Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ALEKSA v. LITHUANIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 27576/05/2009
STATO: Lituania
DATA: 21/07/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

SECOND SECTION
CASE OF ALEKSA v. LITHUANIA
(Application no. 27576/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
21 July 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Aleksa v. Lithuania,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Ireneu Cabral Barreto,
Vladimiro Zagrebelsky,
Danutė Jočienė,
Dragoljub Popović,
András Sajó,
Nona Tsotsoria, judges,
and Sally Dollé, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 30 June 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 27576/05) against the Republic of Lithuania lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Lithuanian national, Mr V. A.
(“the applicant”), on 19 July 2005.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr V. G., a lawyer practising in Kaunas. The Lithuanian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms E. Baltutytė.
3. On 18 March 2008 the Court decided to give notice to the Government of the applicant's complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. It also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant was born in 1951 and lives in Kaunas.
A. Proceedings regarding the premises
5. On 17 November 1992 the Kaunas City Board restored the applicant's property rights to part of a building in Kaunas. In particular, it restored the applicant's property rights to 1/12 of the uninhabited part of the building (hereafter “the disputed premises”). The property restitution decision specified that the property rights to the disputed premises would be restored in accordance with the procedure and terms fixed by the Government.
6. On 15 October 1993 the Kaunas City deputy mayor and the applicant signed a statement of transfer acceptance (priÄ—mimo-perdavimo aktas), by which the disputed premises were transferred to the applicant.
On 21 December 1993 the applicant registered his title to the property.
7. By a decision of 21 March 1994, the Kaunas City mayor declared the statement of transfer acceptance unlawful and consequently null and void. By a decision of 31 May 1994, the Kaunas City Board supplemented the decision of 17 November 1992 with a clause which specified the form in which the property rights were to be restored It was decided to pay compensation for the disputed premises, at that time occupied by a pharmacy, after the Government had determined the means and the procedure by which compensation was to be paid.
8. By a decision of 14 June 1994, the Kaunas City Board transferred the disputed premises from the balance sheet of one State-run company to the balance sheet of the State-run company of Kaunas area pharmacies. Subsequently, by a decision of the Kaunas City Board of 14 June 1996 the disputed premises were transferred into the private ownership of the closed-stock company Šlamučio vaistinė.
9. On 3 June 1994 the applicant brought a civil claim (“the first civil case”), challenging the local authorities' decisions of 21 March 1994 and 31 May 1994. It was dismissed as unsubstantiated by the Kaunas City District Court on 4 July 1994.
10. On 22 August 1994 the Supreme Court quashed the lower court's decision and remitted the case for a fresh examination. The Supreme Court noted that the lower court had not examined all the relevant circumstances. In particular, it had not taken account of the fact that, at the time of the adoption of the impugned decisions, the applicant had already been recognised as the owner of the entire building. The Supreme Court observed that only a court and not a local authority could have annulled the applicant's ownership rights.
11. On 7 October 1994 the Kaunas City District Court decided to suspend the civil proceedings further to a request by the applicant, on account of the illness of one of his relatives, V.A., who was also a plaintiff in that case. The court ordered the applicant to inform it when his relative's state of health would allow her to participate in the proceedings.
12. On 3 October 1994 the State-run company of Kaunas area pharmacies brought a civil claim, seeking the partial annulment of the Kaunas City Board's decision of 17 November 1992 (hereinafter “the second civil case”).
13. On 8 January 1996 the applicant and other plaintiffs brought a new civil claim (hereinafter “the third civil claim”), challenging the Kaunas City Board's decision of 14 June 1994.
14. On 1 July 1999 the Kaunas City District Court of its own motion resumed the civil proceedings in the first civil case.
15. On 2 September 1999 the Kaunas City District Court decided to join all three cases and examine them together.
16. On 9 September 1999 the Kaunas City District Court granted the applicant's claim. It declared the local authority's decisions of 21 March 1994 and 31 May 1994 null and void, restoring the applicant's title to the premises occupied by the pharmacy.
17. On 28 February 2000 the Kaunas Regional Court upheld that decision.
18. On 12 September 2000 the Supreme Court quashed the lower courts' decisions and returned the case to the Kaunas City District Court for an examination de novo. The Supreme Court considered that the lower courts had again failed to assess all the relevant circumstances – even those to which attention had been drawn in its decision of 22 August 1994 – and that they had erred in law.
19. On 18 February 2004 the Kaunas City District Court dismissed the applicant's claim. The court observed that the law had not provided for restitution in kind of immovable property if it had been occupied by public-interest institutions, such as a pharmacy. The court further interpreted the decision of 17 November 1992, noting that it could not have been read as guaranteeing restitution in kind of the entire building, but only of the unoccupied part. The court annulled the ambiguous phrasing of the decision, leaving it to the local authorities to determine how to remedy the situation, either by pecuniary compensation or by the transfer of an equivalent property.
20. On 23 September 2004 the Kaunas Regional Court upheld the decision of the first-instance court.
21. On 26 January 2005 the Supreme Court dismissed a cassation appeal by the applicant.
22. On 25 May 2005 certain parties to the case, including the applicant, submitted a request to the Kaunas City District Court to interpret its decision of 18 February 2004. Their request was dismissed
on 21 June 2005.
23. On 3 April 2006 the applicant instituted civil proceedings challenging the initial proportions of his and other interested parties' property rights, as fixed by the decision of 17 November 1992. In a final decision of 5 September 2007, the Kaunas City District Court noted that, although the applicant had been duly informed about the hearing, he or his lawyer had failed to appear, thus failing to contribute to the speedy resolution of the proceedings and showing no interest in their outcome. The applicant's claim was left unexamined.
24. On 11 December 2008 the head of the Kaunas City Municipality issued an order to pay the applicant pecuniary compensation for the disputed premises. The compensation was to be paid in three instalments from 2008 to 2010 and for that purpose, in a letter of 15 December 2008, the Kaunas City Municipality requested the applicant to indicate the details of his bank account. The applicant refused to accept the municipality's letter.
B. Proceedings regarding the plot of land
25. By the above-mentioned decision of 17 November 1992, the Kaunas City Board restored the applicant's property rights to 1/12 of the plot of land adjacent to the disputed premises and measuring 2,097 sq. m. Pursuant to that decision, 1/12 of a plot of land measuring 1,288 sq. m was to be returned to him in kind and for the remaining part, equivalent to 1/12 of 809 sq. m, compensation was to be paid.
26. On 12 November 1996 the Kaunas City Municipality adopted a detailed territorial-planning decision which specified that the actual existing size of the plot of land which was to be returned in kind was 950 sq. m and not 1,288 sq. m.
27. On 8 April 2002 the applicant submitted a claim to the Kaunas Regional Administrative Court, requesting it to oblige the Registers Centre to record the applicant as the owner of 1/12 of the plot of land of 1,288 sq. m adjacent to the disputed premises. On 15 May 2002 the applicant also challenged the detailed territorial-planning decision of 12 November 1996.
28. On 4 March 2005 the Kaunas Regional Administrative Court dismissed the applicant's claims. The court noted that the decision of 17 November 1992 did not specify the exact location of the particular plot of land to which the applicant's and other interested persons' property rights were restored, since at the time of the decision no territorial planning had been carried out and the plot of land had not been measured or marked in any particular place. It followed from the nature of the decision that it merely established that property rights to a plot of land had been restored, without specifying the particular location of that plot. Consequently, the decision of 17 November 1992 did not give the applicant the right to register his title to that plot in the State Land Registry.
29. The court also noted that the decision of 12 November 1996 had established that the plot of land of 1,288 sq. m did not exist, its real size being 950 sq. m. No evidence had been submitted to the court which could question that finding. Since the decision of 17 November 1992 was valid, the issue of compensation for the difference in size of the plots (by assigning the applicant an equivalent plot) or their exact location was left for determination by the competent local authorities. The Kaunas Regional Administrative Court further noted that the territorial-planning decision aimed to establish the activity permitted on the disputed land and to safeguard the public interest.
30. On 21 June 2005 the Supreme Administrative Court upheld the lower court's decision. The court emphasised that, in accordance with domestic law, a plot of land in respect of which property rights were restored had to be delimited in a territorial plan. The decision of 17 November 1992 on the restoration of the applicant's property rights to the plot of land at issue lacked any characterisation allowing it to be specifically identified (cartographically or by any other form of delimitation) as an item of immovable property. Moreover, data of that kind had not even existed at the time of the Supreme Administrative Court's decision. It followed that the Kaunas City Board had not established the applicant's entitlement to a particular plot of land, but only his right to obtain restitution in kind of 1/12 of a plot of land measuring 1,288 sq. m.
31. On 22 January 2006 a cadastral survey was carried out, which fixed the dimensions of the plot of land adjacent to the disputed premises at 1,038 sq. m. The applicant took part in the process and accepted the results of the survey as regards the area of the land in question. On 9 May 2007, on the basis of the cadastral survey, the Kaunas County Governor adopted a decision on the basis of which the plot of land adjacent to the disputed premises was registered in the State Land Registry. On 2 April 2008 the Kaunas County Governor issued an order establishing the parts of the plot of land to be assigned to the applicant.
32. On 4 June 2008 the applicant requested the Kaunas Regional Administrative Court to discontinue the case regarding his claim of 8 April 2002.
33. By a decision of 13 October 2008, the head of the Kaunas Regional Administration restored the applicant's property rights to a plot of land of 44 sq. m, adjacent to the disputed premises. The decision specified that the applicant was entitled to compensation for the remaining 131 sq. m.
34. In a letter of 11 December 2008 the local authorities requested the applicant to state his preference as regards compensation for the remaining 131 sq. m.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
35. The relevant domestic law and practice concerning the domestic remedies with regard to length of proceedings complaints have been summarised in the judgment Četvertakas and Others v. Lithuania (no. 16013/02, §§ 19-22, 20 January 2009). In addition, Article 484 of the Civil Code, in force until 1 July 2001, provided that an organisation was to compensate for any damage which its employees had caused while performing their professional duties.
36. The Law on the procedure and conditions for restoration of ownership rights to existing real property (Įstatymas dėl piliečių nuosavybės teisių į išlikusį nekilnojamąjį turtą atstatymo tvarkos ir sąlygų), enacted on 18 June 1991 and amended on numerous occasions, provided for two forms of restitution – the return of the property in kind or compensation for it, if its physical return was not possible. Article 12 of the Law provided that the State was to buy out the land which was situated within the limits of a town and on which an infrastructure necessary for public needs had been built. Pursuant to Article 14 of the Law, if a house had been converted into non-residential premises which had been given to a medical institution or used for medical purposes, those premises were to be bought out by the State. The local authorities were competent to decide on the method of compensation.
37. On 27 May 1994 the Constitutional Court examined the issue of the compatibility of the Constitution with the domestic laws on the restoration of property rights. In its decision the Constitutional Court held, inter alia, that possessions which had been nationalised by the Soviet authorities since 1940 should be treated as “property under the de facto control of the State”. The Constitutional Court stated:
“The rights of a former owner to particular property have not been restored until the property is returned or appropriate compensation is afforded. The law does not itself provide any rights while it is not applied to a concrete person in respect of a specific property. In such a situation the legal effect of a decision by a competent authority to return the property or to provide compensation is such that only from that moment does the former owner obtain property rights to a specific property.”
The Constitutional Court also held that fair compensation for property which could not be returned in kind was compatible with the principle of the protection of property.
38. On 20 June 1995 the Constitutional Court affirmed that the choice by Parliament of the partial reparation principle was influenced by the difficult political and social conditions, in that “new generations had grown, new proprietary and other socio-economic relations had been formed during the 50 years of occupation, which could not be ignored in deciding the question of restitution of property”.
39. The Law on the restoration of citizens' ownership rights to existing real property (Piliečių nuosavybės teisių į išlikusį nekilnojamąjį turtą atkūrimo įstatymas), which was enacted on 1 July 1997 and which repealed the Law on the procedure and conditions for the restoration of ownership rights to existing real property, at the material time read as follows:
Article 8 Conditions and procedures for restoration of ownership rights to residential houses, portions thereof and flats
“1. Ownership rights to residential houses, portions thereof and flats shall be restored to persons specified in Article 2 of this Law by returning them in kind, except for residential houses, portions thereof and flats which are subject to a State buyout pursuant to Article 15 of this Law...”
Article 15 Residential houses, portions thereof and flats bought out by the State
“Residential houses, portions thereof and flats shall be bought out by the State from the citizens specified in Article 2 of this Law, who shall be afforded compensation in accordance with Article 16 of this Law, provided that such residential houses, portions thereof or flats:
(1) have been converted into premises unfit for human occupancy and used for educational, health care protection, cultural or scientific purposes, or by communal care residences. The list of such premises shall be approved by the Government...”
