Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MINASYAN AND SEMERJYAN v. ARMENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 27651/05/2009
STATO: Armenia
DATA: 23/06/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (victim) ; Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of P1-1 ; Just satisfaction reserved
THIRD SECTION
CASE OF MINASYAN AND SEMERJYAN v. ARMENIA
(Application no. 27651/05)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
23 June 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Minasyan and Semerjyan v. Armenia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Josep Casadevall, President,
Elisabet Fura-Sandström,
Boštjan M. Zupančič,
Alvina Gyulumyan,
Ineta Ziemele,
Luis López Guerra,
Ann Power, judges,
and Stanley Naismith, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 2 June 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 27651/05) against the Republic of Armenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Armenian nationals, Ms N. M. (“the first applicant”) and Ms Y, S, (“the second applicant”), on 1 July 2005.
2. The first and the second applicants (jointly, “the applicants”) were represented by Ms L. G., a lawyer practising in Yerevan. The Armenian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr G. Kostanyan, Representative of the Republic of Armenia at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. On 2 July 2007 the President of the Third Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The first and the second applicants, who are mother and daughter, were born in 1960 and 1990 respectively and live in Los Angeles, USA.
5. The first applicant was the owner of a 26 sq. m. flat in an apartment building situated at 9 Byuzand Street, Yerevan. The flat was acquired by the first applicant on 30 May 1995. The building in question was situated on a plot of land owned by the State.
6. The applicants alleged that the second applicant enjoyed a right of use in respect of the above flat as the first applicant's family member residing in it.
7. The Government contested this allegation and claimed that the second applicant did not enjoy the right of use in respect of the first applicant's flat and simply had the right to live in it.
8. On 5 October 2001 the Government adopted Decree no. 950, approving the procedure for taking plots of lands and immovable property situated within expropriation zones of Yerevan and for preparing the relevant price offers. The Mayor of Yerevan was entrusted with its implementation. According to that Decree, the amount of compensation was to be determined on the basis of the market value of the immovable property, which was to be determined by a licensed valuation organisation or organisations selected through a tender process. Financial incentives were envisaged for those proprietors who, within ten days of receiving the price offer, gave their consent to hand over their property. Persons who were registered within the expropriation zones and their minor children were to be awarded 2,000,000 Armenian drams (AMD) as a support.
9. On 1 August 2002 the Government adopted Decree no. 1151-N, approving the expropriation zones of the immovable property (plots of land, buildings and constructions) situated within the administrative boundaries of the Central District of Yerevan to be taken for the needs of the State for the purpose of carrying out construction projects, covering a total area of 345,000 sq. m. Byuzand Street was listed as one of the streets falling within such expropriation zones.
10. On 4 March 2004 the Government adopted Decree no. 399-N, authorising the Mayor of Yerevan, for the purpose of facilitating the construction works in the expropriation zones, to include in the compensation offers in specific cases the grant of construction permits without a tender process through direct negotiations.
11. On 17 June 2004 the Government adopted Decree no. 909-N, authorising the Mayor of Yerevan to grant such a construction permit for one of the sections of Byuzand Street – which was to be renamed Main Avenue – to a private company, G. H. CJSC.
12. On 28 July 2004 G. H.CJSC and the Yerevan Mayor's Office signed an agreement which, inter alia, authorised the former to negotiate directly with the owners of the property subject to expropriation and, should such negotiations fail, to institute court proceedings on behalf of the State, seeking forced expropriation of such property.
13. On 23 December 2004 G. H. CJSC informed the first applicant that her flat was situated in the expropriation zones approved by Government Decree no. 1151-N. An independent licensed organisation, O. Ltd, had carried out a valuation of her property, in accordance with the procedure prescribed by Government Decree no. 950. According to the valuation report prepared by O. Ltd, the sum of compensation to be paid to her was the Armenian dram equivalent of 7,000 US dollars (USD). An additional sum equivalent to USD 6,720 would be paid to her as a financial incentive, if she agreed to sign an agreement and to hand over the property within the following five days. The sum of compensation and the financial incentive to be paid to the second applicant, pursuant to Government Decree no. 950, amounted to the equivalent of USD 2,000 and USD 1,500 respectively.
14. It appears that the applicants did not accept this offer.
15. On an unspecified date, G. H. CJSC instituted court proceedings against the applicants on behalf of the State. Referring to, inter alia, Government Decree no. 1151-N, the plaintiff argued that the construction project of the Main Avenue, which was supposed to replace Byuzand Street, was impossible without demolition of the building in which the flat in question was situated and sought to terminate the applicants' rights through payment of compensation and to evict them. In support of its claim, the plaintiff submitted the valuation report prepared by O. Ltd.
16. On 3 February 2005 the Kentron and Nork-Marash District Court of Yerevan (Երևան քաղաքի Կենտրոն և Նորք-Մարաշ համայնքների առաջին ատյանի դատարան) granted the claim of G. H.CJSC. The District Court found that it had been decided by the authorities to take the relevant plot of land for State needs, which was impossible without terminating the applicants' rights in respect of the immovable property situated on that land. It decided to terminate the first and the second applicant's rights and to award them the Armenian dram equivalent of USD 7,000 and USD 2,000 respectively as compensation. The court based its findings on Articles 218, 225 § 2 and 283 of the Civil Code, while the amount of compensation awarded to the first applicant was determined on the basis of the valuation report prepared by O. Ltd.
17. On an unspecified date, the applicants lodged an appeal.
18. The first applicant alleged that, in the proceedings before the Civil Court of Appeal, she filed a motion requesting the court to order a commodity expert opinion in order to contest the valuation carried out by O. Ltd. This motion was allegedly rejected by the Court of Appeal.
19. On 18 April 2005 the Civil Court of Appeal (ՀՀ քաղաքացիական գործերով վերաքննիչ դատարան) upheld the judgment of the District Court.
20. On 29 April 2005 the applicants lodged an appeal on points of law. In their appeal they argued, inter alia, that the ownership in respect of the flat had been unlawfully terminated by a Government decree and not a statute, as required by the domestic law.
21. On 27 May 2005 the Court of Cassation (Õ€Õ€ Õ¾Õ³Õ¼Õ¡Õ¢Õ¥Õ¯ Õ¤Õ¡Õ¿Õ¡Ö€Õ¡Õ¶) dismissed the applicants' appeal, referring to the findings of the lower courts.
22. On an unspecified date the flat in question was demolished.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The domestic provisions related to the question of lawfulness of the interference
1. The Constitution of Armenia (adopted on 5 July 1995 through a referendum)
23. The relevant provisions of the Constitution, as in force at the material time, read as follows:
Article 5
“...Public authorities and public officials are competent to perform only such actions as authorised by law.”
Article 6
“Armenia is a State based on rule of law.
The Constitution of [Armenia] has a supreme legal force and its provisions are directly applicable.
Laws which are found to be incompatible with the Constitution, as well as other legal acts which are found to be incompatible with the Constitution and laws, have no legal force. ...”
Article 28
“Every one has the right to property and the right to bequeath. ...[A person] can be deprived of [his or her] property only by a court in cases prescribed by law.
Property can be expropriated for the needs of society and the State only in exceptional cases of paramount public interest, on the basis of a law and with prior equivalent compensation.”
Article 100
“The Constitutional Court, in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law: (1) decides on the conformity of the laws, the resolutions of the National Assembly, the edicts and directives of the President of [Armenia] and the decrees of the Government with the Constitution; ...”
2. The Law on Legal Acts (in force from 31 May 2002)
24. The Law on Legal Acts prescribes the types and hierarchy of legal acts in Armenia. The relevant provisions of the Law, as in force at the material time, provided as follows.
25. Section 4 listed the legal acts adopted in Armenia which included, inter alia, the Armenian Constitution, the Armenian laws and the decrees of the Government.
26. Section 8 provided that the Constitution laid down the principles of legal regulation on the territory of Armenia and was the legal foundation of the Armenian legislation. It had supreme legal force and its provisions were directly applicable. The laws and other legal acts were adopted on the basis of the Constitution or for the purpose of its implementation and were not to contradict it.
27. Section 9 provided that laws regulated the most important, inherent and stable social relations and were enacted in compliance with the Constitution through a referendum or by the National Assembly. They were not to contradict the Constitution, the active laws and the decisions of the Constitutional Court.
28. Section 14 provided that the Government adopted decrees within the scope of the powers vested in it by the Constitution and the laws. The decrees of the Government were not to contradict the Constitution, the laws and the decisions of the Constitutional Court. They were to regulate any relations not regulated by the laws, unless those relations, pursuant to the Constitution and the laws or the edicts and directives of the President of Armenia, were to be regulated by other legal acts.
3. The Constitutional Court Act (in force from 8 December 1995 to 1 July 2006)
29. Section 64 of the Constitutional Court Act provided that the decisions of the Constitutional Court were final and not subject to appeal. They entered into force from the moment of their delivery and had a binding effect on the territory of Armenia.
4. The Civil Code (in force from 1 January 1999) and the Land Code (in force from 15 June 2001)
30. Articles 218-221 of the Civil Code and Articles 104 and 108 the Land Code, as in force at the material time, stipulated the conditions for taking plots of land for the needs of society and the State.
31. Article 283 of the Civil Code provided that, if it was impossible to take a plot of land for the needs of society and the State without terminating the ownership in respect of buildings, constructions and other immovable property situated on it, the State could take such property from the owner by compensating its value.
5. The Immovable Property Act (in force from 25 January 1996 to 1 January 1999)
32. The provisions of the Immovable Property Act, the conformity of which with the Constitution was examined by the Constitutional Court on 27 February 1998 (see paragraph 33 below), provided:
Section 22: Expropriation of immovable property for the needs of society and the State
“...[2.] The equivalent amount of compensation for expropriation of immovable property for the needs of society and the State is determined by a decree of the Government of [Armenia] on the basis of the results of the negotiation between the Government of [Armenia] and the owner of the property subject to expropriation and upon [the owner's] written consent.
