Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF OLARU AND OTHERS v. MOLDOVA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 06, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 476/07/2009
STATO: Moldova
DATA: 28/07/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Respondent State to take measures of a general character ; Just satisfaction reserved
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF OLARU AND OTHERS v. MOLDOVA
(Applications nos. 476/07, 22539/05, 17911/08 and 13136/07)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
28 July 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Olaru and Others v. Moldova,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ledi Bianku,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 7 July 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in four applications (nos. 476/07, 22539/05, 17911/08 and 13136/07) against the Republic of Moldova lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by six Moldovan nationals, Mr V. O. and Mr A. L., Ms C. L., Ms O. L., Ms V. G. and Mr S. R. (“the applicants”), on 11 December 2006, 31 May 2005, 2 April 2008 and 3 January 2007.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr. A. T., Mr F. N., Ms J. H. and Mr A. B., lawyers practising in Chişinău. The Moldovan Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr V. Grosu.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, a breach of their rights guaranteed by Article 6 §1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention as a result of the authorities' failure to comply with final judicial decisions delivered by domestic courts in their favour.
4. On 1 July 2008 the Court declared one of the applications (13136/07) partly inadmissible and decided to communicate the complaints in all the applications concerning the non-enforcement of final judicial decisions to the Government. It also decided to examine the merits of the applications at the same time as their admissibility (Article 29 § 3). The Court also decided, under Rule 54 § 2 (c) of the Rules of Court, to grant the cases priority under Rule 41 and to invite the parties to submit further written observations on the above applications. The Chamber furthermore decided to inform the parties that it was considering the suitability of applying a pilot judgment procedure in the cases (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 and the operative part, ECHR 2004-V, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC] no. 35014/97, ECHR 2006-... §§ 231-239 and the operative part) and requested the parties' observations on the matter.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Application no. 476/07 by V. O.
5. The applicant, Mr V. O., is a Moldovan national who was born in 1971 and lives in Chişinău. He is a police officer.
6. According to the Law on Police Forces, the local public administration is obliged to provide police officers with social housing (see the Domestic Law part below).
7. On an unspecified date the applicant instituted civil proceedings against the Chişinău Municipal Council and on 16 December 2004 the Centru District Court ordered the defendant to provide the applicant with accommodation. The judgment became final and enforceable; however, it has not been enforced to date.
B. Application no. 17911/08 by A., C. and O. L. v. Moldova
8. The applicants, A., C. and O. L. are a family of Moldovan nationals who were born in 1972, 1973 and 1994 respectively and live in Straseni.
9. Between 1997 and 2003 the first applicant was a judge. By a final judgment of 10 September 2001 of the Edineţ District Court, the Edineţ Municipal Council was ordered to provide the applicants with housing in accordance with the provisions of the Law on the Status of Judges.
10. Since the judgment was not enforced, on 11 March 2005, the applicants applied for a change in the manner of enforcement of the judgment.
11. On 9 June 2006 the Râşcani District Court ordered the Edineţ Local Council to pay the applicants the value of the apartment, namely 15,000 dollars (USD).
12. The judgment of 10 September 2001 has not been enforced to date.
C. Application no. 22539/05 by V. G.
13. The applicant, Ms V. G., is a Moldovan national who was born in 1955 and lives in Chişinău.
14. Together with her three children and a nephew, the applicant lived in an apartment measuring sixteen square metres, which was part of a bigger house.
15. On an unspecified date, a third party instituted proceedings against the Chişinău Municipal Council for the restitution of the house in which the applicant's apartment was located, in accordance with Law No. 1225-XII “on the rehabilitation of the victims of the political repression committed by the totalitarian communist occupying regime”.
16. On 22 July 1998 the Centru District Court found in favour of the third party and ordered the eviction of the applicant from her apartment. At the same time, in accordance with the provisions of the same law, the court ordered the Municipal Council to provide the applicant with alternative accommodation in accordance with the provisions of the Housing Code. According to the latter provisions, each member of the applicant's family had the right to accommodation of at least nine square metres.
17. The judgment of 22 July 1998 has not been enforced to date.
D. Application no.13136/07 by S. R.
18. The applicant, Mr S. R., is a Moldovan national who was born in 1951 and lives in Chişinău.
19. The applicant is an internally displaced person. After the 1992 war he fled Transdniestria and settled in Chişinău.
20. On 21 October 1993 the Government of the Republic of Moldova adopted Decision no. 658 “on housing for persons forced to quit their houses in the eastern region of Moldova”.
21. On an unspecified date the applicant instituted proceedings against the Government and the Chişinău local authorities seeking housing.
22. By a final judgment of 7 June 2006 the Supreme Court of Justice ordered the Government and the Chişinău Municipal Council to provide the applicant with an apartment.
23. It appears that enforcement proceedings were conducted against the Chişinău Municipal Council only; however, the judgment has not been enforced to date.
II. RELEVANT NON-CONVENTION MATERIAL
A. Domestic law and practice
24. The relevant provisions of Law no. 435 on administrative decentralisation read as follows:
“Section 12. Financial decentralisation
(1) The public local authorities enjoy, within the limits of the law, financial autonomy. They shall adopt their own budgets which shall be independent and separate from the budget of the State.
Section 13. The property of the territorial-administrative units
(1) The public local authorities shall have their own distinct patrimony, which shall include movable and immovable goods. They shall dispose freely of it under the conditions provided for by law.
(2) The patrimony of the territorial-administrative units shall be delimited and separated from that of the State, according to the law.
(3) The delimitation presupposes ... exclusive decisional competence of the territorial-administrative units in respect of the administration of the patrimony...”
25. Law no. 416 on Police Forces, in so far as relevant, provides as follows:
“Section 35. Housing for police officers
Police officers must be provided with housing by the local administrative authorities after three years of employment...”
26. The relevant part of Law no. Nr. 544 on the status of judges provides:
“Section 30. Housing for judges
(1) If a judge has no accommodation or if he needs an improvement to be made to his accommodation, or if he has not been provided with the supplementary fifteen square metres, the local administrative authority is obliged to provide the judge with housing within six months from the moment when the above circumstances arise ...
(2) After ten years of service the accommodation provided to a judge shall be transferred into his ownership.”
27. The relevant part of Law no. 1225 on the rehabilitation of victims of political repression provides:
“Section 12. Restitution of property to persons who were subjects of repression
Any citizen of the Republic of Moldova who has been the subject of political repression and subsequently rehabilitated, shall have returned to him, at his request or at the request of his heirs, any property which was confiscated, nationalised or taken away from him in some other way.
...
The persons who have to be evicted from the houses restored to their owners shall be provided with accommodation by the local administration authorities ... at the time of eviction, in accordance with the legislation in force.”
28. The relevant provisions of the Government's decision no. 658 concerning housing for citizens forced to leave their houses in the eastern region of the Republic of Moldova read as follows:
1. The families of citizens forced to leave their houses in the eastern region of Moldova [Transdniestria] as a result of the military actions for the safeguarding of the independence and integrity of Moldova or as a result of their political activity directed against separatism... shall be provided with housing in accordance with the housing legislation in force.
29. The relevant parts of Law no. 118, the Prosecuting Authorities Act, read as follows:
“Section 38. Housing
(1) If a prosecutor has no accommodation or if he needs an improvement in his accommodation, the local administrative authority shall be obliged to provide him or her with housing within one year of the date of his or her appointment ...”
30. According to section 9 (3) of the Military Social Protection Law military personnel are entitled to free housing provided by the Ministry of Defence. However, it appears from a judgment of the Centru District Court of 3 March 2004 in the case of Olisevschi v. the Chişinău Municipal Council that it was the Chişinău local authorities which were obliged to provide the plaintiff with a two-roomed apartment.
31. After the communication of the present cases to the respondent Government, the Ministry of Justice prepared a draft law amending twenty-eight acts providing for social housing privileges to twenty-three categories of persons. It appears that the proposed amendments provided for the total annulment of social housing privileges in Moldova. The draft law was sent to different branches of the Government for approval on 5 November 2008. The Court has no information as to what happened to the proposed draft law after November 2008.
B. Materials of the Council of Europe
32. The European Charter of Local Self-Government reads, in so far as relevant:
“Article 9 – Financial resources of local authorities
Local authorities shall be entitled, within national economic policy, to adequate financial resources of their own, of which they may dispose freely within the framework of their powers.
