Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF TRGO v. CROATIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 35298/04/2009
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 11/06/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of P1-1 ; Remainder inadmissible ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed ; Non-pecuniary damage - finding of a violation sufficient
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF TRGO v. CROATIA
(Application no. 35298/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
11 June 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Trgo v. Croatia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 19 May 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 35298/04) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, Mr F. T. (“the applicant”), on 11 October 2004.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr A. N., a lawyer practising in Makarska. The Croatian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs Š. Stažnik.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions had been violated because the domestic courts had refused to acknowledge his ownership that he had acquired by adverse possession.
4. On 16 January 2007 the President of the First Section decided to communicate the complaint concerning the right of property to the Government. On 4 September 2008 the Chamber decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1924 and lives in Krilo Jesenice.
A. Property dispute
1. Background to the case
(a) Social ownership and its transformation
6. The legal system of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) distinguished between two types of ownership: private ownership (privatno vlasništvo) and social ownership (društveno vlasništvo). While owners of property in private ownership were private individuals (natural persons) and some private legal entities called “civil legal entities” (građanske pravne osobe) such as foundations, associations and religious communities, property in social ownership, according to the official doctrine, had no owner. Nevertheless, the federal State, the constituent Republics, municipalities being local government units and other various legal entities called “social legal entities” (društvene pravne osobe), among which the most important ones were companies, known at the time as “organisations of associated labour” (organizacije udruženog rada) and later on as “socially owned companies” (društvena poduzeća), were during the socialist period given certain quasi-ownership rights over property in social ownership, such as the right to use it (pravo korištenja), the right to administer it (pravo upravljanja) or the right to dispose of it (pravo raspolaganja). Private individuals could also acquire certain rights over property in social ownership. Notably, many individuals living in socially owned flats had specially protected tenancies (stanarsko pravo) in respect of those flats.
7. The Constitution of the Republic of Croatia of 1990 (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette, no. 56/1990 with subsequent amendments) acknowledged only one type of ownership: private ownership. Therefore, in order to bring the country's legal system in conformity with its Constitution, in the period between 1991 and 1997 the Croatian Parliament adopted several legislative acts with a view to transforming social ownership into private ownership.
8. In particular, the Specially Protected Tenancies (Sale to Occupier) Act (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, Official Gazette no. 27/1991 with subsequent amendments – “the Sale to Occupier Act”), which entered into force on 19 June 1991, enabled the holders of specially protected tenancies to purchase their flats which were in social ownership under favourable conditions and thereby become their owners.
9. The Transformation of Socially Owned Companies Act (Zakon o pretvorbi društvenih poduzeća, Official Gazette no. 19/1991 with subsequent amendments), which entered into force on 1 May 1991, provided that all “socially owned companies” had to transform into commercial companies, in particular into either limited liability companies or joint stock companies.
10. On 1 January 1997 both the Ownership and Other Rights In Rem Act (Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Official Gazette no. 91/1996 of 28 October 1996 – “the 1996 Property Act”), and the Act on Compensation for, and Restitution of, Property Taken During the Yugoslav Communist Regime (Zakon o naknadi za imovinu oduzetu za vrijeme jugoslavenske komunističke vladavine, Official Gazette nos. 92/1996, with subsequent amendments – “the Denationalisation Act”), entered into force. By entry into force of these two Acts the transformation of social ownership into private ownership was largely completed.
11. The 1996 Property Act provided that by its entry into force the holders of the rights to use, administer and dispose of socially owned property (see paragraph 6 above) were to become the owners of that property. As regards, in particular, commercial companies created through transformation of socially owned companies pursuant to the Transformation of Socially Owned Companies Act, the 1996 Property Act provided that those companies were already from the moment of their transformation to be considered the owners of socially owned property in respect of which they previously held the rights to use, administer and dispose of it (see section 360(1) of 1996 Property Act in paragraph 28 below).
12. The Denationalisation Act provided that in respect of certain property that had been through nationalisation or confiscation appropriated from its former owners during socialism and transferred into social ownership there was to be restitution in kind. It thereby enabled some former owners or their heirs to obtain ownership of such property which had until then been socially owned property.
(b) Acquisition of ownership of socially owned property by adverse possession
13. The legislation of the former SFRY, in particular section 29 of the Basic Property Act of 1980 (see paragraph 27 below), prohibited the acquisition of ownership of socially owned property by adverse possession (dosjelost).
14. When incorporating the 1980 Basic Property Act into the Croatian legal system on 8 October 1991, Parliament repealed that provision (see paragraph 27 below).
15. Subsequently, the new Property Act of 1996 provided in section 388(4) that the period prior to 8 October 1991 was to be included in calculating the period for acquisition of ownership by adverse possession of socially owned immovable property (see paragraph 28 below).
16. Following several petitions for constitutional review (prijedlog za ocjenu ustavnosti) submitted by the former owners of property that had been appropriated during socialism, on 8 July 1999 the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) accepted the initiative, and decided to institute proceedings to review the constitutionality of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act (decision nos. U-I-58/1997, U-I-235/1997, U-I-237/1997, U-I-1053/1997 and U-I-1054/1997 of 8 July 1999, Official Gazette no. 80/1999 of 30 July 1999).
17. On 17 November 1999 the Constitutional Court abrogated section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act (decisions nos. U-I-58/1997, U-I-235/1997, U-I-237/1997, U-I-1053/1997 and U-I-1054/1997 of 17 November 1999, Official Gazette no. 137/99 of 4 December 1999). It held that the impugned provision had retroactive effects with adverse consequences for the rights of third persons and was therefore unconstitutional.
The Constitutional Court's decision in its relevant part reads as follows:
DECISION
I.
The provisions of section ... 388 paragraph 4 of the [1996 Property Act] are hereby abrogated.
II.
...
Reasons
I.
The petitioners consider that the impugned provision tends to favour various users of property, who used it without any title, by enabling them to acquire ownership at the expense of [former] owners from whom it was taken during Communism ... They also point out that retroactive [application of the rules of] adverse possession should not be allowed.
...
The petition [for constitutional review] is well founded.
The impugned provision attributes a common quality to a certain state of facts even in respect of the period during which that quality was expressly excluded by law.
Namely, section 29 of the [1980 Basic Property Act] provided that ownership of socially owned property could not be acquired by adverse possession. That provision was repealed by section 3 of the Act on the Incorporation of the [1980 Basic Property Act] (...) , as a result of which all immovable property which had been in social ownership before the adoption of the [new 1990] Constitution, regardless of its status in the transitional period, came under the general regime also as regards [the acquisition of ownership by] adverse possession.
Since, in the court's view, repealing in the particular case amounts only to abrogation ex nunc [ukidanje] and not to annulment ex tunc [poništavanje], it has to be concluded that the period of possession of the socially owned property before 8 October 1991 (the day of entry into force of the Act on the Incorporation of the [1980 Basic Property Act]) cannot be taken into account for the purposes of acquiring ownership by adverse possession ...
Namely, the possessors of the property, in respect of which the acquisition of ownership by adverse possession was expressly excluded by law, were aware that this property was not susceptible to [acquisition of ownership by] adverse possession, which was also known to the holders of [various] rights over the same property (the right to administer, use and dispose of it), who therefore did not [have to] use relevant remedies against the risk of losing the property on account of its acquisition by its possessors through adverse possession. Therefore, in the application of the impugned provision it may happen that holders of certain property rights lose these rights, which the Constitution allows only exceptionally and with compensation.
What is more, the impugned provision makes possible the acquisition of ownership of certain property even before the time-limits for acquisition by adverse possession started to run, while [at the same time] the time-limits for acquisition by adverse possession of many types of former socially owned property are actually being extended (the property owned by the Republic of Croatia, counties and units of local self-government ...).
[For these reasons], the court finds that the impugned provision is not, in the substantive sense [substantive unconstitutionality], in conformity with the highest values [of the constitutional order] of equality, inviolability of property and the rule of law enshrined in Article 3 of the Constitution, and the guarantee of property enshrined in Article 48 paragraph 1 of the Constitution.
Furthermore, the court concludes that the impugned provision has retroactive effects, for which reason it is not in conformity with the provision of Article 90 paragraph 2 of the Constitution either.
...
..., [T]he court finds that while determining the retroactive effects of the said provision of section 388 paragraph 4 of the [1996 Property Act], the procedure prescribed by the Rules of Procedure of the Croatian Parliament was not observed.
For the court, when [in the legislative process] the legislator breaches its self-prescribed rules of procedure.... ...the legislative act adopted in such improper way, is not in accordance with ... the [principle of the] rule of law enshrined in Article 3 of the Constitution.
This further means that ... the impugned provision ... is not even in the formal sense [formal unconstitutionality] in compliance with Article 90 paragraph 2 of the Constitution.
2. Proceedings in the particular case
18. In 1997 the applicant instituted civil proceedings before the Makarska Municipal Court (Općinski sud u Makarskoj) against the Municipality of Podgora (Općina Podgora) and the State seeking a declaration of his ownership of certain plots of land and their registration in his name in the land register. The applicant claimed that the property at issue had been owned by his late uncle and confiscated in 1949 by the socialist authorities. The applicant's late mother had been in possession of the land since 1953, as the applicant had continued to be after her death on 16 February 1992. Given that the prescribed period for acquisition of ownership by adverse possession had elapsed, the applicant claimed to have acquired ownership of the land.
19. On 16 February 2001 the Municipal Court ruled for the applicant and ordered that he be recorded in the land register as the owner of the property. The court held:
“After finding that the plaintiff's mother was a bona fide possessor of the immovable property in question, it needs to be established whether she possessed it during the statutory period necessary to acquire ownership by adverse possession.
Once section 29 of the 1991 Basic Property Act was repealed... it has become possible to acquire ownership by adverse possession of socially owned immovable property ... [Also], under section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act, in calculating the period for the acquisition by adverse possession of immovable property which was socially owned on 8 October 1991, the period before that date has also to be taken into account.
Section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act was abrogated by a decision of the Constitutional Court ... , which means that, in the period prior to its abrogation, that provision was in force, that is until late 1999...
In order to acquire ownership by adverse possession of State-owned immovable property, under section 159(4) of the 1996 Property Act, a period twice as long as that set out in paragraphs 2 and 3 of that section is required, which means that in respect of the land at issue a continuous undisturbed possession in good faith over a period of forty years is needed.
Having regard to the fact that ... the plaintiff was, through his mother, in continuous possession of the land in question since 1953, it has to be concluded that he acquired ownership by adverse possession ...”
20. On an appeal by both respondents, on 18 June 2004 the Split County Court (Županijski sud u Splitu) reversed the first-instance judgment and dismissed the applicant's claim on the following grounds:
“It is undisputed between the parties that:
- the immovable property at issue was confiscated from the plaintiff's legal predecessor... in 1949;
- the respondent was recorded [as owner] in the land register on the basis of the confiscation decision;
- the plaintiff and his legal predecessor have had continuous possession [thereof] since 1953...
The first-instance court erred in finding that the plaintiff had acquired ownership by adverse possession of the immovable property at issue because he and his legal predecessor had had continuous possession since 1953, on the basis of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act, which was subsequently abrogated by a decision of the Constitutional Court... In its decision the Constitutional Court held that the unconstitutionality of the abrogated provision existed already prior to it being abrogated, that is, since its entry into force, a conclusion that is also accepted by this court. Consequently, irrespective of the fact that section 388(4) was in force until the publication of the Constitutional Court's decision in the Official Gazette, the [first-instance court's] decision could not be based on an unconstitutional provision.”
