Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF RYSEV v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 924/03/2009
STATO: Russia
DATA: 18/06/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION
CASE OF RYSEV v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 924/03)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
18 June 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Rysev v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 28 May 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 924/03) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mr N. L. R. (“the applicant”), on 15 December 2002.
2. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were initially represented by Mrs V. Milinchuk, former Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights, and subsequently by Mr G. Matyushkin, their Representative.
3. On 1 July 2008 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to rule on the admissibility and merits of the application at the same time (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant was born in 1959 and lives in St Petersburg.
5. In 1987 the applicant inherited one half of a house in Leningrad (now St Petersburg) from his mother.
A. Construction work on the plot of land and the related proceedings
1. Background
6. In 1989 the City Council decided to build new apartment buildings in the area where the applicant's house was situated. It also decided that the houses affected by the construction plan would be demolished and their inhabitants resettled.
7. Between 1992 and 1996 construction work was carried out on the land by private companies commissioned by the City Council. Different underground pipelines were installed. During the construction work the applicant and his family continued to live in their house. The applicant alleges that as a result of the construction work his garden was destroyed and that the largest part of the plot became unfit for garden purposes.
8. On 26 January 1996 the applicant acquired the title to the plot of land surrounding his house.
2. First examination of the case
9. On 22 September 1997 the applicant brought a court action against the Administration of the Primorskiy District of St Petersburg and private companies which had carried out the construction work. He requested the court to declare that the construction work carried out on the plot of land had resulted in de facto expropriation of part of his land and to award him compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage. The case was assigned to judge S.
10. In 1998 and 1999 the case was adjourned several times. In particular, between 10 June and 24 November 1998 no hearings were scheduled because the judge was busy in unrelated proceedings. Several hearings were adjourned either because the defendants and third parties failed to appear or because the applicant amended his claims.
11. In 2000 and 2001 the case was adjourned several times. In particular, between 17 February and 26 April 2000 the proceedings were suspended pending an expert study. Between 24 August 2000 and 15 March 2001 and between 21 June and 10 August 2001 the case was adjourned because the judge was on sick leave. One hearing did not take place because the defendants failed to appear.
12. On 13 August 2001 the Primorskiy District Court of St Petersburg granted the applicant's claims for compensation of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage in part and dismissed the remainder of his claims.
13. On 18 July 2002 the St Petersburg City Court (“the City Court”) held that the first-instance court had failed to properly establish important circumstances of the case and to duly assess the evidence. It quashed the judgment of 13 August 2001 in so far as it awarded the applicant compensation for non-pecuniary damage and remitted the matter to the first-instance court for a fresh examination. It upheld the remaining part of the judgment.
3. Second examination of the case
14. On 16 August 2002 the case was reassigned to judge K., who set the examination of the case down for 16 January 2003. On that date the case was adjourned until 20 March 2003, because the applicant intended to submit additional evidence to the court.
15. On 4 March 2003 the case was reassigned to judge A. and was scheduled for 22 May 2003. On that date the hearing was postponed until 29 September 2003, at the applicant's request, so that he could undergo a medical examination.
16. Between September 2003 and November 2004 the case was adjourned several times because the applicant amended his claims and the defendants had to study his new claims, the court requested additional evidence from the parties and the applicant needed time to prepare questions to experts. Between 29 April and 8 October 2004 the case was adjourned because the applicant's representative failed to appear. The applicant submitted that he did not ask for those adjournments and requested the District Court to continue the examination of the case.
17. Between 15 February 2005 and 14 March 2006 the proceedings were suspended pending another expert study which had to establish the impact of the construction work on the state of health of the applicant and his daughters.
18. Between March and September 2006 several hearings were adjourned in order to call experts and the applicant's daughter to the hearing. Some hearings were postponed to give the applicant's daughter time to prepare her claims, but also because the applicant amended his claims and the defendant needed time to study them. One hearing did not take place because the defendants did not appear.
19. On 21 September 2006 the Primorskiy District Court, after a fresh examination, dismissed the applicant's claim for compensation for non-pecuniary damage. On 7 December 2006 the City Court upheld that judgment.