Local authorities' financial resources shall be commensurate with the responsibilities provided for by the constitution and the law.”
33. On 21 and 22 June 2007 the Department for the Execution of the Judgments of the European Court of Human Rights of the Council of Europe organised a Round Table on “Non-enforcement of domestic courts decisions in member states: general measures to comply with European Court judgments”. In a document containing the conclusions of the round table, the participants expressed the following views:
“As regards the legal and regulatory framework preventing non-execution:
ensuring a coherent legal framework and/or coherent practices for the control and restitution of property respecting the requirements of the Convention;
improving budgetary planning, notably by ensuring the compatibility between the budgetary laws and the State's payment obligations;
proper control over the use of the budgetary funds by the authorities responsible for payments;
providing for specific mechanisms for rapid additional funding to avoid unnecessary delays in the execution of judicial decisions in case of shortfalls in the initial budgetary appropriations;
setting up, where appropriate, a special fund or special reserve budgetary lines, to ensure timely compliance with judicial decisions, with a subsequent possibility of recovering from the debtor the relevant sums together with default interest;
ensuring the individuals' effective access to execution proceedings by clearly identifying the authority responsible for execution and simplifying the requirements to be fulfilled by the execution documents;
As regards domestic remedies in case of non-execution:
introducing, either in budgetary laws and in other laws, a general obligation to automatically compensate for delays in execution of judicial decisions through appropriate default interest at a reasonable rate (e.g. in line with the Central Bank's marginal lending rate);
ensuring effective civil liability of the State for damages arising from the non-execution of domestic judicial decisions, which are not compensated by the default interest and providing, in appropriate cases, for the possibility of recovering awards made from the state agents responsible;
guaranteeing the existence of effective procedures capable of accelerating the execution process leading to full compliance with the judicial decision;
providing for increased recourse to money penalties, where appropriate, the automatic increase of those money penalties as the authority concerned continues to delay execution;
improving the personal responsibility of state agents in case of deliberate non-execution through efficient penalties or fines;
further developing central procedures for the freezing of accounts held by debtor authorities in order to secure the honouring of payment obligations, including the possibility of freezing also the accounts of authorities subordinate to the debtor's authority;
setting up or improving procedures and regulations allowing the seizure of state assets which are manifestly not necessary for the fulfilment of the missions of the authorities concerned and, where appropriate, drawing up necessary inventories;
providing the bailiffs with sufficient means and powers so as to allow them to properly ensure, where appropriate, the enforcement of judicial decisions;
strengthening the individual responsibility (disciplinary, administrative and criminal where appropriate) of decision makers in case of abusive non-execution and providing the responsible state authorities with the necessary powers to that effect...”
34. Recommendation Rec(2004)6 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on the improvement of domestic remedies (adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 12 May 2004 at its 114th Session), in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“Remedies following a “pilot” judgment
13. When a judgment which points to structural or general deficiencies in national law or practice (“pilot case”) has been delivered and a large number of applications to the Court concerning the same problem (“repetitive cases”) are pending or likely to be lodged, the respondent state should ensure that potential applicants have, where appropriate, an effective remedy allowing them to apply to a competent national authority, which may also apply to current applicants. Such a rapid and effective remedy would enable them to obtain redress at national level, in line with the principle of subsidiarity of the Convention system.
14. The introduction of such a domestic remedy could also significantly reduce the Court's workload. While prompt execution of the pilot judgment remains essential for solving the structural problem and thus for preventing future applications on the same matter, there may exist a category of people who have already been affected by this problem prior to its resolution. The existence of a remedy aimed at providing redress at national level for this category of people might allow the Court to invite them to have recourse to the new remedy and, if appropriate, declare their applications inadmissible.
15. Several options with this objective are possible, depending, among other things, on the nature of the structural problem in question and on whether the person affected by this problem has applied to the Court or not.
16. In particular, further to a pilot judgment in which a specific structural problem has been found, one alternative might be to adopt an ad hoc approach, whereby the state concerned would assess the appropriateness of introducing a specific remedy or widening an existing remedy by legislation or by judicial interpretation.
17. Within the framework of this case-by-case examination, states might envisage, if this is deemed advisable, the possibility of reopening proceedings similar to those of a pilot case which has established a violation of the Convention, with a view to saving the Court from dealing with these cases and where appropriate to providing speedier redress for the person concerned. The criteria laid out in Recommendation Rec(2000)2 of the Committee of Ministers might serve as a source of inspiration in this regard.
18. When specific remedies are set up following a pilot case, governments should speedily inform the Court so that it can take them into account in its treatment of subsequent repetitive cases.
19. However, it would not be necessary or appropriate to create new remedies, or give existing remedies a certain retroactive effect, following every case in which a Court judgment has identified a structural problem. In certain circumstances, it may be preferable to leave the cases to the examination of the Court, particularly to avoid compelling the applicant to bear the further burden of having once again to exhaust domestic remedies, which, moreover, would not be in place until the adoption of legislative changes.”
THE LAW
35. The applicants complained that the authorities' failure to comply with the binding and enforceable judgments in their favour had violated their right to a court under Article 6 of the Convention and their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law...”
36. It was also submitted by the applicants that the facts of their applications disclosed the existence of a “systemic situation” where deficiencies in the national law and practice may give rise to numerous similar applications. Article 46 of the Convention provides:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
I. ADMISSIBILITY OF THE CASES
37. The Court considers that the applicants' complaints raise questions of fact and law which are sufficiently serious that their determination should depend on an examination of the merits, and that no other grounds for declaring them inadmissible have been established. The Court therefore declares these complaints admissible. In accordance with its decision to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention (see paragraph 4 above), the Court will immediately consider the merits of the complaints.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 AND OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
38. The applicants complained that the non-enforcement of the judgments in their favour had violated their rights under Article 6 § 1 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
39. The Government submitted that they had taken measures directed at the enforcement of the judgments in question; however, they could not be enforced in view of the high number of similar unenforced judgments and of lack of funds on the part of the local public authorities. The Government admitted that there were no reasons to depart from the Court's previous case-law in similar cases where a violation of Article 6 § 1 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had been found.
40. The Court notes that the judgments in favour of the applicants remained unenforced for periods varying between three and eleven years. The Court has found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in numerous cases concerning delays in enforcing final judgments (see, among other authorities, Prodan v. Moldova, no. 49806/99, ECHR 2004-III (extracts), and Luntre and Others v. Moldova, nos. 2916/02, 21960/02, 21951/02, 21941/02, 21933/02, 20491/02, 2676/02, 23594/02, 21956/02, 21953/02, 21943/02, 21947/02 and 21945/02, 15 June 2004).
41. Having examined the materials submitted to it, the Court agrees with the parties that there is nothing in the files which would allow it to reach a different conclusion in the present cases. Accordingly, the Court finds, for the reasons given in the above-mentioned cases, that the failure to enforce the judgments in favour of the applicants within a reasonable time constitutes a violation of Article 6 § 1 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
A. The submissions of the parties
42. The applicants submitted that the impossibility of local public authorities to comply with final court judgments ordering them to offer social housing disclosed a systemic problem which could potentially affect some 10,000 individuals from five categories of persons entitled to such housing. Those categories were: judges, prosecutors, police officers, internally displaced persons and employees of the penitentiary system.
43. According to the applicants this shortcoming was the result of the malfunctioning of the Moldovan housing legislation in that it imposes on the local administration the obligation to provide social housing to certain categories of persons in the absence of any financial coverage for that purpose, thus making it impossible for the local administrations to comply with final court judgments to that effect.
44. The fact that the Government obliged the local authorities to provide different categories of population with social housing without providing financial support for that purpose amounted to a breach of the principle of local autonomy as guaranteed by Article 9 of the European Charter of Local Self-Government.
45. Referring to the measures proposed by the Government (see paragraph 47 below), the applicants argued that they only provided a solution for the future and that they did not solve the problem of the existing non-enforced domestic judgments concerning social housing. The applicants suggested several solutions in that respect. According to them the central Government could create an effective financial mechanism for supporting the local authorities in complying with existing judgments granting social housing. Alternatively, the central Government could take over retroactively the obligation to provide social housing from the local administrations.
46. The applicants finally stressed that the Government should also put in place a mechanism for the payment of compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage suffered as a result of the non-enforcement or late enforcement of final judgments awarding social housing.