Article 16 Compensation to citizens for real property bought out by the State
“1. The State shall compensate citizens for existing real property which is bought out by the State, as well as for real property which existed prior to 1 August 1991, but subsequently ceased to exist as a result of decisions adopted by the State or local authorities.
2. When the State compensates citizens for real property which, in accordance with this Law, is not given back in kind, the principle of equal value shall be applied to both the property that is not returned and other property which is transferred instead of it as compensation for the property bought out by the State. ...
7. Compensation for buildings used for economic and commercial purposes, residential houses, portions thereof and flats which are not returned pursuant to this Law shall be established in accordance with the methods approved by the Government. ...”
40. Article 2 of the Land Act (Žemės įstatymas), enacted on 26 April 1994, provides that a “plot of land” is a part of the territory, which has fixed boundaries and has an established purpose for which it is used.
41. The Land Reform Act enacted on 25 July 1991, provided:
Article 6: Privatisation of land
“2. In the implementation of land reform, land shall be acquired either by restoring the right to ownership, or by purchasing the land. ...”
Article 22: Delimitation of plots of land and distribution of documentation on land ownership
“On the basis of the land-use plans produced in connection with the land reform, the State Institute of Land-Use Management shall mark the boundaries of plots of land and shall prepare documentation attesting to land ownership or land-usage rights.”
42. Article 3 of the Territorial Planning Act, enacted on 12 December 1995, provides that one of the objectives of territorial planning is to reconcile the interests of natural and legal entities with the interests of the public, municipalities and the State regarding the conditions for the use of a particular territory and plots of land. Pursuant to Article 18 of the Act, detailed plans are drawn up which impose restrictions on possible activities on the plot of land in question. The requirements relating to any construction, territorial development and the purpose of land use are determined, and land and other real property may be expropriated for public needs. These detailed plans may entitle natural and legal persons to develop activities on the plot of land in question.
43. Articles 2 and 3 of the Immovable Property Cadastre Act, which was enacted on 27 June 2000 and is applicable when denoting items of immovable property, provide that an item of immovable property must be registered in the form of a written text, figures, graphical elements (dots and lines) as well as information expressed by cartographical methods, defining the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the immovable property.
44. On 15 November 1991 the Government of the Republic of Lithuania adopted Resolution No. 470 on the implementation of the Law on the procedure and conditions for restoration of ownership rights to existing real property. Article 9 of the Resolution provided that property rights to land were to be formally established in accordance with the appropriate territorial plan (Nuosavybės teisė į žemę įforminama pagal atitinkamos teritorijos žemėtvarkos projektą).
45. The Code of Civil Procedure, in force since 1 January 2003, provides that a judge may withdraw from a hearing on his or her own initiative, or the parties to the procedure may request the judge's removal, when there are circumstances raising doubts as to that person's impartiality (Article 68). Article 366 § 1 (8) of the Code provides that civil proceedings may be reopened if an unlawfully constituted court heard the case.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF THE LENGTH OF THE PROCEEDINGS
46. The applicant complained that the length of the civil proceedings regarding the restitution of the disputed premises had been incompatible with the “reasonable time” requirement of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal...”
A. Admissibility
47. The Government submitted that the applicant should have brought a claim for damages before a civil court under Articles 483 and 484 of the Civil Code, in force until 1 July 2001. Relying on the ruling of the Constitutional Court of 19 August 2006, the Government also argued that, even assuming that specific redress had not been enshrined in any law, the applicant could have claimed redress by directly relying on the Constitution.
48. The Government also contended that the applicant could have applied to the domestic courts, seeking redress for the length of the civil proceedings under Article 6.272 of the Civil Code, in force since 1 July 2001. In this connection they submitted a copy of a judgment delivered by the Supreme Court on 6 February 2007 whereby a person had been awarded damages under Article 6.272 of the Civil Code for the excessive length of proceedings, albeit criminal, which had been instituted in 1998 and discontinued in 2004. In view of the applicant's failure to lodge such a claim in the present case, the complaint about the length of the proceedings should be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies, pursuant to Article 35 § 1 of the Convention. Lastly, the Government submitted that part of the impugned civil proceedings fell outside the Court's competence ratione temporis.
49. The applicant contested the Government's argument, stating that no adequate remedy existed which he could use in relation to his Convention complaint as to the excessive length of the proceedings.
50. The Court observes at the outset that it has no competence to examine events which occurred prior to 20 June 1995, the date of the entry into force of the Convention in respect of Lithuania. In so far as part of the civil proceedings took place before that date, this aspect of the application should be rejected under Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 as being incompatible ratione temporis with the provisions of the Convention.
51. As to the Government's plea of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies the Court refers to its conclusion in Baškienė v. Lithuania (no. 11529/04, §§ 68-72, 24 July 2007), where it held that a claim for damages under Article 6.272 of the Civil Code did not satisfy the test of “effectiveness”. The Court finds no reason to depart from its existing case-law in this regard. It further observes that, as an example of the relevant domestic case-law regarding Article 6.272 of the Civil Code, the Government relied on the decision of the Supreme Court of 6 February 2007. However, in the instant case the civil proceedings lasted from 3 June 1994 until 26 January 2005 (see paragraphs 9 and 21 above), while the application was lodged with the Court on 19 July 2005. Consequently, the Court remains unconvinced that the possibility of claiming damages for the excessive length of proceedings under Article 6.272 of the Civil Code had – at the time when the present application was submitted – already acquired a sufficient degree of legal certainty requiring its use for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
52. As to the Government's argument that the applicant could have brought a claim based on Articles 483 and 484 of the Civil Code, in force until 1 July 2001, or on the Constitution, they have not adduced any evidence to demonstrate that such a remedy had any reasonable prospect of success, especially before the ruling of the Constitutional Court on 19 August 2006 (see Četvertakas and Others v. Lithuania, no. 16013/02, § 30, 20 January 2009).
53. That being so, the Government's plea of inadmissibility on the ground of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
54. The Court also notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
55. The Government argued that the overall length of the civil proceedings regarding the disputed premises was reasonable. They submitted that the length of the proceedings had been affected by the serious illness of one of the parties. In particular, they noted that the civil proceedings had been suspended for almost five years and that this delay had been partly attributable to the conduct of the applicant, who had failed to request the domestic court to resume them (see paragraphs 11 and 14 above). They further contended that the case was complex since it had involved many plaintiffs, who had submitted numerous claims and counterclaims. A number of parties to the case had been replaced by other persons. The Government also drew the Court's attention to the fact that the case file consisted of 8 volumes (2,234 pages) and that there had been frequent changes in domestic legislation regulating the restitution process. It followed that there had been no breach of the right to a hearing within a “reasonable time”, conferred by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
56. The applicant disagreed, stating that the complexity of the case was not sufficient to discharge the State of its obligation to observe the reasonable time requirement. He noted, in particular, that the case had been suspended before the Kaunas City District Court for almost five years. The applicant conceded that he had been under an obligation to inform the court when his relative's state of health would allow her to participate in the proceedings. Nonetheless, he argued that it was the court which was primarily responsible for the swift resolution of the case. The applicant further observed that after the decision of the Supreme Court of 12 September 2000, by which the case had been returned to the first-instance court for a fresh examination, the Kaunas City District had only given its decision on 18 February 2004. Consequently, the length of these proceedings had been excessive.
57. The Court notes that although the civil proceedings were instituted on 3 June 1994, the period falling within its jurisdiction began only on 20 June 1995 (see paragraph 52 above) and lasted until 26 January 2005. The overall length of the proceedings was thus nine years and seven months for three levels of jurisdiction. However, the Court observes that by
20 June 1995 the proceedings had already been pending for a year.
58. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicant and the relevant authorities and what was at stake for the applicant in the dispute (see, among many other authorities, Frydlender v. France [GC], no. 30979/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-VII).
59. The Court has frequently found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in applications raising issues similar to the one in the present case (see Szilágyi v. Hungary, no. 73376/01, 5 April 2005).
60. The Court observes that the present proceedings were indeed complex, particularly because of the number of participants, several interrelated court proceedings, the ongoing legislative amendments and the restitution aspect. That, however, cannot justify their significant overall length.
61. The Court shares the Government's view that the applicant has himself contributed to the length of the proceedings, given that from 7 October 1994 until 1 July 1999 they had been suspended since he had failed to inform the Kaunas City District Court about his relative's state of health (see paragraphs 11 and 14 above). Furthermore, while those proceedings were pending the applicant initiated new civil proceedings concerning the same issues (see paragraph 13 above). Nevertheless, the Court cannot fail to observe that the length of proceedings was also preconditioned by certain omissions on the part of the State. Namely, owing to the lower courts' failure to assess all the relevant circumstances in the case, the Supreme Court twice remitted the case to them for a fresh examination (see paragraphs 10 and 18 above). It should also be noted that it took the Kaunas City District Court three and a half years to adopt a new decision after the Supreme Court had returned the case to it for an examination de novo (see paragraphs 18 and 19 above and the judgment Kobelyan v. Georgia, no. 40022/05, not yet final, § 19).
62. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that the total length of the impugned civil proceedings breached the “reasonable time” requirement. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION ON ACCOUNT OF THE PARTIALITY OF THE DOMESTIC COURTS
63. The applicant further complained that the judge of the Kaunas City District Court who had heard his case on 18 February 2004 and a judge of the Kaunas Regional Court who had heard his case on 23 September 2004 had been biased since both judges had previously worked in the same Kaunas law office as the lawyers for the opposing party. He relied on the right to an impartial tribunal under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
64. The Government contended that the applicant's complaint was manifestly ill-founded. They pointed out that until 11 March 1990, when Lithuania had restored its independence, and for several years after that date there had been only one law office in the city of Kaunas: the Kaunas law office. The lawyers who worked there were not bound by partnership relations. The Government conceded that the lawyers for the opposing party had indeed worked at the same Kaunas law office as the judges who had heard the applicant's case. However, those lawyers had stopped working at the Kaunas law office in 1992 and had established their own law firm. As regards the judges, they had stopped working at that law office in 1997 and 2002 respectively, when they had been appointed as judges. The Government lastly argued that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies, since he had failed, in accordance with the requirements of domestic law, to challenge the composition of the courts that had decided his case.
65. The Court notes that the applicant failed to complain to the domestic courts regarding the alleged partiality of the judges. In particular, he did not raise that issue in his appeal or in his cassation appeal. Moreover, if the applicant had found out about the previous professional relations of the judges and the lawyers for the opposing party only after the civil proceedings had ended with the Supreme Court's judgment of 26 January 2005, he could have submitted a request for the reopening of the proceedings under Article 366 § 1 (8) of the Code of Civil Procedure. However, the Court has no information to suggest that the applicant ever took such a step. Hence this complaint is inadmissible for failure to exhaust domestic remedies, as required by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
A. The applicant's inability to recover the disputed premises in kind
66. The applicant also complained that he had not been able to obtain restitution of the disputed premises in kind. He alleged a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
67. The Government submitted at the outset that this part of the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as well as his remaining complaints under that Article were inadmissible ratione temporis, since they related to events which had occurred before 24 May 1996, when Protocol No. 1 to the Convention entered into force in respect of Lithuania.
68. The Government pointed out that the focus of the dispute between the applicant and the authorities was not the restoration of his property rights as such, but the question whether the applicant had been entitled to restitution of the disputed premises in kind. By the decisions
of 21 March 1994 and 31 May 1994, the local authorities had not annulled the applicant's property rights but had only specified the form of restitution. As under national law it was not possible to return the disputed premises in kind, the local authorities and, later, the courts decided that the applicant had to be compensated for the disputed premises either by allocating him a property of equivalent value or by paying him pecuniary compensation. In the Government's opinion, this possibility for the applicant to obtain compensation for the premises at issue ensured a reasonable balance between the interests of the applicant and the public, and had been approved by the courts at three levels of jurisdiction.
69. The applicant noted that on 17 November 1992 the local authorities had restored his property rights. He disagreed with the Government and argued that, even though the disputed decisions of 21 March 1994 and 31 May 1994 regarding the way his property rights should be restored had been adopted prior to the entry into force of Protocol No. 1 in respect of Lithuania, the civil proceedings regarding the validity of those decisions had lasted until the Supreme Court's ruling of 26 January 2005. Taking that factor into account, the present complaint fell within the Court's competence ratione temporis.