21. The applicant lodged a constitutional complaint against that judgment, claiming, inter alia, an infringement of his property rights. On 3 March 2005 the Constitutional Court dismissed the applicant's complaint, finding that:
“During the... proceedings ... the Constitutional Court has established that [the second-instance judgment] was reached in application of the relevant provisions of substantive law, and that the legal findings of the second-instance court were well reasoned, and that therefore there has been no infringement of the complainant's ownership rights...”
B. Reopening of criminal proceedings
22. In 1994 the applicant requested the reopening of criminal proceedings which had ended in 1945 and in which his uncle had been convicted.
23. On 14 October 2003 the Split County Court declared the applicant's request inadmissible, finding that he had not been entitled to make such a request. On appeal, the Supreme Court (Vrhovni sud Republike Hrvatske) upheld the first-instance decision on 18 February 2004.
24. Subsequently, on 30 June 2004 the Constitutional Court declared the applicant's complaint inadmissible for lack of jurisdiction.
C. The administrative proceedings for the restitution of confiscated property
25. On 5 May 1997 the applicant applied to the competent administrative authority seeking restitution of the above plots of land that had been confiscated from his late uncle in 1949 by the socialist authorities. In doing so he relied on the Denationalisation Act. It appears that the proceedings were later on stayed and that they are formally still pending.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. The Constitutional Court Act
26. The 1999 Constitutional Act on the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Croatia (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 99/1999 of 29 September 1999, which entered into force on 24 September 1999 – “the Constitutional Court Act”), as amended by the 2002 Amendments (Ustavni zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Ustavnog zakona o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Official Gazette no. 29/2002 of 22 March 2002, which entered into force on 15 March 2002), in its relevant part reads as follows:
Section 53
“(1) The Constitutional Court shall abrogate [ukinuti] a statute or its provisions if it finds that they are incompatible with the Constitution ...
(2) Unless the Constitutional Court decides otherwise, the abrogated [ukinuti] statute or its provisions shall cease to have legal force on the date of publication of the Constitutional Court's decision in the Official Gazette [i.e. ex nunc].
(3) ...”
Section 56
“(1) The final sentence for a criminal offence based on a statutory provision that has been abrogated as contrary to the Constitution shall cease to produce legal effects from the day of the entry into force of the Constitutional Court's decision abrogating the statutory provision on the basis of which the sentence was delivered and may be set aside by [a petition for] reopening of criminal proceedings.
(2) Every natural or legal person who has lodged with the Constitutional Court a petition to review constitutionality of a statutory provision, or a constitutionality or legality of a provision of subordinate legislation, and whose petition has been accepted by the Constitutional Court and [that] provision abrogated [ex nunc], has a right to lodge with the competent authority [a petition for reopening of proceedings] and ask that the decision based on the abrogated ... provision ... be set aside.
(3) ...
(4) [The petition for reopening of the proceedings] referred to in paragraphs 2 and 3 of this section may be lodged within five months of the publication of the Constitutional Court's decision in the Official Gazette.
(5) In proceedings in which no final decision has been adopted before the date of the entry into force of the Constitutional Court's decision abrogating a statute, [...] or its provisions, and this statute [ ...] is directly applicable in the case, the abrogated statute [...] or its provisions shall not be applied from the date of the entry into force of the Constitutional Court's decision.”
B. The 1980 Basic Property Act
27. Section 29 of the Basic Ownership Relations Act (Zakon o osnovnim vlasničkopravnim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 6/1980 and 36/1990, which entered into force on 1 September 1980 – “the 1980 Basic Property Act”) prohibited the acquisition by adverse possession of ownership of socially owned property.
Section 3 of the Act on the Incorporation of the Act on Basic Ownership Relations (Zakon o preuzimanju zakona o osnovnim vlasničkopravnim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia no. 53/1991 of 8 October 1991) repealed section 29 of the Basic Property Act.
C. The 1996 Property Act
28. The relevant part of the Ownership and Other Rights In Rem Act (Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Official Gazette no. 91/1996 of 28 October 1996, which entered into force on 1 January 1997 – “the 1996 Property Act”), as in force at the material time, read as follows:
Part three
RIGHT OF OWNERSHIP
...
Chapter 6.
ACQUISITION OF OWNERSHIP
Legal grounds for acquisition
Section 114
“(1) Ownership may be acquired by legal transaction, by decision of a court or other public authority, by succession, or by the operation of law.”
Acquisition [of ownership] by the operation of law...
...
(d) Acquisition by adverse possession
Section 159
“(1) Ownership may be acquired by adverse possession on the basis of the exclusive possession of a certain property... if such possession has lasted continuously for a period of time determined by law and if the possessor is capable of being the owner of such property.
(2) An exclusive possessor who possesses under just title, in good faith and whose possession is free of vice shall acquire ownership of movable property after three years and of immovable property after ten years.
(3) An exclusive possessor who possesses at least in good faith shall acquire ownership of movable property after ten years and of immovable property after twenty years of continuous exclusive possession.
(4) An exclusive possessor of a property owned by the Republic of Croatia ... shall acquire ownership by adverse possession once his or her ... possession has lasted continuously for a period twice as long as that set out in paragraphs 2 and 3 of this section.”
Part nine
TRANSITIONAL AND FINAL PROVISIONS
Chapter 1.
TRANSFORMATION OF SOCIAL OWNERSHIP
General provisions on transformation
Section 359
“(1) ...
(2) The right of ownership and other rights in rem acquired under the provisions of this Act on transformation of the rights to administer, use or dispose of socially owned property ... shall be considered acquired under the condition that they are not in collision with the rights of other persons over [such] property under the denationalisation legislation.
Transformation of the rights to administer, use and dispose of [the socially owned property]
Section 360
“(1) The right to administer, use or dispose of socially owned property became by the transformation [privatisation] of its holder the right of ownership of that person who through the transformation became the former holder's universal legal successor ...
(2) The right to administer, use or dispose of socially owned property which before the entry into force of this Act was not transformed into a subject of the right of ownership, shall by this Act's entry into force become [its] right of ownership ...
(3) The provisions of paragraph 1 and 2 of this section shall be applied, mutatis mutandis, to other rights in rem.
(4) Registration of the right to administer, use or dispose of [socially owned property] in the land register ... shall be considered registration of the right of ownership.”
Presumptions
Section 362
“(1) It is considered that the owner of a socially owned immovable property is a person registered in the land register as a holder of the right to administer, use or dispose of that immovable property.
(2) ...”
Protection of the transformed rights
Section 363
“(1) Person whose right of ownership is derived from the former right to administer, use or dispose of socially owned property ... shall have the right to protect it as any owner ...”
...
Chapter 4.
FINAL PROVISIONS
Section 388
“(1) The acquisition, modification, legal effects or termination of rights in rem after the entry into force of this Act shall be assessed on the basis of its provisions...
(2) The acquisition, modification, legal effects and termination of rights in rem until the entry into force of this Act shall be assessed on the basis of rules applicable at the moment of the acquisition, modification or termination of those rights or of their legal effects.
(3) If the prescribed time-limits for the acquisition and termination of rights in rem set out in this Act started to run before its entry into force, they shall continue to run pursuant to paragraph 2 of this section...
(4) In calculating the period for the acquisition by adverse possession of immovable property which was socially owned on 8 October 1991, and for the acquisition of [other] rights in rem over such property, the period before that date shall also be taken into account.”
D. The 2001 Amendment to the 1996 Property Act
29. The relevant part of the 2001 Amendment to the 1996 Property Act (Zakon o izmjeni i dopuni Zakona vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Official Gazette no. 114/2001 of 20 December 2001, which entered into force on the same day) that were enacted following the abrogation of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act by the Constitutional Court on 17 November 1999, reads as follows:
Section 2
“In section 388, a new paragraph 4 shall be added after paragraph 3, to read:
'In calculating the period for the acquisition by adverse possession of immovable property which was socially owned on 8 October 1991, and for the acquisition of [other] rights in rem over such property, the period before that date shall not be taken into account.'”
E. The 1996 Denationalisation Act
30. The Act on Compensation for, and Restitution of, Property Taken During the Yugoslav Communist Regime (Zakon o naknadi za imovinu oduzetu za vrijeme jugoslavenske komunističke vladavine, Official Gazette nos. 92/1996, 92/1999 (corrigendum), 80/2002 and 81/2002 (corrigendum), which entered into force on 1 January 1997 – “the 1996 Denationalisation Act”) enables the former owners of confiscated or nationalised property, or their heirs in the first line of succession (direct descendants and a spouse), to seek under certain conditions either restitution of or compensation for the appropriated property.
F. The Civil Procedure Act
31. The 1977 Civil Procedure Act (Zakon o parničnom postupku, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 4/1977, 36/1977 (corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 and 35/1991 and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia nos. 53/1991, 91/1992, 112/1999, 117/2003 and 84/2008, which entered into force on 1 July 1977 – “the Civil Procedure Act”), as amended by the 2003 Amendments (Official Gazette no. 117/2003, which entered into force on 1 December 2003) in its relevant part reads as follows:
Reopening of proceedings following the final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom
Section 428a
“(1) When the European Court of Human Rights has found a violation of a human right or fundamental freedom guaranteed by the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms or additional protocols thereto ratified by the Republic of Croatia, a party may, within thirty days of the finality of the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, file a petition with the court in the Republic of Croatia which adjudicated in the first instance in the proceedings in which the decision violating the human right or fundamental freedom was rendered, to set aside the decision by which the human right or fundamental freedom was violated.
(2) The proceedings referred to in paragraph 1 of this section shall be conducted by applying, mutatis mutandis, the provisions on the reopening of proceedings.
(3) In the reopened proceedings the courts are required to respect the legal opinions expressed in the final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights finding a violation of a fundamental human right or freedom.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
32. The applicant claimed to have ex lege acquired ownership of the above-mentioned plots of land by adverse possession on the basis of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act. He complained that the refusal of the domestic courts to acknowledge his ownership in the above civil proceedings – because that provision had been abrogated by the Constitutional Court while those proceedings had been pending – had violated his property rights. He explained that under the domestic law the ownership was acquired by adverse possession ipso jure, that is when the conditions were met, and that he had met those conditions prior to the Constitutional Court's decision, which decisions have only ex nunc effects. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
33. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
34. The Government disputed the admissibility of this complaint on two grounds. They argued that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies and that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was not applicable to the present case.
1. Non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
35. The Government noted that, apart from bringing a civil action with a view to being declared the owner of the property at issue on the basis of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act, the applicant had also instituted administrative proceedings under the Denationalisation Act seeking restitution of the same property, which had been confiscated from his late uncle, and that these proceedings were still pending.
36. That being so, the Government deemed that in a situation where an applicant attempts to use two remedies available at the domestic level at the same time in order to assert his rights, the rule of exhaustion of domestic remedies required that both remedies be used, up to the highest level of jurisdiction. Since the administrative proceedings for the restitution of property under the Denationalisation Act were still pending, the Government argued that the applicant's complaint was premature.