47. The Government did not dispute the fact that the problem of non-enforcement of domestic judgments awarding social housing disclosed the existence of a “systemic problem”. They agreed that the legislation in force granted social housing to a number of categories of persons and that more than one hundred final domestic judgments had not been enforced to date. They also admitted that the obligation imposed on the local administration authorities to bear the cost of social housing for specific categories of persons was contrary to the principle of local autonomy and decentralisation. In order to overcome the problem, a draft law had drawn up by the Ministry of Justice proposing to cancel social housing privileges for twenty-three categories of persons (see paragraph 31 above). The draft law had been sent to different bodies of the Government and non-governmental organisations for consultation.
48. The Government were aware that the draft law did not provide a solution for the judgments which already exist, and expressed their willingness to have the applicants' cases examined within the framework of a “pilot procedure”.
B. The Court's assessment
1. General principles
49. The Court reiterates that Article 46 of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of Article 1, imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to secure the right of the applicant which the Court found to be violated. Such measures must also be taken in respect of other persons in the applicant's position, notably by solving the problems that have led to the Court's findings (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000 VIII; Christine Goodwin v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 28957/95, § 120, ECHR 2002 VI; Lukenda v. Slovenia, no. 23032/02, § 94, ECHR 2005-X; and S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 30562/04 and 30566/04, § 134, 4 December 2008). This obligation has consistently been emphasised by the Committee of Ministers in the supervision of the execution of the Court's judgments (see, among many authorities, Interim Resolutions DH(97)336 in cases concerning the length of proceedings in Italy; DH(99)434 in cases concerning the action of the security forces in Turkey; and ResDH(2001)65 in the case of Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy; ResDH(2006)1 in the cases of Ryabykh and Volkova).
50. In order to facilitate effective implementation of its judgments along these lines, the Court may adopt a pilot judgment procedure allowing it to clearly identify in a judgment the existence of structural problems underlying the violations and to indicate specific measures or actions to be taken by the respondent State to remedy them (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 and the operative part, ECHR 2004-V, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC] no. 35014/97, §§ 231-239 and the operative part, 2006-VIII). This adjudicative approach is however pursued with due respect for the Convention organs' respective functions: it falls to the Committee of Ministers to evaluate the implementation of individual and general measures under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski v. Poland (friendly settlement) [GC], no. 31443/96, § 42, ECHR 2005-IX, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland (friendly settlement) [GC], no. 35014/97, § 42, 28 April 2008).
51. Another important aim of the pilot judgment procedure is to induce the respondent State to resolve large numbers of individual cases arising from the same structural problem at the domestic level, thus implementing the principle of subsidiarity which underpins the Convention system. Indeed, the Court's task, as defined by Article 19, that is to “ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the High Contracting Parties in the Convention and the Protocols thereto”, is not necessarily best achieved by repeating the same findings in large series of cases (see, mutatis mutandis, E.G. v. Poland (dec.), no. 50425/99, § 27, ECHR 2008–..(extracts)). The object of the pilot judgment procedure is to facilitate the speediest and most effective resolution of a dysfunction affecting the protection of the Convention rights in question in the national legal order (see Wolkenberg and Others v. Poland (dec.), no. 50003/99, § 34, ECHR 2007-XIV (extracts)). While the respondent State's action should primarily aim at the resolution of such a dysfunction and at the introduction where appropriate of effective domestic remedies in respect of the violations in question, it may also include ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers of redress in line with the Convention requirements. The Court may decide to adjourn examination of all similar cases, thus giving the respondent State an opportunity to settle them in such various ways (see, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski, cited above, § 198, and Xenides-Arestis v. Turkey, no. 46347/99, § 50, 22 December 2005).
52. If, however, the respondent State fails to adopt such measures following a pilot judgment and continues to violate the Convention, the Court will have no choice but to resume examination of all similar applications pending before it and to take them to judgment so as to ensure effective observance of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, E.G. v. Poland, cited above, § 28).
2. Application of the principles to the present case
53. The Court notes that the problem of non-enforcement of final judgments is Moldova's prime problem in terms of numbers of applications pending before the Court. According to the Court's statistics, approximately 300 such applications were registered on the Court's list of cases on the date of adoption of the present judgment.
54. The group of the so-called social housing non-enforcement cases accounts for approximately fifty per cent of all non-enforcement Moldovan cases and concerns the failure of local governments to comply with final judgments awarding applicants housing rights or money in lieu of housing. The problem appears to have its origin in socially-oriented legislation enacted by Parliament or the Government, which bestows social housing privileges on a very wide category of persons at the expense of the local governments. According to this legislation more than twenty different categories of persons are entitled to receive accommodation free of charge. For instance, a judge is entitled to social housing after six months' service; a police officer, depending on his or her rank, after one or three years; a military officer after one year; a prosecutor after one year.
55. While the rest of the non-enforcement cases from Moldova usually concern small amounts of money, are usually enforced with certain delays and usually end with friendly settlement agreements or unilateral declarations by the Government, the cases from the social housing group are very rarely enforced, because of chronic lack of funds on the part of local governments. In fact the local governments are placed in a situation where they have to choose between fulfilling their normal duties such as, for instance, providing community services and operating schools and kindergartens or using the funds for building accommodation for judges, police officers, prosecutors and others. An example which addresses the situation of the social housing cases is the case of Caraman v. Moldova ((dec.), no. 3755/05, 22 April 2008) where the parties reached a friendly settlement agreement according to which the Government were to pay the applicant damages and to “ensure the urgent enforcement of the judgment” in favour of the applicant. One year after striking the case out of its list of cases, the Court was obliged to restore it to the list because the final judgment in favour of the applicant had not been enforced due to the Chişinău Municipality's lack of funds.
56. The above findings and the Government's acknowledgement of the existence of a structural problem allow the Court to conclude that the violations found in the present judgment reflect a persistent structural dysfunction and that the present situation must be qualified as a practice incompatible with the Convention (see Bottazzi v. Italy [GC], no. 34884/97, § 22, ECHR 1999-V).
57. As argued by the applicants and admitted by the Government, the problems at the root of the violations of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention found in the present cases stem from the provisions in Moldovan law granting social housing to numerous categories of persons at the expense of local governments without providing adequate funding for such social projects. The Court notes that the Government admitted that this situation was also contrary to the principle of local autonomy and decentralisation. In admitting the existence of the systemic dysfunction, the Government have already taken some general measures with a view to solving it. In particular, the Ministry of Justice has prepared a draft law intended to cancel social housing privileges for twenty-three categories of persons (see paragraph 31 above). The Court agrees that such a measure, if followed through, is capable of solving the problem for the future. However, as rightly pointed out by the applicants and admitted by the Government, this initiative does not provide solutions for the judgments granting social housing rights which already exist. The Court considers that this problem, although not particularly complex, raises issues which go, in principle, beyond the Court's judicial function. It will thus abstain in these circumstances from indicating any specific general measure to be taken in this respect. The Committee of Ministers is better placed and equipped to monitor the necessary measures to be adopted by Moldova in this respect. The Court therefore leaves it to the Committee of Ministers to ensure that the Moldovan Government, in accordance with its obligations under the Convention, adopts the necessary measures consistent with the Court's conclusions in the present judgment.
58. The Court further recalls that in Moisei v. Moldova (no. 14914/03, §§ 29-33, 19 December 2006) and in Tudor-Auto S.R.L. and Triplu-Tudor S.R.L. v. Moldova (nos. 36341/03, 36344/03, and 30346/05, §§ 57-62, 9 December 2008) it found violations of Article 13 of the Convention on account of lack of effective domestic remedies against non-enforcement of final judgments. The Court has not been informed since about the introduction of any effective remedies in Moldova and therefore the State must introduce a remedy which secures genuinely effective redress for violations of the Convention on account of the State authorities' prolonged failure to comply with final judicial decisions concerning social housing delivered against the State or its entities. Such a remedy, created under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, must conform to the Convention principles and be available within six months of the date on which the present judgment becomes final.
59. The Court reiterates that one of the aims of the pilot judgment procedure is to allow the speediest possible redress to be granted at the domestic level to the large numbers of individuals suffering from the structural problem identified in the pilot judgment. It may thus be decided in the pilot judgment that the proceedings in all cases stemming from the same structural problem be adjourned pending the implementation of the relevant measures by the respondent State. The Court considers it appropriate to adopt a similar approach following the present judgment while differentiating between the cases already pending before the Court and those that could be brought in the future.