70. The applicant further argued that the domestic courts had misinterpreted the national law in finding that the disputed premises could not have been returned to him in kind. In particular, he alleged that there was no public interest in refusing him ownership of those premises and in transferring title to the pharmacy. In the applicant's view, there was no public interest in that particular pharmacy conducting its business on those particular premises. Moreover, the restoration of the applicant's property rights in kind did not preclude the pharmacy from renting the premises. As the domestic courts had not established a sufficient public interest for the expropriation of the applicant's property, there had been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
71. The Court notes the Government's argument that the impugned restitution-related decisions were adopted between 1992 and 1994, that is to say, before 24 May 1996, when Protocol No. 1 entered into force in respect of Lithuania. However, the Court observes that even though the judicial proceedings as to the lawfulness of those decisions, to the extent that they related to the disputed premises, were initiated on 3 June 1994, they lasted until 26 January 2005. During that period the applicant was restricted in his enjoyment of his possessions. Furthermore, not until 11 December 2008 did the head of the Kaunas City Municipality issue an order to pay the applicant pecuniary compensation for the disputed premises (see paragraph 24 above). Moreover, as regards the restitution of land, the Court notes that the proceedings were initiated on 8 April 2002. It follows that this part of the applicant's complaint as to the alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, as well as his remaining complaints under that provision, cannot be dismissed as being incompatible ratione temporis.
72. To the extent that the applicant complained about his inability to recover the disputed premises in kind following the re-establishment of the Lithuanian State, the Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention does not guarantee, as such, the right to the restitution of property. Nor can it be interpreted as creating any general obligation for the Contracting States to restore property which had been expropriated before they ratified the Convention, or as imposing any restrictions on their freedom to determine the scope and conditions of any property restitution to former owners (see, among many authorities, Jantner v. Slovakia, no. 39050/97, § 34, 4 March 2003; Bergauer and Others v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 17120/04, 13 December 2005).
73. In the context of the present case, the Court has regard to the decision of the Kaunas City District Court of 18 February 2004 that, in accordance with the applicable domestic legislation, the applicant had no right to recover the actual disputed premises. The authorities were simply required to compensate him, either by allocating to him another property of equal value or by paying him pecuniary compensation. The Court sees no cause to depart from the domestic court's findings, which were based on its direct knowledge of the national law and the factual circumstances of the case. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It must therefore be rejected under Article 35 § 4.
B. Modification of the size and location of the plot of land
74. The applicant further alleged that in its decision of 12 November 1996 the Kaunas City Municipality had unlawfully reduced the size and modified the location of the plot of land assigned to him. In particular, he contended that on 17 November 1992 the Kaunas City Board had restored his property rights to 1/12 of the plot of land adjacent to the disputed premises, measuring 1,288 sq. m. However, the aforementioned decision of 12 November 1996 specified that the overall size of the plot in question was 950 sq. m. The applicant invoked the right to the protection of property under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
75. The Government emphasised that the decision of 17 November 1992 had never been modified with regard to the size of the plot of land in respect of which the applicant's property rights had been restored, namely 1/12 of 2,097 sq. m. The decision to restore the applicant's property rights had been based exclusively on archived documents - inter alia an inventory file from 1947 indicating the size of the plot as being 2,097 sq. m. However, in 1965 the Soviet authorities had decided to set aside part of that land for the building of a kindergarten. In accordance with Article 12 of the Restoration of Property Act of 1991, the State had to buy out land which was occupied by infrastructures needed for social purposes. Thus, the property restitution decision was not based on the actual size of a factually existing plot of land. Moreover, that part of the restitution decision remained in force, as had been confirmed by the administrative courts.
76. As for the location of the plot of land, the Government noted that the decision of 17 November 1992 had not created an enforceable right to the physical return of 1/12 of a specific plot measuring 1,288 sq. m since, as had been confirmed by the national courts, that plot lacked any characterisation allowing it to be specifically identified cartographically. The part of the plot adjacent to the disputed premises which could be restored to the applicant in kind had been determined in accordance with the provisions of national law, whilst taking into account the actual area of the land at issue.
77. The Government lastly noted that the applicant could no longer claim to be the victim of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention since on 22 January 2006 the cadastral delimitation of the plot of land adjacent to the disputed premises had been carried out and the applicant had accepted the area of the land established as a result of that exercise. Moreover, on 4 June 2008 the applicant had requested the Kaunas Regional Administrative Court to discontinue the case regarding his claim of 8 April 2002 to ownership of 1/12 of the plot of land of 1,288 sq. m adjacent to the disputed premises in kind. The Government concluded that this part of the application was manifestly ill-founded and had to be declared inadmissible under Article 34 and Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
78. As regards the location of the plot of land, the Court notes the domestic courts' conclusion that the decision of 17 November 1992 had not granted the applicant any property right to a particular plot of land, but had only established his right to obtain restitution of 1/12 part of a plot, measuring 2,097 sq. m. The courts also observed, and the Court sees no ground to hold otherwise, that that order required, by its very nature, a decision specifying the exact location of the plot by reference to the cartographical indicators determined by the territorial plan (see paragraphs 28-30 above). The Court also endorses the Government's argument that part of the plot of land which could physically be returned to the applicant in 2008 was determined in accordance with the provisions of national law, whilst taking into account the actual area of the plot land at issue. The Court lastly observes that the applicant himself consented to the cadastral delimitation and accepted its results (see paragraph 31 above).
79. Regarding the size of the plot of land in respect of which the applicant's property rights were restored, the Court takes into account the fact that the Kaunas Regional Administrative Court, while noting that the plot of 1,288 sq. m in reality did not exist, emphasised that the restitution decision of 17 November 1992 remained in force. The court observed that the local authorities had an obligation to resolve the issue of compensation for the difference in the size of the plot. In this connection the Court notes the decision of 13 October 2008 in which an area of land measuring 44 sq. m was physically returned to the applicant and he was offered compensation (in the form of property or money) for the remaining 131 sq. m, which means that he could actually obtain the equivalent of 175 sq. m, constituting 1/12 of 2,097 sq. m.
80. It follows that the applicant's complaints regarding the location of the plot of land and the size of the plot in respect of which his property rights were restored are manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. They must therefore be rejected under Article 35 § 4.
C. The overall delay in finalising the restitution process
81. Lastly, invoking the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the applicant contended that, as a result of the overall delay in finalising the restitution process, he had been unduly restricted in the enjoyment of his property.
82. As regards the disputed premises, the Government pointed out that the delay in finalising the restitution process had mainly been caused by the behaviour of the applicant, who had obstructed the expeditious restoration of his property rights by insisting on the return of the premises in kind. In addition, the applicant had not acted in a cooperative manner as regards his conduct during the proceedings. Lastly, even after the Supreme Court's decision of 26 January 2005, by which it was acknowledged that he was not entitled to the physical restitution of the disputed premises, the applicant had initiated additional judicial proceedings which further prolonged the finalisation of the restitution process.
83. On the matter of the plot of land, the Government noted that the land restitution process in Lithuania was very complicated and lengthy because of the difficult political and social conditions as new proprietary relations had emerged. Judicial disputes, which were common in restitution cases, were also to be regarded as an obstacle to the rapidity of the process. It followed that the cooperation of claimants played an important role. The possibility of finalising the restitution process with the least delay often depended on the readiness of claimants to choose a type of restitution not involving the physical return of the property at issue and to reach an agreement with other co-owners. The Government also pointed out that, under the domestic law, the restitution process concerning the plot of land was directly related to the finalisation of the restoration of property rights to the disputed premises. As long as the exact part of the premises which was owned by the applicant was not determined, it was not possible to establish the size of the plot of land. Since the applicant to a great extent had himself obstructed the smooth restoration of property rights to the premises, this had subsequently caused delays in finalising the restitution of the land. Taking all of the above into account, the Government argued that the applicant had not acted with a view to finalising the restitution of the land in question expeditiously.
84. The Court observes that, by a decision of 17 November 1992, the Kaunas City Board granted the applicant the right to obtain compensation corresponding to the value of the disputed premises. Even though that right was created in an inchoate form, as its materialisation was to be effected by an administrative decision allocating State assets to him, according to the rules fixed by the Government, it clearly constituted a legal basis for the State's obligation to implement it. However, as the decision to pay pecuniary compensation to the applicant was only taken on 11 December 2008 (see paragraph 24 above), that is to say, many years later, the Court considers that the applicant faced certain restrictions on his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions, conferred by the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Accordingly, this complaint must be declared admissible, no ground of inadmissibility having been established. Moreover, the Court is of the view that this part of the complaint, although already partly addressed when examining the length of proceedings complaint under Article 6 § 1, merits a separate examination under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see the judgment of Igariene and Petrauskiene vs. Lithuania, no. 26892/05, § 55, 21 July 2009, not yet final).
85. It is recalled that, for the purposes of the above-mentioned provision, the Court must determine whether a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the protection of the individual's fundamental rights (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 68, Series A no. 52). The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Străin and Others v. Romania, no. 57001/00, § 44, ECHR 2005-VII).
86. The Court takes cognisance of the fact that the present case concerns restitution of property and is not unmindful of the complexity of the legal and factual issues a State faces when resolving such questions (see Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99, 48380/99, 51362/99, 53367/99, 60036/00, 73465/01 and 194/02, § 166, 15 March 2007). It follows that certain impediments to the realisation of the applicant's right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions are not in themselves open to criticism. However, there is a risk that such restitution proceedings may unreasonably restrict an applicant's ability to deal with his or her possessions, particularly if such proceedings are protracted (see, mutatis mutandis, Luordo v. Italy, no. 32190/96, § 70, ECHR 2003-IX). The state of uncertainty which an applicant may experience as a result of delays attributable to the authorities is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State's conduct (see Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão and Others v. Portugal, nos. 29813/96 and 30229/96, § 54, ECHR 2000-I, and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, §§ 151 and 185, ECHR 2004-V).
87. In the context of the present case, the Court observes that the State recognised the applicant's right to compensation for the disputed premises as early as 17 November 1992. Even taking into account that Protocol No. 1 to the Convention came into force with regard to Lithuania only four years later, the applicant has still not been paid to date. The Court is not insensitive to the complexities inherent in the restitution process. However, in the present case the hindrance to the peaceful enjoyment of his property is mainly attributable to the respondent State, since the Court has already found that the related civil proceedings breached the “reasonable time” requirement (see paragraph 62 above). In the Court's view, notwithstanding the uncooperative attitude of the applicant, the overall length of the restitution proceedings upset the balance which had to be struck between the general interest in securing the disputed premises for public needs and the applicant's personal interest in the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. The interference with the applicant's right was accordingly disproportionate to the aim pursued.
88. On the matter of the plot of land, the Court takes note of the Government's argument that, under domestic law, its restitution was directly linked with the finalisation of the restoration of property rights to the premises. Therefore the Court considers that no separate examination of this part of the applicant's complaint is needed.
89. Having regard to the foregoing, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
90. The applicant further complained, under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, that the courts had incorrectly applied domestic procedural and substantive law when examining his claims regarding restitution.
91. The Court reiterates that it is not its task under the Convention to act as a court of appeal, or a so-called court of fourth instance, from the decisions taken by domestic courts. It is the role of the latter to interpret and apply the domestic law (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 86, ECHR 2005-VI). It follows that this complaint must be rejected as being manifestly ill-founded, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
92. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
93. The applicant claimed 180,000 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage.
94. The Government contested these claims as unsubstantiated and excessive.
95. The Court does not discern any causal link between the violation found and the pecuniary damage alleged; it therefore rejects this claim. However, the Court considers that the applicant has suffered some non-pecuniary damage. In the light of the parties' submissions and, in particular, having regard to the applicant's failure to effectively cooperate with the authorities as regards the swift resolution of the restitution dispute, the Court awards the applicant EUR 1,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
96. The applicant claimed 5,299 Lithuanian litai (LTL – approximately 1,535 euros (EUR)) for the legal costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and the Strasbourg Court. To substantiate his claim he submitted bills and receipts for the sum of LTL 2,299 (approximately EUR 665) and contended that the documents proving the remaining expenses had been stolen.
97. The Government contested these claims as unsubstantiated and unreasonable.
98. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicant EUR 665.
C. Default interest
99. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares admissible, unanimously, the applicant's complaints concerning the excessive length of the civil proceedings and his inability to enjoy his possessions;
2. Declares inadmissible, unanimously, the remainder of the application;
3. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
4. Holds by six votes to one that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
5. Holds unanimously
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following sums, to be converted into the national currency of that State at the rate applicable on the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage,
(ii) EUR 655 (six hundred and fifty-five euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, for costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicant's claims for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 21 July 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the dissenting opinion of Judge Jočienė is annexed to this judgment.
S.D.
F.T.

PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE JOÄŒIENÄ–
1. I agree with the majority of my colleagues on all aspects of the case concerning the violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, as well as with all inadmissibility issues decided therein, but I cannot agree with their finding that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerning the overall delay in finalising the restitution process.