[3.] If the owner of the property disagrees with the expropriation of the property by the Government of [Armenia] or the amount of compensation, then the immovable property may be expropriated by the Government of [Armenia] only through court proceedings.
[4.] The owner of the immovable property subject to expropriation for the needs of society and the State must abstain from causing damage to the immovable property before the entry into force of the court decision.
[5.] The procedure for expropriation of immovable property for the needs of society and the State is established by the Government of [Armenia], pursuant to the provisions of this Section. ...”
6. The Decision of the Constitutional Court of 27 February 1998 on the Conformity of Paragraphs Two, Three, Four and Five of Section 22 of the Immovable Property Act adopted by the National Assembly on 27 December 1995 with Articles 8 and 28 of the Constitution (ՀՀ սահմանադրական դատարանի 1998 թ. փետրվարի 27-ի որոշումը Ազգային ժողովի կողմից 1995 թ. դեկտեմբերի 27-ին ընդունված «Անշարժ գույքի մասին» ՀՀ օրենքի 22 հոդվածի երկրորդ, երրորդ, չորրորդ և հինգերորդ մասերի` ՀՀ սահմանադրության 8 հոդվածին և 28 հոդվածի երկրորդ մասին համապատասխանության հարցը որոշելու վերաբերյալ գործով)
33. When deciding on the conformity of paragraphs 2, 3, 4 and 5 of Section 22 of the Immovable Property Act with, inter alia, Article 28 of the Constitution, the Constitutional Court provided the following interpretation of that provision. Since the phrases “for the needs of society and the State” and “only in exceptional cases” were concepts requiring assessment and concerned a fundamental constitutional right, the Constitution stipulated that expropriation of property on such grounds could be carried out only on the basis of a law, thereby creating necessary legislative safeguards. The phrase “on the basis of a law” implied not a normative legal act which regulated the expropriation procedure in general, but a law pursuant to which the property in question was to be expropriated. Thus, a person's property could be expropriated and – in the absence of his consent – his ownership could be terminated by the State only through the adoption of a law in respect of the concrete immovable property, which would substantiate the exceptional importance and significance of the expropriation and which would indicate the needs of society and the State to be satisfied by the expropriation. The law would also oblige the Government to fix the amount of compensation, taking market prices into account, on the basis of a financial-economic assessment, the results of the negotiation between the Government and the owner of the property subject to expropriation, and upon the owner's written consent. The Government was not entitled to establish a procedure for expropriation of property for the needs of society and the State that would authorise it to expropriate immovable property.
7. Government Decree no. 1151-N of 1 August 2002 Concerning the Implementation of Construction Projects Within the Administrative Boundaries of the Kentron District of Yerevan (ՀՀ կառավարության 2002 թ. օգոստոսի 1-ի թիվ 1151-Ն որոշումը Երևանի Կենտրոն թաղային համայնքի վարչական սահմանում կառուցապատման ծրագրերի իրականացման միջոցառումների մասին)
34. For the purpose of implementation of construction projects in Yerevan, the Government decided to approve the expropriation zones of the immovable property (plots of land, buildings and constructions) situated within the administrative boundaries of the Central District of Yerevan to be taken for the needs of the State, with a total area of 345,000 sq. m. Byuzand Street was listed in Annex 2 to this Decree as falling within these expropriation zones.
35. The Mayor of Yerevan was instructed to determine the boundaries of the plots of land to be taken for the needs of the State and to register them at the Real Estate Registry. The owners and users of the immovable property situated within the expropriation zones were to be informed about the deadlines, sources of financing and the procedure for taking their immovable property. Valuation of the immovable property in question was to be organised and carried out by the relevant licensed organisations.
B. The domestic provisions related to the right of use of accommodation
1. The Housing Code (in force from 1 July 1983 to 26 November 2005)
36. Article 54 provided that members of the tenant's family included his spouse, their children and their parents. Other persons could be recognised as the tenant's family members, if they lived with him or her and ran a common household.
37. Article 120 provided that family members of the owner of a house, whom the owner had accommodated in his or her house, had the right, equally with him or her, to use the accommodation, if no reservations had been made at the time when the family members were accommodated. Persons mentioned in the first sentence of Article 54 of this Code were considered as members of the owner's family. These persons were to continue to enjoy the right of use of accommodation even in case of disruption of family ties with the owner.
2. The Civil Code (in force from 1 January 1999)
38. Article 135, which concerns State registration of property rights, provides that the right of ownership and other property rights in respect of immovable property, including the right of use, are subject to State registration.
39. Chapter 14 of the Civil Code entitled “Ownership of Accommodation and Other Property Rights” contained specific provisions related to the right of use of accommodation which, at the material time, read as follows:
Article 225: The right of use of accommodation
“1. The family members of the owner of accommodation and other persons have the right of use of accommodation, if that right has been registered in accordance with the procedure prescribed by the Law on the State Registration of Rights in Respect of Property.
2. The origination, implementation and termination of the right of use of accommodation are stipulated by a notarised written agreement concluded with the owner.
If no agreement is reached concerning the termination of the right of use of accommodation, that right can be terminated upon the owner's request by a court through payment of compensation equivalent to the market value.
3. The right of use of accommodation may not be an object of sale or purchase, mortgage and lease.
4. The person enjoying the right of use of accommodation may demand from anybody, including the owner, to redress the violations of his [or her] right in respect of the accommodation.
5. The right of use of accommodation does not terminate in case of transfer of ownership in respect of a house or a flat to another person, except when the person enjoying the right of use of accommodation has undertaken a notarised obligation to give up that right prior to the transfer of ownership.”
40. The above Article 225 was amended following the circumstances of the present case, namely on 4 October 2005, and its fourth paragraph read as follows:
“4. The amount of compensation for a one-month period is determined on the basis of the amount of rent payable for given accommodation at the moment of termination of the right [of use] and is calculated the following way: for each person, whose right of accommodation is registered, the area [is calculated] by means of dividing the living area by the total number of persons enjoying the right of gratuitous use of accommodation and the owners, but [should not be] less than five or more than nine square metres.
The compensation is calculated for a period of three years and is paid at once, unless agreed otherwise by the parties.”
3. The Law on the State Registration of Rights in Respect of Property (in force from 6 May 1999)
41. Section 41 of the Law on the State Registration of Rights in Respect of Property provides that rights of spouses, children and other dependants in respect of property, which are conferred on them by law, are effective even if they have not been registered separately.
4. The Children's Rights Act (in force from 27 June 1996)
42. Section 16 of the Children's Rights Act provides that a child family member of the tenant or owner of accommodation, regardless of his or her place of residence, has the right to live in the accommodation occupied by that tenant or owner.
5. The Family Code (in force from 19 April 2005)
43. Article 47 of the Family Code provides, inter alia, that a child has no ownership in respect of his or her parents' property, while the parents have no ownership in respect of the child's property. Children and parents living together may dispose of and use each other's property by mutual agreement.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
44. The applicants complained that the deprivation of their possessions was in violation of the guarantees of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
45. The Government submitted that the second applicant could not claim to be a victim of an alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 because she did not have any “possessions” within the meaning of that provision.
46. The Court considers that the Government's objection regarding the second applicant's victim status is closely linked to the substance of her complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and should be joined to the merits.
47. The Court notes that the applicants' complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Whether the second applicant had “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) The parties' submissions
48. The second applicant submitted that she enjoyed the right of use of accommodation in respect of the flat owned by the first applicant. There was well-established case-law of the appeal and cassation courts in Armenia which, pursuant to Articles 54 and 120 of the Housing Code, recognised the right of use of accommodation based on three factors: (1) being a member of the family of the owner of the accommodation, (2) living in that accommodation, and (3) running a joint household with the owner. All these three factors, which were not to be applied cumulatively, existed in her case. Moreover, her enjoyment of that right was not disputed in the course of the domestic proceedings.
49. Admitting that her right of use of accommodation was not registered at the Real Estate Registry, the second applicant submitted that that right was valid even without State registration since, pursuant to Section 41 of the Law on the State Registration of Rights in Respect of Property, rights of spouses, children and other dependants in respect of property, which were conferred on them by law, were effective without such registration. In any event, she was not able to register that right, even if she wanted to, because Government Decree no. 1151-N had placed limitations on the flat in question which precluded any transactions from being registered at the Real Estate Registry.
50. The second applicant further submitted that it was explicitly stated in the draft agreement on taking property presented by the plaintiff to the domestic courts that “The implementer awards the registered person financial incentive for terminating her rights and vacating the immovable property”. Thus, the authorities recognised the existence of a valuable right which they sought to terminate through signing the above agreement. Furthermore, the right of use of accommodation was considered a property right under the Armenian law. It was an autonomous right which existed independently from the right of ownership and could be terminated only through the payment of adequate compensation. It therefore constituted an asset which was to be regarded as a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
51. The Government submitted that the second applicant did not enjoy any property rights in respect of the flat owned by the first applicant, including the right of use of accommodation. The latter right, pursuant to Article 225 of the Civil Code, could arise only from the moment of State registration. However, there was no evidence to show that the second applicant had such a right registered at the Real Estate Registry. Thus, the only right enjoyed by the second applicant was the right to live in the flat in question, pursuant to Article 47 of the Family Code and Section 16 of the Children's Rights Act. This right, however, could not be considered as “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) The Court's assessment
52. The Court notes at the outset that the main disagreement between the parties concerns the question whether the second applicant enjoyed the right of use of accommodation in respect of the flat owned by the first applicant. In support of their arguments the parties referred to various domestic legal provisions.