37. They added that the Denationalisation Act was legislation adopted precisely for the purposes of resolving the issues relating to the restitution of property appropriated during the socialist regime. Thus, administrative proceedings instituted on the basis of that Act were the primary remedy to be used by persons in situations comparable to that of the applicant.
38. The applicant did not comment on this issue.
39. For the Court, it is sufficient to note that under the Denationalisation Act the only persons entitled to restitution of, or compensation for, property appropriated during the socialist regime are the former owners themselves or their heirs in the first line of succession, that is, a former owner's spouse and direct descendants. Since the applicant is only a nephew of his late uncle he is not entitled to restitution of the property in question. Accordingly, his application for restitution before the administrative authorities, in the Court's view, has no prospects of success.
40. It follows that the Government's objection concerning non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
2. Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
41. The Government argued that the applicant had never had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. They considered it undisputed that he had never had “effective enjoyment of a property right over the immovable property in question.” In their view, the applicant had only a conditional claim in respect of those plots of land, on the basis of which he thought he could acquire, by adverse possession, the right of ownership. However, under the domestic law, the applicant could not have had a legitimate expectation of having his claim satisfied.
42. The Government admitted that at a specific moment in time, the legislator had adopted the provision under which the applicant's conditional claim would have been granted had that provision remained in force. However, that provision had been abrogated by the Constitutional Court as being unconstitutional. Accordingly, as early as the time of passing of the first-instance judgment, let alone at the time when the second-instance court reversed it, the applicant could not have had a legitimate expectation that he would acquire ownership by adverse possession, because it had been clear that he had not met the necessary requirements and that the first-instance court could not have based its judgment on that provision.
43. The applicant disagreed.
44. The Court reiterates that an applicant may allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his or her “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or claims that are sufficiently established to be regarded as “assets”. The Court has also referred to claims in respect of which an applicant can argue that he has at least a “legitimate expectation” that they will be realised, that is, that he or she will obtain effective enjoyment of a property right (see, inter alia, Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, ECHR 2002-VII, § 69, and Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004-IX). However, a legitimate expectation has no independent existence; it must be attached to a proprietary interest which must itself be sufficiently established (see Kopecký, cited above, §§ 45-53). In reality, the question for the Court is therefore whether the applicant has a sufficiently established claim to attract the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
45. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the applicant suggested that the ownership of the property at issue vested in him without the intervention of the courts (see, by converse implication, Kopecký, cited above, § 41) whereas the Government argued that he had a “claim” rather than an “existing possession”.
46. The Court notes that under Croatian law ownership will, in principle, be acquired by adverse possession ipso jure when all statutory conditions are met. However, it also notes that the question whether or not the applicant satisfied the statutory conditions for acquiring ownership by adverse possession was to be determined in the proceedings before the competent courts, and that he needed a declaratory judgment acknowledging his ownership in order to effectively enjoy his property. The Court therefore considers that the proprietary interest relied on by the applicant was in the nature of a claim and cannot be characterised as an “existing possession” within the meaning of the Court's case-law.
47. The Court reiterates that where a proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, it may be regarded as an “asset” only if there is a sufficient basis for that interest in national law or, in other words, when the claim is sufficiently established to be enforceable (see paragraph 44 above, as well as Kopecký, cited above, §§ 49 and 52; and Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301-B).
48. It would appear from the findings of the domestic courts (see paragraphs 19-20 above) that it was uncontested that the applicant and his mother had been in exclusive and continuous possession in good faith of the property in question since 1953, that is for more than forty years, and that he had thus already in 1993 met the statutory conditions for acquiring ownership by adverse possession. It may therefore be inferred that the applicant, on the basis of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act, ex lege became the owner of the land at issue on 1 January 1997 when the Act entered into force. That provision remained in force until the Constitutional Court abrogated it almost three years later. The Court thus considers that the applicant's claim had a sufficient basis in national law to qualify as an “asset” protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
49. It follows that the Government's objection as to the non-applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must also be dismissed.
50. The Court furthermore concludes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It also notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
51. The Government submitted that the case did not disclose any interference with the applicant's property rights. They explained that the applicant had complained against the second-instance judgment, which had reversed that of the first-instance court passed in his favour. However, since he could not have acquired any right under the first-instance judgment that had not become final, the judgment of the second-instance court could not have interfered with his property rights.
52. They further claimed that, even assuming that there had been interference, it had been justified as lawful, pursuing a legitimate aim and proportionate. In particular, they argued that the case should be viewed in the context of process of restitution of, and compensation for, the property appropriated during the socialist regime, which process involved comprehensive moral, political and economic considerations. In such situations, which necessarily involve balancing of conflicting interests between current users of the property and persons from whom it had been taken, the State had a wide margin of appreciation. The Split County Court in its judgment relied on the decision of the Constitutional Court which abrogated section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act because it retroactively allowed acquisition of ownership of socially owned property by adverse possession to persons who held the possession of it without any title and who knew that they could not have acquired its ownership through adverse possession. In such circumstances the impugned provision had thus created a completely new legal situation affording those persons preferential treatment over the former owners from whom the property had been taken by force during the socialist regime. Therefore, the abrogation had had a legitimate aim of protecting the rights of others and maintaining the principle of legal certainty. Furthermore, the Constitutional Court's decision had not been contrary to the principle of proportionality because by adopting the Denationalisation Act the State had regulated the issue of restitution of, and compensation for, the nationalised and confiscated property, and it was under that Act the applicant should have, and indeed had, asserted his right in respect of the property confiscated from his late uncle.
53. The applicant disagreed.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) Whether there was an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of “'possessions”'
54. In the light of the above finding that the applicant's claim was sufficiently established to qualify as an “asset” attracting the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that the refusal of the second-instance court to grant that claim and thereby acknowledge the applicant's ownership of the property in question undoubtedly constituted interference with his property rights.
55. In order to further establish whether that interference was justified it has to be borne in mind that the applicant did not complain about the abrogation of section 388(4) of the Property Act by the Constitutional Court in its decision of 17 November 1999, and the reasons behind that decision. Rather, he complained that, unlike the first-instance court, the second-instance court had not acknowledged the legal consequences that that provision had already produced before it had been abrogated, namely that he had ex lege acquired the ownership of the property at issue. Instead, the County Court had, in the applicant's opinion, unwarrantedly applied the Constitutional Court's decision of 17 November 1999, contrary to section 53(2) of the Constitutional Court Act. This resulted in the refusal of his claim, which in the applicant's view amounted to a violation of his property rights.
56. While the reasons justifying the application of the Constitutional Court's decision in the applicant's case resulting in refusal of his claim and those justifying the abrogation of section 388(4) are different and should be kept analytically separate, they are nevertheless interrelated and the Court will examine them together when determining whether the interference pursued an aim that was in the public (general) interest and whether it was proportional to that aim. However, it has first to establish whether the interference was lawful.
(b) Whether the interference was “provided for by law”
57. The Court notes that, as a consequence of the abrogation of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act by the Constitutional Court, the Split County Court was under an obligation to apply the Constitutional Court's decision of 17 November 1999 in the (pending) proceedings before it pursuant to the Constitutional Court Act, in particular its section 56(5). The County Court's judgment was thus in accordance with the law. Apart from this constitutional law aspect, the judgment was lawful in its civil law aspect as it was based on the provisions of the 1996 Property Act, as amended by the 2001 Amendment.
(c) Whether the interference was “in the public interest”
58. The Court observes that under section 53(2) of the Constitutional Court Act, the abrogation of a statute or statutory provision has only ex nunc effects. However, this rule – that was motivated by the principle of legal certainty, which aims to protect acquired rights – is not absolute. For instance, that rule does not apply to pending cases, that is to situations where one party to the proceedings claims to have acquired certain rights relying on a statute or statutory provision in force at the time of the institution of the proceedings but later on abrogated by the Constitutional Court before the adoption of a final decision (section 56(5) of the Constitutional Court Act). This provision is not only intended to protect the rights of persons who have suffered consequences of an unconstitutional statute or provision. It also reflects the principle that the courts cannot decide on the basis of a statute or statutory provision that has been abrogated as unconstitutional.
59. In that situation, as well as in those envisaged in other paragraphs of section 56 of the Constitutional Court Act, the protection of the rights of those who have suffered consequences of an unconstitutional statute or statutory provision prevails over the principle of legal certainty, that is, over the acquired rights of those who have benefited from an unconstitutional statute or provision.
60. It follows that the interference in the present case, that is the judgment of the Split County Court rendered in the application of section 56(5) of the Constitutional Court Act served to protect the rights of those who might have suffered consequences of the application of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act before its abrogation. In particular, as it follows from the Constitutional Court's decision, section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act was abrogated because of its retroactive effects and the resultant adverse consequences for the property rights of persons (hereafter: “the third persons”) who had acquired those rights on the basis of: (a) other provisions of that Act (such are, for example, commercial companies, see paragraph 11 above), (b) the Denationalisation Act (former owners or their heirs, see paragraph 12 above) or (c) the Sale to Occupier Act (former tenants of the flats in social ownership let under the specially protected tenancies who purchased their flats and thereby became their owners, see paragraph 8 above).
61. Thus, the Constitutional Court's decision is to be seen as a correction of the unfair effects of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act and was therefore in the “public interest”.
(d) Proportionality of the interference
62. The Court considers that the issue it has to determine is whether the application of the rule embodied in section 56(5) of the Constitutional Court Act – which in the circumstances such as those prevailing in the present case gives precedence to the rights of those who have suffered consequences of an unconstitutional statute or provision over the rights of those who have benefited from it – resulting in the interference with the applicant's property rights, struck the requisite fair balance between the demands of the general interest and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights, and whether it imposed a disproportionate and excessive burden on the applicant (see, inter alia, Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99, 72203/01 and 72552/01, § 93, ECHR 2005-...).
63. In this connection the Court reiterates that in situations such as the one in the present case, involving fundamental reform of a country's political, legal and economic system during the transition from the socialist regime to a democratic state, the national authorities face an exceptionally difficult exercise in having to balance the rights of different persons affected by the process. Under these circumstances, a wide margin of appreciation should be accorded to the respondent State (see, Jahn and Others, cited above, §§ 91-92, and, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 182, ECHR 2004-V).
64. The Court observes that during the socialist regime in Croatia, that is for more than forty years, the acquisition of ownership of the socially owned property by adverse possession was expressly prohibited by law. The Court adheres to the Constitutional Court's view that given the mentioned prohibition the persons enjoying certain rights over socially owned property (see paragraph 6 above) in the socialist period had no need to exercise those rights with the same vigour, or to use appropriate remedies to protect that property against the adverse possessors, as if the prohibition had not existed. Thus, by enacting section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act the legislator indeed legislated retroactively as it attached legal consequences to a previous behaviour to which such consequences could not have been attached at the relevant time. By doing so it failed to give the opportunity to the persons enjoying rights over socially owned property to adjust their conduct.
65. Against this background, the domestic authorities balancing the competing interests took the stance that the mere fact that for a brief period of time amounting to less than three years (between the 1996 Property Act's entry into force on 1 January 1997 and the abrogation of its section 388(4) by the Constitutional Court on 17 November 1999) the possessors of the socially owned property (like the applicant in the present case) had a legal opportunity to become its owners through adverse possession was not sufficient to outweigh the rights and interests of third persons (see paragraph 60 above) over such property. To hold otherwise would mean to allow section 388(4) to subsist and produce consequences even after it had been abrogated as unconstitutional, and effectively prevent those third persons from realising their legally acknowledged rights over the socially owned property.