60. In so far as the latter category of cases is concerned, the Court will adjourn the proceedings on all new applications lodged with the Court after the delivery of the present judgment, in which the applicants complain solely of non-enforcement and/or delayed enforcement of domestic judgments concerning social housing. The adjournment will be effective for a period of one year after the present judgment has become final and, according to the circumstances, the applicants in those cases may be required to resubmit their grievances to the domestic authorities (see Burdov v. Russia (no. 2), no. 33509/04, § 143, 15 January 2009).
61. The Court decides, however, to follow a different course of action in respect of the applications lodged before the delivery of the present judgment. In the Court's view, it would be unfair if the applicants in such cases, who have allegedly been suffering continuing violations of their right to a court for years and have sought relief in this Court, were compelled yet again to resubmit their grievances to the domestic authorities, be it on the grounds of a new remedy or otherwise. The Court therefore considers that the respondent State must grant adequate and sufficient redress, within one year of the date on which the judgment becomes final, to all victims of non-enforcement or unreasonably delayed enforcement by State authorities of domestic judgments concerning social housing who lodged their applications with the Court before the delivery of the present judgment. In the Court's view, such redress may be achieved through implementation proprio motu by the authorities of an effective domestic remedy in these cases or through ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers of redress in line with the Convention requirements. Pending the adoption of domestic remedial measures by the Moldovan authorities, the Court decides to adjourn adversarial proceedings in all these cases for one year from the date on which this judgment becomes final. This decision is without prejudice to the Court's power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list following a friendly settlement between the parties or the resolution of the matter by other means in accordance with Articles 37 or 39 of the Convention (see Burdov (no. 2), cited above, §§ 144-146).
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
62. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
63. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and a further procedure fixed, with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Moldovan Government and the applicants.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the applications admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the State's failure to enforce the final domestic judgments in favour of the applicants;
3. Holds that the above violations originated in a practice incompatible with the Convention which consists in the State's recurrent failure to comply with final judgments awarding social housing in respect of which aggrieved parties have no effective domestic remedy;
4. Holds that the respondent State must set up, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, an effective domestic remedy which secures adequate and sufficient redress for non-enforcement or delayed enforcement of final domestic judgments concerning social housing in line with the Convention principles as established in the Court's case-law;
5. Holds that the respondent State must grant such redress, within one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final, to all victims of non-enforcement or unreasonably delayed enforcement of social housing final judgments in cases lodged with the Court before the delivery of the present judgment;
6. Holds that pending the adoption of the above measures, the Court will adjourn, for one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final, the proceedings in all cases concerning the non-enforcement and/or delayed enforcement of final domestic judgments concerning social housing, without prejudice to the Court's power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list following a friendly settlement between the parties or the resolution of the matter by other means in accordance with Articles 37 or 39 of the Convention;
7. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 in the instant cases is not ready for decision and accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 28 July 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; Stato Rispondente deve prendere misure di carattere generale; soddisfazione Equa riservata
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA OLARU ED ALTRI C. MOLDAVIA
(Richieste N. 476/07, 22539/05 17911/08 e 13136/07)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
28 luglio 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa di Olaru ed Altri c. Moldavia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ledi Bianku, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 7 luglio 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da quattro richieste (N. 476/07, 22539/05 17911/08 e 13136/07) contro la Repubblica della Moldavia depositate presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da sei cittadini della Moldavia, il Sig. V. O. ed il Sig. A. L., la Sig.ra C. L., la Sig.ra O. L., la Sig.ra V. G. ed il Sig. S. R. (“i richiedenti”), l’11 dicembre 2006, il 31 maggio 2005, il 2 aprile 2008 e il 3 gennaio 2007 .
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. A. T., il Sig. F. N., la Sig.ra J. H. ed il Sig. A. B., avvocati che praticano a Chişinău. Il Governo della Moldavia (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. V. Grosu.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, una violazione dei loro diritti garantiti dall’ Articolo 6 §1 della Convenzione e dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione come risultato dell'inosservanza delle autorità di decisioni giudiziali definitive consegnate da tribunali nazionali a loro favore.
4. Il 1 luglio 2008 la Corte dichiarò una delle richieste (13136/07) parzialmente inammissibile e decise di comunicare al Governo le azioni di reclamo in tutte le richieste riguardo alla non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali definitive. Decise anche di esaminare i meriti delle richieste allo stesso tempo della loro ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3). La Corte decise anche, sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2 (c) dell’ordinamento della Corte, di accordare la priorità delle cause sotto l’Articolo 41 ed inoltre invitare le parti a presentare osservazioni scritte sulle richieste sopra. La Camera decise inoltre di informare le parti che stava considerando l'appropriatezza di applicare una procedura di sentenza guida nelle cause (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 e la parte operativa, ECHR 2004-V , e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC] n. 35014/97, ECHR 2006 -... §§ 231-239 e la parte operativa) e richiese le osservazioni delle parti sulla questione.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. Richiesta n. 476/07 di V. O.
5. Il richiedente, il Sig. V.O. é un cittadino moldavo che nacque nel 1971 e vive z Chişinău. Lui é un agente di polizia.
6. Secondo la legge sulle Forze di Polizia, l'amministrazione pubblica locale è obbligata a fornire ad agenti di polizia un alloggio sociale, (vedere la parte di Diritto nazionale sotto).
7. In una data non specificata il richiedente avviò dei procedimenti civili contro il Consiglio Municipale di Chişinău e la Corte distrettuale di Centru ordinò che l'imputato fornisse al richiedente un alloggio il 16 dicembre 2004. La sentenza divenne definitiva ed esecutiva; comunque, non è stato eseguito ad oggi.
B. Richiesta n. 17911/08 di A., C. ed O. L. c. Moldavia
8. I richiedenti, A., C. ed O. L. sono una famiglia di cittadini moldavi che nacquero rispettivamente nel 1972, 1973 e 1994 e vivono a Straseni.
9. Fra il 1997 ed il 2003 il primo richiedente era un giudice. Con una sentenza definitiva del 10 settembre 2001 della Corte distrettuale di Edineţ, al Consiglio Municipale di Edineţ fu ordinato di fornire ai richiedenti un alloggio in conformità con le disposizioni della legge sullo Status di Giudici.
10. Poiché la sentenza non fu eseguita, l’11 marzo 2005, i richiedenti fecero istanza per un cambio nel metodo di esecuzione della sentenza.
11. Il 9 giugno 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Râşcani ordinò al Consiglio Locale di Edineţ di pagare ai richiedenti il valore dell'appartamento, vale a dire 15,000 dollari (USD).
12. La sentenza del 10 settembre 2001 non è stata eseguita ad oggi.
C. Richiesta n. 22539/05 di V. G.
13. Il richiedente, la Sig.ra V. G. è una cittadina moldava che nacque nel 1955 e vive a Chişinău.
14. Insieme coi suoi tre figli ed un nipote, il richiedente viveva in un appartamento che misurava sedici metri quadrati che era parte di un alloggio più grande.
15. Una terza parte avviò procedimenti contro il Consiglio Municipale di Chişinău per la restituzione dell'alloggio nella quale l'appartamento del richiedente era situato in una data non specificata, in conformità con la Legge N.ro 1225-XII “sulla riabilitazione delle vittime della repressione politica commessa dal regime comunista totalitario occupante.”
16. Il 22 luglio 1998 la Corte distrettuale di Centru decise a favore della terza parte ed ordinò lo sfratto del richiedente dal suo appartamento. Allo stesso tempo, in conformità con le disposizioni della stessa legge la corte ordinò al Consiglio Municipale di fornire al richiedente un alloggio alternativo in conformità con le disposizioni del Codice dell’Alloggio. Secondo queste ultime disposizioni, ogni membro della famiglia del richiedente aveva il diritto ad alloggio di almeno nove metri quadrati.
17. La sentenza del 22 luglio 1998 non è stata eseguita ad oggi.
D. Richiesta no.13136/07 di S. R.
18. Il richiedente, il Sig. S. R. é un cittadino moldavo che nacque nel 1951 e vive a Chişinău.
19. Il richiedente é una persona internamente deportata. Dopo la guerra del 1992 lui abbandonò Transdniestria e si stabilì a Chişinău.