53. In this respect, the Court observes that the domestic courts, when deciding to terminate the applicants' rights in respect of the flat in question, made reference, inter alia, to the second paragraph of Article 225 of the Civil Code which stipulates the conditions for termination of the right of use of accommodation. Thus, the enjoyment by the second applicant of the right of use of accommodation was implicitly acknowledged by the domestic courts, which decided to award her compensation for the termination of that right. It follows that the Government's assertions to the contrary have no basis in the findings of the domestic courts and must be dismissed.
54. While it is not in dispute between the parties whether the right of use of accommodation constitutes “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court, nevertheless, considers it necessary to address this question of its own motion.
55. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is not limited to the ownership of material goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law. In the same way as material goods, certain other rights and interests constituting assets can also be regarded as “property rights” and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision. In each case the issue that needs to be examined is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 1999-II; Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000-I; and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 129, ECHR 2004-V).
56. The Court observes that under the Armenian law the right of use of property is a distinct right listed among other property rights (see the domestic provisions cited in paragraphs 38 and 39 above). At the material time, a person having the right of use of accommodation continued to enjoy that right even in case of transfer of ownership in respect of the accommodation in question (Article 225 § 5 of the Civil Code). Furthermore, that right could be terminated only through payment of an adequate compensation (Article 225 § 2 of the Civil Code). The Court therefore considers that the right of use of accommodation enjoyed by the second applicant in respect of the flat owned by the first applicant was a distinct property right which involved a pecuniary interest and therefore constituted a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The fact that the second applicant was paid a sum of money as a result of the expropriation proceedings only reaffirms the Court's foregoing finding. Having reached this conclusion, the Court considers that the Government's objection regarding the applicant's victim status must be dismissed.
2. Whether there was an interference with the applicants' possessions
57. It was not in dispute between the parties that there had been an interference with the first applicant's peaceful enjoyment of her possessions.
58. As regards the second applicant, the Government submitted that, since the only right enjoyed by her was the right to live in the flat in question, there was no interference with her rights guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
59. Having already established that the second applicant had “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 56 above), the Court considers that the termination of the first applicant's ownership and the second applicant's right of use in respect of the flat in question for the purpose of implementing construction projects in the centre of Yerevan undoubtedly amounted to an interference with the applicants' peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
3. Whether the interference with the applicants' possessions was justified
(a) The applicable rule
60. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, as a recent authority, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 134, ECHR 2004-V).
61. The Court considers that the termination of the first applicant's ownership and the second applicant's right of use amounted to a deprivation of their possessions. Accordingly, it is the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which is applicable in the instant case.
(b) Compliance with the conditions laid down in the second sentence of the first paragraph
(i) The parties' submissions
62. The applicants submitted that the deprivation of the first applicant's possessions was not carried out under “conditions provided for by law”, namely Article 28 of the Constitution as in force at the material time. That provision provided that property could be expropriated “for the needs of society and the State in exceptional cases of paramount public interest, on the basis of a law and with prior equivalent compensation”. When interpreting that provision in its decision of 27 February 1998 the Constitutional Court stated that a person could be deprived of his property only through the adoption of a law in respect of a concrete immovable property, which would substantiate the exceptional importance of the expropriation and which would indicate the needs of society and the State to be satisfied by the expropriation. The Constitutional Court further stated that the Government was not entitled to establish a procedure for the expropriation of property for the needs of society and the State.
63. However, no law was adopted in connection with the expropriation of the first applicant's property and the entire expropriation process was based on a number of Government decrees. Nor were the other conditions of the above Article 28 met. In particular, no needs of society or the State were mentioned in Government Decree no. 1151-N or the relevant provisions of the Civil Code and the Land Code. Furthermore, the first applicant was not offered a “prior equivalent compensation”, while the amount of compensation offered to the second applicant was determined in an arbitrary manner. Lastly, the deprivation of the first applicant's property was in violation of the then Article 5 of the Constitution, since the Government exceeded its authority by unlawfully establishing the expropriation and valuation procedures, and granting itself extensive powers to expropriate property.
64. The applicants further submitted that the deprivation of the second applicant's possessions was also not carried out under “conditions provided for by law”, namely Article 225 of the Civil Code. According to that provision, only the owner of a property could claim the termination of the right of use enjoyed by another person in respect of that property. In the present case, however, it was the Government that initiated the proceedings seeking to terminate the second applicant's right of use and therefore there was no legal basis to grant this claim.
65. The Government submitted that Article 28 of the Constitution was not applicable to the first applicant's case. That provision applied only to property which was subject to expropriation for the needs of society and the State. According to Articles 218-221 and 283 of the Civil Code and Articles 104 and 108 of the Land Code, only plots of land fell into the category of property subject to expropriation for the needs of society and the State, but not the immovable property situated on that land. The termination of ownership of private persons in respect of houses or other constructions was therefore the result of the State taking land which belonged to it. In the present case, the first applicant did not own land but only a flat in the building situated on a plot of land which had to be taken for the needs of society and the State. Thus, her flat could not be considered as an object of expropriation for those needs and the compensation paid to her was to be viewed as damage awarded as a result of expropriation of the plot of land. In sum, Article 28 of the Constitution was not applicable to the present case.
(ii) The Court's assessment
66. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that the States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 79, ECHR 2000-XII). It follows that the issue of whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 69, Series A no. 52) becomes relevant only once it has been established that the interference in question satisfied the requirement of lawfulness and was not arbitrary (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
67. The Court further reiterates that the phrase “subject to the conditions provided for by law” requires in the first place the existence of and compliance with adequately accessible and sufficiently precise domestic legal provisions (see Lithgow and Others v. the United Kingdom, 8 July 1986, § 110, Series A no. 102).
68. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that the first and the second applicants enjoyed and were deprived of two distinct rights, that of ownership and that of use of accommodation. The Court will therefore examine the question of compliance with the guarantees of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of each applicant separately.
(α) The first applicant
69. The Court observes that the first applicant was the owner of a flat which measured 26 sq. m. and was part of a building situated at 9 Byuzand Street in the centre of Yerevan. On 1 August 2002 the Government of Armenia adopted a decree, namely Decree no. 1151-N, deciding to expropriate the immovable property, such as plots of land, buildings and constructions, situated in certain central areas of Yerevan which were identified as “expropriation zones”. This property was to be expropriated for the purpose of carrying out construction projects in Yerevan and Byuzand Street was listed as falling within one of these expropriation zones.
70. The Court further observes that, at the material time, the main domestic legal provision regulating the expropriation of property for public needs was Article 28 of the Constitution. The Government argued that this provision was not applicable to the first applicant's case. The Court, however, is not convinced by this argument. It notes that the first applicant was deprived of her property on the basis of an application lodged with the courts by a private company acting on behalf of the State for the purpose of implementation of Government Decree no. 1151-N. Hence, her ownership in respect of her flat was terminated for no other purpose than implementing the Government policy of carrying out construction projects in the centre of Yerevan. Furthermore, the domestic courts explicitly stated in their judgments that the first applicant's ownership was being terminated because the land on which her property was situated was to be taken for State needs. Here the Court does not share the Government's interpretation, according to which only the land but not the property situated on it should be considered as an object of expropriation. Moreover, it is not clear on what grounds the Government make such an assertion given that in the instant case the plot of land in question was public property and the only private property which was being taken by the State was that owned by the first applicant. Thus, the first applicant's case clearly falls into the category of situations covered by Article 28 of the Constitution.
71. The Court observes that one of the requirements of that constitutional provision, which had supremacy over all other legal acts, was that any expropriation of property for public needs be carried out “on the basis of a law”. When interpreting this phrase in its decision of 27 February 1998 the Constitutional Court, whose decisions had binding effect, pointed out, in particular, that private property could be expropriated for public needs only through the adoption of a law in respect of the concrete property. Moreover, the word “law” (օրենք), as used by the Constitutional Court, denoted not just any legal act but a statute adopted by the parliament, thereby reserving the question of decision-making on specific cases of expropriation for public needs to the legislature. This interpretation was further reinforced by the Constitutional Court's finding that the Government, that is the executive branch, was not authorised to decide on the expropriation of private property for public needs (see paragraph 33 above).
72. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court observes that no law was ever adopted by the Armenian parliament in respect of the first applicant's property, as required by Article 28 of the Constitution, and the entire expropriation process, including the procedure for determination of the amount of compensation, was governed by a number of Government decrees. It follows that the deprivation of the first applicant's property was not carried out in compliance with “conditions provided for by law”.
(β) The second applicant
73. The Court observes that the second applicant enjoyed the right of use in respect of the flat owned by the first applicant and this right was terminated by the courts with reference to second paragraph of Article 225 of the Civil Code.
74. The Court reiterates that the requirement of lawfulness means that rules of domestic law must be sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable (see, among other authorities, Hentrich v. France, 22 September 1994, § 42, Series A no. 296-A; Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 109, ECHR 2000-I; and Carbonara and Ventura v. Italy, no. 24638/94, § 64, ECHR 2000-VI).
75. The Court notes that the above Article 225 § 2 contained rules on termination of a person's right of use of accommodation. Those rules, however, spoke of the possibility of terminating the right of use upon the owner's request and contained no mention whatsoever of terminating that right upon an application lodged by any person other than the owner, be it the State or, like in the present case, a private company acting on behalf of the State. Thus, it appears that the second applicant's right of use was terminated with reliance on legal rules which were not applicable to her case. The Court considers that such termination of her right of use was bound to result in an unforeseeable or arbitrary outcome and must have deprived the second applicant of effective protection of her rights. It therefore cannot but describe the interference with the second applicant's possessions on such a legal basis as arbitrary.