2. Nevertheless, I agree with the majority's position (see paragraph 84 of the judgment) that the particular circumstances of the case require a separate examination of the merits of this complaint, even after finding a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see also Okçu v. Turkey, no. 39515/03, 21 July 2009, §§ 48-50, not yet final). Consequently, I also agree that this part of complaint is admissible (ibid).
3. The applicant in this part of his application is complaining that, as a result of the overall delay in finalising the restitution process, he had been unduly restricted in the enjoyment of his property.
4. First of all, I note that the restitution process was very complicated and lengthy because of the difficult political and social conditions which emerged with the creation of new proprietary relations (see, mutatis mutandis, Kopecky v. Slovakia, [GC] no. 44912/98, §§ 35, 37, ECHR 2004-IX). Judicial disputes, which were common in restitution cases, were also to be regarded as an obstacle to the rapidity of the process. It follows that the cooperation of claimants played an important role. Therefore, the possibility of finalising the restitution process with the least delay often depended on the readiness of claimants to choose a type of restitution not involving the physical return of the property at issue, and to reach an agreement with other co-owners. Of course, even accepting that some difficulties will arise for the State in the restitution process, I fully agree with the well developed jurisprudence of the Court, that a "fair balance" must be struck between the demands of the general interests of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 68-69, Series A no. 52), and that an excessive burden cannot be placed on the person concerned
(see Brumărescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999-VII). I also agree with the Court's established position that a person cannot be unreasonably placed in a situation where he cannot effectively deal with his possessions, particularly where such situations are protracted due the State authorities' fault (see paragraph 86 of the judgment).
5. Turning to the present case, I note that the case file and all the documents therein show that the delay in finalising the restitution process for the disputed premises had mainly been caused by the behaviour of the applicant and his failure to effectively cooperate with the authorities. It was the applicant who had obstructed the expeditious restoration of his property rights by insisting on the return of the premises in kind, knowing that no such possibility existed (see paragraphs 66, 69-70 and 72-73 of the judgment). In addition, the applicant did not act in a cooperative manner during the civil proceedings. In particular, the civil case was suspended from 7 October 1994 until 1 July 1999 since the applicant failed to inform the Kaunas City District Court about his relative's state of health (see paragraphs 11, 13-14 and 22 of the judgment). Even after the Supreme Court's final decision of 26 January 2005, by which it was acknowledged that he was not entitled to the physical restitution of the disputed premises, the applicant initiated further judicial proceedings, by submitting new requests and claims to the domestic courts, whilst at the same time showing no interest in their possible outcome by, inexplicably, failing to appear before the court (see paragraphs 22 and 23 of the judgment). Moreover, the applicant failed to cooperate with the local authorities, given that he refused to accept the letter of 15 December 2008 in which the Kaunas City Municipality requested him to indicate his bank account details in order to pay him compensation for the disputed premises (see paragraph 24 of the judgment).
6. As regards the plot of land, I note that the Court decided not to examine this complaint separately (see paragraph 88 of the judgment). In my view, this aspect could have been examined separately, because it could have confirmed the conclusion of no violation of Article 1 of Protocol 1 of the Convention. Under the domestic law, the restitution of the plot of land in this case was directly linked with the finalisation of the restoration of property rights to the premises, the latter process having been delayed by the applicant himself. I observe that, after the final decision of 21 June 2005 of the Supreme Administrative Court, the restitution proceedings were quite rapid. The process of cadastral delimitation and measurement was completed on 22 January 2006, and in 2007 the plot of land adjacent to the disputed premises was registered in the State Land Registry. Finally, after the applicant withdrew his administrative claim on 4 June 2008, the head of the Kaunas Regional Administration adopted a decision specifying the size and location of the plot of land, physically returned to him an area of land measuring 44 sq. m, and requested him to indicate his preferences regarding compensation for the remaining 131 sq. m of the plot. Therefore, I cannot see any unjustified delays which could be attributable to the State in finalising the restitution of the plot of land.
7. In the context of the present case, I agree with the Court that the overall delay in finalising the restitution process was substantial (see paragraph 62 of the judgment). However, having regard to the considerations above, particularly the applicant's uncooperative attitude towards the authorities (see Užkurėlienė and Others v. Lithuania, no. 62988/00, §§ 34-36, 7 April 2005), which attitude negatively influenced the rights of other plaintiffs in the case (see the judgment of Igarienė and Petrauskienė v. Lithuania, no. 26892/05, 21 July 2009, not yet final), I think that there has been no infringement of the applicant's right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions and that a "fair balance" has been struck.
Accordingly, I find no violation Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in this case.


TESTO TRADOTTO

SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA ALEKSA C. LITUANIA
(Richiesta n. 27576/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
21 luglio 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Aleksa c. Lituania,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente, Ireneu Cabral Barreto, Vladimiro Zagrebelsky, Danutė Jočienė, Dragoljub Popović, András Sajó, Nona Tsotsoria, giudici,
e Sally Dollé, Cancelliere di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 30 giugno 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 27576/05) contro la Repubblica della Lituania depositata presso la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino lituano, il Sig. V. A. (“il richiedente”), il 19 luglio 2005.
2. Il richiedente è stato rappresentato dal Sig. V. G., un avvocato che pratica a Kaunas. Il Governo lituano (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra E. Baltutytė.
3. Il 18 marzo 2008 la Corte ha deciso di dare avviso al Governo delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Ha deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il richiedente nacque nel 1951 e vive a Kaunas.
A. Procedimenti riguardo ai locali
5. Il 17 novembre 1992 il Consiglio della Città di Kaunas ripristinò i diritti di proprietà del richiedente su parte di un edificio a Kaunas. In particolare, ripristinò i diritti di proprietà del richiedente su 1/12 della parte inabitata dell'edificio (in futuro “i locali contestati”). La decisione di restituzione della proprietà specificò che i diritti di proprietà sui locali contestati sarebbero stati ripristinati in conformità con la procedura e termini fissati dal Governo.
6. Il 15 ottobre 1993 il sindaco aggiunto della città di Kaunas ed il richiedente firmarono una dichiarazione di accettazione di trasferimento (priėmimo-perdavimo aktas) con cui i locali contestati furono trasferiti al richiedente. Il 21 dicembre 1993 il richiedente registrò il suo titolo di proprietà.
7. Con una decisione del 21 marzo 1994, il sindaco della città di Kaunas dichiarò la dichiarazione dell'accettazione di trasferimento illegale e di conseguenza priva di valore legale. Con una decisione del 31 maggio 1994, il Consiglio della Città di Kaunas completò la decisione del 17 novembre 1992 con una clausola che specificava la forma nella quale i diritti di proprietà avrebbero dovuto essere ripristinati. E’stato deciso di pagare il risarcimento per i locali contestati, a quel tempo occupati da una farmacia, dopo che il Governo aveva determinato i mezzi e la procedura con cui sarebbe pagato il risarcimento.
8. Con una decisione del 14 giugno 1994, il Consiglio della città di Kaunas trasferì i locali contestati dal rendiconto patrimoniale di una società gestita dallo Stato al rendiconto patrimoniale della società gestita dallo Stato delle farmacie dell’ area di Kaunas. Successivamente, con una decisione del Consiglio della città di Kaunas del 14 giugno 1996 questi locali contestati sono stati trasferiti nella proprietà privata della società per azioni chiusa Šlamučio vaistinė.
9. Il 3 giugno 1994 il richiedente introdusse una rivendicazione civile (“il primo giudizio civile”), impugnando le decisioni delle autorità locali del 21 marzo 1994 e del 31 maggio 1994. Fu respinta come non comprovata dalla Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas il 4 luglio 1994.
10. Il 22 agosto 1994 la Corte Suprema annullò la decisione della corte inferiore e rinviò la causa per un nuovo esame. La Corte Suprema notò che la corte inferiore non aveva esaminato tutte le circostanze attinenti. In particolare, non aveva preso in conto del fatto che, al tempo dell'adozione delle decisioni contestate, il richiedente era già stato riconosciuto come il proprietario dell' intero edificio. La Corte Suprema osservò che solamente un tribunale e non un'autorità locale avrebbe potuto annullare i diritti di proprietà del richiedente.
11. Il 7 ottobre 1994 la Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas ha deciso di sospendere inoltre i procedimenti civili su richiesta del richiedente, a causa della malattia di uno dei suoi parenti V.A. che era anche un querelante di quella causa. La corte ordinò al richiedente di informarla quando lo stato di salute del suo parente gli avrebbe permesso di partecipare ai procedimenti.
12. Il 3 ottobre 1994 la società delle farmacie gestite dallo stato dell’ area di Kaunas introdusse una rivendicazione civile, chiedendo l'annullamento parziale della decisione del Consiglio della città di Kaunas del 17 novembre 1992 (in seguito “il secondo giudizio civile”).
13. L’ 8 gennaio 1996 il richiedente e gli altri querelanti introdussero una nuova rivendicazione civile (in seguito “la terza rivendicazione civile”), impugnando la decisione del Consiglio della città di Kaunas del 14 giugno 1994.
14. Il 1 luglio 1999 la Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas di sua propria iniziativa riprese i procedimenti civili nel primo giudizio civile.
15. Il 2 settembre 1999 la Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas ha deciso di congiungere tutte le tre cause e di esaminarle insieme.
16. Il 9 settembre 1999 la Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas ammise il ricorso del richiedente. Dichiarò le decisioni dell'autorità locale del 21 marzo 1994 e del 31 maggio 1994 prive di valore legale, ripristinando il titolo di proprietà del richiedente sui locali occupati dalla farmacia.
17. Il 28 febbraio 2000 la Corte Regionale di Kaunas sostenne quella decisione.
18. Il 12 settembre 2000 la Corte Suprema annullò le decisioni dei tribunali inferiori e restituì la causa alla Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas per un esame de novo. La Corte Suprema considerò che i tribunali inferiori erano andati a vuoto di nuovo nel valutare tutte le circostanze attinenti -anche quelle su cui l’attenzione era stata attratta nella sua decisione del 22 agosto 1994-e che loro avevano errato in legge.
19. Il 18 febbraio 2004 Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente. La corte osservò che la legge non prevedeva la restituzione in natura del patrimonio immobiliare se fosse stato occupato da istituzioni di interesse pubblico, come una farmacia. La corte interpretò inoltre la decisione del 17 novembre 1992, notando che non poteva essere letta come se garantisse la restituzione in natura dell' intero edificio, ma solamente della parte non occupata. La corte annullò la frase ambigua della decisione, di determinare come rimediare alla situazione, o tramite risarcimento materiale o tramite trasferimento di una proprietà equivalente.
20. Il 23 settembre 2004 la Corte Regionale di Kaunas sostenne la decisione della corte di prima istanza.
.
21. Il 26 gennaio 2005 la Corte Suprema respinse un ricorso di cassazione da parte del richiedente.
22. Il 25 maggio 2005 certe parti alla causa, incluso il richiedente presentarono una richiesta alla Corte distrettuale della Città di Kaunas per interpretare la sua decisione del 18 febbraio 2004. La loro richiesta fu respinta il 21 giugno 2005.
23. Il 3 aprile 2006 il richiedente avviò procedimenti civili che impugnavano le proporzioni iniziali del suo diritto e dei diritti di proprietà delle altre parti interessate, come fissato dalla decisione del 17 novembre 1992. In una decisione definitiva del 5 settembre 2007, la Corte distrettuale della Città di Kaunas ha notato che, benché il richiedente fosse stato informato debitamente dell'udienza, lui o il suo avvocato non erano riusciti a comparire, non riuscendo così a contribuire alla decisione veloce dei procedimenti e non mostrando interesse per il loro risultato. La rivendicazione del richiedente fu lasciata non esaminata.
24. L’ 11 dicembre 2008 il capo del Municipio della Città di Kaunas emise un ordine per pagare al richiedente il risarcimento materiale per i locali contestati. Il risarcimento sarebbe stato pagato in tre rate dal 2008 al 2010 e a questo fine, in una lettera del 15 dicembre 2008 il Municipio della Città di Kaunas richiese al richiedente di indicare i dettagli del suo conto bancario. Il richiedente rifiutò di accettare la lettera del municipio.
B. Procedimenti a riguardo delll'area di terreno
25. Con la decisione summenzionata del 17 novembre 1992, il Consiglio della città di Kaunas ripristinò i diritti di proprietà del richiedente su 1/12 dell'area di terreno adiacente ai locali contestati e che misurava 2,097 metri quadri. Facendo seguito a quella decisione, 1/12 di un'area di terreno che misurava 1,288 metri quadrati gli sarebbe stata ritornata in natura e per la parte rimanente, equivalente a 1/12 di 809 metri quadrati, sarebbe stato pagato un risarcimento.