66. Turning to the particular circumstances of the present case, the Court observes that he domestic courts established: (a) that the land in question had been owned by the applicant's late uncle, (b) that it had been confiscated in 1949 by the socialist authorities and that the State had been recorded as its owner in the land register ever since, (c) that the applicant's mother had been in possession of the land since 1953, as the applicant had continued to be after her death on 16 February 1992. There is no indication that anyone, apart from the State itself, acquired any rights over that land during socialism, or that any (third) person (see paragraph 60 above), except the applicant himself (see paragraph 25 above), has ever claimed any rights in respect of that land. The Court therefore considers that the concerns that prompted the Constitutional Court to abrogate section 388(4) of 1996 Property Act were not present in the applicant's case. That provision was abrogated to protect the rights of third persons whereas in the applicant's case there were no rights of third persons involved.
67. In these circumstances, the Court considers that the applicant, who reasonably relied on legislation, later on abrogated as unconstitutional, should not – in the absence of any damage to the rights of other persons – bear the consequences of the State's own mistake committed by enacting such unconstitutional legislation. In fact, as a consequence of the abrogation, the ownership of the property the applicant acquired by adverse possession on the basis of the provision later on abrogated as unconstitutional, was returned to the State, which thereby benefited from its own mistake. In this connection, the Court reiterates that the risk of any mistake made by the State authority must be borne by the State and the errors must not be remedied at the expense of the individual concerned, especially where no other conflicting private interest is at stake (see, Gashi v. Croatia, no. 32457/05, § 40, 13 December 2007, and Radchikov v. Russia, no. 65582/01, § 50, 24 May 2007).
68. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
69. The applicant also complained about the domestic courts' decisions not to reopen criminal proceedings in which his uncle had been convicted. He relied on Articles 2, 6, 7, 9, 10, 13 and 14 of the Convention, which provide, respectively, for right to life, right to a fair trial, no punishment without law, freedom of thought, conscience and religion, freedom of expression, right to an effective remedy and prohibition of discrimination in the enjoyment of Convention rights.
70. The Court reiterates that according to the established case-law of the Convention organs Article 6 does not apply to proceedings concerning the reopening of a criminal case (see, for example, Carlotto v. Italy, no. 22420/93, Commission decision of 20 May 1997, Decisions and Reports (DR) 89-B, p. 27). It further observes that the remaining complaints do not concern interferences with the applicant's Convention rights. It follows that this part of the application is incompatible ratione materiae et personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
71. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
1. The parties' submissions
72. The applicant claimed 15,000 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage sustained on account of unlawful confiscation and the resultant impossibility to use his property. He also claimed EUR 15,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
73. The Government contested these claims. They submitted, in particular, that the applicant was not entitled to any pecuniary damage on account of the alleged impossibility to use his property because it was undisputed that he had actually used the land in question.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) Pecuniary damage
74. As regards the claim for pecuniary damages, the Court notes that throughout the domestic proceedings and before the Court the applicant argued that he and his late mother had been in continuous possession of the land in question since 1953. That being so the Court cannot accept his argument that he was unable to use it.
75. Furthermore, the Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences. If national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 32-33, ECHR 2000-XI). In this connection the Court notes that under section 428a of the Civil Procedure Act an applicant may file a petition for reopening of the civil proceedings in respect of which the Court has found a violation of the Convention. Given the nature of the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the reasons for which it has found a violation of that Article, the Court considers that in the present case the most appropriate way of repairing the consequences of that violation is to reopen the proceedings complained of. As it follows that the domestic law allows such reparation to be made, the Court considers that there is no call to award the applicant any sum in respect of pecuniary damage.
76. In the light of the foregoing considerations, the Court rejects the applicant's claim for pecuniary damages.
(b) Non-pecuniary damage
77. As regards the claim for non-pecuniary damages, the Court considers that a finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction in the circumstances.
B. Costs and expenses
78. The applicant also claimed EUR 1,000 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and EUR 2,000 for those incurred before the Court.
79. The Government did not express an opinion on the matter.
80. The Court notes that the applicant failed to submit any relevant supporting documents proving that he had actually incurred any costs, although he was invited to do so. It follows that he failed to comply with the requirements set out in Rule 60 § 2 of the Rules of Court. The Court therefore rejects his claim for costs and expenses (Rule 60 § 3).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaint concerning the right of property admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that the finding of a violation constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction for the non-pecuniary damage sustained by the applicant;
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Obiezione preliminare respinta ( non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione di P1-1; Resto inammissibile; danno Materiale - rivendicazione respinta; danno morale – costatazione di violazione sufficiente
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA TRGO C. CROATIA
(Richiesta n. 35298/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
11 giugno 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte fuori in Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Trgo c. Croatia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il19 maggio 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 35298/04) contro la Repubblica della Croazia depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino croato, il Sig. F. T. (“il richiedente”), l’11 ottobre 2004.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. A. N., un avvocato che pratica a Makarska. Il Governo croato (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra Š. Stažnik.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che il suo diritto al pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà era stato violato perché i tribunali nazionali avevano rifiutato di dare credito alla sua proprietà che lui aveva acquisito tramite usucapione.
4. Il 16 gennaio 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di comunicare l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto di proprietà al Governo. Il 4 settembre 2008 la Camera decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1924 e vive a Krilo Jesenice.
A. Controversia della Proprietà
1. Background della causa
(a) proprietà Sociale e la sua trasformazione
6. L'ordinamento giuridico della precedente Repubblica Federale Socialista dell'Iugoslavia (SFRY) distingue fra due tipi di proprietà: proprietà privata (privatno vlasništvo) e proprietà sociale (društveno vlasništvo). Mentre i proprietari di proprietà nella proprietà privata erano individui privati ( persone fisiche) e delle persone giuridiche private chiamate “persone giuridiche civili” (građanske pravne osobe) come le fondazioni, le associazioni e le comunità religiose, la proprietà nella proprietà sociale, secondo la dottrina ufficiale non aveva proprietario. Ciononostante, allo Stato federale, alle Repubbliche costituenti, i municipi che sono unità di governo locale e le altre varie persone giuridiche chiamate “persone giuridiche sociali” (društvene pravne osobe) fra cui le più importanti erano le società, conosciute al tempo come “ organizzazioni di lavoratori associati” (organizacije udruženog rada) e più tardi come “società possedute socialmente” (društvena poduzeća), durante il periodo socialista venivano dati certi diritti di quasi - proprietà sulla proprietà in proprietà sociale, come il diritto di usarla (pravo korištenja), il diritto di amministrarla (pravo upravljanja) o il diritto di disporne (pravo raspolaganja). Anche individui privati potrebbero acquisire certi diritti su proprietà in proprietà sociale. In particolare, molti individui che vivevano in appartamenti socialmente posseduti avevano godevano di affitti particolarmente agevolati (stanarsko pravo) riguardo quegli appartamenti.
7. La Costituzione della Repubblica della Croatia del 1990 (Ustav Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 56/1990 con susseguenti emendamenti) ammise solamente tipo di proprietà: la proprietà privata. Nel periodo fra il 1991 ed il 1997 il Parlamento croato adottò perciò per portare l'ordinamento giuridico del paese in conformità alla sua Costituzione, molti atti legislativi nella prospettiva di trasformare la proprietà sociale in proprietà privata.
8. In particolare, l’Atto degli Affitti Specialmente Protetti (Vendita ad Occupante) (Zakon o prodaji stanova na kojima postoji stanarsko pravo, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 27/1991 con emendamenti susseguenti-“ Atto della Vendita ad Occupante”) che entrò in vigore 19 giugno 1991 abilitò i possessori di affitti specialmente protetti ad acquistare i loro appartamenti che erano in proprietà sociale sotto condizioni favorevoli e con ciò divenirne proprietari.
9. L’Atto di Trasformazione di Società Socialmente Possedute (Zakon o pretvorbi društvenih poduzeća, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 19/1991 con emendamenti susseguenti) che entrò in vigore il 1 maggio 1991 prevedeva che tutte “le società socialmente possedute” dovevano trasformarsi in società commerciali, in particolare in società a responsabilità limitata o in società per azioni.
10. Il 1 gennaio 1997 entrarono in vigore sia l’Atto di Proprietà e degli Altri Diritti In Rem (Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 91/1996 28 ottobre 1996-“L’Atto di Proprietà del 1996”), e l'Atto sul Risarcimento e la Restituzione della Proprietà Presa Durante il Regime Comunista iugoslavo (Zakon o naknadi za imovinu oduzetu za vrijeme jugoslavenske komunističke vladavine, Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 92/1996, con emendamenti susseguenti-“l’Atto di denazionalizzazione ”),. Con entrata in vigore di questi due Atti la trasformazione di proprietà sociale in proprietà privata era estesamente completata.
11. L’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 prevedeva che con la sua entrata in vigore i possessori dei diritti ad utilizzare, amministrare e disporre di una proprietà socialmente posseduta (vedere paragrafo 6 sopra) dovevano diventare i proprietari di quella proprietà. Riguardo,in particolare, alle società commerciali create tramite trasformazione di società socialmente possedute facendo seguito all’Atto di Trasformazione di Società Socialmente Possedute, l’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 prevedeva che quelle società dovevano già dal momento della loro trasformazione essere considerate proprietarie di proprietà socialmente possedute a riguardo delle quali loro prima detenevano dei diritti di utilizzo, di amministrazione e di disporne (vedere sezione 360(1) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996, paragrafo 28 sotto).
12. L'Atto di Denazionalizzazione prevedeva che riguardo certe proprietà che erano state acquisite tramite nazionalizzazione o sequestro dai suoi proprietari precedenti durante il socialismo e trasferite in proprietà sociale ci doveva essere restituzione in natura. Abilitava con ciò i proprietari precedenti o i loro eredi ad ottenere la proprietà di simili proprietà che sino a quel momento era stata una proprietà socialmente posseduta.
(b) l'Acquisizione di proprietà in proprietà socialmente posseduta tramite usucapione
13. La legislazione della precedente SFRY, in particolare nella sezione 29 dell’Atto di Proprietà Di base del 1980 (vedere paragrafo 27 sotto), proibì l'acquisizione della proprietà di proprietà socialmente possedute tramite usucapione ( dosjelost).
14. Incorporando L’Atto di Proprietà di base del 1980 nell'ordinamento giuridico croato l’8 ottobre 1991, il Parlamento abrogò questo provvedimento (vedere paragrafo 27 sotto).
15. Successivamente,il nuovo Atto di Proprietà del 1996 prevedeva nella sezione 388(4) che il periodo prima dell’8 ottobre 1991 sarebbe stato incluso nel calcolo del periodo per l'acquisizione di proprietà tramite usucapione del patrimonio immobiliare socialmente posseduto (vedere paragrafo 28 sotto).
16. In seguito a molti ricorsi per revisione costituzionale (prijedlog za ocjenu ustavnosti) presentati da precedenti proprietari di proprietà che erano state espropriate durante il socialismo, l’8 luglio 1999 la Corte Costituzionale (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) accettò l'iniziativa, e decise di avviare procedimenti per fare una revisione della costituzionalità della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 (decisioni N. U-I-58/1997, UI-235/1997, U-I-237/1997, U-I-1053/1997 ed U-I-1054/1997 dell’ 8 luglio 1999, Gazzetta Ufficiale, n. 80/1999 del 30 luglio 1999).