20. Il 21 ottobre 1993 il Governo della Repubblica della Moldavia adottò la Decisione n. 658 “sull’alloggio per persone costrette a lasciare i loro alloggi nella regione orientale della Moldavia.”
21. In una data non specificata il richiedente avviò dei procedimenti contro il Governo e le autorità locali di Chişinău chiedono un alloggio.
22. Con una sentenza definitiva del 7 giugno 2006 la Corte di giustizia Suprema ordinò al Governo ed al Consiglio Municipale Chişinău di fornire al richiedente un appartamento.
23. Sembra che dei procedimenti di esecuzione furono condotti solamente contro il Consiglio Municipale di Chişinău; comunque, la sentenza non è stata eseguita ad oggi.
II. MATERIALE ATTINENTE NON DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Diritto nazionale e pratica
24. Le disposizioni attinenti della Legge n. 435 sulla decentralizzazione amministrativa si legge come segue:
“Sezione 12. Decentralizzazione finanziaria
(1) le autorità locali e pubbliche godono, all'interno dei limiti della legge, di autonomia finanziaria. Loro adotteranno i loro propri bilanci che saranno indipendenti e separati dal bilancio dello Stato.
Sezione 13. La proprietà delle unità territoriali -amministrative
(1) le autorità locali e pubbliche avranno il loro proprio patrimonio distinto che includerà beni mobili ed immobili. Loro disporranno liberamente di questi sotto le condizioni previste dalla legge.
(2) il patrimonio delle unità territoriali -amministrative sarà delimitato e sarà separato da quello dello Stato, a norma di legge.
(3) la delimitazione presuppone... la competenza decisionale ed esclusiva delle unità territoriali -amministrative a riguardo dell'amministrazione del patrimonio...”
25. La Legge n. 416 sulle Forze di Polizia, nella parte attinente, prevede come segue:
“Sezione 35. Alloggio per agenti di polizia
Ad agenti di polizia devono essere forniti alloggi dalle autorità amministrative e locali dopo tre anni di lavoro...”
26. La parte attinente della Legge n. Nr. 544 sullo status di giudici prevede:
“Sezione 30. Alloggio per giudici
(1) se un giudice non ha alloggio o se lui ha bisogno che venga fatta una miglioria al suo alloggio, o se a lui non sono stati offerti quindici metri quadrati supplementari, l'autorità amministrativa locale è obbligata a fornire al giudice un alloggio entro sei mesi dal momento in cui le circostanze sopra sorgono...
(2) dopo dieci anni di servizio l'alloggio fornito ad un giudice sarà trasferito nella sua proprietà.”
27. La parte attinente della Legge n. 1225 sulla riabilitazione delle vittime della repressione politica prevede:
“Sezione 12. Restituzione della proprietà a persone che erano stato soggetti a repressione
A qualsiasi cittadino della Repubblica di Moldavia che è stato soggetto a repressione politica e successivamente è stato riabilitato, verrà restituito, a sua richiesta o a richiesta dei suoi eredi una qualsiasi proprietà che fu confiscata, nazionalizzata o toltagli in ogni altro modo.
...
Alle persone che dovevano essere sfrattate dagli alloggi ripristinati ai loro proprietari sarà fornito un alloggio dalle autorità di amministrazione locali... al tempo dello sfratto, in conformità con la legislazione vigente.”
28. Le disposizioni attinenti della decisione del Governo n. 658 riguardo all’ alloggio per i cittadini costrinsero a lasciare i loro alloggi nella regione orientale della Repubblica di Moldavia si leggono come segue:
1. Alle famiglie di cittadini costretti a lasciare i loro alloggi nella regione orientale della Moldavia [Transdniestria] come risultato delle azioni militari per la protezione dell'indipendenza e dell'integrità della Moldavia o come risultato della loro attività politica diretta contro il separatismo... verrà fornito un alloggio in conformità con la legislazione vigente sugli alloggi.
29. Le parti attinenti della Legge n. 118, l’Atto delle Autorità Perseguenti, si legge come segue:
“Sezione 38. Alloggio
(1) se un procuratore non ha alloggio o se lui ha bisogno di un miglioramento del suo alloggio, l'autorità amministrativa e locale sarà obbligata ad offrirgli un alloggio entro un anno della data della sua designazione...”
30. Secondo la sezione 9 (3) della Legge sulla Protezione Sociale e Militare al personale militare è concesso di liberare un alloggio fornito dal Ministero della Difesa. Comunque, sembra da una sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Centru del 3 marzo 2004 nella causa Olisevschi c. il Consiglio Municipale di Chişinău che erano le autorità locali di Chişinău ad essere obbligate a fornire al querelante un appartamento di due locali.
31. Dopo la comunicazione delle presenti cause al Governo rispondente, il Ministero della Giustizia preparò un disegno di legge che correggeva ventotto atti che prevedevano dei diritti di alloggio sociale a ventitré categorie di persone. Sembra che gli emendamenti proposti prevedessero l'annullamento totale dei privilegi dell’ alloggio sociale in Moldavia. Il disegno di legge fu spedito a rami diversi del Governo per l’approvazione il 5 novembre 2008. La Corte non ha informazioni riguardo a ciò che accadde al disegno di legge proposto dopo il novembre 2008.
B. Materiali del Consiglio dell'Europa
32. Lo Statuto europeo di Autogoverno Locale si legge nella sua parte attinente :
“Articolo 9-risorse Finanziarie delle autorità locali
Alle Autorità locali saranno concesso, all'interno della politica economica nazionale, di loro proprie risorse finanziarie adeguate di loro proprio di cui loro possono disporre liberamente all'interno della struttura dei loro poteri.
Le risorse finanziarie delle autorità locali saranno commisurate con le responsabilità previste dalla costituzione e dalla legge.”
33. Il 21 e il 22 giugno 2007 il Settore per l'Esecuzione delle Sentenze della Corte europea dei Diritti umani del Consiglio dell'Europa organizzò una Tavola Rotonda sulla “ Non-esecuzione di decisioni da parte dei tribunali nazionali negli stati membro: misure generali per attenersi alle sentenze della Corte europea.” In un documento che contiene le conclusioni della tavola rotonda, i partecipanti espressero le seguenti prospettive:
“Riguardo alla struttura legale e regolatrice che previene la non-esecuzione:
assicurare una struttura legale coerente e/o pratiche coerenti per il controllo e la restituzione della proprietà che rispettano i requisiti della Convenzione;
migliorare la programmazione del bilancio in particolare assicurando la compatibilità fra le leggi budgetarie e gli obblighi di pagamento dello Stato;
controllo adeguato sull'uso dei finanziamenti budgetari da parte delle autorità responsabili dei pagamenti;
prevedere dei meccanismi specifici per il rapido finanziamento supplementare per evitare ritardi non necessari nell'esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali in caso di ammanchi nelle appropriazioni budgetarie iniziali;
stabilire , dove appropriato, un finanziamento speciale o delle linee speciale di riserva budgetarie, assicurare ottemperanza opportuna con le decisioni giudiziali, con la susseguente possibilità di recuperare dal debitore le somme attinenti insieme con l’ interesse di mora;
assicurare l'accesso efficace degli individui a procedimenti di esecuzione identificando chiaramente l'autorità responsabile dell’ esecuzione e semplificando i requisiti da adempiere da parte dei documenti di esecuzione;
Riguardo alle vie di ricorso nazionali in caso di non-esecuzione:
introdurre, o in leggi budgetarie e in altre leggi, un obbligo generale di compensare automaticamente i ritardi nell’esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali attraverso interesse di mora appropriato ad un tasso ragionevole (cioè in linea col tasso del prestito marginale della Banca Centrale );
assicurare responsabilità civile efficace dello Stato per i danni che sorgono dalla non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali che non vengono compensati con l'interesse di mora e prevedere, in casi appropriate, la possibilità di recuperare assegnazioni fatte dagli agenti statali responsabili;
garantire l'esistenza di procedure efficaci capaci di accelerare il processo di esecuzione che conduce alla piena ottemperanza della decisione giudiziale;
prevedere un aumento del ricorso a sanzioni penali in denaro, dove appropriato, l'aumento automatico di quelle sanzioni penali in denaro quando l'autorità riguardata continua a rimandare l’esecuzione;
migliorare la responsabilità personale degli agenti statali in caso di non-esecuzione intenzionale tramite sanzioni penali efficienti o multe;
ulteriore sviluppo di procedure centrali per il congelamento di conti tenuti da autorità debitrici per garantire di onorare degli obblighi di pagamento, incluso la possibilità di gelare anche i conti di autorità subordinate all'autorità debitrice;
stabilire o migliorare procedure e regolamentazioni che permettono la confisca di beni statali che non sono manifestamente necessari all'adempimento delle missioni delle autorità riguardate e, dove appropriato, stesura di inventari necessari;
offrire agli ufficiali giudiziari mezzi e poteri sufficienti così come concedere loro di assicurare in modo appropriato, dove appropriato, l'esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali;
rafforzare la responsabilità individuale (disciplinare, amministrativa e penale dove appropriato) di coloro che prendono decisioni in casi di non-esecuzione abusiva e fornire alle autorità statali responsabili i poteri necessari a questo effetto...”