26. Il 12 novembre 1996 il Municipio della Città di Kaunas adottò una decisione di pianificazione territoriale particolareggiata che specificò che la taglia esistente ed effettiva dell'area di terreno in natura che sarebbe gli stata ritornata era di 950 metri quadrati e non di 1,288 metri quadrati.
27. L’ 8 aprile 2002 il richiedente presentò una rivendicazione alla Corte amministrativa Regionale di Kaunas, richiedendole di obbligare il Centro Registri a registrare il richiedente come il proprietario di 1/12 dell'area di terreno di 1,288 metri quadrati adiacente ai locali contestati. Il 15 maggio 2002 il richiedente impugnò anche la decisione di pianificazione territoriale particolareggiata del 12 novembre 1996.
28. Il 4 marzo 2005 la Corte amministrativa Regionale di Kaunas respinse le rivendicazioni del richiedente. La corte notò che la decisione del 17 novembre 1992 non specificava l'ubicazione esatta della particolare area di terreno sulla quale furono ripristinati i diritti di proprietà del richiedente e di altre persone interessate, poiché al tempo della decisione nessuna pianificazione territoriale era stata eseguita e l'area di terreno non era stata misurata o segnata in qualsiasi particolare posto. Ne seguì dalla natura della decisione che ha stabilito soltanto che erano stati ripristinati i diritti di proprietà su un'area di terreno, senza specificare la particolare ubicazione di quell'area. Di conseguenza, la decisione del 17 novembre 1992 non diede al richiedente il diritto di registrare il suo titolo su questa area presso Cancelleria Statale della Terra.
29. La corte notò anche che la decisione del 12 novembre 1996 aveva stabilito che l'area di terreno di 1,288 metri quadrati non esisteva, essendo la sua vera misura 950 metri quadrati. Nessuna prova era stata presentata alla corte tale da poter mettere in discussione quella costatazione. Poiché la decisione del 17 novembre 1992 era valida, il problema del risarcimento per la differenza fra le misure delle aree (assegnando un'area equivalente al richiedente) o la loro ubicazione esatta fu lasciata per la determinazione alle autorità locali competenti. La Corte amministrativa Regionale di Kaunas ha notato inoltre che la decisione della pianificazione territoriale mirava a stabilire l'attività permessa sulla terra contestata e a salvaguardare l'interesse pubblico.
30. Il 21 giugno 2005 la Corte amministrativa Suprema sostenne la decisione del tribunale inferiore. La corte enfatizzò che, in conformità con il diritto nazionale, un'area di terreno a riguardo della quale i diritti di proprietà sono stati ripristinati doveva essere delimitata in un piano territoriale. La decisione del 17 novembre 1992 sulla restituzione dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente sull'area di terreno in questione mancava di qualsiasi caratterizzazione che permettesse di essere specificamente identificata (cartograficamente o in qualsiasi altra forma di delimitazione) come un elemento del patrimonio immobiliare. Inoltre, non esistevano dati di questo genere anche al tempo della decisione della Corte amministrativa Suprema. Ne seguì che il Consiglio della città di Kaunas non aveva stabilito il diritto del richiedente su una particolare area di terreno, ma solamente il suo diritto ad ottenere la restituzione in natura di 1/12 di un'area di terreno che misurava 1,288 metri quadrati.
31. Il 22 gennaio 2006 fu effettuato un esame catastale che fissava le dimensioni dell'area di terreno adiacente ai locali contestati a 1,038 metri quadrati. Il richiedente prese parte al processo ed accettò i risultati dell'esame riguardo all'area della terra in oggetto. Il 9 maggio 2007, sulla base dell'esame catastale, il Governatore Provinciale di Kaunas adottò una decisione sulla base della quale l'area di terreno adiacente ai locali contestati fu registrata presso la Cancelleria Statale della Terra. Il 2 aprile 2008 il Governatore Provinciale di Kaunas emise un ordine che stabiliva le parti dell'area di terreno da assegnare al richiedente.
32. Il 4 giugno 2008 il richiedente richiese alla Corte amministrativa Regionale di Kaunas di terminare la causa che riguardava la sua rivendicazione dell’ 8 aprile 2002.
33. Con una decisione del 13 ottobre 2008, il capo dell’ Amministrazione Regionale di Kaunas ripristinò i diritti di proprietà del richiedente su di un'area di terreno di 44 metri quadrati, adiacente ai locali contestati. La decisione specificò che al richiedente fu concesso il risarcimento per io rimanenti 131 metri quadrati.
34. In una lettera dell’ 11 dicembre 2008 le autorità locali richiesero al richiedente di affermare la sua preferenza come risarcimento a riguardo dei rimanenti 131 metri quadrati.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
35. Il diritto nazionale attinente e la pratica riguardo alle vie di ricorso nazionali con riguardo alla lunghezza dei procedimenti delle azioni di reclamo è stato riassunto nella sentenza Četvertakas ed Altri c. Lituania (n. 16013/02, §§ 19-22 20 gennaio 2009). Inoltre, l’Articolo 484 del Codice civile, in vigore sino al 1 luglio 2001, prevedeva che un'organizzazione doveva compensare qualsiasi danno che aveva causato ai suoi impiegati che assolvevano i loro doveri professionali.
36. La Legge sulla procedura e le condizioni per la restituzione dei diritti di proprietà sui beni immobili esistenti (Įstatymas dėl piliečių nuosavybės teisių į išlikusį nekilnojamąjį turtą atstatymo tvarkos ir sąlygų), approvata il 18 giugno 1991 e corretta in numerose occasioni, prevedeva due forme di restituzione -il ritorno della proprietà in natura o il risarcimento per questa se il suo ritorno fisico non fosse stato possibile. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 14 della Legge, se un alloggio fosse stato convertito in locali non-residenziali che erano stati dati ad un'istituzione medica o usato ai fini medici, quei locali sarebbero stati comprati dallo Stato. Le autorità locali erano competenti per decidere sul metodo del risarcimento.
37. Il 27 maggio 1994 la Corte Costituzionale esaminò il problema della compatibilità della Costituzione coi diritti nazionali sulla restituzione dei diritti di proprietà. Nella sua decisione la Corte Costituzionale sostenne, inter alia che le proprietà che erano state nazionalizzate dalle autorità sovietiche dal 1940 avrebbero dovuto essere trattate come “proprietà sotto il controllo de facto dello Stato.” La Corte Costituzionale affermò:
“I diritti di un proprietario precedente della particolare proprietà non vengono ripristinati finché la proprietà non viene ritornata o non viene riconosciuto il risarcimento appropriato. La legge non prevede di per se stessa qualsiasi diritto fintanto che non è applicato ad una persona concreta a riguardo di una specifica proprietà. In tale situazione l'effetto legale di una decisione da parte di un'autorità competente di restituire la proprietà o di offrire il risarcimento è tale solamente dal momento che il proprietario precedente ottiene i diritti di proprietà su una specifica proprietà.”
La Corte Costituzionale sostenne anche che il risarcimento equo per la proprietà che non poteva essere restituita in natura era compatibile col principio della protezione di proprietà.
38. Il 20 giugno 1995 la Corte Costituzionale affermò che la scelta del Parlamento del principio di riparazione parziale fu influenzata dalle condizioni politiche e sociali difficili, in cui “le nuove generazioni erano cresciute, nuove relazioni socio-economiche e di proprietà erano state formate durante gli anni 50 dell’ occupazione che non potevano essere ignorate nel decidere la questione della restituzione della proprietà.”
39. La Legge sulla restituzione dei diritti di proprietà dei cittadini su beni immobili esistenti (Piliečių nuosavybės teisių į išlikusį nekilnojamąjį turtą atkūrimo įstatymas), che fu decretata il 1 luglio 1997 e che abrogò la Legge sulla procedura e le condizioni per la restituzione dei diritti di proprietà su beni immobili esistenti, al tempo attinente si legge come segue:

Articolo 8 Le condizioni e le procedure per la restituzione dei diritti di proprietà sugli alloggi residenziali, porzioni di questi ed appartamenti
“1. Diritti di proprietà su alloggi residenziali, parti di questi ed appartamenti saranno ripristinati a favore delle persone specificate nell’ Articolo 2 di questa Legge restituendoli in natura, a parte gli alloggi residenziali, parti di questi ed appartamenti che sono soggetti acquisto Statale facendo seguito all’ Articolo 15 di questa Legge...”
L’Articolo 15 Gli alloggi Residenziali, parti di questi ed appartamenti comprati dallo Stato
“Gli Alloggi residenziali, parti di questi ed appartamenti saranno comprati dallo Stato dai cittadini specificati nell’Articolo 2 di questa Legge che saranno compensati in conformità con l’Articolo 16 di questa Legge ad eccezione che questi alloggi residenziali, parti di questi o appartamenti:
(1) sono stati convertito in locali disadatti all’ occupazione umana ed usati ai fini educativi, di protezione e di assistenza sanitaria, culturali o scientifici o come case di cura comunali. Il ruolo di simili locali sarà approvato dal Governo...”
Articolo il 16 Il Risarcimento a cittadini per i beni immobili comprati dallo Stato
“1. Lo Stato compenserà i cittadini per beni immobili esistenti che sono stati comprati dallo Stato, così come per beni i immobili esistenti prima del 1 agosto 1991 ma che hanno successivamente cessò di esistere come risultato di decisioni adottate dalle autorità Statali o locali.
2. Quando lo Stato compensa i cittadini per beni immobili che, in conformità con questa Legge, non vengono restituiti in natura, il principio del valore uguale sarà applicato sia alla proprietà che non viene restituita sia all'altra proprietà che viene trasferita invece di questa come risarcimento per la proprietà comprata dallo Stato. ...
7. Il risarcimento per gli edifici usati ai fini economici e commerciali, alloggi residenziali parti di questi ed appartamenti che non sono restituiti facendo seguito a questa Legge sarà stabilito in conformità coi metodi approvati dal Governo. ...”
40. L’Articolo 2 dell’Atto della Terra (Žemės įstatymas), decretato il 26 aprile 1994, prevede che un “area di terreno” è una parte del territorio che ha confini fissi e ha un fine stabilito per il quale viene usata.
41. L’Atto della Riforma agraria (Žemės reformos įstatymas), decretato il 25 luglio 1991, prevede:
Articolo 6: Privatizzazione della terra
“2. Nell'attuazione della riforma agraria, il terreno verrà acquisito ripristinando il diritto a proprietà, o acquistando la terra. ...”
Articolo 22: Delimitazione di aree di terra e la distribuzione della documentazione su proprietà di terra
“Sulla base dei piani dell’uso di terreno prodotti in collegamento con la riforma agraria, l'Istituto Statale della Gestione dell’Uso della Terra marcherà i confini delle aree di terreno e preparerà la documentazione che attesta la proprietà della terra o i diritti dell’uso del terreno.”
42. L’Articolo 3 dell’Atto di Pianificazione Territoriale, decretato il 12 dicembre 1995, prevede che uno degli obiettivi di pianificazione territoriale è di riconciliare gli interessi delle entità fisiche e giuridiche con gli interessi del pubblico, dei municipi e dello Stato riguardo alle condizioni per l'uso di un particolare territorio e di aree di terreno. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 18 dell'Atto, vengono disegnati dei piani particolareggiati, che impongono delle restrizioni sulle possibili attività sull'area di terreno in oggetto. Vengono determinati i requisiti relativi a qualsiasi costruzione, sviluppo territoriale ed il fine dell’ uso di terreno, e il terreno e altri beni immobili possono essere espropriati per necessità pubbliche. Questi piani particolareggiati possono concedere a soggetti fisici e giuridici dir sviluppare delle attività sull'area di terreno in oggetto.
43. Gli Articoli 2 e 3 dell'Atto del Catasto del Patrimonio immobiliare che fu decretato il 27 giugno 2000 ed è applicabile quando denotando articoli di patrimonio immobiliare, prevede che un articolo di patrimonio immobiliare deve essere registrato nella forma di un testo scritto, di cifre , di elementi grafici (punti e linee) così come di informazioni espresse con metodi cartografici , definendo i quantitativi e le caratteristiche qualitative del patrimonio immobiliare.
44. Il 15 novembre 1991 il Governo della Repubblica della Lituania adottò la Decisione N.ro 470 sull'attuazione della Legge sulla procedura e sulle condizioni per la restituzione dei diritti di proprietà su beni immobili esistenti. L’Articolo 9 della Decisione prevedeva che i diritti di proprietà sul terreno dovevano essere stabiliti formalmente in conformità col piano territoriale appropriato (Nuosavybės teisė į žemę įforminama pagal atitinkamos teritorijos žemėtvarkos projektą).