B. Alleged prohibitions on the repair of the house and on the sale of the plot of land
20. According to the applicant, on several occasions he intended to repair his house. At his request the authorities replied that his house was still subject to demolition in the near future and that his family would be provided with a flat. The applicant had to abandon his plan to repair the house. The applicant also submitted that he had to decline an offer for the purchase of his house, because it was scheduled for demolition. Also, prospective buyers of his plot of land withdrew after consulting the city authorities. The applicant did not bring any court proceedings in respect of the alleged prohibitions on the repair of the house and on the sale of the plot of land.
C. Further proceedings
21. In 1999 the Governor of St Petersburg annulled the decision to resettle the inhabitants of the houses affected by the construction plan. It was by then considered unlikely that the City would need to acquire these properties in order to implement its new town plan. The applicant sued the Governor and claimed compensation for non-pecuniary damage. By a final decision of 3 July 2001 the City Court dismissed his claims.
22. The applicant also sued the City and District administrations for their failure to provide him with a flat. By a final decision of 18 October 2001 the City Court dismissed his claims.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
23. The applicant complained that the length of the proceedings which ended on 7 December 2006 had been incompatible with the “reasonable time” requirement, laid down in Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal ...”
24. The proceedings commenced in 1997, when the applicant lodged his claim with the Primorskiy District Court of St Petersburg. However, the Court will only consider the period of the proceedings which took place after 5 May 1998, when the Convention entered into force in respect of Russia. In assessing the reasonableness of the time that elapsed after that date, account must be taken of the state of the proceedings at the time. The period in question ended on 7 December 2006. Thus, the Court has competence ratione temporis to examine a period of approximately eight years and seven months. During that period the case was examined at two levels of jurisdiction.
A. Admissibility
25. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
26. The Government firstly argued that the length of proceedings in the present case was due to the particular complexity of the case. They further submitted that the applicant had also contributed to the length of the proceedings by amending his claims on several occasions, and by lodging different motions; he had requested an expert study and appealed against the first-instance court decisions. Moreover, the parties had failed to appear at several hearings. The domestic courts had conducted the proceedings properly. They had examined the case twice at two levels of jurisdiction. Some insignificant delays had occurred when the judge was on sick leave or was involved in unrelated proceedings.
27. In the applicant's view, the most significant delays in the proceedings were caused by repeated reassignment of the case to different judges and the poor quality of the first-instance court decisions.
28. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicant and the relevant authorities and what was at stake for the applicant in the dispute (see, among many other authorities, Frydlender v. France [GC], no. 30979/96, § 43, ECHR 2000-VII). In addition, only delays attributable to the State may justify a finding of a failure to comply with the “reasonable time” requirement (see Pedersen and Baadsgaard v. Denmark [GC], no. 49017/99, § 49, ECHR 2004-XI).
29. The Court agrees with the Government that the proceedings at issue were of a certain complexity as they required examination of a complex factual background, involved several parties and required experts' reports. It also notes that the applicant amended his claims on several occasions. While the Court considers that these factors rendered more difficult the task of the domestic courts, it cannot accept that the complexity of the case, taken on its own, was such as to justify the overall length of proceedings.
30. As to the applicant's conduct, the Court is not convinced by the Government's argument that the applicant should be held responsible for amending his claims, lodging motions, requesting expert opinions and lodging appeals. It has been the Court's constant approach that an applicant cannot be blamed for taking full advantage of the resources afforded by the national law in the defence of his interests (see, mutatis mutandis, Yağcı and Sargın v. Turkey, 8 June 1995, § 66, Series A no. 319-A). Furthermore, the Government claimed that the parties had failed to appear at some hearings. The Court considers that the domestic courts should have taken measures to discipline the defendants for their repeated failure to appear. In so far as the applicant is concerned, the Government did not indicate any dates on which the applicant had failed to appear. It is true that between 29 April and 8 October 2004 the case was adjourned because the applicant's representative did not appear. However, even if the applicant may be held responsible for the delay due to the failure of his counsel to appear, the Court considers that the applicant cannot be held accountable for any other substantial delays in the proceedings.