17. Il 17 novembre 1999 la Corte Costituzionale abrogò la sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 ( decisioni N. U-I-58/1997, U-I-235/1997, U-I-237/1997, U-I-1053/1997 ed U-I-1054/1997 del 17 novembre 1999, Gazzetta Ufficiale, n. 137/99 4 dicembre 1999). Sosteneva che la disposizione contestata aveva effetti retroattivi con conseguenze avverse per i diritti di terze persone ed era perciò incostituzionale.
La decisione della Corte Costituzionale nella sua parte attinente si legge come segue:
DECISIONE
I.
Le disposizioni della sezione... 388 paragrafo 4 dell’ [Atto di proprietà del 1996] sono abrogate con la presente.
II.
...
Ragioni
I.
I ricorrenti considerano che la disposizione contestata tende a favore di vari utenti di proprietà che l’utilizzano senza alcun titolo, abilitandoli ad acquisire proprietà a spesa dei [precedenti] proprietari dai quali fu presa durante il Comunismo... Loro indicano anche [l’applicazione delle regole dell’] usucapione retroattiva non dovrebbe essere concessa.
...
Il ricorso [per revisione costituzionale] è ben fondato .
La disposizione contestata attribuisce una qualità comune ad un certo stato di fatti persino rispetto al periodo durante il quale la qualità fu esclusa espressamente dalla legge.
Vale a dire, la sezione 29 [dell’Atto di Proprietà di Base del 1980] prevedeva che il possesso di proprietà socialmente posseduta non poteva essere acquisito tramite usucapione. Questa disposizione fu abrogata dalla sezione 3 dell'Atto sull'Incorporazione [Atto di Proprietà di base del 1980] (...) , come risultato di ciò anche ogni patrimonio immobiliare che era stato in proprietà sociale prima dell'adozione della Costituzione[nuova del 1990] , nonostante il suo status di periodo di transizione, venne sotto il regime generale riguardo [all'acquisizione di proprietà tramite] usucapione.
Quindi, nella prospettiva della corte, avendo abrogato in casi particolari importi all’abrogazione solo ex nunc [ukidanje] e non all’ annullamento ex tunc [iponištavanje], si doveva concludere che il periodo di proprietà della proprietà socialmente posseduta prima dell’ 8 ottobre 1991 ( giorno di entrata in vigore dell'Atto sull'Incorporazione [Atto di Proprietà di Base del 1980]) non può essere preso in considerazione ai fini di acquisire una proprietà tramite usucapione...
Vale a dire, i possessori della proprietà, a riguardo della quale l'acquisizione di proprietà tramite usucapione fu esclusa espressamente dalla legge erano consapevoli che questa proprietà non era suscettibile di [acquisizione di proprietà tramite] usucapione il che era anche noto ai possessori di [vari] diritti sulla stessa proprietà (il diritto di amministrare, di usare e di disporne ) che perciò non [dovevano] utilizzare vie di ricorso attinenti contro il rischio di perdere la proprietà a causa della sua acquisizione da parte dei suoi possessori tramite usucapione. Nella richiesta della disposizione contestata può accadere perciò, che possessori di certi diritti di proprietà perdano questi diritti che la Costituzione concede solamente eccezionalmente e con risarcimento.
Inoltre, la disposizione contestata costituisce una possibile acquisizione di proprietà di certe proprietà anche prima che il tempo-limite dell'acquisizione tramite usucapione cominci a decorrere, mentre [allo stesso tempo] i tempi-limite per l'acquisizione tramite usucapione di molti tipi di proprietà precedentemente possedute socialmente vengono davvero prolungati (la proprietà posseduta dalla Repubblica di Croazia, contee ed unità di autogoverno locale...).
[Per queste ragioni], la corte costata che la disposizione contestata non è, nel senso effettivo [effettivamente incostituzionale], in conformità ai valori più alti [dell'ordine costituzionale] dell'uguaglianza, dell'inviolabilità della proprietà e dell'articolo di legge custodito nell’ Articolo 3 della Costituzione, e della garanzia di proprietà custodita nell’Articolo 48 paragrafo 1 della Costituzione.
Inoltre, la corte conclude che la disposizione contestata ha effetti retroattivi per la qual ragione non è in conformità con la disposizione dell’ Articolo 90 paragrafo 2 della Costituzione.
...
..., [La] corte costata che determinando gli effetti retroattivi della suddetta disposizione della sezione 388 paragrafo 4 [dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996], la procedura prescritta dagli Articoli di Procedura del Parlamento croato non fu osservata.
Per la corte, quando [nell'elaborazione legislativa] il legislatore viola le regole di procedura da lui stesso stabilite.... ... l'atto legislativo adottato in modo così improprio, non è in conformità con... [il principio dell’] articolo di legge custodito nell’ Articolo 3 della Costituzione.
Questo vuole dire inoltre che... la disposizione contestata... non è nemmeno nel senso formale [incostituzionalità formale] in ottemperanza con l’Articolo 90 paragrafo 2 della Costituzione.
2. Procedimenti nella particolare causa
18. Nel 1997 il richiedente avviò procedimenti civili di fronte alla Corte Municipale di Makarska (Općinski sud u Makarskoj) contro il Municipio di Podgora (Općina Podgora) ed lo Stato chiedendo una dichiarazione della sua proprietà di certe aree di terra e la loro registrazione a suo nome nel registro della terra. Il richiedente rivendicò che la proprietà in questione che era stata posseduta dal suo defunto zio ed era stata confiscata nel 1949 dalle autorità socialiste. La defunta madre del richiedente era in possesso della terra dal 1953, come il richiedente aveva continuato ad esserlo dopo la sua morte del 16 febbraio 1992. Dato che il periodo prescritto per l'acquisizione di proprietà tramite usucapione era passato, il richiedente rivendicava di avere acquisito la proprietà della terra.
19. Il 16 febbraio 2001 la Corte Municipale decise a favore del richiedente ed ordinò che venisse registrato nel registro della terra come proprietario della proprietà. La corte sostenne:
“Dopo avere trovato che la madre del querelante era un possessore in buona fede del patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto, occorreva stabilire se lei ne era in possesso per tutto il periodo legale necessario ad acquisire la proprietà tramite usucapione.
Una volta che fu abrogata la sezione 29 dell’Atto di Proprietà Di base del 1991... è divenuto possibile acquisire una proprietà tramite usucapione del patrimonio immobiliare socialmente posseduto... [Anche], sotto la sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996, nel calcolare il periodo per l'acquisizione tramite usucapione del patrimonio immobiliare che fu posseduto socialmente l’8 ottobre 1991, anche il periodo prima di questa data doveva essere preso in considerazione.
La Sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 fu abrogata con una decisione della Corte Costituzionale... il che vuole dire che, nel periodo prima della sua abrogazione, questa disposizione era in vigore, cioè fino al tardo 1999...
Per acquisire una proprietà tramite usucapione del patrimonio immobiliare Statale, sotto la sezione 159(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996, un periodo due volte lungo come quello esposto nei paragrafi 2 e 3 di questa sezione è richiesto ciò significa che riguardo alla terra in questione occorreva una proprietà imperturbata e continua in buon fede per un periodo di quaranta anni.
Avendo riguardo al fatto che... il querelante aveva, grazie a sua madre, una proprietà continua della terra in oggetto fin dal 1953, si doveva concludere che lui aveva acquisito la proprietà tramite usucapione...”
20. Su ricorso da parte di ambo i convenuti, il 18 giugno 2004 la corte di contea di Spalato Court (Županijski sud u Splitu) invertì la sentenza di prima-istanza e respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente per i seguenti motivi:
“È incontrastato fra le parti che:
- il patrimonio immobiliare in questione fu confiscato dal predecessore legale del querelante... nel 1949;
- il convenuto fu registrato [come proprietario] nel registro della terra sulla base della decisione di sequestro;
- il querelante ed il suo legale predecessore hanno avuto una proprietà continua [a riguardo] fin dal 1953...
La corte di prima -istanza errò nel trovare che il querelante aveva acquisito proprietà tramite usucapione del patrimonio immobiliare in questione perché lui ed il suo legale predecessore avevano proprietà continua dal 1953, sulla base della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 che fu abrogato successivamente con una decisione della Corte Costituzionale... Nella sua decisione la Corte Costituzionale sostenne che l’incostituzionalità della disposizione abrogata già esisteva prima di essere abrogata, cioè , fin dalla sua entrata in vigore, una conclusione che è accettata anche da questa corte. Di conseguenza, irrispettoso del fatto che la sezione 388(4) era in vigore sino alla pubblicazione della decisione della Corte Costituzionale sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale, la decisione della [corte di prima -istanza] non poteva basarsi su una disposizione incostituzionale.”
21. Il richiedente presentò un reclamo costituzionale contro che sentenza, chiedendo inter alia, una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà. Il 3 marzo 2005 la Corte Costituzionale respinse l'azione di reclamo del richiedente, trovando che:
“Durante i... procedimenti... la Corte Costituzionale ha stabilito che [la sentenza di seconda -istanza] fu raggiunta in applicazione delle disposizioni attinenti di diritto sostanziale, e che le sentenze legali della corte di seconda -istanza furono ben ragionate , e che non c'è stata perciò nessuna violazione dei diritti di proprietà del reclamante...”
B. Riapertura dei procedimenti penali
22. Nel 1994 il richiedente richiese la riapertura dei procedimenti penali che erano terminati nel 1945 ed in cui era stato dichiarato colpevole suo zio.
23. Il 14 ottobre 2003 la Corte di Contea di Spalato dichiarò la richiesta del richiedente inammissibile, trovando che non gli era stato concesso di fare tale richiesta. Su ricorso, la Corte Suprema (Vrhovni sud Republike Hrvatske) sostenne la decisione di prima -istanza il 18 febbraio 2004.
24. Il 30 giugno 2004 la Corte Costituzionale dichiarò successivamente, l'azione di reclamo del richiedente inammissibile per mancanza di giurisdizione.
C. I procedimenti amministrativi per la restituzione della proprietà confiscata
25. Il 5 maggio 1997 il richiedente fece domanda all'autorità amministrativa competente chiedendo la restituzione delle aree sopracitate di terra che erano state confiscate dal suo defunto zio nel 1949 dalle autorità socialiste. Nel fare così lui si appellò all'Atto di Denazionalizzazione. Sembra che i procedimenti furono sospesi più tardi e che sono formalmente ancora pendenti.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. L’Atto della Corte Costituzionale
26. L’Atto Costituzionale del 1999 sulla Corte Costituzionale della Repubblica di Croazia (Ustavni zakon o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 99/1999 del 29 settembre 1999 che entrò in vigore il 24 settembre 1999-“l’ Atto della Corte Costituzionale”), corretto con gli Emendamenti del 2002 (Ustavni zakon o izmjenama i dopunama Ustavnog zakona o Ustavnom sudu Republike Hrvatske, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 29/2002 del 22 marzo 2002 che entrò in vigore il 15 marzo 2002), nelle sue parti attinenti si legge come segue:
Sezione 53
“(1) la Corte Costituzionale abrogherà [ukinuti] uno statuto o le sue disposizioni se trova che sono incompatibili con la Costituzione...