(γ) Conclusion
76. The Court concludes that the deprivation of the applicants' possessions was incompatible with the principle of lawfulness. This conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights (see, for example, Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 62, ECHR 1999-II).
77. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of both applicants.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
78. The applicants complained that they had been placed at a substantial disadvantage vis-à-vis their opponent, because G. H.CJSC was able to submit a valuation report in support of its arguments concerning the amount of compensation, while the first applicant's motion requesting a commodity expert opinion was arbitrarily rejected by the Civil Court of Appeal. The applicants relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which, in so far as relevant, provides:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
79. The Court notes that the applicants did not submit any evidence in support of this complaint, such as copies of the alleged motion or of the Court of Appeal's alleged rejection of that motion. The Court observes that the case file as it stands contains no evidence to suggest that the trial was conducted in violation of the guarantees of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
80. The Court concludes that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
81. The applicants complained that the deprivation of their possessions amounted also to a violation of Article 8 of the Convention which provides:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
82. Having regard to the conclusion reached on the applicants' complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraphs 76 and 77 above), the Court does not need to examine their complaint under Article 8 of the Convention, for which reason it must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
83. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
84. The first applicant claimed a total amount of 150,150 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage. This amount was comprised of the market value of the flat amounting to EUR 133,467 and the loss of income amounting to EUR 16,683.
85. As regards the calculation of these amounts, the applicants alleged that they were unable to obtain any information from public authorities necessary for the effective presentation of their claims, because of public officials having economic interests in the construction projects and therefore blocking any access to the relevant official information. Nor was it possible to order an independent valuation of the expropriated property, since the valuation companies, being licensed by the authorities, feared reprisals, including a possible withdrawal of a licence, and refused to provide information.
86. In view of the above, according to the first applicant, the market value of the expropriated flat was to be calculated using the method of capitalisation of income and would therefore amount to AMD 62,400,000, which, according to the applicable exchange rate, was equivalent to EUR 133,467.
87. The first applicant further submitted she could have rented out her flat since May 2005, had it not been expropriated, for AMD 10,000 per square metre. Thus, her loss of income from that date until the submission of the claim for just satisfaction, namely November 2005, amounted to AMD 7,800,000 which, according to the applicable exchange rate, was equivalent to EUR 16,683.
88. The second applicant argued that the amount of compensation payable to her was to be calculated pursuant to the formula prescribed by the amended Article 225 of the Civil Code (see paragraph 40 above). Based on such a calculation, she claimed EUR 6,930 in respect of pecuniary damage, the Armenian equivalent of that sum, according to the applicable exchange rate, amounting to AMD 3,240,000.
89. The applicants also claimed EUR 25,000 for non-pecuniary damage and EUR 1,700 for costs and expenses.
90. The Government did not comment on these claims.
91. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the further procedure fixed with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Government and the applicants.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decides to join to the merits the Government's objection concerning the second applicant's victim status and to dismiss it;
2. Declares the complaint concerning the deprivation of the applicants' possessions admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
4. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within the three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 23 June 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stanley Naismith Josep Casadevall
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Obiezione preliminare congiunta ai meriti e respinta ( vittima); il Resto inammissibile; Violazione di P1-1; soddisfazione Equa riservata
TERZA SEZIONE
CAUSA MINASYAN E SEMERJYAN C. ARMENIA
(Richiesta n. 27651/05)
SENTENZA
(i meriti)
STRASBOURG
23 giugno 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Minasyan e Semerjyan c. Armenia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (terza Sezione), riunendosi che come una Camera, compose da:
Josep Casadevall, Presidente, Elisabet Fura-Sandström, Boštjan M. Zupančič, Alvina Gyulumyan, Ineta Ziemele, Luis López Guerra, l'Ann Power, giudici,
e Stanley Naismith, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 2 giugno 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 27651/05) contro la Repubblica dell'Armenia depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini Armeni, il Sig.ra N. M. (“il primo richiedente”) ed la Sig.ra Y, S, (“il secondo richiedente”), il 1 luglio 2005.
2. Il primo ed il secondo richiedente (congiuntamente, “i richiedenti”) sono stati rappresentati dalla Sig.ra L. G., un avvocato che pratica a Yerevan. Il Governo Armeno (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. G. Kostanyan, Rappresentante della Repubblica dell'Armenia alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. Il 2 luglio 2007 il Presidente della terza Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il primo ed il secondo richiedente che sono madre e figlia nacquero rispettivamente nel 1960 e nel 1990 e vivono a Los Angeles, Stati Uniti.
5. Il primo richiedente era il proprietario di un appartamento di 26 metri quadrati in un condominio situato al 9 di Byuzand Street, Yerevan. L'appartamento fu acquisito dal primo richiedente il 30 maggio 1995. L'edificio in oggetto era situato su un'area di terreno posseduta dallo Stato.
6. I richiedenti addussero che il secondo richiedente godeva di un diritto di uso riguardo all'appartamento sopra come membro della famiglia del primo richiedente che risiedeva in questo.
7. Il Governo contestò questa dichiarazione ed affermò che il secondo richiedente non godeva del diritto di uso riguardo all'appartamento del primo richiedente e semplicemente aveva diritto a vivere in questo.
8. Il 5 ottobre 2001 il Governo adottò il Decreto n. 950, che approvava la procedura per prendere aree di terreno e patrimoni immobiliari, situati all'interno di zone di espropriazione di Yerevan e per preparare le offerte di prezzo attinenti. Al Sindaco di Yerevan fu affidata la sua attuazione. Secondo questo Decreto, l'importo del risarcimento sarebbe determinato sulla base del valore di mercato del patrimonio immobiliare che sarebbe determinato da un'organizzazione di valutazione autorizzata o da organizzazioni selezionate tramite un processo a pagamento. Incentivi finanziari sono stati previsti per quei proprietari che, entro dieci giorni dal ricevimento dell'offerta del prezzo, avranno dato il loro beneplacito a concedere la loro proprietà. Alle persone che sono state registrate all'interno delle zone di espropriazione ed i loro figli minorenni si sarebbero dovute assegnare 2,000,000 dracme Armene (AMD) come sostegno.
9. Il 1 agosto 2002 il Governo adottò il Decreto n. 1151-N, che approvava le zone di espropriazione del patrimonio immobiliare (aree di terrenni, edifici e costruzioni) situate all'interno dei confini amministrativi del Distretto Centrale di Yerevan da prendere per necessità dello Stato al fine di eseguire progetti di costruzione, che ricoprivano un'area totale di 345,000 metri quadrati. La via Byuzand fu elencata come una delle strade che rientravano all'interno di simili zone di espropriazione.
10. Il 4 marzo 2004 il Governo adottò il Decreto n. 399-N, che autorizzava il Sindaco di Yerevan, al fine di facilitare i lavori di costruzione nelle zone di espropriazione da includere nelle offerte di risarcimento nei specifici casi in cui la concessione di permessi di costruzione senza un processo a pagamento tramite negoziazioni dirette.
11. Il 17 giugno 2004 il Governo adottò il Decreto n. 909-N, che autorizzava il Sindaco di Yerevan ad accordare tale permesso di costruzione per una delle sezioni di via Byuzand- che avrebbe cambiato il nome in Viale Principale- ad una società privata, G. H. CJSC.
12. Il 28 luglio 2004 G. H. CJSC e l'Ufficio del Sindaco di Yerevan firmarono un accordo che, inter alia, autorizzava il primo a negoziare direttamente coi proprietari della proprietà soggetta all'espropriazione e, se simili negoziazioni fossero andate a vuoto, ad avviare atti a favore dello Stato, chiedendo l’espropriazione forzata di simile proprietà.
13. Il 23 dicembre 2004 G. H. CJSC informò il primo richiedente che il suo appartamento era situato nelle zone di espropriazione approvate dal Decreto Governativo n. 1151-N. Un'organizzazione autorizzata indipendente, O. Ltd aveva eseguito una valutazione della sua proprietà, in conformità con la procedura prescritta dal Decreto Governativo n. 950. Secondo il rapporto di valutazione preparato da O. Ltd, la somma del risarcimento da pagarle era l’equivalente in dracme Armene di 7,000 dollari Stati Uniti (USD). Una somma supplementare equivalente ad USD 6,720 sarebbe stata pagata a lei come incentivo finanziario, se lei fosse stata d'accordo a firmare un accordo e cedere la proprietà entro i successivi cinque giorni. La somma del risarcimento e l'incentivo finanziario da pagare al secondo richiedente, facendo seguito al Decreto Governativo n. 950, corrispondeva rispettivamente all'equivalente di USD 2,000 ed USD 1,500.
14. Sembra che i richiedenti non accettarono questa offerta.
15. In una data non specificata, G. H. CJSC avviò atti contro i richiedenti a favore dello Stato. Facendo riferimento, inter alia, al Decreto Statale n. 1151-N, il querelante dibatté che il progetto di costruzione del Viale Principale che si supponeva dovesse sostituire via Byuzand era impossibile senza la demolizione dell'edificio in cui l'appartamento in oggetto era situato e richiese di concludere i diritti dei richiedenti tramite il pagamento del risarcimento e di sfrattarli. In appoggio alla sua rivendicazione, il querelante presentò il rapporto di valutazione preparato da O. Ltd.