31. As regards the conduct of the judicial authorities, the Court notes the Government's argument that during the period under consideration the domestic authorities examined the case twice at two levels. The Court observes in this respect that the need for the second round of proceedings was attributable to the District Court's failure to properly establish important circumstances of the case and to duly assess the evidence. In any event, the fact that the domestic courts heard the case several times did not absolve them from complying with the reasonable time requirement of Article 6 § 1 (see Litoselitis v. Greece, no. 62771/00, § 32, 5 February 2004).
32. The Court further observes that from 10 June until 24 November 1998 no hearings were scheduled because the judge was involved in unrelated proceedings. Furthermore, between 24 August 2000 and 15 March 2001 and between 21 June and 10 August 2001 no proceedings took place because the judge was on sick leave. The accumulated delay amounted to more than a year. The Court further notes that a considerable delay occurred when the case was reassigned to judge K., who took the case over on 16 August 2002 and scheduled the case only for 16 January 2003. In this connection, the Court reiterates that it is for Contracting States to organise their legal systems in such a way that their courts can guarantee the right of everyone to obtain a final decision within a reasonable time (see, for instance, Löffler v. Austria, no. 30546/96, § 21, 3 October 2000). The manner in which a State provides for mechanisms to comply with this requirement – whether by increasing the numbers of judges, or by automatic time-limits and directions, or by some other method – is for the State to decide. If a State lets proceedings continue beyond the “reasonable time” prescribed by Article 6 of the Convention without doing anything to advance them, it will be responsible for the resultant delay (see Price and Lowe v. the United Kingdom, nos. 43185/98 and 43186/98, § 23, 29 July 2003). The Court finds that in the present case the authorities did not take due measures to speed up the proceedings and, therefore, the delays resulting from the judge's absence from the hearings and reassignment of the case to different judges are imputable to the State.
33. The Court further notes that the proceedings were suspended for more than a year pending the expert examination ordered on 15 February 2005. That expert study had to establish the impact of the construction work on the state of health of the applicant and his daughters. However, such a term of examination appears quite long. In this respect, the Court reiterates that the principle responsibility for the delay due to the expert opinions rests ultimately with the State. It was incumbent on the domestic court to ensure that the expert examination was performed without delay (see, for example, Rolgezer and Others v. Russia, no. 9941/03, § 30, 29 April 2008; Volovich v. Russia, no. 10374/02, § 30, 5 October 2006; and Capuano v. Italy, 25 June 1987, § 32, Series A no. 119). However, the Government did not provide any information to show that the first-instance court had inquired into the progress of the expert report.
34. In sum, the Court considers that the most significant delays in the proceedings are attributable to the domestic courts.
35. In the light of the criteria laid down in its case-law, and having regard to all the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that in the instant case the length of the proceedings was excessive and failed to meet the “reasonable time” requirement. There has accordingly been a breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
36. The applicant made several complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. He firstly complained that the construction work carried out on his plot of land had resulted in de facto expropriation of part of the land for which he had not received any compensation. The Court reiterates that, in accordance with the general rules of international law, the provisions of the Convention do not bind a Contracting Party in relation to any act or fact which took place or any situation which ceased to exist before the date of the entry into force of the Convention with respect to that Party (see Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 70, ECHR 2006-...). Furthermore, the Court's temporal jurisdiction is to be determined in relation to the facts constitutive of the alleged interference. The subsequent failure of remedies aimed at redressing that interference cannot bring it within the Court's temporal jurisdiction (see Blečić, cited above, § 77). In the present case the alleged interference (construction work) with the applicant's house and land took place between 1989 and 1996, i.e. before the ratification of the Convention by Russia. The proceedings by which the applicant challenged the interference and which ended on 7 December 2006, i.e. after the ratification, did not constitute a new or independent interference with the applicant's property rights, but were aimed at providing him with redress for the interference that had occurred between 1989 and 1996. It follows that this complaint is incompatible ratione temporis with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
37. The applicant further complained about the authorities' failure to resettle him in a different place. The Court observes that the applicant challenged the authorities' failure to provide him with accommodation in two separate actions and the final decisions were taken on 3 July and 18 October 2001 respectively, whereas the application was lodged on 15 December 2002. It follows that this complaint has been introduced out of time and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
38. Lastly, the applicant complained that he could not repair his house because the authorities intended to demolish it and that he could not sell his house and land either because of the authorities' refusal to authorise the prospective buyers' projects for use of the land or because of the underground pipelines installed there. The Court notes that the applicant did not lodge any complaints in that respect with the competent state authorities. It follows that this complaint must be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies pursuant to Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
39. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
40. The Court points out that under Rule 60 of the Rules of Court any claim for just satisfaction must be submitted in writing within the time-limit fixed for the submission of the applicant's observations on the merits, “failing which the Chamber may reject the claim in whole or in part”.