(2) a meno che la Corte Costituzionale decida altrimenti, gli statuti abrogati [l'ukinuti] o le loro disposizioni cesseranno di avere vigore legale in data della pubblicazione della decisione della Corte Costituzionale sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale [cioè ex nunc].
(3)...”
Sezione 56
“(1) la sentenza definitiva per un reato penale basato su una disposizione legale che è stata abrogata come contraria alla Costituzione cesserà di produrre effetti legali dal giorno dell'entrata in vigore della decisione della Corte Costituzionale che abroga la disposizione legale sulla base della quale la sentenza fu resa e può essere accantonata con [un ricorso per] riapertura di procedimenti penali.
(2) ogni persona fisica o legale che ha depositato con la Corte Costituzionale un ricorso per fare una revisione di costituzionalità di una disposizione legale, o una costituzionalità o legalità di una disposizione di legislazione subordinata, e il cui ricorso è stato accettato dalla Corte Costituzionale e [quella] disposizione abrogata [ex nunc], ha diritto a depositare con l'autorità competente [un ricorso per riaprire i procedimenti] e di chiedere che la decisione basata sui provvedimenti… abrogarti... venga accantonata.
(3)...
(4) [i ricorsi per riaprire dei procedimenti] menzionato nei paragrafi 2 e 3 di questa sezione possono essere depositati entro cinque mesi dalla pubblicazione della decisione della Corte Costituzionale sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale .
(5) nei procedimenti in cui nessuna decisione definitiva è stata adottata prima della data dell'entrata in vigore della decisione della Corte Costituzionale che abrogava uno statuto, [...] o le sue disposizioni, e questo statuto [...] è direttamente applicabile alla causa, lo statuto abrogato [...] o le sue disposizioni non saranno applicate in data dell'entrata in vigore della decisione della Corte Costituzionale.”
B. L’Atto di Proprietà Di base del 1980
27. La Sezione 29 dell'Atto delle Relazioni di Proprietà Di base (Zakon od osnovnim vlasničkopravnim odnosima, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale Socialista dell'Iugoslavia N. 6/1980 e 36/1990 che entrò in vigore il 1 settembre 1980-“L’Atto di Proprietà Di base del 1980”) proibì l'acquisizione tramite usucapione di proprietà delle proprietà socialmente possedute.
La Sezione 3 dell'Atto sull'Incorporazione dell'Atto sulle Relazioni di Proprietà Di base (Zakon o preuzimanju zakona o osnovnim vlasničkopravnim odnosima, Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Croazia n. 53/1991 dell’8 ottobre 1991) abrogò la sezione 29 dell’Atto di Proprietà Di base .
C. L’Atto di Proprietà del 1996
28. La parte attinente dell’Atto di Proprietà e di Altri Diritti In Rem (Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 91/1996 del 28 ottobre 1996 che entrò in vigore il 1 gennaio 1997-“l’Atto di Proprietà del 1996”), come in vigore al tempo materiale, si legge come segue:
Parte tre
DIRITTO DI PROPRIETÀ
...
Capitolo 6.
L'ACQUISIZIONE DI PROPRIETÀ
I motivi legali per l'acquisizione
Sezione 114
“(1) la proprietà può essere acquisita tramite operazione legale, tramite decisione di una corte o di altra autorità pubblica, tramite successione o tramite operazione di legge.”
Acquisizione [di proprietà] tramite operazione di legge...
...
(d) l'Acquisizione tramite usucapione
Sezione 159
“(1) la proprietà può essere acquisita tramite usucapione sulla base della proprietà esclusiva di una certa proprietà... se simile proprietà dura da un periodo di tempo determinato dalla legge continuamente e se il possessore è capace di essere il proprietario di simile proprietà.
(2) un possessore esclusivo che possiede sotto giusto titolo equo , in buona fede e la cui proprietà è libera da vizio acquisirà la proprietà di una proprietà mobile dopo tre anni e di un patrimonio immobiliare dopo dieci anni.
(3) un possessore esclusivo che possiede almeno in buona fede acquisirà la proprietà di una proprietà mobile dopo dieci anni e di un patrimonio immobiliare dopo venti anni di proprietà esclusiva e continua.
(4) un possessore esclusivo di una proprietà posseduta dalla Repubblica di Croazia... acquisirà la proprietà tramite usucapione una volta che la sua... proprietà dura continuamente per un periodo due volte lungo come che stabilito nei paragrafi 2 e 3 di questa sezione.”
Parte nove
DISPOSIZIONI TRANZITORIE E DEFINITIVE
Capitolo 1.
TRASFORMAZIONE DELLA PROPRIETÀ SOCIALE
Disposizioni Generali sulla trasformazione
Sezione 359
“(1)...
(2) il diritto di proprietà e gli altri diritti in rem acquisito sotto le disposizioni di questo Atto su trasformazione dei diritti per amministrare, uso o si sbarazza di proprietà socialmente posseduta... sarà considerato acquisito sotto la condizione che loro non sono in collisione coi diritti di altre persone su [simile] proprietà sotto la legislazione di denationalisation.
Trasformazione dei diritti per amministrare, uso e dispone di [la proprietà socialmente posseduta]
Sezione 360
“(1) il diritto per amministrare, uso o si sbarazza di proprietà socialmente posseduta divenne con la trasformazione [la privatizzazione] del suo possessore il diritto di proprietà di che persona che per la trasformazione divenne il successore legale universale del possessore precedente...
(2) il diritto per amministrare, uso o si sbarazza di proprietà socialmente posseduta che di fronte all'entrata in vigore di questo Atto non fu trasformato in una materia del diritto di proprietà, con l'entrata di questo Atto in vigore divenuto [suo] il diritto di proprietà...
(3) le disposizioni di paragrafo 1 e 2 di questa sezione sarà fatto domanda, mutatis mutandis, agli altri diritti in rem.
(4) registrazione del diritto per amministrare, uso o dispone di [possedette socialmente proprietà] nel registro di terra... sarà considerato registrazione del diritto di proprietà.”
Presunzioni
Sezione 362
“(1) si considera che il proprietario di un patrimonio immobiliare socialmente posseduto è una persona registrata nel registro di terra come un possessore del diritto per amministrare, l'uso o dispone di quel il patrimonio immobiliare.
(2)...”
Protezione dei diritti trasformati
Sezione 363
“(1) persona il cui diritto di proprietà è derivato dal diritto precedente per amministrare, uso o si sbarazza di proprietà socialmente posseduta... avrà diritto a proteggerlo come qualsiasi il proprietario...”
...
Capitolo 4.
DEFINITIVO DISPOSIZIONI
Sezione 388
“(1) l'acquisizione, la modifica, gli effetti legali o la conclusione dei diritti in rem dopo l'entrata in vigore di questo Atto saranno valutati sulla base delle sue disposizioni...
(2) l'acquisizione, la modifica, gli effetti legali e la conclusione dei diritti in rem sino all'entrata in vigore di questo Atto saranno valutati sulla base di articoli applicabili al momento dell'acquisizione, della modifica o della conclusione di qui diritti o dei loro effetti legali.
(3) se i tempi-limite prescritti per l'acquisizione e la conclusione dei diritti in rem stabiliti in questo Atto cominciassero a decorrere prima della sua entrata in vigore, loro continueranno a decorrere facendo seguito ai paragrafi 2 di questa sezione...
(4) nel calcolare il periodo per l'acquisizione tramite usucapione di un patrimonio immobiliare che è stato posseduto socialmente l’8 ottobre 1991, e per l'acquisizione di [altri] diritti in rem su simile proprietà, anche il periodo prima di quella data sarà preso in considerazione.”
D. L'Emendamento del 2001 all’Atto di Proprietà del 1996
29. La parte attinente dell'Emendamento del 2001 all’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 Zakon o izmjeni i dopuni Zakona vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 114/2001 del 20 dicembre 2001 che entrò in vigore nello stesso giorno) che fu decretata a seguito dell'abrogazione della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 della Corte Costituzionale del 17 novembre 1999, si legge come segue:
Sezione 2
“Nella sezione 388, un nuovo paragrafo 4 sarà aggiunto dopo il paragrafo 3, e si legge:
'Nel calcolare il periodo per l'acquisizione tramite usucapione di un patrimonio immobiliare che era posseduto socialmente l’ 8 ottobre 1991, e per l'acquisizione di [altri] diritti in rem su simile proprietà, il periodo prima a quella data non sarà preso in considerazione.'”
E. L'Atto di Denazionalizzazione del 1996
30. L'Atto sul Risarcimento , e la Restituzione della Proprietà Presa Durante il Regime Comunista iugoslavo Zakon o naknadi za imovinu oduzetu za vrijeme jugoslavenske komunističke vladavine, Gazzetta Ufficiale N. 92/1996, 92/1999 (corrigendum), 80/2002 e 81/2002 (corrigendum) che entrò in vigore il 1 gennaio 1997-“L’Atto di Denazionalizzazione del 1996”) abilita i precedenti proprietari di proprietà confiscata o nazionalizzata, o i loro eredi in prima linea di successione (discendenti diretti ed un consorte), di chiedere sotto certe condizioni la restituzione o il risarcimento per la proprietà sequestrata.
F. L’Atto di Procedura Civile
31. Il Civile del 1977 Procedura Atto (Zakon postupku di parničnom di o, Ufficiale Pubblica della Repubblica Federale e Socialista dell'Iugoslavia N. 4/1977, 36/1977 (il corrigendum), 36/1980, 69/1982, 58/1984, 74/1987, 57/1989, 20/1990, 27/1990 e 35/1991 ed Ufficiale Pubblicano della Repubblica di Croatia N. 53/1991, 91/1992, 112/1999 117/2003 e 84/2008 che entrarono in vigore 1 luglio 1977-“il Procedura Atto Civile”), corretto coi 2003 Emendamenti (Ufficiale Pubblica n. 117/2003 che entrarono in vigore 1 dicembre 2003) nelle sue letture di parte attinenti siccome segue:
Riapertura dei procedimenti che seguono la sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani a Strasburgo che trova una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o di una libertà
Sezione 428a
“(1) quando la Corte europea dei Diritti umani ha trovato una violazione di un diritto umano o di una libertà fondamentale garantiti dalla Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e delle Libertà Fondamentali o inoltre dai protocolli supplementari ratificati dalla Repubblica di Croazia, una parte può, entro trenta giorni dalla sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani, introdurre un ricorso con la corte nella Repubblica di Croazia che giudicò in prima istanza nei procedimenti in cui fu resa la decisione che viola il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale, per accantonare la decisione con cui il diritto umano o la libertà fondamentale sono stati violati.
(2) i procedimenti designati nel paragrafo 1 di questa sezione saranno condotti applicando, mutatis mutandis, le disposizioni sulla riapertura dei procedimenti.
(3) nei procedimenti riaperti i tribunali sono costretti a rispettare le opinioni giuridiche espresse nella sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei Diritti umani che trova una violazione di un diritto umano fondamentale o della libertà.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
32. Il richiedente chiese di avere acquisito ex lege la proprietà delle aree summenzionate di terra tramite usucapione sulla base della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996. Lui si lamentò che il rifiuto dei tribunali nazionali di dare credito alla sua proprietà nei procedimenti civili sopra -perché questa disposizione era stata abrogata dalla Corte Costituzionale mentre quei procedimenti erano pendenti-aveva violato il suo diritto alla proprietà. Lui spiegò che sotto il diritto nazionale la proprietà fu acquisita tramite usucapione jure ipso, cioè quando le condizioni sono state soddisfatte, e che lui aveva soddisfatto quelle condizioni prima della decisione della Corte Costituzionale decisioni che hanno solamente effetti ex nunc. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
33. Il Governo contestò questo argomento.
A. Ammissibilità
34. Il Governo contestò l'ammissibilità di questa azione di reclamo per due motivi. Dibatté che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali e che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non era applicabile alla presente causa.