16. Il 3 febbraio 2005 la Corte distrettuale di Kentron e di Nork-Marash di Yerevan (Երևան քաղաքի Կենտրոն և Նորք-Մարաշ համայնքների առաջին ատյանի դատարան) ammise la rivendicazione di G. H. CJSC. La Corte distrettuale trovò che era stato deciso dalle autorità di prendere l'area attinente di terreno per necessità di Stato il che era impossibile senza terminare i diritti dei richiedenti riguardo al patrimonio immobiliare situato su quel terreno. Decise di concludere i diritti del primo e del secondo richiedente ed assegnare loro rispettivamente l’ equivalente in dracme Armene di USD 7,000 ed USD 2,000 come risarcimento. La corte basò le sue sentenze sugli Articoli 218, 225 § 2 e 283 del Codice civile, mentre l'importo del risarcimento assegnato al primo richiedente fu determinato sulla base del rapporto di valutazione preparata da O. Ltd.
17. In una data non specificata, i richiedenti depositarono un ricorso.
18. Il primo richiedente addusse che, nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte d'appello Civile, lei registrò un'istanza richiedendo al tribunale di ordinare l’opinione di un esperto di prodotti base competente per contestare la valutazione eseguita da O. Ltd. Questa istanza fu respinta presumibilmente dalla Corte d'appello.
19. Il 18 aprile 2005 la Corte d'appello Civile (ՀՀ քաղաքացիական գործերով վերաքննիչ դատարան) sostenne la sentenza della Corte distrettuale.
20. Il 29 aprile 2005 i richiedenti depositarono un ricorso su questioni di diritto. Nel loro ricorso dibatterono, inter alia che la proprietà a riguardo dell'appartamento era stata terminata illegalmente con un decreto Statale e non un statuto, come richiesto dal diritto nazionale.
21. Il 27 maggio 2005 la Corte di Cassazione (Õ€Õ€ Õ¾Õ³Õ¼Õ¡Õ¢Õ¥Õ¯ Õ¤Õ¡Õ¿Õ¡Ö€Õ¡Õ¶) respinse il ricorso dei richiedenti, riferendosi alle sentenze delle corti inferiori.
22. In una data non specificata l'appartamento in oggetto fu demolito.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Le disposizioni nazionali in relazione alla questione della legalità dell'interferenza
1. La Costituzione dell'Armenia (adottata il 5 luglio 1995 tramite referendum)
23. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione, come in vigore al tempo attinente, si leggono come segue:
Articolo 5
“... Autorità pubbliche ed ufficiali pubblici sono competenti per compiere solamente simili azioni autorizzate dalla legge.”
Articolo 6
“L’Armenia è un Stato basato sulla supremazia del diritto.
La Costituzione [dell'Armenia] ha un vigore legale e supremo e le sue disposizioni sono direttamente applicabili.
Leggi che vengono trovate come incompatibili con la Costituzione, così come gli altri atti legali che vengono trovati incompatibili con la Costituzione e le leggi, non hanno vigore legale. ...”
Articolo 28
“Ognuno ha diritto alla proprietà ed il diritto a tramandare . ... [Una persona] può essere privata della [sua] proprietà solamente da una corte in casi prescritti dalla legge.
La proprietà può essere espropriata solamente per le necessità della società e dello Stato in casi eccezionali di supremo interesse pubblico, sulla base di una legge e con previo risarcimento equivalente .”
Articolo 100
“La Corte Costituzionale, in conformità con una procedura prescritta dalla legge: (1) decide la conformità delle leggi, le decisioni dell’Assemblea Nazionale, degli editti e delle direttive del Presidente [dell'Armenia] ed i decreti del Governo con la Costituzione;...”
2. La Legge sugli Atti Legali (in vigore dal 31 maggio 2002)
24. La Legge sugli Atti Legali prevede i tipi e la gerarchia degli atti legali in Armenia. Le disposizioni di legge attinenti, come in vigore al tempo attinente, prevedono ciò che segue.
25. La Sezione 4 elenca gli atti legali adottati in Armenia che includono, inter alia, la Costituzione Armena, le leggi Armene ed i decreti del Governo.
26. La Sezione 8 prevede che la Costituzione stabilisca i principi di regolamentazione legale sul territorio dell'Armenia e sia il fondamento legale della legislazione Armena. Abbia vigore legale e supremo e le sue disposizioni siano direttamente applicabili. Le leggi e gli altri atti legali vengono adottati sulla base della Costituzione o al fine della sua attuazione ed non devono contraddirla.
27. La Sezione 9 prevede che leggi regolano le più importanti, inerenti e stabili relazioni sociali e vengono decretate in ottemperanza con la Costituzione tramite un referendum o tramite l’Assemblea Nazionale. Non devono contraddire la Costituzione, le leggi attive e le decisioni della Corte Costituzionale.
28. La Sezione 14 prevede che il Governo adotti i decreti all'interno della sfera dei poteri assegnati legalmente in esso con la Costituzione e le leggi. I decreti del Governo non devono contraddire la Costituzione, le leggi e le decisioni della Corte Costituzionale. Loro dovevano regolare qualsiasi relazione non regolata dalle leggi, a meno che quelle relazioni, facendo seguito alla Costituzione e le leggi o gli editti e che indica la direzione del Presidente dell'Armenia, devono essere regolate da altri atti legali.
3. L’Atto della Corte Costituzionale (in vigore dall’ 8 dicembre 1995 al 1 luglio 2006)
29. La Sezione 64 dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale prevede che le decisioni della Corte Costituzionale sono definitive e non soggette a ricorso. Loro entrano in vigore dal momento della loro consegna ed hanno un effetto vincolante sul territorio dell'Armenia.
4. Il Codice civile (in vigore dal 1 gennaio 1999) e il Codice della Terra (in vigore dal 15 giugno 2001)
30. Gli Articoli 218-221 del Codice civile e gli Articoli 104 e 108 del Codice della Terra, come in vigore al tempo attinente, definiscono le condizioni per prendere delle aree di terreno per necessità di società e lo Stato.
31. L’Articolo 283 del Codice civile prevede che, se fosse impossibile prendere un'area di terreno per le necessità della società e dello Stato senza terminare la proprietà a riguardo degli edifici, delle costruzioni e di altri patrimoni immobiliari situati su questi, lo Stato potrebbe prendere simile proprietà dal proprietario compensando il suo valore.
5. L’Atto del Patrimonio immobiliare (in vigore dal25 gennaio 1996 al 1 gennaio 1999 )
32. Le disposizioni dell’Atto del Patrimonio immobiliare, la cui conformità con la Costituzione fu esaminata dalla Corte Costituzionale il 27 febbraio 1998 (vedere paragrafo 33 sotto), prevede:
Sezione 22: L'espropriazione di patrimonio immobiliare per le necessità di società e lo Stato
“... [2.] l'importo equivalente del risarcimento per l'espropriazione del patrimonio immobiliare per le necessità della società e dello Stato è determinato da un decreto del Governo [dell'Armenia] sulla base dei risultati della negoziazione fra il Governo [dell'Armenia] ed il proprietario della proprietà oggetto dell'espropriazione e su beneplacito scritto[del proprietario].
[3.] se il proprietario della proprietà non è d'accordo con l'espropriazione della proprietà da parte del Governo [dell'Armenia] o l'importo del risarcimento, allora il patrimonio immobiliare può essere espropriato dal Governo [dell'Armenia] solamente tramite atti.
[4.] il proprietario del patrimonio immobiliare oggetto dell'espropriazione per le necessità della società e dello Stato deve astenersi dal provocare danno al patrimonio immobiliare prima dell'entrata in vigore della decisione del tribunale.
[5.] la procedura per l'espropriazione del patrimonio immobiliare per le necessità della società e dello Stato è stabilita dal Governo [dell'Armenia], facendo seguito alle disposizioni di questa Sezione. ...
6. La Decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 27 febbraio 1998 sulla Conformità dei Paragrafi Due, Tre, Quattro e Cinque della Sezione 22 del’Atto sul Patrimonio immobiliare adottato dall’Assemblea Nazionale il 27 dicembre 1995 con gli Articoli 8 e 28 della Costituzione (ՀՀ սահմանադրական դատարանի 1998 թ. փետրվարի 27-ի որոշումը Ազգային ժողովի կողմից 1995 թ. դեկտեմբերի 27-ին ընդունված «Անշարժ գույքի մասին» ՀՀ օրենքի 22 հոդվածի երկրորդ, երրորդ, չորրորդ և հինգերորդ մասերի` ՀՀ սահմանադրության 8 հոդվածին և 28 հոդվածի երկրորդ մասին համապատասխանության հարցը որոշելու վերաբերյալ գործով)
33. Decidendo sulla conformità dei paragrafi 2, 3 4 e 5 della Sezione 22 dell’Atto sul Patrimonio immobiliare con, inter alia, l’Articolo 28 della Costituzione la Corte Costituzionale offrì la seguente interpretazione di quella disposizione. Poiché delle frasi “per le necessità della società e dello Stato” e “solamente in cause eccezionali” sono concetti che richiedono la valutazione ed riguardano un diritto costituzionale fondamentale, la Costituzione stabilisce che l'espropriazione di proprietà su simili motivi potrebbe essere eseguita solamente sulla base di una legge, mentre crea con ciò le salvaguardie legislative necessarie. La frase “sulla base di una legge” non implica un atto legale e normativo che regola la procedura di espropriazione in generale, ma una legge in seguito della la proprietà in oggetto deve essere espropriata. Così, la proprietà di una persona potrebbe essere espropriata e –in assenza del suo beneplacito-la sua proprietà potrebbe essere terminata solamente dallo Stato tramite l'adozione di una legge a riguardo del patrimonio immobiliare concreto che proverebbe l'importanza eccezionale e il significato dell'espropriazione e che indicherebbe le necessità della società e dello Stato da soddisfare s con l'espropriazione. La legge obbligherebbe anche il Governo a fissare l'importo del risarcimento, prendendo in conto fissa il prezzo di mercato, sulla base di una valutazione finanziario – economica, i risultati della negoziazione fra il Governo ed il proprietario della proprietà soggetta all'espropriazione, e sul beneplacito scritto del proprietario. Al Governo non è concesso di stabilire una procedura per l'espropriazione di proprietà per le necessità della società e dello Stato che l'autorizzerebbe ad espropriare il patrimonio immobiliare.