34. Raccomandazione Rec(2004)6 del Comitato dei Ministri agli stati membro sul miglioramento delle vie di ricorso nazionali (adottata dal Comitato dei Ministri il 12 maggio 2004 nella sua 114a Sessione), nella sua parte attinente si legge come segue:
“Le vie di ricorso seguono una sentenza “ guida”
13. Quando una sentenza che evidenzia delle deficienze strutturali o generali nella legge nazionale o nella pratica (“causa guida”) è stata consegnata e un gran numero di richieste alla Corte riguardo allo stesso problema (“cause ripetitive”) è pendente o è probabile che venga depositato, lo stato rispondente dovrebbe assicurare che i potenziali richiedenti abbiano, dove appropriato, una via di ricorso efficace che conceda loro fare appello ad un'autorità nazionale competente, il che si può applicare anche a richiedenti correnti. Tale via di ricorso rapida ed efficace permetterebbe loro di ottenere compensazione a livello nazionale, in linea col principio di sussidiarietà del sistema della Convenzione.
14. L'introduzione di tale via di ricorso nazionale potrebbe ridurre anche significativamente il carico di lavoro della Corte. Mentre l’esecuzione pronta di una sentenza guida rimane essenziale per risolvere il problema strutturale e prevenire così le future richieste sulla stessa questione, può esistere una categoria di persone che già sono state colpite da questo problema prima della sua decisione. È probabile che l'esistenza di una via di ricorso mirata ad offrire compensazione a livello nazionale per questa categoria di persone potrebbe permettere alla Corte di invitarli ad essere ricorsi alla nuova via di ricorso e, se appropriato, potrebbe dichiarare le loro richieste inammissibile.
15. Molte scelte con questo obiettivo sono possibili, dipendendo, fra le altre cose dalla natura del problema strutturale in oggetto e sia che la persona colpita da questo problema abbia fatto appello o meno alla Corte .
16. In particolare, oltre ad una sentenza guida nella quale è stato trovato un specifico problema strutturale, un'alternativa sarebbe adottare un approccio ad hoc, dal quale lo stato riguardato valuterebbe l'appropriatezza di introdurre una specifica via di ricorso o ampliare una via di ricorso esistente tramite legislazione o tramite interpretazione giudiziale.
17. All'interno della struttura di questo esame di caso -per- caso, gli stati prevedrebbero, se questo è ritenuto consigliabile, la possibilità di riaprire procedimenti simili a quelli di una causai guida che ha stabilito una violazione della Convenzione, nella prospettiva per evitare alla Corte di trattare queste cause e dove appropriato per offrire compensazione più veloce alla persona riguardata. I criteri esposti nella Raccomandazione Rec(2000)2 del Comitato dei Ministri è probabile che servi come una fonte di inspirazione a questo riguardo .
18. Quando le specifiche delle vie di ricorso che seguono una causa guida sono ponte,i governi dovrebbero informare velocemente la Corte così che possa prenderle in considerazione nel suo trattamento di successive cause ripetitive .
19. Comunque, non sarebbe necessario o appropriato creare nuove vie di ricorso, o dare a determinate vie di ricorso esistenti un certo effetto retroattivo, seguendo ogni causa nella quale una sentenza della Corte ha identificato un problema strutturale. In certe circostanze, può essere preferibile lasciare le cause all'esame della Corte, in particolare per evitare di obbligare il richiedente a sopportare un ulteriore carico di dovere ancora una volta esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali che, oltretutto, non sarebbero a disposizione sino all'adozione di cambi legislativi.”
LA LEGGE
35. I richiedenti si lamentarono che l'inosservanza delle autorità nell’adempiere delle sentenze esecutive e vincolanti a loro favore aveva violato il loro diritto ad una corte sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed il loro diritto al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che, nella parte attinente, si legge come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza pubblica corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”

Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale…”
36. Fu presentato anche dai richiedenti che i fatti delle loro richieste rivelarono l'esistenza di una “situazione sistematica” in cui le deficienze nella legge nazionale e della pratica avrebbero potuto generare numerose richieste simili. L’Articolo 46 della Convenzione prevede:
“1. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa alla quale loro sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà la sua esecuzione.”
I. L'AMMISSIBILITÀ DELLE CAUSE
37. La Corte considera che le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti pongono questioni di fatto e di diritto che sono sufficientemente serie la cui determinazione dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei meriti, e che non è stato stabilito nessun altro motivo per dichiararle inammissibili. La Corte dichiara perciò queste azioni di reclamo ammissibili. In conformità con la sua decisione di applicare l’articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 4 sopra), la Corte immediatamente considererà i meriti delle azioni di reclamo.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 E DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
38. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la non-esecuzione delle sentenze a loro favore aveva violato i loro diritti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
39. Il Governo presentò di aver preso delle misure dirette all'esecuzione delle sentenze in oggetto; comunque, non potevano essere eseguite in prospettiva del numero elevato di sentenze no rese esecutive simili e di mancanza di finanziamenti da parte delle autorità pubbliche locali. Il Governo ammise che non c'era nessuna ragioni di discostarsi dalla precedente giurisprudenza della Corte in cause simili in cui era stata trovata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
40. La Corte nota che le sentenze a favore dei richiedenti rimasero non esecutive per periodi che variano fra i tre e gli undici anni. La Corte ha trovato violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in numerose cause riguardo a ritardi nell'esecuzione di sentenze definitive (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Prodan c. Moldavia, n. 49806/99, ECHR 2004-III (gli estratti), e Luntre ed Altri c. Moldavia, N. 2916/02, 21960/02 21951/02, 21941/02 21933/02, 20491/02 2676/02, 23594/02 21956/02, 21953/02 21943/02, 21947/02 e 21945/02 15 giugno 2004).
41. Avendo esaminato i materiali a lei presentati la Corte si confà con le parti che sostengono che non c'è niente nelle pratiche che le permetterebbe di giungere ad una conclusione diversa nelle presenti cause. Di conseguenza, la Corte trova, per le ragioni date nelle cause summenzionate, che l'insuccesso nell’ eseguire le sentenze a favore dei richiedenti all'interno di un termine ragionevole costituisce una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 e dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
42. I richiedenti presentarono che l'impossibilità delle autorità pubbliche locali di attenersi con le sentenze definitive della corte che ordinavano loro di offrire un alloggio sociale rivelò un problema sistematico che avrebbe potuto colpire potenzialmente qualcosa come 10,000 individui di cinque categorie di persone a cui era concesso simile alloggio. Quelle categorie erano: giudici, procuratori, agenti di polizia, deportati internamente ed impiegati del sistema penitenziario.
43. Secondo i richiedenti questo difetto era il risultato del malfunzionamento della legislazione in merito all’ alloggio moldavo che imponeva all'amministrazione locale l'obbligo di offrire un alloggio sociale a certe categorie di persone in assenza di qualsiasi copertura finanziaria a questo fine, rendendo così impossibile alle amministrazioni locali attenersi alle sentenze definitive della corte a quell'effetto.
44. Il fatto che il Governo obbligò le autorità locali a fornire a categorie diverse di popolazione un alloggio sociale senza offrire un appoggio finanziario per questo fine corrispondeva ad una violazione del principio dell'autonomia locale come garantito dall’ Articolo 9 dello Statuto europeo di Autogoverno Locale.