45. Il Codice di Procedura Civile, in vigore fin dal 1 gennaio 2003, prevede che un giudice può ritirarsi da un'udienza di sua propria iniziativa, o le parti alla procedura possono richiedere l'allontanamento del giudice, quando ci sono delle circostanze che sollevano dubbi riguardo all'imparzialità della persona (Articolo 68). L’Articolo 366 § 1 (8) del Codice prevede che dei procedimenti civili possono essere riaperti se costituita ascoltasse la causa una corte illegalmente.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE A CAUSA DELLA LUNGHEZZA DEI PROCEDIMENTI
46. Il richiedente si lamentò che la lunghezza dei procedimenti civili riguardo alla restituzione dei locali contestati era stata incompatibile col “ termine ragionevole” richiesto dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ad ognuno viene concessa una... udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole da parte di un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale...”
A. Ammissibilità
47. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto introdurre una rivendicazione per danni di fronte ad un tribunale civile sotto gli Articoli 483 e 484 del Codice civile, in vigore dal 1 luglio 2001. Appellandosi alla direttiva della Corte Costituzionale del 19 agosto 2006, il Governo dibatté anche che, presumendo anche che la specifica compensazione non fosse stata racchiusa in alcuna legge, il richiedente avrebbe potuto chiedere compensazione appellandosi direttamente ala Costituzione.
48. Il Governo contese anche che il richiedente avrebbe potuto ricorrere ai tribunali nazionali, chiedendo compensazione per la lunghezza dei procedimenti civili sotto l’Articolo 6.272 del Codice civile, in vigore dal 1 luglio 2001. In questo collegamento presentò una copia di una sentenza consegnata dalla Corte Suprema il 6 febbraio 2007 in cui erano stati assegnati dei danni ad una persona sotto l’Articolo 6.272 del Codice civile per la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti, benché criminali che erano stati avviati nel 1998 ed era terminati nel 2004. In prospettiva dell'insuccesso del richiedente nel depositare tale rivendicazione nella presente causa, l'azione di reclamo sulla lunghezza dei procedimenti dovrebbe essere respinta per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione. Infine, il Governo presentò che parte dei procedimenti civili contestati non rientravano nella competenza ratione temporis della Corte.
49. Il richiedente contestò l'argomento del Governo, affermando che non esisteva nessuna via di ricorso adeguata che potesse usare in relazione alla sua azione di reclamo della Convenzione riguardo alla lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti.
50. La Corte osserva all'inizio che non ha nessuna competenza per esaminare eventi che sono accaduti prima del 20 giugno 1995, la data dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione a riguardo della Lituania. Dal momento che parte dei procedimenti civili è accaduta prima di quella data, questo aspetto della richiesta dovrebbe essere respinto sotto l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 come ratione temporis incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione.
51. Riguardo alla dichiarazione del Governo in merito al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali la Corte si riferisce alla sua conclusione in Baškienė c. Lituania (n. 11529/04, §§ 68-72 24 luglio 2007), dove sostenne che una rivendicazione per danni sotto l’Articolo 6.272 del Codice civile non soddisfaceva la prova dell’ “efficacia.” La Corte non trova nessuna ragione di abbandonare la sua
giurisprudenza esistente a questo riguardo. Osserva inoltre che, come un esempio della giurisprudenza nazionale attinente riguardo all’ Articolo 6.272 del Codice civile, il Governo si appellò alla decisione della Corte Suprema del 6 febbraio 2007. Nella presente causa i procedimenti civili durarono comunque, dal 3 giugno 1994 fino al 26 gennaio 2005 (vedere paragrafi 9 e 21 sopra), mentre la richiesta fu depositata presso la Corte il 19 luglio 2005. Di conseguenza, la Corte non rimane convinta che la possibilità di chiedere i danni per la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti sotto l’Articolo 6.272 del Codice civile aveva- al tempo in cui la presente richiesta fu presentata -già acquisito un grado sufficiente di certezza legale da richiedere il suo uso per ai fini dell’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
52. Riguardo all'argomento del Governo per cui il richiedente avrebbe potuto introdurre una rivendicazione basata sugli Articoli 483 e 484 del Codice civile, in vigore dal 1 luglio 2001, o sulla Costituzione, non ha portato alcuna prova per dimostrare che tale via di ricorso aveva una qualsiasi prospettiva ragionevole di successo, specialmente prima della direttiva della Corte Costituzionale del 19 agosto 2006 (vedere Četvertakas ed Altri c. Lituania, n. 16013/02, § 30 20 gennaio 2009).
53. Essendo così, la dichiarazione del Governo dell'inammissibilità per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
54. La Corte nota anche che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile epr qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
55. Il Governo dibatté che la lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti civili riguardo ai locali contestati era ragionevole. Presentò che la lunghezza dei procedimenti era stata influenzata dalla malattia seria di una delle parti. In particolare, notò che i procedimenti civili erano stati sospesi per pressoché cinque anni e che questo ritardo era stato parzialmente attribuibile alla condotta del richiedente che non era riuscito a richiedere al tribunale nazionale di riprenderli (vedere paragrafi 11 e 14 sopra). Sostenne inoltre che la causa era complessa poiché aveva coinvolto molti querelanti che avevano presentato numerose rivendicazioni e contro rivendicazioni . Un numero di parti alla causa era stato sostituito da altre persone. Il Governo attrasse anche l'attenzione della Corte sul fatto che l'archivio della causa consisteva di 8 volumi (2,234 pagine) e che c'erano stati cambi frequenti nella legislazione nazionale che regolava il processo di restituzione. Ne seguì che non c'era stata nessuna violazione del diritto ad un'udienza entro un “ termine ragionevole”, garantito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
56. Il richiedente non era d'accordo, affermando che la complessità della causa non era sufficiente per assolvere lo Stato dal suo obbligo di osservare il requisito del termine ragionevole. Lui notò, in particolare, che la causa era stata sospesa di fronte alla Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas per pressoché cinque anni. Il richiedente ammise che lui era stato sotto l’ obbligo di informare la corte quando lo stato di salute del suo parente gli avrebbe concesso di partecipare ai procedimenti. Nondimeno, dibatté che era la corte che era primariamente responsabile per la decisione rapida della causa. Il richiedente osservò inoltre che dopo la decisione della Corte Suprema del 12 settembre 2000 con la quale la causa era stata ritornata alla corte di prima -istanza per un nuovo esame, il Distretto della città di Kaunas aveva reso la sua decisione solamente il 18 febbraio 2004. Di conseguenza, la lunghezza di questi procedimenti era stata eccessiva.
57. La Corte nota che benché i procedimenti civili fossero stati avviati il 3 giugno 1994, il periodo che rientra all'interno della sua giurisdizione è cominciato solamente il 20 giugno 1995 (vedere paragrafo 52 sopra) e è durato sino al 26 gennaio 2005. La lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti era così di nove anni e sette mesi per tre livelli di giurisdizione. Comunque, la Corte osserva che il 20 giugno 1995 i procedimenti erano già pendenti da un anno.
58. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti deve essere valutata alla luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento ai seguenti criteri: la complessità della causa, la condotta del richiedente e delle autorità attinenti e ciò era in pericolo per il richiedente nella controversia (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Frydlender c. Francia [GC], n. 30979/96, § 43 ECHR 2000-VII).
59. La Corte ha frequentemente trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione in richieste che sollevavano problemi simili a quello nella causa presente (vedere Szilágyi c. Ungheria, n. 73376/01, 5 aprile 2005).
60. La Corte osserva che i presenti procedimenti erano davvero complessi, particolarmente a causa del numero di partecipanti, di molti atti collegati, degli emendamenti legislativi in corso e dell'aspetto della restituzione. Comunque, ciò non può giustificare la loro significativa lunghezza complessiva .
61. La Corte condivide la prospettiva del Governo per cui il richiedente stesso ha contribuito alla lunghezza dei procedimenti, dato che dal 7 ottobre 1994 sino al 1 luglio 1999 erano stati sospesi poiché non era riuscito ad informare la Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas sullo stato di salute del suo parente (vedere paragrafi 11 e 14 sopra). Inoltre, mentre quei procedimenti erano pendenti il richiedente iniziò procedimenti nuovi civili riguardo agli stessi problemi (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). Ciononostante, la Corte non può andare a vuoto nell’osservare che la lunghezza di procedimenti era stata anche condizionata da certe omissioni da parte dello Stato. Vale a dire, a causa dell'insuccesso dei tribunali inferiori nel valutare tutte le circostanze attinenti nella causa, la Corte Suprema rinviò due volte la causa a loro per un nuovo esame (vedere paragrafi 10 e 18 sopra). Si dovrebbe notare anche che la Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas impiegò tre anni e mezzo per adottare una nuova decisione dopo che la Corte Suprema le aveva ritornato la causa per un esame de novo (vedere paragrafi 18 e 19 sopra e la sentenza Kobelyan c. Georgia, n. 40022/05, non ancora definitiva, § 19).
62. Le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per permettere la Corte per concludere che la lunghezza totale dei procedimenti civili e contestati violò il requisito del “ termine ragionevole”. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE A CAUSA DELLA PARZIALITÀ DEI TRIBUNALI NAZIONALI
63. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre che il giudice della Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas che aveva ascoltato la sua causa il 18 febbraio 2004 ed un giudice della Corte Regionale di Kaunas che aveva ascoltato la sua causa il 23 settembre 2004 erano stati influenzati poiché entrambi i giudici prima avevano lavorato nello stesso ufficio legale di Kaunas come avvocati per la parte avversaria. Lui si appellò al diritto ad un tribunale imparziale sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
64. Il Governo sostenne che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente era manifestamente mal-fondata. Indicò che dall’ 11 marzo 1990, quando la Lituania aveva ripristinato la sua indipendenza, e per molti anni dopo quella data c'era stato solamente un ufficio legale nella città di Kaunas: l'ufficio legale di Kaunas. Gli avvocati che lavorarono là non erano legati da relazioni di associazione. Il Governo concedette che gli avvocati per la parte avversaria avevano lavorato davvero presso lo stesso ufficio legale di Kaunas come i giudici che avevano ascoltato la causa del richiedente. Comunque, quegli avvocati avevano smesso di lavorare presso l'ufficio legale di Kaunas nel 1992 ed avevano stabilito la loro propria società legale. Riguardo ai giudici, loro avevano smesso di lavorare presso quell’ufficio legale rispettivamente nel 1997 e nel 2002, quando loro erano stati nominati giudici. Il Governo dibatté infine che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali, poiché non aveva, in conformità coi requisiti del diritto nazionale, impugnato la composizione dei tribunali che avevano deciso la sua causa.
65. La Corte nota che il richiedente non riuscì a lamentarsi presso i tribunali nazionali riguardo all’addotta parzialità dei giudici. In particolare, lui non sollevò quel problema nel suo ricorso o nel suo ricorso in cassazione. Inoltre, se il richiedente avesse scoperto le precedenti relazioni professionali dei giudici e degli avvocati per la parte avversaria solo dopo che i procedimenti civili erano stati terminati con la sentenza della Corte Suprema di 26 gennaio 2005, lui avrebbe potuto presentare una richiesta per la riapertura dei procedimenti sotto l’Articolo 366 § 1 (8) del Codice di Procedura Civile. Comunque, la Corte non ha nessuna informazione che suggerisca che il richiedente abbia mai intrapreso tale passo. Quindi questa azione di reclamo è inammissibile per insuccesso nell’ esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
A. l'incapacità del richiedente di recuperare in natura i locali contestati
66. Il richiedente si lamentò anche che lui non era stato in grado ottenere la restituzione in natura dei locali contestati. Lui addusse una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
67. Il Governo presentò all'inizio che questa parte dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 così come le sue azioni di reclamo rimanenti sotto questo Articolo erano inammissibili ratione temporis, poiché loro si riferirono ad eventi che erano accaduti prima del 24 maggio 1996, quando il Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione entrò in vigore a riguardo della Lituania.
68. Il Governo indicò che il cuore della controversia fra il richiedente e le autorità non era la restituzione dei suoi diritti di proprietà come tali, ma la questione se al richiedente era stato concessa la restituzione in natura dei locali contestati. Con le decisioni del21 marzo 1994 e del 31 maggio 1994, le autorità locali non avevano annullato i diritti di proprietà del richiedente ma avevano specificato solamente la forma di restituzione. Siccome sotto legge nazionale non era possibile restituire in natura i locali contestati, le autorità locali e, più tardi, i tribunali decisero che il richiedente doveva essere compensato per i locali contestati o assegnandogli una proprietà del valore equivalente o pagandogli il risarcimento materiale. Secondo il Governo, questa possibilità per il richiedente di ottenere il risarcimento per i locali in questione assicurava un equilibrio ragionevole fra gli interessi del richiedente e quello pubblico, ed era stata approvata dai tribunali su tre livelli di giurisdizione.