41. In the instant case, on 4 November 2008 the applicant was invited to submit his claims for just satisfaction. He failed to submit any such claims within the required time-limit. Therefore, the Court makes no award under Article 41 of the Convention.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint concerning the excessive length of the proceedings admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Decides to make no award under Article 41.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 18 June 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA RYSEV C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 924/03)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
18 giugno 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Rysev c. Russia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione
Avendo deliberato in privato il 28 maggio 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 924/03) contro la Federazione russa depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, il Sig. N. L. R. (“il richiedente”), il 15 dicembre 2002.
2. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato inizialmente dalla Sig.ra V. Milinchuk, Rappresentante precedente della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani e successivamente dal Sig. G. Matyushkin, il suo Rappresentante.
3. Il 1 luglio 2008 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di decidere sull'ammissibilità ed i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il richiedente nacque nel 1959 e vive a San Pietroburgo.
5. Nel 1987 il richiedente ereditò la metà di un alloggio a Leningrado (ora San Pietroburgo) da sua madre.
A. Lavoro di Costruzione sull'area di terrenno ed i procedimenti relativi
1. Background
6. Nel 1989 il Consiglio Urbano decise di costruire nuovi palazzi nell'area dove l'alloggio del richiedente era situato. Decise anche che gli alloggi colpiti dal piano di costruzione sarebbero stati demoliti ed i loro abitanti rialloggiati.
7. Fra il 1992 ed il 1996 il lavoro di costruzione fu eseguito sul terreno da società private commissionate dal Consiglio Urbano. Diverse condutture sotterranee furono installate. Durante il lavoro di costruzione il richiedente e la sua famiglia continuarono a vivere nel loro alloggio. Il richiedente adduce che come un risultato del lavoro di costruzione il suo giardino fu distrutto e che la maggior parte dell'area divenne disadatta ai fini dell’orto.
8. Il 26 gennaio 1996 il richiedente acquisì il titolo di proprietà all'area di terreno che circondava il suo alloggio.
2. Primo esame della causa
9. Il 22 settembre 1997 il richiedente iniziò un'azione legale contro l'Amministrazione del Distretto di Primorskiy di San Pietroburgo e le società private che avevano eseguito il lavoro di costruzione. Lui richiese al tribunale di dichiarare che il lavoro di costruzione eseguito sull'area di terreno aveva dato luogo all'espropriazione de facto di parte della sua terra e di assegnargli un risarcimento per danno materiale e morale. La causa fu assegnata al giudice S.
10. Nel 1998 e nel 1999 la causa fu aggiornata molte volte. In particolare, fra il 10 giugno e il 24 novembre 1998 nessuna udienza fu programmata perché il giudice era occupato in procedimenti non correlati. Molte udienze furono aggiornate una perché gli imputati e le terze parti non riuscirono a comparire o perché il richiedente corresse le sue rivendicazioni.
11. Nel 2000 e nel 2001 la causa fu aggiornata molte volte. In particolare, fra il 17 febbraio e il 26 aprile 2000 i procedimenti furono sospesi per uno studio competente pendente. Fra il 24 agosto 2000 e il 15 marzo 2001 e fra il 21 giugno e il 10 agosto 2001 la causa fu aggiornata perché il giudice era in congedo per malattia. Un'udienza non ebbe luogo perché gli imputati non riuscirono a comparire.