45. Riferendosi alle misure proposte dal Governo (vedere paragrafo 47 sotto), i richiedenti dibatterono che offrivano solamente una soluzione per il futuro e che loro non risolvevano il problema delle esistenti sentenze nazionali non-eseguite concernenti l’ alloggio sociale. I richiedenti suggerirono molte soluzioni a questo riguardo. Secondo loro il Governo centrale avrebbe potuto creare un meccanismo finanziario efficace per sostenere le autorità locali nell'attenersi con le sentenze esistenti che accordavano un alloggio sociale. Il Governo centrale avrebbe potuto prendersi carico alternativamente, in modo retroattivo dell'obbligo di offrire un alloggio sociale dalle amministrazioni locali.
46. I richiedenti infine sottolinearono che il Governo avrebbe dovuto anche mettere in opera un meccanismo per il pagamento immediato del risarcimento per danno materiale e morale come un risultato della non-esecuzione o della tarda esecuzione di sentenze definitive che assegnavano un alloggio sociale.
47. Il Governo non contestò il fatto che il problema della non-esecuzione delle sentenze nazionali che assegnavano un alloggio sociale rivelò l'esistenza di un “problema sistematico.” Concordò sul fatto che la legislazione vigente accordava un alloggio sociale ad un numero di categorie di persone e che più di cento sentenze definitive nazionali non erano state eseguite ad oggi. Ammise anche che l'obbligo imposto sulle autorità delle amministrazioni locali di sopportare il costo dell’ alloggio sociale per specifiche categorie di persone era contrario al principio dell'autonomia locale e della decentralizzazione. Per superare il problema un disegno legge era stato pensato dal Ministero di Giustizia che proponeva di annullare i privilegi dell’alloggio sociale per ventitré categorie di persone (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra). Il disegno di legge era stato spedito ai diversi enti delle organizzazioni Statali e non-governative per consultazione.
48. Il Governo era consapevole che il disegno di legge non offriva una soluzione per le sentenze già esistenti, ed espresse la sua buona volontà di esaminare le cause dei richiedenti all'interno della struttura di una “procedura di guida.”
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Principi Generali
49. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, come interpretato alla luce dell’ Articolo 1, impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale di implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato dei Ministri misure appropriate individuali e/o generali per garantire il diritto del richiedente di cui la Corte ha trovato violazione. Simili misure devono essere prese anche a riguardo di altre persone nella posizione del richiedente, in particolare risolvendo i problemi che hanno condotto alle sentenze della Corte (vedere Scozzari e Giunta c. Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000 VIII; Christine Goodwin c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 28957/95, § 120 ECHR 2002 VI; Lukenda c. Slovenia, n. 23032/02, § 94 ECHR 2005-X; e S. e Marper c. Regno Unito [GC], N. 30562/04 e 30566/04, § 134 4 dicembre 2008). Questo obbligo è stato enfatizzato costantemente dal Comitato dei Ministri nella soprintendenza dell'esecuzione delle sentenze della Corte (vedere, fra molte autorità, Decisioni Provvisorie DH(97)336 in cause riguardo alla lunghezza di procedimenti in Italia; DH(99)434 in cause riguardo all'azione delle forze di sicurezza in Turchia; e ResDH(2001)65 nella causa di Scozzari e Giunta c. Italia; ResDH(2006)1 nelle cause dRyabykh e Volkova).
50. Per facilitare l’attuazione efficace delle sue sentenze lungo queste linee la Corte può adottare una procedura di sentenza guida che le conceda chiaramente di identificare in una sentenza l'esistenza di problemi strutturali sottostanti le violazioni e di indicare le specifiche misure od azioni da prendere dallo Stato rispondente per rimediarli (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 e la parte operativa, il 2004-V di ECHR, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC] n. 35014/97, §§ 231-239 e la parte operativa 2006-VIII). Questo approccio aggiudicativo viene comunque intrapreso con dovuto riguardo alle rispettive funzioni degli organi della Convenzione: spetta al Comitato dei Ministri di valutare l'attuazione di misure generali o individuali e sotto l’Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski c. Polonia (regolamento amichevole) [GC], n. 31443/96, § 42, ECHR 2005-IX, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia (regolamento amichevole) [GC], n. 35014/97, § 42 28 aprile 2008).
51. Un altro importante scopo della procedura della sentenza guida è incitare lo Stato rispondente a chiarire i grandi numeri di cause individuali che sorgono dallo stesso problema strutturale a livello nazionale, implementando così il principio di sussidiarietà che sostiene il sistema di Convenzione. Effettivamente, il compito della Corte, come definito dall’ Articolo 19, che è “assicurare l'osservanza degli impegni presi dalle Alte Parti Contraenti nella Convenzione e nei Protocolli”, non è realizzato necessariamente meglio ripetendo le stesse sentenze in una grande serie di cause (vedere, mutatis mutandis, E.G. c. Polonia (dec.), n. 50425/99, § 27 ECHR 2008-.. (estratti)). L'oggetto della procedura della sentenza guida è facilitare la soluzione più veloce e più efficace di una disfunzione che colpisce la protezione dei diritti della Convenzione in oggetto nell'ordine legale nazionale (vedere Wolkenberg ed Altri c. Polonia (dec.), n. 50003/99, § 34 ECHR 2007-XIV (estratti)). Mentre l'azione dello Stato rispondente dovrebbe mirare primariamente alla decisione di tale disfunzione ed all'introduzione dove appropriato di vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci a riguardo delle violazioni in oggetto, può includere anche soluzioni ad hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte unilaterali riparatrici e di compensazione in linea coi requisiti della Convenzione. La Corte può decidere di aggiornare l’esame di tutte le cause simili, dando così allo Stato rispondente un'opportunità di regolarle in modi differenti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski citata sopra, § 198, e Xenides-Arestis c. Turchia, n. 46347/99, § 50 22 dicembre 2005).
52. Comunque, se lo Stato rispondente fallisce nell’adottare simili misure sa seguito di una sentenza guida e continua a violare la Convenzione, la Corte non avrà nessuna alternativa se non riprendere l’esame di tutte le richieste simili pendenti di fronte a sé e portarle ad una sentenza così da assicurare l’osservanza effettiva della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, E.G. c. Polonia, citata sopra, § 28).
2. L’applicazione dei principi alla presente causa
53. La Corte nota che il problema di non-esecuzione di sentenze definitive è il primo problema della Moldavia in termini di numero di richieste pendenti di fronte alla Corte. Secondo le statistiche della Corte, approssimativamente 300 simili richieste sono state registrate sul ruolo della Corte di cause in data dell'adozione della presente sentenza.
54. Il gruppo delle così definite cause non eseguite riguardanti gli alloggi sociali conta approssimativamente il cinquanta per cento di ogni causa non eseguita della Moldavia e concerne l'insuccesso dei governi locali nell’ attenersi alle sentenze definitive che assegnano a richiedenti dei diritti di alloggio o denaro al posto dell’ alloggio. Il problema sembra avere la sua origine nella legislazione orientata al sociale decretata dal Parlamento o dal Governo che concede un alloggio sociale a una categoria privilegiata molto ampia di persone a spese dei governi locali. Secondo questa legislazione a più di venti categorie diverse di persone viene concesso di ricevere un alloggio esente da spese. Per esempio, ad un giudice viene concesso un alloggio sociale dopo il servizio di sei mesi; ad un agente di polizia, a seconda del suo livello, dopo uno o tre anni; un ufficiale militare dopo un anno; un procuratore dopo un anno.
55. Mentre il resto delle cause di non-esecuzione dalla Moldavia di solito riguardano piccoli importi di denaro , vengono eseguiti di solito con certi ritardi e di solito terminano con accordi di regolamenti amichevoli o dichiarazioni unilaterali da parte del Governo, le cause dal gruppo degli alloggi sociali vengono eseguite molto raramente, a causa di mancanza cronica di finanziamenti da parte dei governi locali. Infatti i governi locali sono messi in una situazione in cui devono scegliere fra adempiere i loro doveri normali come, per esempio offrire servizi alla comunità e gestire scuole ed asili infantili o usare i finanziamenti per costruire alloggi per giudici, agenti di polizia , procuratori ed altri. Un esempio che si riferisce alla situazione delle cause degli alloggi sociali è la causa Caraman c. Moldavia ((dec.), n. 3755/05, 22 aprile 2008) dove le parti raggiunsero un accordo di regolamento amichevole secondo il quale il Governo doveva pagare al richiedente dei danni e “garantire l'esecuzione urgente della sentenza” a favore del richiedente. Un anno dopo avere cancellato la causa dal suo ruolo di cause, la Corte fu obbligata a ripristinarla al ruolo perché la sentenza definitiva a favore del richiedente non era stata eseguita a causa della mancanza di finanziamenti del Municipio di Chişinău.
