualsiasi interesse di terze parti sarebbe stato pregiudicato dando effetto alla scelta di rinnovamento e non vi era niente per se deplorevole nell'inclusione di tale termine in accordi di contratti d'affitto. La Corte notò inoltre che non c'era nessun arricchimento indebito del richiedente che aveva l'aspettativa di trarre un ritorno futuro dal suo investimento nel contratto d'affitto avendo avuto la scelta di rinnovo un'importante parte del contratto d'affitto per una persona come il richiedente che aveva sostenuto degli obblighi di costruzione.
6. La maggioranza nella presente causa mette l'enfasi sul principio di buon governo nel contesto di diritti di proprietà e critica le autorità per un'addotta omissione nell’agire in buon tempo ed in modo appropriato e coerente una volta ha scoperto il loro errore. Mentre accettiamo l'importanza del principio di buon governo, non possiamo trovare che il principio è stato violato nella presente causa; la revisione dell'assegnazione della pensione EWK ha avuto luogo, nella nostra prospettiva con prontezza ragionevole e, una volta scoperto l'errore, le autorità hanno agito in modo appropriato e senza alcun ritardo indebito.
7. È dibattuto inoltre che dove, come qui, un errore è stato causato dalle autorità stesse senza qualsiasi colpa di una terza parte, un “approccio di proporzionalità diverso” viene richiesto nel determinare se il carico sopportato da un richiedente è stato eccessivo. È poco chiaro a noi a quale riguardo l'approccio da adottare in tale causa si dice che differisca da quello in altre cause. Comunque, accettando anche che una prova più severa può essere richiesta dove le autorità nazionali sono responsabili per l'errore che ha dato luogo alla concessione originale della pensione EWK, noi non troviamo che la revoca della concessione abbia imposto sul richiedente un carico individuale eccessivo. Noi siamo confermati in questa visione da quattro fattori. Al primo posto, benché la pensione EWK assegnata al richiedente fu contrassegnata come indefinitamente valida, non era in qualsiasi caso un beneficio permanente o immutabile; il pagamento della pensione era soggetto a revisione periodica ed era passibile di essere cessato se, inter alia, si fosse trovato che la condizione medica del figlio della richiedente non avesse più richiesto cure permanente. Inoltre, spettava ai tribunali nazionali erano responsabile di trovare passibile di revoca dove una nuova prova era stata presentata o dove circostanze attinenti preesistenti l'assegnazione di pensione iniziale ma che non erano state prese in esame dalle autorità, erano venute successivamente alla luce. In secondo luogo, la decisione del Consiglio di Previdenza Sociale di revocare la concessione della pensione era sottoposto ad esame accurato a tre livelli di giurisdizione dai tribunali nazionali che hanno esaminato le nuove prove mediche riguardo al figlio della richiedente prima di concludere che la richiedente era stata spossessata giustamente del diritto ad una pensione sotto lo schema previsto dall'Ordinanza del 1989 siccome lei non ha soddisfatto il requisito di cure permanente e necessarie. In terzo luogo, come notato sopra, nonostante il fatto che la revoca fosse retrospettiva, la richiedente non era stata mai costretta a rimborsare le somme che le erano state pagate erroneamente. In quarto luogo, quando la richiedente perse il suo diritto alla pensione EWK, lei si qualificò per un'altra forma di beneficio di pre-pensionamento dallo Stato, benché fosse significativamente inferiore come valore rispetto alla pensione EWK. È vero che, per ragioni che sono poco chiare ma che potrebbero essere riferite al fatto che la richiedente stava intraprendendo in concomitanza procedimenti presso i tribunali nazionali per impugnare la revoca della pensione EWK, i procedimenti alternativi per ottenere i benefici di pre-pensionamento non furono conclusi sino al 25 ottobre 2005. Comunque, l'assegnazione di questi benefici fu retrodatata al 25 ottobre 2002, con la conseguenza che la richiedente ha ricevuto un prezzo globale equivalente al pagamento della pensione di 3 anni.
8. In queste circostanze, noi siamo incapaci di concludere che un equilibrio equo non è stato previsto fra il pubblico in questione e gli interessi privati o che i diritti della richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sono stati violati.
9. Riguardo all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, le ragioni a cui noi ci siamo appellati sopra servono anche rispondere all'azione di reclamo del richiedente per cui la revoca della decisione di assegnare la pensione EWK ha danneggiato il principio della certezza legale. Cos’, come la maggioranza della Camera, noi non consideriamo che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto questo Articolo richieda un esame separato.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.