12. Il 13 agosto 2001 la Corte distrettuale di Primorskiy di San Pietroburgo ammise in parte i ricorsi del richiedente per il risarcimento di danno materiale e morale e respinse il resto delle sue rivendicazioni.
13. Il 18 luglio 2002 la Corte della Città di San Pietroburgo (“ Corte Civica”) sostenne che la corte di prima -istanza era andata a vuoto nel stabilire in modo appropriato le importanti circostanze della causa e valutare debitamente le prove. Annullò la sentenza del 13 agosto 2001 per ciò che riguardava l’assegnazione del risarcimento del richiedente per danno morale e rinviò la questione alla corte di prima -istanza per un nuovo esame. Sostenne la parte rimanente della sentenza.
3. Secondo esame della causa
14. Il 16 agosto 2002 la causa fu riassegnata al giudice K. che stabilì l'esame della causa per il 16 gennaio 2003. In quella data la causa è stata aggiornata al 20 marzo 2003, perché il richiedente intendeva presentare al tribunale una prova supplementare.
15. Il 4 marzo 2003 la causa fu riassegnata al giudice A. e fu programmata per il 22 maggio 2003. In questa data l'udienza fu posticipata sino al 29 settembre 2003, su richiesta del richiedente così che lui avrebbe potuto subire un esame medico.
16. Fra il settembre 2003 e il novembre 2004 la causa fu aggiornata molte volte perché il richiedente corresse le sue rivendicazioni e gli imputati dovevano studiare le sue nuove rivendicazioni, la corte richiese una prova supplementare dalle parti ed il richiedente ebbe bisogno di tempo per preparare domande agli esperti. Fra il 29 aprile e l’ 8 ottobre 2004 la causa fu aggiornata perché il rappresentante del richiedente non riuscì a comparire. Il richiedente presentò che non aveva richiesto quegli aggiornamenti e richiese alla Corte distrettuale di continuare l'esame della causa.
17. Fra il 15 febbraio 2005 e il 14 marzo 2006 i procedimenti furono sospesi per un altro studio pendenti competente che doveva stabilire l'impatto del lavoro di costruzione sullo stato di salute del richiedente e delle sue figlie.
18. Fra il marzo e il settembre 2006 molte udienze furono aggiornate per chiamare esperti e la figlia del richiedente all'udienza. Delle udienze furono posticipate per dare il tempo alla figlia del richiedente di preparare le sue rivendicazioni, ma anche perché il richiedente corresse le sue rivendicazioni e gli imputati ebbero bisogno di tempo per studiarle. Un'udienza non ebbe luogo perché gli imputati non comparirono.
19. Il 21 settembre 2006 la Corte distrettuale di Primorskiy, dopo un nuovo esame respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente per il risarcimento per danno morale. Il 7 dicembre 2006 la Corte Civica sostenne quella sentenza.
B. Addotte proibizioni sulla riparazione dell'alloggio e sulla vendita dell'area di terreno
20. In molte occasioni aveva avuto l’intenzione di riparare il suo alloggio secondo il richiedente. Alla sua richiesta le autorità risposero che il suo alloggio era ancora soggetto alla demolizione in un futuro prossimo e che alla sua famiglia sarebbe stato fornito un appartamento. Il richiedente doveva abbandonare il suo progetto di riparare l'alloggio. Il richiedente presentò anche che lui doveva declinare un'offerta per l'acquisto del suo alloggio, perché era programmata la sua demolizione. Anche, eventuali acquirenti della sua area di terreno ritirarono l’offerta dopo avere consultato le autorità civiche. Il richiedente non intraprese nessun atto legale a riguardo delle proibizioni addotte sulla riparazione dell'alloggio e sulla vendita dell'area di terreno.