1. Il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
35. Il Governo notò che, a parte portare un'azione civile nella prospettiva di essere dichiarato il proprietario della proprietà in questione sulla base della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996, il richiedente aveva avviato anche procedimenti amministrativi sotto l’Atto di Denazionalizzazione chiedendo la restituzione della stessa proprietà che era stata confiscata da suo defunto zio e che questi procedimenti erano ancora pendenti.
36. Che essendo così, il Governo ha ritenuto che in una situazione in cui un richiedente tenta di usare due vie di ricorso disponibili a livello nazionale allo stesso momento in modo da asserire i suoi diritti, la norma dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali richiedeva che venissero utilizzate i rimedi, fino al livello più alto di giurisdizione. Poiché i procedimenti amministrativi per la restituzione di proprietà sotto l'Atto di Denazionalizzazione erano ancora pendente, il Governo dibatté che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente era prematura.
37. Aggiunse che l'Atto di Denazionalizzazione era la legislazione adottata precisamente ai fini di chiarire i problemi relativi alla restituzione di proprietà espropriate durante il regime socialista. Così, i procedimenti amministrativi avviati sulla base di questo Atto siano la via di ricorso primaria da utilizzare dalle persone in situazioni comparabile a quella del richiedente.
38. Il richiedente non ha fatto commenti su questa questione.
39. Per la Corte, è sufficiente notare che sotto l’Atto di Denazionalizzazione le sole persone sole a cui viene concessa la restituzione, o il risarcimento della proprietà sequestrata durante il regime socialista sono i precedenti proprietari o i loro eredi in prima linea di successione cioè il consorte di un precedente proprietario e i discendenti diretti. Poiché il richiedente è solamente un nipote di suo zio defunto in oggetto a lui non è concessa la restituzione della proprietà. Di conseguenza, la sua richiesta per la restituzione di fronte alle autorità amministrative, nella prospettiva della Corte non ha nessuna prospettive di successo.
40. N segue che l'obiezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
2. L'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
41. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non aveva mai avuto un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Considera incontrastato che lui non aveva mai avuto “godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà sul patrimonio immobiliare in oggetto.” Nella sua prospettiva, il richiedente aveva solamente una rivendicazione condizionale riguardo a quelle aree di terra, sulla base della quale pensava di poter acquisire, tramite usucapione, il diritto di proprietà. Sotto il diritto nazionale, il richiedente non poteva avere comunque, un'aspettativa legittima di vedere la sua rivendicazione soddisfatta
42. Il Governo ammise che in uno specifico momento nel tempo, il legislatore aveva adottato la disposizione sotto cui sarebbe stato ammesso il ricorso condizionale del richiedente ammesso che la disposizione rimanesse in vigore. Comunque, questa disposizione era stata abrogata dalla Corte Costituzionale come incostituzionale. Di conseguenza, solamente al tempo di passare la sentenza di prima -istanza, fino a quando la corte di seconda -istanza l'invertì, il richiedente non poteva avere un'aspettativa legittima di acquisire la proprietà tramite usucapione, perché era stato chiaro che lui non aveva soddisfatto i requisiti necessari e che il tribunale di prima -istanza non poteva basare la sua sentenza su quella disposizione.
43. Il richiedente non era d'accordo.
44. La Corte reitera che un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente dal momento che le decisioni contestate si riferiscono alla sua “ proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. “Le proprietà” può essere “proprietà esistente” o rivendicazioni che sono stabilite sufficientemente da essere riguardate come “ beni.” La Corte si è riferita anche a rivendicazioni a riguardo delle quali un richiedente può dibattere di avere almeno un’ “aspettativa legittima” che loro verrano realizzate, cioè , che otterrà un godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (vedere, inter alia, Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. Repubblica ceca (dec.) [GC], n. 39794/98, ECHR 2002-VII, § 69, e Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 ECHR 2004-IX). Comunque, un'aspettativa legittima non ha un’esistenza indipendente; deve essere abbinata ad un interesse di proprietà che deve essere lui stesso sufficientemente stabilito (vedere Kopecký, citata sopra, §§ 45-53). In realtà, la questione per la Corte è quindi, se il richiedente ha una rivendicazione sufficientemente stabilita da richiedere la protezione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
45. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte nota che il richiedente suggerì che la proprietà della proprietà in questione è stata assegnata legalmente a lui senza l'intervento dei tribunali (vedere, per implicazione contraria, Kopecký, citata sopra, § 41) mentre il Governo dibatté che lui aveva una“rivendicazione” piuttosto che un “proprietà esistente.”
46. La Corte nota che sotto la legge croata la proprietà , in principio sarà acquisita tramite usucapione jure ipso quando tutte le condizioni legali vengono soddisfatte. Nota anche comunque, che la questione se il richiedente abbia o meno soddisfatto le condizioni legali per acquisire la proprietà tramite usucapione dovrebbe essere determinata in procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali competenti, e che lui aveva bisogno di una sentenza dichiaratoria che desse credito alla sua proprietà per godere efficacemente della sua proprietà. La Corte considera perciò che l'interesse della proprietà a cui il richiedente si è appellati era nella natura di una rivendicazione e non può essere caratterizzato come una “proprietà esistente” all'interno del significato della giurisprudenza della Corte.
47. La Corte reitera che dove un interesse di proprietà è nella natura di una rivendicazione, può essere riguardato come un “ bene” solamente se c'è una base sufficiente per quell’ interesse nella legge nazionale o, in altre parole, quando la rivendicazione è sufficientemente stabilita da essere esecutiva (vedere paragrafo 44 sopra, così come Kopecký, citata sopra, §§ 49 e 52; e Stran Raffinerie greche e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia, 9 dicembre 1994, § 59 la Serie A n. 301-B).
48. Sembrerebbe dalle sentenze dei tribunali nazionali (vedere paragrafi 19-20 sopra) che fosse incontestato che il richiedente e sua madre erano rimasti in proprietà esclusiva e continua in buona fede della proprietà in oggetto fin dal 1953, quindi per più di quaranta anni, e che lui aveva così già nel 1993 soddisfatto le condizioni legali per acquisire la proprietà tramite usucapione. Può essere dedotto perciò che il richiedente, sulla base della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996, ex lege divenne il proprietario della terra in questione il 1 gennaio 1997 quando l'Atto entrò in vigore. Questa disposizione rimase in vigore finché la Corte Costituzionale l'abrogò pressoché tre anni più tardi. La Corte considera così che la rivendicazione del richiedente aveva una base sufficiente nella legge nazionale da avere la qualifica di “bene” protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
49. Ne segue che anche l'obiezione del Governo riguardo alla non-applicabilità dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 deve essere respinta.
50. La Corte conclude inoltre che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota anche che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
51. Il Governo presentò che la causa non rivelava nessuna interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente. Spiegò che il richiedente si era lamentato contro la sentenza di seconda -istanza che aveva revocato quella della corte di prima -istanza passata a suo favore. Comunque, poiché lui non poteva acquisire un qualsiasi diritto sotto la sentenza di prima -istanza che non era divenuta definitiva, la sentenza della corte di seconda -istanza non poteva interferire coi suoi diritti di proprietà.
52. Disse inoltre che, presumendo anche che ci fosse stata interferenza, era stata giustificata come legale, in quanto perseguiva uno scopo legittimo e proporzionato. In particolare, dibatté che la causa dovrebbe essere vista nel contesto dell’ elaborazione della restituzione, ed il risarcimento della proprietà sequestrata durante il regime socialista il cui processo ha comportato delle considerazioni comprensive morali, politiche ed economiche . In simili situazioni che necessariamente comportano il bilanciamento di interessi contraddittori fra gli utenti correnti della proprietà e le persone da cui è stata presa, lo Stato aveva un margine ampio di valutazione. La Corte della Contea di Spalato nella sua sentenza si è appellata alla decisione della Corte Costituzionale che abrogò la sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 perché concedette retroattivamente l’acquisizione della proprietà di una proprietà socialmente posseduta tramite usucapione a persone che mantenevano la proprietà stessa senza qualsiasi titolo e che sapevano che loro non avrebbero potuto acquisire la loro proprietà tramite usucapione. In simili circostanze la disposizione contestata aveva creato così una situazione legale e completamente nuova che riconosceva a queste persone un trattamento preferenziale rispetto ai precedenti proprietari a cu la proprietà era stata presa con la forza durante il regime socialista. Perciò, l'abrogazione aveva avuto lo scopo legittimo di proteggere i diritti altrui e mantenere il principio della certezza legale. Inoltre, la decisione della Corte Costituzionale non era stata contraria al principio della proporzionalità perché adottando l’Atto di Denazionalizzazione lo Stato aveva regolato il problema della restituzione e del risarcimento delle proprietà nazionalizzata e confiscata, ed era sotto questo Atto che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto asserire , e in realtà lo aveva fatto , il suo diritto riguardo alla proprietà confiscata da suo defunto zio.
53. Il richiedente non era d'accordo.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Se c'era stata un'interferenza col godimento pacifico della “' proprietà” '
54. Alla luce della costatazione sopra per cui la rivendicazione del richiedente era sufficientemente stabilita da qualificare come un “ bene” che richiedeva la protezione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che il rifiuto del tribunale di seconda -istanza di accordare questa rivendicazione e con ciò riconoscere il possesso del richiedente della proprietà in oggetto costituiva indubbiamente un’interferenza col suo diritto alla proprietà.
55. In modo da stabilire ulteriormente se questa interferenza era giustificata si doveva tener presente che il richiedente non si lamentò dell'abrogazione della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà della Corte Costituzionale nella sua decisione del 17 novembre 1999, e delle ragioni dietro a questa decisione. Piuttosto, lui si lamentò che, diversamente dal tribunale di prima -istanza, la corte di seconda -istanza non aveva dato credito alle conseguenze legali che questa disposizione aveva già prodotto prima che fosse stata abrogata, vale a dire che lui aveva ex lege acquisito il possesso della proprietà in questione. Invece, la Corte della Contea di Spalato aveva, nell'opinione del richiedente, ingiustificatamente applicato la decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 17 novembre 1999, contraria alla sezione 53(2) dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale. Questo diede luogo al rifiuto della sua rivendicazione che nella prospettiva del richiedente corrispose ad una violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà.
56. Mentre le ragioni che giustificano la richiesta della decisione della Corte Costituzionale nella causa del richiedente che portarono al rifiuto della sua rivendicazione e quelle che giustificarono l'abrogazione della sezione 388(4) sono diverse e dovrebbero essere tenute analiticamente separate, loro sono ciononostante collegate e la Corte li esaminerà insieme nel determinare se l'interferenza ha perseguito uno scopo che era nell’interesse pubblico (generale) ed era proporzionale a quello scopo. Deve comunque prima stabilire se l'interferenza era legale.