7. Decreto statale n. 1151-N del 1 agosto 2002 Riguardo all'Attuazione di Progetti di Costruzione All'interno dei Confini Amministrativi del Distretto di Kentron di Yerevan (ՀՀ կառավարության 2002 թ. օգոստոսի 1-ի թիվ 1151-Ն որոշումը Երևանի Կենտրոն թաղային համայնքի վարչական սահմանում կառուցապատման ծրագրերի իրականացման միջոցառումների մասին)
34. Al fine dell’ attuazione di progetti di costruzione in Yerevan, il Governo decise di approvare le zone di espropriazione del patrimonio immobiliare (aree di terreno, edifici e costruzioni) situate all'interno dei confini amministrativi del Distretto Centrale di Yerevan da prendere per le necessità dello Stato, con un'area totale di 345,000 metri quadrati. Via Byuzand fu elencata nell’Annesso 2 a questo Decreto come rientrante all'interno di questi zone di espropriazione.
35. Al Sindaco di Yerevan furono date istruzioni per determinare i confini delle aree di terreni da prendere per le necessità dello Stato e per registrarle presso la Cancelleria dei Beni immobili. I proprietari e gli utenti del patrimonio immobiliare situato all'interno delle zone di espropriazione sarebbero informati sul termine massimo, sulle fonti di finanziare e la procedura per prendere il loro patrimonio immobiliare. Si doveva organizzare la valutazione del patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto e doveva essere eseguita dalle organizzazioni autorizzate attinenti.
B. Le disposizioni nazionali in riferimento al diritto di uso dell’alloggio
1. Il Codice sull’Alloggio (in vigore dal1 luglio 1983 a 26 novembre 2005)
36. L’Articolo 54 prevede che membri della famiglia dell'inquilino includano il suo consorte, i loro figli ed i loro genitori. Le altre persone potrebbero essere riconosciute come membri di famiglia dell'inquilino, nel caso vivessero con lui o con lei e mandassero avanti una famiglia comune.
37. L’ Articolo 120 prevede che i membri della famiglia del proprietario di un alloggio in cui il proprietario ha alloggiato il suo alloggio, ha il diritto, ugualmente con lui o con lei di usare l’alloggio, se nessuna riserva è stato fatta al tempo in cui i membri della famiglia furono alloggiati. Le persone menzionate nella prima frase dell’ Articolo 54 di questo Codice sono considerate come membri della famiglia del proprietario. Queste persone devono anche continuare a godere del diritto di uso dell’alloggio in caso di disgregazione dei legami di famiglia col proprietario.
2. Il Codice civile (in vigore dal 1 gennaio 1999)
38. L’Articolo 135 che concerne la registrazione Statale dei diritti di proprietà, prevede che il diritto di proprietà e gli altri diritti di proprietà riguardo al patrimonio immobiliare, incluso il diritto di uso sono soggetti a registrazione Statale.
39. Il Capitolo 14 del Codice civile intitolato “Proprietà dell’Alloggio e gli Altri Diritti di Proprietà” contiene le specifiche disposizioni riferite al diritto di uso dell’alloggio che, al tempo di attinente, si legge come segue:
Articolo 225: Il diritto di uso dell’alloggio
“1. I membri della famiglia del proprietario dell’alloggio e le altre persone hanno il diritto di uso dell’alloggio, se questo diritto è stato registrato in conformità con la procedura prescritta dalla Legge sulla Registrazione Statale dei Diritti Riguardo alla Proprietà.
2. La derivazione, l’attuazione e la conclusione del diritto di uso dell’alloggio sono convenuti con un accordo scritto ed autenticato concluso col proprietario.
Se nessun accordo è giunto riguardo alla conclusione del diritto di uso dell’alloggio questo diritto può essere terminato su richiesta del proprietario da un tribunale tramite pagamento del risarcimento equivalente al valore di mercato.
3. Il diritto di uso dell’alloggio non può essere un oggetto di vendita o acquisto, ipoteca e contratto d'affitto.
4. La persona che gode il diritto di uso dell’alloggio può richiedere da chiunque, incluso il proprietario di compensare le violazioni del suo diritto riguardo all’alloggio.
5. Il diritto di uso dell’alloggio non termina in caso di trapasso di proprietà riguardo ad un alloggio o un appartamento ad un'altra persona, eccetto quando la persona che gode il diritto di uso dell’alloggio ha intrapreso l’obbligo legalizzato di abbandonare quel diritto prima del passaggio di proprietà.”
40. L'Articolo 225 sopra fu corretto in seguito alle circostanze della presente causa, vale a dire il 4 ottobre 2005, ed il suo quarto paragrafo si legge come segue:
“4. L'importo del risarcimento per un periodo di un mese è determinato sulla base dell'importo di affitto pagabile per il determinato alloggio al momento della conclusione del diritto [di uso] ed è calcolato nel seguente modo: per ogni persona il cui diritto di alloggio è registrato, l'area [viene calcolata] tramite divisione dell'area calpestabile per il numero totale di persone che godono il diritto di uso gratuito dell’alloggio ed i proprietari, ma [non dovrebbe essere] meno di cinque o più di nove metri quadrati.
Il risarcimento viene calcolato per un periodo di tre anni e viene subito pagato, a meno che concordato altrimenti tra le parti.”
3. La Legge sulla Registrazione Statale dei Diritti Riguardo alla Proprietà (in vigore dal 6 maggio 1999)
41. La Sezione 41 della Legge sulla Registrazione Statale di Diritti Riguardo alla Proprietà prevede che diritti dei consorti, dei figli e delle altre persone a carico riguardo alla proprietà che è conferita a loro per legge sono effettivi anche se non sono stati registrati separatamente.
4. L’Atto sui Diritti dei Figli (in vigore dal 27 giugno 1996)
42. La Sezione 16 dell’Atto sui dei Figli prevede che un figlio membro della famiglia dell'inquilino o proprietario dell’alloggio, nonostante la sua residenza, ha diritto a vivere nell’allloggio occupato da quell’ inquilino o proprietario.
5. Il Codice della Famiglia (in vigore da 19 aprile 2005)
43. L’Articolo 47 del Codice della Famiglia prevede, inter alia, che un figlio non ha proprietà a riguardo della proprietà dei suoi genitori, mentre i genitori non hanno proprietà a riguardo della proprietà del figlio. Figli e genitori che vivono insieme possono disporre ed usare la proprietà gli degli altri di comune accordo.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
44. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la privazione delle loro proprietà era una violazione delle garanzie dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
45. Il Governo presentò che il secondo richiedente non poteva chiedere di essere una vittima della violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 perché lei non aveva alcuna “ proprietà” all'interno del significato di quella disposizione.
46. La Corte considera che l'obiezione del Governo riguardo allo status di vittima del secondo richiedente è collegata da vicino alla sostanza della sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, e dovrebbe essere congiunta ai meriti.
47. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non sono manifestamente mal fondate all'interno del significato di Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che loro non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo. Devono essere perciò dichiarati ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Se il secondo richiedente aveva una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
(a) le osservazioni delle parti
48. Il secondo richiedente presentò di godere del diritto di uso dell’alloggio riguardo all'appartamento posseduto dal primo richiedente. C'era una giurisprudenza ben stabilita delle corti d’appello e di cassazione in Armenia che, facendo seguito agli Articoli 54 e 120 del Codice dell’alloggio, ha riconosciuto il diritto di uso dell’alloggio basato su tre fattori: (1) essere un membro della famiglia del proprietario dell’alloggio, (2) vivere in quell’alloggio , e (3) mandare avanti una famiglia insieme al proprietario. Tutti questi tre fattori che non si dovevano applicare cumulativamente erano presenti nel su caso. Inoltre, il suo godimento di questo diritto non è stato contestato nel corso dei procedimenti nazionali.
49. Ammettendo che il suo diritto di uso dell’alloggio non fu registrato presso la Cancelleria dei Beni immobili, il secondo richiedente presentò che questo diritto era anche valido senza registrazione Statale poiché, facendo seguito alla Sezione 41 della Legge sulla Registrazione Statale dei Diritti Riguardanti Proprietà, i diritti dei consorti, dei figli e delle altre persone a carico a riguardo della proprietà che fu conferita a loro per legge erano effettivi senza simile registrazione. In qualsiasi caso, lei non era in grado di registrare questo diritto, anche se avesse voluto, perché il Decreto Statale n. 1151-N aveva messo delle limitazioni sull'appartamento in oggetto che preclusero che qualsiasi operazione venisse registrata presso la Cancelleria dei Beni immobili.