C. Ulteriori procedimenti
21. Nel 1999 il Governatore di San Pietroburgo annullò la decisione di rialloggiare gli abitanti degli alloggi colpiti dal piano di costruzione. Si considerava al quel punto improbabile che la Città avrebbe avuto bisogno di acquisire queste proprietà per perfezionare il suo nuovo piano urbano. Il richiedente citò in giudizio il Governatore e chiese il risarcimento per danno non-materiale. Con una decisione definitiva del 3 luglio 2001 la Corte Civica respinse le sue rivendicazioni.
22. Il richiedente citò in giudizio anche la Città e le amministrazioni del Distretto per il loro insuccesso nell’ offrirgli un appartamento. Con una decisione definitiva del 18 ottobre 2001 la Corte Civica respinse le sue rivendicazioni.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
23. Il richiedente si lamentò che la lunghezza dei procedimenti che terminarono il 7 dicembre 2006 era stata incompatibile col requisito del “termine ragionevole” stabilito nell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“ Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
24. I procedimenti cominciarono nel 1997, quando il richiedente depositò la sua rivendicazione con la Corte distrettuale di Primorskiy di San Pietroburgo. Comunque, la Corte considererà solamente il periodo dei procedimenti che ebbero luogo dopo il 5 maggio 1998, quando la Convenzione entrò in vigore a riguardo della Russia. Nel valutare la ragionevolezza del tempo che è trascorso dopo quella data, deve essere preso in conto lo stato dei procedimenti al tempo. Il periodo in questione terminò il 7 dicembre 2006. Così, la Corte ha competenza ratione temporis per esaminare un periodo di approssimativamente otto anni e sette mesi. Durante questo periodo la causa è stata esaminata in due livelli di giurisdizione.
A. Ammissibilità
25. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere perciò dichiarata ammissibile.
B. Meriti
26. Il Governo dibatté in primo luogo che la lunghezza dei procedimenti nella presente causa era dovuta alla particolare complessità della causa. Presentò inoltre che il richiedente aveva contribuito anche alla lunghezza dei procedimenti correggendo le sue rivendicazioni in molte occasioni, e depositando istanze diverse; lui aveva richiesto uno studio competente ed aveva fatto appello contro le decisioni della corte di prima -istanza. Inoltre, le parti non erano riuscite a comparire in molte udienze. I tribunali nazionali avevano condotto in modo appropriato i procedimenti. Loro avevano esaminato due volte la causa a due livelli di giurisdizione. Erano accaduti dei ritardi insignificanti quando il giudice era stato in congedo per malattia o era stato impegnato in procedimenti non correlati.
27. Secondo il richiedente, i ritardi più significativi nei procedimenti furono causati dal ripetuto riassegnazione della causa a giudici diversi e la scarsa qualità delle decisioni della corte di prima -istanza.
28. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti deve essere valutata ala luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento al seguente criterio: la complessità della causa, la condotta del richiedente e le autorità attinenti e la posta in pericolo per il richiedente nella controversia (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Frydlender c. Francia [GC], n. 30979/96, § 43 ECHR 2000-VII). Inoltre, solamente i ritardi attribuibili allo Stato possono giustificare la costatazione di un'inosservanza del requisito del “termine ragionevole” (vedere Pedersen e Baadsgaard c. Danimarca [GC], n. 49017/99, § 49 ECHR 2004-XI).
29. La Corte si confà col Governo che i procedimenti in questione erano di una certa complessità siccome hanno richiesto un esame del complesso background dei fatti, coinvolto molte parti e richiesto i rapporti di esperti. Nota anche che il richiedente corresse le sue rivendicazioni in molte occasioni. Mentre la Corte considera che questi fattori resero più difficile il compito delle corti nazionali, non può accettare che la complessità della causa, presa da sola era tale da giustificare la lunghezza complessiva dei procedimenti.