69. Il richiedente notò che il 17 novembre 1992 le autorità locali avevano ripristinato i suoi diritti di proprietà. Lui non era d'accordo col Governo e dibatté che, anche se le decisioni contestate del 21 marzo 1994 e del 31 maggio 1994 riguardo al modo in cui i suoi diritti di proprietà avrebbero dovuto essere ripristinati erano state adottate prima dell'entrata in vigore di Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo della Lituania, i procedimenti civili riguardanti la validità di quelle decisioni erano durati fino alla decisione della Corte Suprema del 26 gennaio 2005. Prendendo in conto questo fattore, la presente azione di reclamo rientra all'interno della competenza ratione temporis della Corte.
70. Il richiedente dibatté inoltre che i tribunali nazionali avevano interpretato male la legge nazionale nel trovare che i locali contestati non potevano essergli restituiti in natura. In particolare, lui addusse che non c'era interesse pubblico nel rifiutargli la proprietà di quei locali ed a titolo traslativo alla farmacia. Secondo il richiedente, che non c'era interesse pubblico nel rifiutare loro la proprietà di quei locali e nel trasferire il titolo di proprietà da loro alla farmacia. Inoltre, la restituzione dei diritti di proprietà del richiedente in natura non avrebbe precluso alla farmacia di affittare i locali. Siccome i tribunali nazionali non avevano stabilito un interesse pubblico sufficiente per l'espropriazione della proprietà del richiedente, c'era stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
71. La Corte nota l'argomento del Governo per cui le contestate decisioni relative alla restituzione sono state adottate fra il 1992 ed il 1994, cioè , prima del 24 maggio 1996, quando il Protocollo N.ro 1 entrò in vigore a riguardo della Lituania. Comunque, la Corte osserva che anche se i procedimenti giudiziali riguardo alla legalità di quelle decisioni, nella misura in cui si riferivano ai locali contestati furono iniziati il 3 giugno 1994, durarono sino al 26 gennaio 2005. Durante questo periodo il richiedente è stato ristretto nel suo godimento delle sue proprietà. Inoltre, fino all’ 11 dicembre 2008 il capo del Municipio della città di non emise un ordine di pagare al richiedente il risarcimento materiale per i locali contestati (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). Inoltre, riguardo alla restituzione del terreno, la Corte nota che i procedimenti furono iniziati l’8 aprile 2002. Ne segue che questa parte dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente riguardo alla violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, così come le sue rimanenti azioni di reclamo sotto questa disposizione, non possono essere respinte come incompatibili ratione temporis.
72. Nella misura in cui il richiedente si lamentò della sua incapacità di recuperare in natura i locali contestati a seguito del ristabilimento dello Stato lituano, la Corte reitera che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non garantisce, come tale, il diritto alla restituzione della proprietà. Né si può interpretare come se creasse un qualsiasi obbligo generale per gli Stati Contraenti di ripristinare la proprietà che era stata espropriata prima della loro ratifica della Convenzione, o come se imponesse una qualsiasi restrizioni sulla loro libertà di determinare la sfera e le condizioni di una qualsiasi restituzione di proprietà a proprietari precedenti (vedere, fra molte autorità, Jantner c. Slovacchia, n. 39050/97, § 34 4 marzo 2003; Bergauer ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca (dec.), n. 17120/04, 13 dicembre 2005).
73. Nel contesto della presente causa, la Corte ha, riguardo alla decisione della Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas del 18 febbraio 2004 che, in conformità con la legislazione nazionale applicabile, il richiedente non aveva nessuno diritto di recuperare gli attuali locali contestati. Le autorità erano costrette semplicemente a compensarlo, o assegnandogli un'altra proprietà di valore uguale o pagandogli il risarcimento materiale. La Corte non vede nessuna causa per discostarsi dalle sentenze della corte nazionale che furono basate sulla sua conoscenza diretta della legge nazionale e delle circostanze di fatto della causa. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Deve essere respinta perciò sotto l’Articolo 35 § 4.
B. Modifica della misura e dell’ ubicazione dell'area di terreno
74. Il richiedente addusse inoltre che nella sua decisione del 12 novembre 1996 il Municipio della città di Kaunas aveva ridotto illegalmente la misura ed aveva cambiato l'ubicazione dell'area di terreno assegnatagli. In particolare, lui contese che il 17 novembre 1992 il Consiglio della città di Kaunas aveva ripristinato i suoi diritti di proprietà su 1/12 dell'area di terreno adiacente ai locali contestati, che misurava 1,288 metri quadrati. Comunque, la decisione summenzionata del 12 novembre 1996 specificava che la misura complessiva dell'area in oggetto era di 950 metri quadrati. Il richiedente invocò il diritto alla protezione della proprietà sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
75. Il Governo enfatizzò che la decisione del 17 novembre 1992 non era mai stata cambiata an riguardo della misura dell'area di terreno a riguardo della quale i diritti di proprietà del richiedente erano stati ripristinati, vale a dire 1/12 di 2,097 metri quadrati. La decisione di ripristinare i diritti di proprietà del richiedente era stata basata esclusivamente su documenti archiviati - inter alia un archivio di inventario dal 1947 che indicava la misura dell'area come di 2,097 metri quadrati. Nel 1965 le autorità sovietiche avevano deciso comunque, di accantonare parte di quella terra per la costruzione di un asilo infantile. In conformità con l’Articolo 12 dell’Atto della Restituzione della Proprietà del 1991, lo Stato doveva rilevare il terreno che era occupato da infrastrutture necessarie ai fini sociali. Così, la decisione di restituzione della proprietà non fu basata sulla misura effettiva di un’area effettivamente esistente di terreno. Inoltre, quella parte della decisione di restituzione rimase in vigore, come era stato confermato dai tribunali amministrative.
76. Riguardo all'ubicazione dell'area di terreno, il Governo notò, che la decisione del 17 novembre 1992 non aveva creato un diritto esecutivo al ritorno fisico di 1/12 di una specifica area che misurava 1,288 metri quadrati poiché, come era stato confermato dai tribunali nazionali quella area mancava di una qualsiasi caratterizzazione tale da permettere che fosse specificamente identificata cartograficamente. La parte dell'area adiacente ai locali contestati che potrebbero essere ripristinati in natura al richiedente era stato determinata in conformità con le disposizioni di legge nazionale, prendendo in considerazione l'area effettiva della terra in questione.
77. Il Governo notò ultimamente che il richiedente non potesse più pretendere di essere la vittima di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione poiché il 22 gennaio 2006 la delimitazione catastale dell'area di terreno adiacente ai locali contestati era stata eseguita ed il richiedente aveva accettato l'area di terreno stabilita come risultato di quell'esercizio. Il 4 giugno 2008 il richiedente aveva richiesto inoltre, alla Corte amministrativa Regionale di Kaunas di chiudere la causa che riguardava la sua rivendicazione dell’ 8 aprile 2002 sulla proprietà di 1/12 dell'area di terreno di 1,288 metri quadrati adiacente ai locali contestati in questione. Il Governo concluse che questa parte della richiesta era manifestamente mal-fondata e doveva essere dichiarata inammissibile sotto l’Articolo 34 e l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
78. Riguardo all'ubicazione dell'area di terreno, la Corte nota la conclusione dei tribunali nazionali per cui la decisione del 17 novembre 1992 non aveva accordato al richiedente nessun diritto di proprietà su una particolare area di terreno, ma aveva stabilito solamente il suo diritto a ottenere la restituzione di una 1/12 parte di un'area, che misurava 2,097 metri quadrati. I tribunali osservarono anche, e la Corte non vede nessun motivo per sostenere altrimenti, che quell’ ordine richiedeva, per sua stessa natura, una decisione che specificava l'ubicazione esatta dell'area con riferimento agli indicatori cartografici determinati dal piano territoriale (vedere paragrafi 28-30 sopra). La Corte sottoscrive anche l'argomento del Governo che parte dell'area di terreno che avrebbe potuto essere restituita fisicamente al richiedente nel 2008 è stata determinata in conformità con le disposizioni della legge nazionale, prendendo in considerazione l'area effettiva del terreno dell’ area in questione. La Corte osserva infine che il richiedente stesso acconsentì alla delimitazione catastale ed accettò i suoi risultati (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra).
79. Riguardo alla misura dell'area di terreno a riguardo della quale i diritti di proprietà del richiedente furono ripristinati, la Corte prende in considerazione il fatto che la Corte amministrativa Regionale di Kaunas, notando che l'area di 1,288 metri quadrati in realtà non esisteva, enfatizzò che la decisione di restituzione del 17 novembre 1992 è rimasta in vigore. La corte osservò che le autorità locali avevano un obbligo di chiarire il problema del risarcimento per la differenza nella misura dell'area. In questo collegamento la Corte nota la decisione del 13 ottobre 2008 in cui un'area di terreno che misurava 44 metri quadrato fu restituita fisicamente al richiedente e gli fu offerto il risarcimento (nella forma di proprietà o soldi) per i rimanenti 131 metri quadrati il che significa che lui davvero avrebbe potuto ottenere l'equivalente di 175 metri quadrati, che costituivano 1/12 di 2,097 metri quadrati .
80. Ne segue che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente riguardo all'ubicazione dell'area di terreno e la misura dell'area a riguardo della quale i suoi diritti di proprietà furono ripristinati sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Loro devono essere respinte perciò sotto l’Articolo 35 § 4.
C. Il ritardo complessivo nella finalizzazione del processo di restituzione
81. Infine, invocando il diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, il richiedente contese che, come risultato del ritardo complessivo nella finalizzazione del di restituzione, era stato ristretto impropriamente nel godimento della sua proprietà.
82. Riguardo ai locali contestati, il Governo indicò che il ritardo nella finalizzazione del di restituzione era stato causato principalmente dal comportamento del richiedente che aveva ostruito la restituzione veloce dei suoi diritti di proprietà insistendo sulla restituzione in natura dei locali. Inoltre, il richiedente non aveva agito in modo collaborativo riguardo alla sua condotta durante i procedimenti. Infine, anche dopo la decisione della Corte Suprema del 26 gennaio 2005 con la quale fu ammesso che non gli era stata concessa la restituzione fisica dei locali contestati, il richiedente aveva iniziato procedimenti giudiziali supplementari che prolungarono ulteriormente la finalizzazione del processo di restituzione.
83. Sulla questione dell'area di terreno, il Governo notò, che il processo di restituzione del terreno in Lituania era molto complicato e lungo a causa delle condizioni politiche e sociali difficili in quanto nuove relazioni di proprietà erano emerse. Controversie giudiziali che erano comuni in cause di restituzione sarebbero anche state considerate un ostacolo alla rapidità del processo. Ne segue che la collaborazione dei rivendicatori aveva un importante ruolo. La possibilità di finalizzare il processo di restituzione col minimo ritardo spesso dipendeva dalla prontezza dei rivendicatori nello scegliere un tipo di restituzione che non comporta il ritorno fisico della proprietà in questione e di giungere ad un accordo con gli altri comproprietari. Il Governo indicò anche che, sotto il diritto nazionale,il processo di restituzione riguardo all'area di terreno era collegato direttamente alla finalizzazione della restituzione dei diritti di proprietà sui locali contestati. Fino a che la parte esatta dei locali che erano stati posseduti dal richiedente non veniva determinata, non era possibile stabilire la misura dell'area di terreno. Poiché il richiedente in larga misura aveva ostacolato la semplice restituzione dei diritti di proprietà sui locali, questo aveva provocato successivamente dei ritardi nella finalizzazione della restituzione del terreno. Prendendo in considerazione tutto ciò che precede, il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non aveva agito rapidamente nella prospettiva fi finalizzare la restituzione del terreno in oggetto.
84. La Corte osserva che, con una decisione del 17 novembre 1992, il Consiglio della città di Kaunas accordò al richiedente il diritto di ottenere il risarcimento corrispondente al valore dei locali contestati. Anche se questo diritto fu creato in una forma iniziale, siccome la sua materializzazione sarebbe stata effettuata con una decisione amministrativa che gli avrebbe assegnato i beni Statali, secondo le norme fissate dal Governo chiaramente costituiva una base legale per l'obbligo dello Stato di implementarlo. Comunque, siccome la decisione di pagare il risarcimento materiale al richiedente fu presa solamente l’ 11 dicembre 2008 (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra), cioè , molti anni più tardi, la Corte considera che il richiedente affrontò certe restrizioni sul suo diritto al pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà, conferito dalla prima frase dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Di conseguenza, questa azione di reclamo deve essere dichiarata ammissibile, non essendo stato stabilita nessuna base d'inammissibilità. Inoltre, la Corte è della prospettiva che questa parte dell'azione di reclamo, benché già in parte presa in considerazione esaminando la lunghezza dell’ azione di reclamo dei procedimenti sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1, meriti un esame separato sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere la sentenza Igariene and Petrauskiene c. Lituania, n. 26892/05, § 55, 21 luglio 2009 non ancora definitiva).