50. Il secondo richiedente presentò inoltre che è stato esplicitamente affermato nel progetto di accordo sulla presa della proprietà presentata dal querelante ai tribunali nazionali che “L’attuatore assegna un incentivo finanziario alla persona registrata per terminare i suoi diritti e sgombrare il patrimonio immobiliare.” Così, le autorità hanno riconosciuto l'esistenza di un diritto prezioso che loro cercarono di terminare firmando l'accordo sopra. Inoltre, il diritto dell’ uso dell’alloggio fu considerato un diritto di proprietà sotto la legge Armena. Era un diritto autonomo che esisteva indipendentemente dal diritto di proprietà e che avrebbe potuto essere terminato solamente tramite il pagamento del risarcimento adeguato. Costituiva perciò un bene che dovrebbe essere considerato una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
51. Il Governo presentò che il secondo richiedente non godeva di alcun diritto di proprietà a riguardo dell'appartamento posseduto dal primo richiedente, incluso il diritto di uso dell’alloggio. Il diritto di quest’ultimo, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 225 del Codice civile, potrebbe sorgere solamente dal momento della registrazione Statale. Non c'era comunque, nessuna prova che dimostrasse che il secondo richiedente aveva fatto registrare tale diritto presso la Cancelleria dei Beni immobili. Così, il solo diritto goduto dal secondo richiedente era il diritto a vivere nell'appartamento in oggetto, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 47 del Codice della Famiglia e la Sezione 16 dell’ Atto sui Diritti dei Figli. Comunque, questo diritto non poteva essere considerato come “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) la valutazione della Corte
52. La Corte nota all'inizio che il disaccordo principale fra le parti concerne la questione se il secondo richiedente godeva del diritto di uso dell’alloggio a riguardo dell'appartamento posseduto dal primo richiedente. In appoggio ai loro argomenti le parti hanno fatto riferimento alle varie disposizioni legali nazionali.
53. A questo riguardo, la Corte osserva, che i tribunali nazionali, decidendo di terminare i diritti dei richiedenti riguardo al'appartamento in oggetto, hanno fatto riferimento inter alia, al secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 225 del Codice civile che definisce le condizioni per la conclusione del diritto di uso dell’alloggio. Così, il godimento da parte del secondo richiedente del diritto di uso dell’alloggio fu implicitamente riconosciuto dai tribunali nazionali che decisero di assegnare il suo risarcimento per la conclusione di quel diritto. Ne segue che le asserzioni del Governo al contrario non hanno base nelle sentenze dei tribunali nazionali e devono essere respinte.
54. Mentre non è in controversia fra le parti se il diritto di uso dell’alloggio costituisca una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte, ciononostante considera necessario rivolgersi a questa questione di sua propria iniziativa.
55. La Corte reitera che il concetto di “ proprietà” nella prima parte dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato alla proprietà di beni di materiale e è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale. Allo stesso modo dei beni materiale, anche certi altri diritti ed interessi che costituiscono dei beni possono essere considerati come “diritti di proprietà” e così come “ proprietà” ai fini di questa disposizione. In ogni caso il problema che ha bisogno di essere esaminato è se le circostanze della causa, considerate nell'insieme, hanno conferito al titolo del richiedente un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 1999-II; Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 100 ECHR 2000-io; e Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 129 il 2004-V di ECHR).
56. La Corte osserva che sotto la legge Armena il diritto di uso di proprietà è un diritto distinto elencato fra gli altri diritti di proprietà (vedere le disposizioni nazionali citate nei paragrafi 38 e 39 sopra). Al tempo attinente, una persona che ha il diritto di uso dell’alloggio continua a godere di quel diritto anche in caso di trasferimento di proprietà a riguardo dell’alloggio in oggetto (Articolo 225 § 5 del Codice civile). Inoltre, quel diritto potrebbe essere terminato solamente tramite pagamento di un risarcimento adeguato (Articolo 225 § 2 del Codice civile). La Corte considera perciò che il diritto di uso dell’alloggio goduto dal secondo richiedente riguardo all'appartamento posseduto dal primo richiedente era un diritto di proprietà distinto che comportava un interesse materiale e perciò costituiva una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Il fatto che al secondo richiedente fu pagata solamente una somma di denaro come risultato dei procedimenti di espropriazione riafferma la precedente costatazione della Corte. Essendo giunta a questa conclusione, la Corte considera che l'obiezione del Governo riguardo allo status di vittima del richiedente deve essere respinta.
2. Se c'era un'interferenza con le proprietà dei richiedenti
57. Non era in controversia fra le parti che c'era stata un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo del primo richiedente delle sue proprietà.
58. Come riguardi il secondo richiedente, il Governo presentò che, poiché il diritto solo godè con lei era il diritto per vivere nell'appartamento in oggetto, non c'era interferenza coi suoi diritti garantiti con Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
59. Già avendo stabilito che il secondo richiedente aveva “le proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (veda paragrafo 56 sopra), la Corte considera che la conclusione della proprietà del primo richiedente ed il diritto del secondo richiedente di uso in riguardo dell'appartamento in oggetto per il fine di perfezionare indubbiamente progetti di costruzione nel centre di Yerevan corrisposto ad un'interferenza col godimento tranquillo dei richiedenti delle loro proprietà.
3. Se l'interferenza con la proprietà dei richiedenti era giustificata
(a) L'articolo applicabile
60. L’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del pacifico godimento della proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo riguarda la privazione di proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che agli Stati Contraenti viene concesso, inter alia, di controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono distinti nel senso di essere distaccati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano dei particolari casi di interferenza col diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo (vedere, come recente autorità, Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 134 il 2004-V di ECHR).
61. La Corte considera che la conclusione della proprietà del primo richiedente ed il diritto del secondo richiedente di uso ha corrisposto ad una privazione delle loro proprietà. Di conseguenza, è la seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che è applicabile nella presente causa.
(b) Ottemperanza con le condizioni poste nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo
(i) osservazioni delle parti
62. I richiedenti presentarono che la privazione della proprietà del primo richiedente non attuata sotto “le condizioni previste dalla legge”, vale a dire l’Articolo 28 della Costituzione come in vigore al tempo attinente. Questo provvedimento prevede che la proprietà potrebbe essere espropriata “per necessità della società e dello Stato in casi eccezionali di supremo interesse pubblico, sulla base di una legge e con previo risarcimento equivalente.” Interpretando questo provvedimento nella sua decisione del 27 febbraio 1998 la Corte Costituzionale ha affermato che una persona potrebbe essere privata della sua proprietà solamente tramite l'adozione di una legge riguardo ad un patrimonio immobiliare concreto che proverebbe l'importanza eccezionale dell'espropriazione e che indicherebbe le necessità della società e dello Stato da soddisfare con l'espropriazione. La Corte Costituzionale affermò inoltre che al Governo non era concesso stabilire una procedura per l'espropriazione della proprietà per le necessità della società e dello Stato.
63. Comunque, nessuna legge fu adottata in collegamento con l'espropriazione della proprietà del primo richiedente e l'elaborazione dell’intera espropriazione fu basata su un numero di decreti Statali. Nemmeno lo furono le altre condizioni dell'Articolo 28 sopra incontrate. In particolare, nessuna necessità della società o dello Stato furono menzionate nel Decreto Governativo n. 1151-N o nelle disposizioni attinenti del Codice civile e del Codice della Terra. Inoltre, al primo richiedente non fu offerto un “previo risarcimento equivalente”, mentre l'importo del risarcimento proposto al secondo richiedente fu determinato in modo arbitrario. Infine, la privazione della proprietà del primo richiedente era in violazione dell’allora Articolo 5 della Costituzione, poiché il Governo superò la sua autorità stabilendo illegalmente l'espropriazione e le procedure di valutazione, ed accordandosi dei poteri ampi per espropriare la proprietà.
64. I richiedenti presentarono inoltre che neanche la privazione della proprietà del secondo richiedente fu attuata sotto “le condizioni previste dalla legge”, vale a dire l’Articolo 225 del Codice civile. Secondo questa disposizione, solamente il proprietario di una proprietà potrebbe chiedere la conclusione del diritto di uso goduto da un'altra persona riguardo a quella proprietà. Nella presente causa, comunque era il Governo che aveva iniziato i procedimenti che cercavano di terminare il diritto di uso del secondo richiedente e non c'era perciò nessuna base legale per ammettere questo ricorso.
65. Il Governo presentò che l’Articolo 28 della Costituzione non era applicabile alla causa del primo richiedente. Questa disposizione si applicava solamente a proprietà che erano soggette all'espropriazione per le necessità della società e dello Stato. Secondo gli Articoli 218-221 e 283 del Codice civile e gli Articoli 104 e 108 del Codice della Terra, solamente le aree di terreni rientravano nella categoria di proprietà soggetta all'espropriazione per le necessità della società e dello Stato, ma non il patrimonio immobiliare situato su quella terra. La conclusione della proprietà di persone private riguardo ad alloggi o ad altre costruzioni era perciò il risultato della presa Statale della terra che apparteneva a questo. Nella presente causa, il primo richiedente non possedeva terra ma solamente un appartamento nell'edificio situato su un'area di terreno che doveva essere presa per le necessità della società e dello Stato. Così, il suo appartamento non poteva essere considerato come oggetto dell'espropriazione per quelle necessità ed il risarcimento pagato a lei doveva essere visto come danno assegnato come risultato dell'espropriazione dell'area di terreno. In somma, l’Articolo 28 della Costituzione non era applicabile alla presente causa.
(ii) valutazione di La Corte
66. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più di importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col pacifico godimento della proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione di proprietà solamente “soggetta alle condizioni previste per legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso della proprietà applicando “ leggi.” Inoltre, la supremazia del diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente in tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Ex Re di Grecia ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 79 ECHR 2000-XII). N Ne segue che il problema se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 69 Serie A n. 52) diviene attinente solamente una volta che viene stabilito che l'interferenza in oggetto ha soddisfatto il requisito della legalità e non era arbitraria (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
67. La Corte reitera inoltre che la frase “soggetto a condizioni previste dalla legge” richiede al primo posto l'esistenza e l’ ottemperanza con delle disposizioni legali nazionali adeguatamente accessibili e sufficientemente precise (vedere Lithgow ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 8 luglio 1986, § 110 Serie A n. 102).
68. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte nota che il primo ed il secondo richiedente hanno goduto e sono stati privati di due diritti distinti quello della proprietà e quello dell’ uso dell’alloggio. La Corte perciò esaminerà separatamente la questione dell’ ottemperanza con le garanzie dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo ad ogni richiedente.