30. Riguardo alla condotta del richiedente, la Corte non è convinta con l'argomento del Governo per cui il richiedente dovrebbe essere ritenuto responsabile di aver corretto le sue rivendicazioni, aver depositato istanze, richiesto opinioni competenti e intrapreso ricorsi. È stato l'approccio continuo della Corte per cui un richiedente non può essere biasimato di approfittare delle risorse riconosciute dalla legge nazionale nella difesa dei suoi interessi (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Yağcı e Sargın c. Turchia, 8 giugno 1995, § 66 Serie A n. 319-a). Inoltre, il Governo affermò che le parti non erano riuscite a comparire a delle udienze. La Corte considera che i tribunali nazionali avrebbero dovuto prendere delle misure per disciplinare gli imputati per la loro ripetuta contumacia. Per ciò che riguarda il richiedente, il Governo non indicò alcuna data in cui il richiedente non era riuscito a comparire. È vero che fra il 29 aprile e l’8 ottobre 2004 la causa fu aggiornata perché il rappresentante del richiedente non comparì. Comunque, anche se il richiedente può essere ritenuto responsabile del ritardo dovuto all'insuccesso del suo consigliere nel comparire, la Corte considera che il richiedente non può essere ritenuto responsabile per qualsiasi altro ritardo sostanziale nei procedimenti.
31. Riguardo alla condotta delle autorità giudiziali, la Corte nota l'argomento del Governo per cui durante il periodo sotto considerazione delle autorità nazionali esaminarono due volte la causa a due livelli. La Corte osserva a questo riguardo che il bisogno per il secondo round di procedimenti era attribuibile all'insuccesso della Corte distrettuale nello stabilire in modo appropriato le importanti circostanze della causa e valutare debitamente le prove. In qualsiasi caso, il fatto che i tribunali nazionali ascoltarono molte volte la causa non li assolve dall'attenersi al requisito del termine ragionevole dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 (vedere Litoselitis c. Grecia, n. 62771/00, § 32 del 5 febbraio 2004).
32. La Corte osserva inoltre che dal 10 giugno sino al 24 novembre 1998 nessuna udienza fu programmata perché il giudice fu coinvolto in procedimenti non correlati. Inoltre, fra il 24 agosto 2000 e il 15 marzo 2001 e fra il 21 giugno e il 10 agosto 2001 nessun procedimento ebbe luogo perché il giudice era in congedo per malattia. Il ritardo accumulato corrispose a più di un anno. La Corte nota inoltre che si verificò un ritardo considerevole quando la causa fu riassegnata al giudice K. che impiegò la causa finita 16 agosto 2002 e programmato la causa solamente per 16 gennaio 2003. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che è per gli Stati Contraenti per organizzare i loro ordinamenti giuridici in tale modo che le loro corti possono garantire il diritto di ognuno per ottenere una definitivo decisione all'interno di un termine ragionevole (veda, per istanza, Löffler c. l'Austria, n. 30546/96, § 21 3 ottobre 2000). La maniera nella quale un Stato prevede per meccanismi per attenersi con questo requisito-se con aumentando i numeri di giudici, o con tempo-limiti automatici e direzioni, o con dell'altro metodo-è per lo Stato per decidere. Se un Statale lascia procedimenti continuare oltre il “il termine ragionevole” prescrisse con Articolo 6 della Convenzione senza fare niente per avanzarli, sarà responsabile per il ritardo risultante (veda Prezzo e Lowe c. il Regno Unito, N. 43185/98 e 43186/98, § 23 29 luglio 2003). I costatazione di Corte che nella causa presente le autorità non presero misure dovute ad accelerazione i procedimenti e, perciò, i ritardi che sono il risultato dell'assenza del giudice dalle udienze e riassegnazione della causa a giudici diversi sono imputabili allo Stato.
33. La Corte nota inoltre che i procedimenti furono sospesi per più di un anno per l'esame competente pendente ordinato il 15 febbraio 2005. Questo studio competente doveva stabilire l'impatto del lavoro di costruzione sullo stato di salute del richiedente e delle sue figlie. Tale termine di esame sembra comunque piuttosto lungo. A questo riguardo, la Corte reitera, che la responsabilità di principio per il ritardo dovuto alle opinioni competenti rimane ultimamente sullo Stato. Spettava al tribunale nazionale assicurare che l'esame competente fosse compiuto senza ritardo (vedere, per esempio, Rolgezer ed Altri c. Russia, n. 9941/03, § 30 29 aprile 2008; Volovich c. Russia, n. 10374/02, § 30 5 ottobre 2006; e Capuano c. Italia, 25 giugno 1987, § 32 Serie A n. 119). Comunque, il Governo non fornì alcuna informazione per mostrare che la corte di prima -istanza si era informata dei progressi del rapporto competente.