85. È ricordato che, ai fini della disposizione summenzionata, la Corte deve determinare, se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità e la protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (veda Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 68 Serie A n. 52). L'equilibrio richiesto non sarà stato previsto nel caso in cui la persona riguardata dovrà sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo (vedere Străin ed Altri c. Romania, n. 57001/00, § 44 ECHR 2005-VII).
86. La Corte prende giurisdizione del fatto che la presente causa concerne la restituzione di proprietà e non è immemore della complessità delle questioni legali e che riguardano i fatti a cui uno Stato deve far fronte chiarendo simili questioni (vedere Velikovi ed Altri c. Bulgaria, N. 43278/98, 45437/99, 48014/99 48380/99, 51362/99 53367/99, 60036/00 73465/01 e 194/02, § 166 15 marzo 2007). Ne segue che certi impedimenti alla realizzazione del diritto del richiedente al pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà non sono di per sé aperti alla critica. C'è comunque, un rischio che simili procedimenti di restituzione possano restringere irragionevolmente la capacità di un richiedente di trattare con la sua o le sue proprietà, in particolare se simili procedimenti vengono protratti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Luordo c. Italia, n. 32190/96, § 70 ECHR 2003-IX). Lo stato di incertezza che un richiedente può sperimentare come risultato di ritardi attribuibili alle autorità è un fattore da prendere in considerazione nel valutare la condotta dello Stato (vedere Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão ed Altri c. Portogallo, N. 29813/96 e 30229/96, § 54 ECHR 2000-io, e Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, §§ 151 e 185, il 2004-V di ECHR).
87. Nel contesto della presente causa, la Corte osserva, che lo Stato ha riconosciuto il diritto del richiedente al risarcimento per i locali contestati fin dal 17 novembre 1992. Prendendo anche in considerazione che il Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione entrò in vigore a riguardo della Lituania solo quattro anni più tardi il richiedente non è ancora stato pagato ad oggi. La Corte non è insensibile alle complessità inerente al processo di restituzione. Comunque, nella presente causa l'ostacolo al pacifico godimento della sua proprietà è principalmente attribuibile allo Stato rispondente, poiché la Corte ha già trovato che i relativi procedimenti civili violarono il requisito del “termine ragionevole” (vedere paragrafo 62 sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte, nonostante l'atteggiamento di non collaborazione del richiedente la lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti di restituzione sconvolse l'equilibrio che doveva essere previsto fra l'interesse generale nel garantire i locali contestati per le necessità pubbliche e l'interesse personale del richiedente nel godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. L'interferenza col diritto del richiedente era di conseguenza sproporzionata allo scopo perseguito.
88. Sulla questione dell'area di terreno, la Corte prende nota dell'argomento del Governo per cui, sotto il diritto nazionale, la sua restituzione fu collegata direttamente alla finalizzazione della restituzione dei diritti di proprietà sui locali. Perciò la Corte considera che non vi è bisogno di nessun esame separato di questa parte dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente.
89. Avendo riguardo a ciò che precede, la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
90. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre, sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che i tribunali nazionali avevano applicato erroneamente le leggi procedurali e sostanziale esaminando le sue rivendicazioni riguardo alla restituzione.
91. La Corte reitera che non è il suo compito sotto la Convenzione di comportarsi come una corte d'appello, o una così definita corte di quarta istanza, dalle decisioni prese dai tribunali nazionali. È il ruolo del secondo di interpretare e applicare il diritto nazionale (vedere Jahn ed Altri c. Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 86 ECHR 2005-VI). Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo deve essere respinta come manifestamente mal-fondata, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
92. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
93. Il richiedente chiese 180,000 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno materiale e morale.
94. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni come non comprovate ed eccessive.
95. La Corte non discerne alcun collegamento causale fra la violazione trovata ed il danno materiale addotto; respinge perciò questa rivendicazione. Comunque, la Corte considera che il richiedente ha sofferto di un certo danno morale. Alla luce delle osservazioni delle parti e, in particolare, avendo riguardo all'insuccesso del richiedente nel cooperare efficacemente con le autorità a riguardo della decisione rapida della controversia della restituzione, la Corte assegna EUR 1,000 al richiedente a riguardo del danno morale.
B. Costi e spese
96. Il richiedente chiese 5,299 litai lituani (LTL-approssimativamente 1,535 euro (EUR)) per le spese processuali e le spese incorse di fronte ai tribunali nazionali e alla Corte di Strasburgo. A sostegno della sua rivendicazione lui presentò dei conti e delle ricevute per la somma di LTL 2,299 (circa EUR 665) e sostenne che i documenti che provavano le spese rimanenti erano stati rubati.
97. Il Governo contestò queste rivendicazioni come non comprovate ed irragionevoli.
98. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei costi e delle spese solamente se è stato dimostrato che questi sono stati davvero e necessariamente sostenuti e sono stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa, data considerazione ai documenti in sua proprietà ed ai criteri sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare EUR 665 al richiedente.
C. Interesse di mora
99. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara ammissibile, all’unanimità, le azioni di reclamo del richiedente riguardo alla lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti civili e alla sua incapacità di godere delle sue proprietà;
2. Dichiara inammissibile, all’unanimità, il resto della richiesta;
3. Sostiene all’unanimità che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
5. Sostiene all’unanimità
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare al richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le seguenti somme, da convertire nella valuta nazionale di questo Stato al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 1,000 (mille euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, a riguardo del danno morale
(ii) EUR 655 (seicento e cinquanta-cinque euro) più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente, per costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge all’unanimità il resto delle rivendicazioni del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 21 luglio 2009, facendo seguito agli Articoli 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell’Ordinamento della Corte.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 dell’Ordinamento della Corte, l'opinione dissidente del Giudice Jočienė è annessa a questa sentenza.
S.D.
F.T.

OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENTE DEL GIUDICE JOÄŒIENÄ–
1. Io concordo con la maggioranza dei miei colleghi su tutti gli aspetti della causa riguardo alla violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, così come con tutti le questioni di inammissibilità decise in questa sede, ma io non posso concordare con la loro costatazione che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo al ritardo complessivo nella finalizzazione del processo di restituzione.
2. Ciononostante, io concordo con la posizione della maggioranza (vedere paragrafo 84 della sentenza) che le particolari circostanze della causa richiedono un esame separato dei meriti di questa azione di reclamo, anche dopo avere trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere anche Okçu c. Turchia, n. 39515/03, 21 luglio 2009, §§ 48-50 non ancora definitiva). Io concordo anche di conseguenza, che questa parte dell’azione di reclamo è ammissibile (ibid).
3. Il richiedente in questa parte della sua richiesta sta lamentandosi che, come risultato del ritardo complessivo nella finalizzazione del processo di restituzione, lui era stato ristretto impropriamente nel godimento della sua proprietà.
4. Prima di tutto, io noto che il processo di restituzione era molto complicato e lungo a causa delle condizioni politiche e sociali difficili che sono emerse con la creazione di nuove relazioni di proprietà (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kopecky c. Slovacchia, [GC] n. 44912/98, §§ 35, 37 ECHR 2004-IX). Le controversie giudiziali ,che erano comuni in cause di restituzione, avrebbero dovuto essere considerate anche un ostacolo alla rapidità del processo. Ne segue che la collaborazione dei rivendicatori ha avuto un ruolo importante. Perciò, la possibilità di finalizzare il processo di restituzione col minimo ritardo spesso dipendeva dalla prontezza dei rivendicatori nello scegliere un tipo di restituzione che non comportasse il ritorno fisico della proprietà in questione, e nel giungere ad un accordo con gli altri comproprietari. Chiaramente, accettando anche che alcune difficoltà sarebbero sorte per lo Stato nel processo di restituzione, io concordo pienamente con la giurisprudenza bene sviluppata della Corte che un equilibrio equo" deve essere previsto fra le richieste degli interessi generali della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 68-69 Serie A n. 52), e che un carico eccessivo non può essere messo sulla persona riguardata (vedere Brumărescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 78 ECHR 1999-VII). Io concordo anche con la posizione stabilita della Corte che una persona non può essere messa irragionevolmente in una situazione in cui non può trattare efficacemente con le sue proprietà, particolarmente dove simili situazioni vengono protratte a causa delle autorità Statali (vedere paragrafo 86 della sentenza).
5. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, io noto che l'archivio della causa e tutti i documenti afferenti mostrano lo che il ritardo nella finalizzazione del processo di restituzione per i locali contestati era stato causato principalmente dal comportamento del richiedente ed dal suo insuccesso nel collaborare efficacemente con le autorità. Era il richiedente che aveva ostruito la restituzione veloce dei suoi diritti di proprietà insistendo sulla restituzione in natura dei locali, sapendo che non esisteva alcuna simile possibilità (vedere paragrafi 66, 69-70 e 72-73 della sentenza). Inoltre, il richiedente non agì in una maniera collaborativa durante i procedimenti civili. In particolare, il giudizio civile fu sospeso dal 7 ottobre 1994 sino al 1 luglio 1999 poiché il richiedente non riuscì ad informare la Corte distrettuale della città di Kaunas sullo stato di salute del suo parente (vedere paragrafi 11, 13-14 e 22 della sentenza). Anche dopo la decisione definitiva della Corte Suprema del 26 gennaio 2005 con la quale fu ammesso che a lui non veniva concessa la restituzione fisica dei locali contestati, il richiedente iniziò gli ulteriori procedimenti giudiziali, presentando nuove richieste e rivendicazioni ai tribunali nazionali non mostrando allo stesso tempo nessun interesse nei loro possibili risultati non riuscendo , inesplicabilmente, a comparire di fronte alla corte (vedere paragrafi 22 e 23 della sentenza). Inoltre, il richiedente non riuscì a collaborare con le autorità locali, dato che lui rifiutò di accettare la lettera del 15 dicembre 2008 in cui il Municipio della città di Kaunas gli richiedeva di indicare i suoi dati del conto bancario per pagargli il risarcimento per i locali contestati (vedere paragrafo 24 della sentenza).
6. Riguardo all'area di terreno, io noto che la Corte decise di non esaminare separatamente questa azione di reclamo (vedere paragrafo 88 della sentenza). Nella mia prospettiva, questo aspetto avrebbe potuto essere esaminato separatamente, perché avrebbe potuto confermare la conclusione di nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo 1 della Convenzione. Sotto il diritto nazionale, la restituzione dell'area di terreno in questa causa era collegata direttamente alla finalizzazione della restituzione dei diritti di proprietà sui locali, essendo stato ritardato il secondo processo dal richiedente stesso. Io osservo che, dopo la decisione definitiva del 21 giugno 2005 della Corte amministrativa Suprema, i procedimenti di restituzione erano piuttosto rapidi. IL processo di delimitazione catastale e di misurazione fu completato il 22 gennaio 2006, e nel 2007 l'area di terreno adiacente ai locali contestati fu registrato presso la Cancelleria Statale della Terra. Infine, dopo che il richiedente ritirò la sua rivendicazione amministrativa il 4 giugno 2008, il capo dell’ Amministrazione Regionale di Kaunas adottò una decisione che specificava la misura e l’ ubicazione dell'area di terreno, gli restituiva fisicamente un'area di terreno che misurava 44 metri quadrati e gli richiese di indicare le sue preferenze riguardo al risarcimento per i rimanenti 131 metri quadrati dell'area. Perciò, io non posso vedere alcun ritardo ingiustificato che potrebbe essere attribuibile allo Stato nella finalizzazione della restituzione dell'area di terreno.
7. Nel contesto della presente causa, io convengo con la Corte che il ritardo complessivo nel finalizzare il processo di restituzione era sostanziale (vedere paragrafo 62 della sentenza). Comunque, avendo riguardo alle considerazioni sopra, particolarmente all'atteggiamento di non collaborativo del richiedente verso le autorità (vedere Užkurėlienė ed Altri c. Lituania, n. 62988/00, §§ 34-36 del 7 aprile 2005) ,atteggiamento che influenzò negativamente i diritti di altri querelanti nella causa (vedere la sentenza Igarienė e Petrauskienė c. Lituania, n. 26892/05, 21 luglio 2009 non ancora definitiva), io penso che non c'è stata nessuna violazione del diritto del richiedente al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà e che un equilibrio equo" è stato previsto.
Di conseguenza, io non trovo violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione in questa causa.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.