56. Le sentenze sopra ed il riconoscimento del Governo dell'esistenza di un problema strutturale permettono alla Corte di concludere che le violazioni trovate nella presente sentenza riflettono un disfunzione strutturale persistente e che la presente situazione deve essere qualificata come una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione (vedere Bottazzi c. Italia [GC], n. 34884/97, § 22 il 1999-V di ECHR).
57. Come sostenuto dai richiedenti ed ammesso dal Governo, i problemi alla radice delle violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 e dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione trovate nelle presenti cause derivano dalle disposizioni nella legge di Moldova che accorda un alloggio sociale a numerose categorie di persone a spesa dei governi locali senza offrire un finanziamento adeguato per i progetti così sociali. La Corte nota che il Governo ammise che questa situazione era anche contraria al principio dell'autonomia locale e della decentralizzazione. Nell'ammettere l'esistenza della disfunzione sistematica, il Governo ha già cominciato delle misure generali nella prospettiva di risolverla. In particolare, il Ministero della Giustizia ha preparato un disegno di legge inteso ad annullare i privilegi dell’alloggio sociale per ventitré categorie di persone (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra). La Corte concorda che tale misura, se seguita , è capace di risolvere il problema per il futuro. Comunque, come indicato esattamente dai richiedenti ed ammesso dal Governo, questa iniziativa non offre soluzioni per le sentenze che accordano diritti di alloggi sociali già esistenti. La Corte considera che questo problema, benché non particolarmente complesso, sollevi problemi che vanno, in principio, oltre la funzione giudiziale della Corte. Si asterrà così in queste circostanze dall'indicare qualsiasi specifica misura generale da prendere a questo riguardo. Il Comitato dei Ministri è messo meglio e specializzato per esaminare le misure necessarie da adottare da parte della Moldavia a questo riguardo. La Corte lascia perciò al Comitato dei Ministri di garantire che il Governo Moldavo, in conformità coi suoi obblighi sotto la Convenzione, adotti le misure necessarie coerenti con le conclusioni della Corte nella presente sentenza.
58. La Corte ulteriormente richiama che in Moisei c. Moldavia (n. 14914/03, §§ 29-33 del 19 dicembre 2006) ed in Tudor-auto S.R.L. e Triplu-Tudor S.R.L. c. Moldavia (N. 36341/03, 36344/03, e 30346/05, §§ 57-62, 9 dicembre 2008) trovò violazioni dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione a causa della mancanza di vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci contro la non-esecuzione di sentenze definitive. La Corte non è stata informata ancora sull'introduzione di una qualsiasi via di ricorso efficace in Moldavia e perciò lo Stato deve introdurre una via di ricorso che garantisca una compensazione sinceramente efficace per le violazioni della Convenzione a causa dell'inosservanza prolungata delle autorità Statali di decisioni giudiziali definitive che concernono un alloggio sociale consegnata contro lo Stato o le sue entità. Tale via di ricorso, creata sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato di Ministri deve adattarsi ai principi della Convenzione e deve essere disponibile entro sei mesi della data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva.
59. La Corte reitera che uno degli scopi della procedura della sentenza guida è di permettere che venga accordata una compensazione il più veloce possibile a livello nazionale a un gran numero di individui che patiscono il problema strutturale identificato nella sentenza guida. Può essere deciso così nella sentenza guida che i procedimenti in tutte le cause che scaturiscono dallo stesso problema strutturale siano aggiornati mancando l’implementazione delle misure attinenti da parte dello Stato rispondente. La Corte considera appropriato adottare un approccio simile seguendo la presente sentenza differenziando però fra le cause già pendenti di fronte alla Corte e quelle che potrebbero essere portate di fronte a lei in futuro.
60. Per ciò che riguarda la seconda categoria seconda di cause , la Corte aggiornerà i procedimenti su tutte le nuove richieste depositate presso la Corte dopo la consegna della presente sentenza nella quale i richiedenti si lamentano solamente della non-esecuzione e/o del ritardo dell’ esecuzione di sentenze nazionali che concernono l’alloggio sociale. L'aggiornamento sarà effettivo per un periodo di un anno dopo che la presente sentenza è divenuta definitiva e, secondo le circostanze, ai richiedenti in quelle cause può essere richiesto di ripresentare i loro danni alle autorità nazionali (vedere Burdov c. Russia (n. 2), n. 33509/04, § 143 15 gennaio 2009).
61. Comunque, la Corte decide di seguire un corso diverso di azione a riguardo delle richieste depositata prima della consegna della presente sentenza. Nella prospettiva della Corte, sarebbe ingiusto se i richiedenti in simili cause che stanno presumibilmente soffrendo di continue violazioni del loro diritto ad un tribunale da anni e hanno chiesto soddisfazione in questa Corte, fossero obbligati ancora di nuovo a ripresentare i loro danni alle autorità nazionali, che sia tramite una nuova via di ricorso o altro. La Corte considera perciò che lo Stato rispondente deve accordare una compensazione adeguata e sufficiente, entro un anno della data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva a tutte le vittime di non-esecuzione o di esecuzione irragionevolmente ritardata da parte delle autorità Statali di sentenze nazionali che concernono l’alloggio sociale che depositarono le loro richieste presso la Corte prima della consegna della presente sentenza. Nella prospettiva della Corte, simile compensazione può essere realizzata tramite implementazione proprio motu dalle autorità di una via di ricorso nazionale efficace in queste cause o tramite soluzioni ad hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatrici unilaterali di compensazione in linea coi requisiti della Convenzione. Essendo pendente l'adozione di misure riparatore nazionali da parte delle autorità della Moldavia, la Corte decide di aggiornare i procedimenti contraddittori in tutti queste cause per un anno dalla data in cui questa sentenza diviene definitiva. Questa decisione non reca danno al potere della Corte in qualsiasi momento di dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi causa simile o di cancellarla dal suo ruolo a seguito di un regolamento amichevole fra le parti o la decisione della questione tramite altri mezzi in conformità con gli Articoli 37 o 39 della Convenzione (vedere Burdov (n. 2), citata sopra, §§ 144-146).
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
62. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
63. La Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione. La questione deve essere di conseguenza riservata e fissata un'ulteriore procedura, con dovuto riguardo alla possibilità di accordo al quale potrebbero giungere il Governo della Moldovaia ed i richiedenti.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le richieste ammissibili;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa dell'insuccesso dello Stato nell’ eseguire le sentenze nazionali definitive s favore dei richiedenti;
3. Sostiene che le violazioni sopra sono scaturite da una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione che consiste nell'inosservanza ricorrente dello Stato delle sentenze definitive che assegnano un alloggio sociale a riguardo del quale le parti danneggiate non hanno alcuna via di ricorso nazionale efficace;
4. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente deve predisporre, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, una via di ricorso nazionale efficace che garantisca compensazione adeguata e sufficiente per la non-esecuzione o l’esecuzione ritardata di sentenze nazionali definitive concernenti l’alloggio sociale in linea coi principi della Convenzione come stabiliti nella giurisprudenza della Corte;
5. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente deve accordare simile compensazione, entro un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva a tutte le vittime di non-esecuzione o di esecuzione irragionevolmente ritardata di sentenze definitive riguardanti alloggi sociali in cause depositate presso la Corte prima della consegna della presente sentenza;
6. Sostiene che essendo pendente l'adozione delle misure sopra, la Corte aggiornerà, per un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva, i procedimenti in tutte le cause riguardanti la non-esecuzione e/o l’ esecuzione ritardata di sentenze nazionali definitive concernenti gli alloggi sociali, senza recare offesa al potere della Corte in qualsiasi momento di dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi causa simile o di cancellarla dal suo ruolo a seguito di un regolamento amichevole fra le parti o la decisione della questione con altri mezzi in conformità con gli Articoli 37 o 39 della Convenzione;
7. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 nelle presenti cause non è pronta per una decisione e di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione per intero;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte un qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 28 luglio 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento della Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.