34. Insomma, la Corte considera, che i ritardi più significativi nei procedimenti sono attribuibili ai tribunali nazionali.
35. Alla luce del criterio stabilito nella sua giurisprudenza, ed avendo riguardo a tutte le circostanze della causa, la Corte considera, che nella presente causa la lunghezza dei procedimenti era eccessiva e non riuscì a rispettare il requisito del “ termine ragionevole”. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
36. Il richiedente fece molte azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Lui si lamentò in primo luogo che il lavoro di costruzione eseguito sulla sua area di terreno aveva dato luogo all'espropriazione de facto di parte della terra per la quale lui non aveva ricevuto alcun risarcimento. La Corte reitera che, in conformità con gli articoli generali di diritto internazionale, le disposizioni della Convenzione non legano una Parte Contraente in relazione a qualsiasi atto o fatto che a avuto luogo o qualsiasi situazione che ha cessato di esistere prima delal data dell'entrata in vigore della Convenzione riguardo a quella Parte (vedere Blečić c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 70 ECHR 2006 -...). Inoltre, la giurisdizione temporale della Corte sarà determinata in relazione ai fatti costitutivi dell'interferenza addotta. L'insuccesso susseguente delle vie di ricorso che miravano a compensare questa interferenza non può portarlo all'interno della giurisdizione temporale della Corte (vedere Blečić, citata sopra, § 77). Nella presente causa l'interferenza addotta (lavoro di costruzione) con l'alloggio e terreno del richiedente ebbe luogo fra il 1989 ed il 1996, cioè dprima della ratifica della Convenzione della Russia. I procedimenti coi quali il richiedente impugnò l'interferenza e che terminarono il 7 dicembre 2006, cioè dopo la ratifica, non costituisce un'interferenza nuova o indipendente coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente, ma avevano lo scopo di offrirgli una compensazione per l'interferenza che era accaduta fra il 1989 ed il 1996. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è ratione temporis incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’ Articolo 35 § 4.
37. Il richiedente si lamentò inoltre dell'insuccesso delle autorità di rialloggiarlo in un posto diverso. La Corte osserva che il richiedente impugnò l'insuccesso delle autorità di offrirgli una sistemazione in due azioni separate e le decisioni definitive furono prese rispettivamente il 3 luglio e il 18 ottobre 2001, mentre la richiesta fu depositata il 15 dicembre 2002. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è stata introdotta fuori termini e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
38. Infine, il richiedente si lamentò di non poter riparare il suo alloggio perché le autorità intendevano demolirlo e di non poter vendere il suo alloggio e terreno a causa del rifiuto delle autorità di autorizzare i progetti degli eventuali acquirenti per l’uso della terra o a causa delle condutture sotterranee installate là. La Corte nota che il richiedente non depositò nessuna azione di reclamo riguardo alle autorità statali competenti. Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo deve essere respinta per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
39. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
40. La Corte indica che sotto l’Articolo 60 degli Articoli di Corte qualsiasi rivendicazione per soddisfazione equa deve essere presentata per iscritto all'interno del tempo-limite fissato per l'osservazione delle osservazioni del richiedente sui meriti, “fallendo la Camera può respingere questa rivendicazione interamente o in parte.”
41. Il 4 novembre 2008 il richiedente fu invitato a presentare le sue rivendicazioni per la soddisfazione equa nella presente causa. Lui non riuscì a presentare alcuna simile rivendicazione all'interno del tempo-limite richiesto. Perciò, la Corte non fa assegnazione sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo alla lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Decide di non fare assegnazione sotto l’Articolo 41.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 18 giugno 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.