(α) Il primo richiedente
69. La Corte osserva che il primo richiedente era il proprietario di un appartamento che misurava 26 metri quadrati ed era parte di un edificio situato al 9 di via Byuzand nel centro di Yerevan. Il 1 agosto 2002 il Governo dell'Armenia adottò un decreto, vale a dire il Decreto n. 1151-N, decidendo di espropriare il patrimonio immobiliare, come aree di terreni, edifici e costruzioni situati in certe aree centrali di Yerevan che furono identificate come “zone di espropriazione.” Questa proprietà sarebbe stata espropriata al fine di eseguire progetti di costruzione in Yerevan e la via Byuzand fu elencata come rientrata all'interno di una di queste zone di espropriazione.
70. La Corte osserva inoltre che, al tempo attinente, la principale disposizione legale nazionale che disciplinava l'espropriazione della proprietà per necessità pubbliche era l’Articolo 28 della Costituzione. Il Governo dibatté che questa disposizione non era applicabile alla causa del primo richiedente. Comunque, la Corte non è convinta di questo argomento. Nota che il primo richiedente fu privato della sua proprietà sulla base di una richiesta depositata con i tribunali da una società privata che agiva a favore dello Stato al fine dell’ attuazione del Decreto Statale n. 1151-N. Quindi , la sua proprietà a riguardo del suo appartamento fu terminata al solo fine di implementare la politica governativa di esecuzione progetti di costruzione nel centro di Yerevan. I tribunali nazionali affermarono esplicitamente inoltre, nelle loro sentenze, che la proprietà del primo richiedente era terminata perché la terra sulla quale era situata la sua proprietà sarebbe stata presa per delle necessità di Stato. Qui la Corte non condivide l'interpretazione del Governo secondo cui solamente la terra ma non la proprietà situata su questa dovrebbe essere considerata come oggetto dell'espropriazione. Inoltre, non è chiaro su quali motivi il Governo faccia tale asserzione dato che nella presente causa l'area di terreno in oggetto era proprietà pubblica e la sola proprietà privata che doveva essere presa dallo Stato era quella posseduta dal primo richiedente. La causa del primo richiedente chiaramente rientra così, nella categoria delle situazioni coperte dall’ Articolo 28 della Costituzione.
71. La Corte osserva che uno dei requisiti di questa disposizione costituzionale che aveva la supremazia su tutti gli altri atti legali era che qualsiasi espropriazione di proprietà per necessità pubbliche fosse effettuata “sulla base di una legge.” Interpretando questa frase nella sua decisione del 27 febbraio 1998 la Corte Costituzionale le cui decisioni avevano effetto vincolante, ha indicato in particolare, che la proprietà privata avrebbe potuto essere espropriata solamente per necessità pubbliche tramite l'adozione di una legge riguardo alla proprietà concreta. Inoltre, la parola “legge” (օրենք), come usata dalla Corte Costituzionale, non denotava non solo qualsiasi atto legale ma uno statuto adottato dal parlamento, riservando con ciò alla legislatura la questione decisionale su specifiche cause d'espropriazione per necessità pubbliche. Questa interpretazione fu applicata inoltre dalla costatazione della Corte Costituzionale per cui il Governo, che è il ramo esecutivo, non era autorizzato a decidere sull'espropriazione di proprietà privata per necessità pubbliche (vedere paragrafo 33 sopra).
72. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte osserva che nessuna legge fu mai adottata dal parlamento Armeno riguardo alla proprietà del primo richiedente, come richiesto dall’Articolo 28 della Costituzione, e l' intero processo di espropriazione, incluso la procedura per la determinazione dell'importo del risarcimento era disciplinato da un numero di decreti Statali. Ne segue che la privazione della proprietà del primo richiedente non fu attuata in ottemperanza con “le condizioni previste dalla legge.”
(β) Il secondo richiedente
73. La Corte osserva che il secondo richiedente godeva del diritto di uso riguardo all'appartamento posseduto dal primo richiedente e questo diritto fu terminato dai tribunali con riferimento al secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 225 del Codice civile.
74. La Corte reitera che il requisito della legalità vuole dire che gli articoli di diritto nazionale devono essere sufficientemente accessibili, precisi e prevedibili (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Hentrich c. Francia, 22 settembre 1994, § 42 Serie A n. 296-un; Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 109 ECHR 2000-io; e Carbonara e Ventura c. Italia, n. 24638/94, § 64 ECHR 2000-VI).
75. La Corte nota che l'Articolo 225 § 2 sopra contiene degli articoli sulla conclusione del diritto di una persona all’i uso dell’alloggio. Comunque, quegli articoli parlarono della possibilità di terminare il diritto d’ uso su richiesta del proprietario e non contiene menzione sulla questione di terminare questo diritto sulla base una richiesta depositata da qualsiasi altra persona diversa dal proprietario, che sia lo Stato o, come nella presente causa, una società privata che agisce a favore dello Stato. Così, sembra che il diritto del secondo richiedente di uso fu terminato basandosi su articoli legali che non erano applicabili alla sua causa. La Corte considera che simile conclusione del suo diritto di uso era destinata a dare luogo ad una conseguenza imprevedibile o arbitraria e ha dovuto spogliare il secondo richiedente della protezione efficace dei suoi diritti. Si può perciò solo descrivere l'interferenza con la proprietà del secondo richiedente su tale base legale come arbitraria.
(γ) Conclusione
76. La Corte conclude che la privazione delle proprietà dei richiedenti era incompatibile col principio della legalità. Questa conclusione non rende necessario accertare se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere, per esempio, Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 62 ECHR 1999-II).
77. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo di ambo i richiedenti.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
78. I richiedenti si lamentarono che loro erano stati messi in di svantaggio sostanziale vis-à-vis del loro oppositore, perché G. H. CJSC era in grado presentare un rapporto di valutazione in appoggio dei suoi argomenti riguardo all'importo del risarcimento, mentre l'istanza del primo richiedente che richiedeva un’opinione competente di un esperto di prodotti base fu respinta arbitrariamente dalla Corte d'appello Civile. I richiedenti si appellarono all’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, prevede:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
79. La Corte nota che i richiedenti non presentarono alcuna prova in appoggio a questa azione di reclamo, come copie dell'addotta istanza o dell’addotto rifiuto della Corte d'appello di quell'istanza. La Corte osserva che il file della causa così com’è non contiene nessuna prova che suggerisca che il processo fu condotto in violazione delle garanzie dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
80. La Corte conclude che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente mal fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
81. I richiedenti si lamentarono del fatto che la privazione delle loro proprietà corrispose anche ad una violazione dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione che prevede:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata e famigliare, del suo domicilio e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto se è in conformità con la legge ed è necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, la sicurezza pubblica o il benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
82. Avendo riguardo alla conclusione raggiunta sull'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafi 76 e 77 sopra), la Corte non ha bisogno di esaminare la loro azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione per la qual ragione deve essere respinto facendo seguito all’Articolo 35 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
83. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
84. Il primo richiedente ha chiesto un importo totale di 150,150 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno materiale. Questo importo era comprensivo del valore di mercato dell’appartamento corrispondente ad EUR 133,467 e la perdita di utili corrispondenti ad EUR 16,683.
85. Riguardo al calcolo di questi importi, i richiedenti addussero che loro erano incapaci di ottenere qualsiasi informazione dalle autorità pubbliche necessarie per la presentazione effettiva delle loro rivendicazioni, a causa di ufficiali pubblici che avevano interessi economici nei progetti di costruzione e bloccavano perciò qualsiasi accesso alle informazioni ufficiali attinenti. Né era possibile ordinare una valutazione indipendente della proprietà espropriata, poiché le società di valutazione, essendo autorizzate dalle autorità, temevano rappresaglie, incluso un possibile ritiro della licenza e si rifiutavano di offrire informazioni.
86. Nella prospettiva di quanto sopra, secondo il primo richiedente il valore di mercato dell'appartamento espropriato sarebbe stato calcolato usando il metodo di capitalizzazione del reddito e corrisponderebbe perciò a AMD 62,400,000 che, secondo il cambio applicabile, era equivalente ad EUR 133,467.
87. Il primo richiedente presentò inoltre che avrebbe potuto affittare il suo appartamento dal maggio 2005, se non fosse stato espropriato, a AMD 10,000 per metro quadrato. Così, la sua perdita di utili da quella data sino alla presentazione della rivendicazione per soddisfazione equa, vale a dire novembre 2005, corrispondeva ad AMD 7,800,000 che, secondo il cambio applicabile era equivalente ad EUR 16,683.
88. Il secondo richiedente dibatté che l'importo del risarcimento pagabile a lei sarebbe stato calcolato facendo seguito alla formula prescritta dall'Articolo 225 corretto del Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra). Basandosi su tale calcolo, lei chiese EUR 6,930 a riguardo del danno materiale, l' equivalente armeno di quella somma, secondo il cambio applicabile corrispondeva ad AMD 3,240,000.
89. I richiedenti chiesero anche EUR 25,000 per danno morale ed EUR 1,700 per costi e spese.
90. Il Governo non fece commenti su queste rivendicazioni.
91. La Corte considera che la questione della richiesta dell’Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione. La questione di conseguenza deve essere riservata e l'ulteriore procedimento fissato con dovuto riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo al quale potrebbero giungere il Governo ed i richiedenti.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere ai meriti l'obiezione del Governo riguardo allo status di vittima del secondo richiedente e di respingerla;
2. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo alla privazione delle proprietà dei richiedenti ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
4. Sostiene che la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ed i richiedenti a presentare, entro i tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diverrà definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedimento e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarlo all’occorrenza .
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 23 giugno 2009, facendo seguito allArticolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stanley Naismith Josep Casadevall
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.