(b) Se l'interferenza era “prevista dalla legge”
57. La Corte nota che, come conseguenza dell'abrogazione della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 della Corte Costituzionale, la Corte di Contea di Spalato era sotto l’ obbligo di applicare la decisione della Corte Costituzionale del 17 novembre 1999 nei procedimenti (pendenti) di fronte a sé facendo seguito all’Atto della Corte Costituzionale, in particolare la sua sezione 56(5). La sentenza della la Corte di Contea era così in conformità con la legge. Separatamente da questo aspetto di legge costituzionale, la sentenza era legale nel suo aspetto di diritto civile siccome era basato sulle disposizioni dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996, corretto con l'Emendamento del 2001.
(c) Se l'interferenza era “nell'interesse pubblico”
58. La Corte osserva che sotto la sezione 53(2) dell’ Atto della Corte Costituzionale, l'abrogazione di un statuto o di una disposizione legale ha solamente effetti ex nunc. Comunque, questo articolo-che fu motivato dal principio di certezza legale che mirava a proteggere dei diritti acquisiti-non è assoluto. Per esempio, questo articolo non si applica a cause pendenti che sono in situazioni in cui una parte ai procedimenti pretende di avere acquisito certi diritti che si basano su uno statuto o una disposizione legale in vigore al tempo dell'istruzione dei procedimenti ma più tardi abrogati dalla Corte Costituzionale prima dell'adozione di una decisione definitiva (sezione 56(5) dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale). Non solo si presuppone che questa disposizione protegga i diritti di persone che hanno sofferto delle conseguenze di un statuto o di una disposizione incostituzionali. Riflette anche il principio che i tribunali non possono decidere sulla base di un statuto o di una disposizione legale che sono stati abrogati come incostituzionale.
59. In questa situazione, così come in quelle previste negli altri paragrafi della sezione 56 dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale, la protezione dei diritti di quelli che hanno sofferto di conseguenze di un statuto o di disposizione legale incostituzionali prevale sul principio di certezza legale cioè sui diritti acquisiti di coloro che hanno tratto profitto da un statuto o da una disposizione incostituzionali.
60. Ne segue che l'interferenza nella presente causa cioè la sentenza della Corte di Contea di Spalato resa nell’applicazione della sezione 56(5) dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale serviva a proteggere i diritti di coloro che avrebbero sofferto delle conseguenze dell’applicazione della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 prima della sua abrogazione. In particolare, come segue dalla decisione della Corte Costituzionale, la sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 fu abrogata a causa dei suoi effetti retroattivi e delle conseguenze avverse risultanti per i diritti di proprietà di persone (in futuro: “le terze persone”) che avevano acquisito quei diritti sulla base di: (a) altre disposizioni di quell’ Atto (come, per esempio, le società commerciali, vedere paragrafo 11 sopra), (b) l’Atto di Denazionalizzazione (proprietari precedenti o i loro eredi, vedere paragrafo 12 sopra) o (c) la L’Atto di Vendita ad Occupanti (inquilini precedenti degli appartamenti in proprietà sociale affittati sotto affitti specialmente protetti che acquistarono i loro appartamenti e con ciò divennero i loro proprietari, vedere paragrafo 8 sopra).
61. Così, la decisione della Corte Costituzionale sarà considerata una correzione degli effetti ingiusti della sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 ed era perciò nell’ “interesse pubblico.”
(d) la Proporzionalità dell'interferenza
62. La Corte considera che la questione che deve determinare è se l’applicazione della norma inglobata nella sezione 56(5) dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale- che nelle circostanze come quelle che prevalgono nella presente causa dà precedenza ai diritti di coloro che hanno sofferto delle conseguenze di un statuto o una disposizione incostituzionali sopra i diritti di coloro che hanno tratto profitto da questi- dando luogo all'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente, prevedeva il giusto equilibrio richiesto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, e se impose un carico sproporzionato ed eccessivo sul richiedente (vedere, inter alia, Jahn ed Altri c. la Germania [GC], N. 46720/99, 72203/01 e 72552/01, § 93 ECHR 2005 -...).
63. In questo collegamento la Corte reitera che in situazioni come quella nella presente causa, comportando riforma fondamentale del sistema politico, legale ed economico di un paese durante la transizione dal regime socialista ad un stato democratico, le autorità nazionali hanno affrontato un esercizio insolitamente difficile nel dover bilanciare i diritti di persone diverse colpite dal processo. Sotto queste circostanze, un margine ampio di valutazione dovrebbe essere concesso allo Stato rispondente (vedere, Jahn ed Altri, citata sopra, §§ 91-92, e, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 182 il 2004-V di ECHR).
64. La Corte osserva che durante il regime socialista in Croazia cioè per più di quaranta anni l'acquisizione del possesso della proprietà socialmente posseduta tramite usucapione fu proibita espressamente dalla legge. La Corte aderisce alla prospettiva della Corte Costituzionale che data la proibizione menzionata le persone che godono di certi diritti su proprietà socialmente possedute (vedere paragrafo 6 sopra) durante il periodo socialista non avevano nessun bisogno di esercitare quei diritti con lo stesso vigore, o usare una via di ricorso appropriata per proteggere quelle proprietà contro i possessori per usucapione, come se la proibizione non fosse esistita. Così, decretando la sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 il legislatore aveva davvero legiferato retroattivamente come sé legasse delle conseguenze legali ad un comportamento precedente al quale simile conseguenze non potevano essere legate al tempo attinente. Facendo così non riuscì a dare l'opportunità alle persone che godevano di diritti sulle proprietà socialmente possedute di correggere la loro condotta.
65. Contro questo sfondo, le autorità nazionali che bilanciando gli interessi in competizione presero la posizione che il mero fatto che per un breve periodo di tempo che corrispose a meno di tre anni (fra l'entrata in vigore dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 il 1 gennaio 1997 e l'abrogazione della sua sezione 388(4) da parte della Corte Costituzionale il 17 novembre 1999) i possessori della proprietà socialmente posseduta (come il richiedente nella presente causa) avevano un'opportunità legale di divenire i suoi proprietari tramite usucapione non era sufficiente per sorpassare d’importanza i diritti e gli interessi di terze persone (vedere paragrafo 60 sopra) su simile proprietà. Sostenere altrimenti vorrebbe dire permettere alla sezione 388(4) di sussistere e produrre conseguenze anche dopo che era stata abrogata come incostituzionale, ed impedire effettivamente a quelle terze persone di realizzare i loro diritti giuridicamente ammessi sulla proprietà socialmente posseduta.
66. Rivolgendosi alle particolari circostanze della presente causa, la Corte osserva che i tribunali nazionali stabilirono: (a) che la terra in oggetto era stata posseduta dal defunto zio del richiedente, (b) che era stata confiscata nel 1949 dalle autorità socialiste e che lo Stato era stato registrato sin da allora come suo proprietario nel registro della terra, (c) che la madre del richiedente era in possesso della terra dal 1953, come il richiedente aveva continuato ad esserlo dopo la sua morte il 16 febbraio 1992. Non c'è indicazione che qualcuno, a parte lo Stato stesso, abbia acquisito un qualsiasi diritto su questa terra durante il socialismo, o che qualsiasi (terza) persona (vedere paragrafo 60 sopra), a parte il richiedente stesso (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra), abbia mai ha chiesto qualsiasi diritto riguardo quella terra. La Corte considera perciò che le preoccupazioni che hanno portato la Corte Costituzionale ad abrogare la sezione 388(4) dell’Atto di Proprietà del 1996 non siano presenti nel caso del richiedente. Questa disposizione fu abrogata per proteggere i diritti di terze persone mentre nella caso del richiedente non era coinvolto nessun diritto di terze persone.
67. In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che il richiedente che ragionevolmente si appellò alla legislazione abrogata più tardi come incostituzionale, non dovrebbe–in assenza di qualsiasi danno ai diritti di altre persone-sopportare le conseguenze dell’ errore dello Stato stesso commesso decretando la legislazione incostituzionale. Infatti, come conseguenza dell'abrogazione, il possesso della proprietà che il richiedente aveva acquisito più tardi tramite usucapione sulla base della disposizione abrogata come incostituzionale, fu ridato allo Stato che con ciò trasse profitto dal suo proprio errore. In questo collegamento, la Corte reitera, che il rischio di qualsiasi errore commesso dall'autorità Statale deve essere sopportato dallo Stato e gli errori non devono essere rimediati a spese dell'individuo riguardato, specialmente dove non è in pericolo nessun altro interesse privato contrario (vedere, Gashi c. Croatia, n. 32457/05, § 40, 13 dicembre 2007, e Radchikov c. Russia, n. 65582/01, § 50 24 maggio 2007).
68. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
69. Il richiedente si lamentò anche delle decisioni dei tribunali nazionali di non riaprire i procedimenti penali nei quali era stato dichiarato colpevole suo zio. Lui si appellò agli Articoli 2, 6, 7 9, 10 13 e 14 della Convenzione che prevedono rispettivamente, il diritto alla vita, il diritto ad un processo equanime, nessuna punizione senza legge, la libertà di pensiero, coscienza e religione, libertà di espressione diritto ad una via di ricorso efficace e proibizione della discriminazione nel godimento dei diritti della Convenzione.
70. La Corte reitera che secondo la giurisprudenza stabilita degli organi della Convenzione l’Articolo 6 non si applica a procedimenti riguardo alla riapertura di una causa penale (vedere, per esempio, Carlotto c. Italia, n. 22420/93, decisione della Commissione del 20 maggio 1997, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 89-B, p. 27). Osserva inoltre che le azioni di reclamo rimanenti non concernono le interferenze coi diritti della Convenzione del richiedente. Ne segue che questa parte della richiesta è ratione materiae et personae incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 e deve essere respinta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
71. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
72. Il richiedente ha chiesto 15,000 euro (EUR) riguardo il danno materiale subito a causa del sequestro illegale e l'impossibilità risultante di utilizzare la sua proprietà. Chiese anche EUR 15,000 riguardo il danno morale.
73. Il Governo ha contestato queste rivendicazioni. Presentò, in particolare, che al richiedente non era concesso nessun danno materiale a causa della presunta impossibilità ad usare la sua proprietà perché era incontrastato che lui in realtà aveva usato la terra in oggetto.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) danno Materiale
74. Riguardo alla rivendicazione per danni materiali, la Corte nota che in tutti i procedimenti nazionali e di fronte alla Corte il richiedente dibatté che lui e la sua defunta madre erano stati in proprietà continua della terra in oggetto fin dal 1953. Essendo così la Corte non può accettare il suo argomento secondo cui non era stato in grado di utilizzarla.
75. Inoltre, la Corte reitera che una sentenza che trova una violazione impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale di porre fine alla violazione e offrire riparazione alle sue conseguenze. Se la legge nazionale non concede -o concede solamente in modo parziale – una riparazione, l’Articolo 41 conferisce poteri alla Corte per riconoscere alla vittima simile soddisfazione come ritiene più appropriato (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 32-33 ECHR 2000-XI). In questo collegamento la Corte nota che sotto la sezione 428a dell’Atto di Procedura Civile un richiedente può istruire un ricorso per riaprire dei procedimenti civili a riguardo dei quali la Corte ha trovato una violazione della Convenzione. Data la natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e le ragioni per cui ha trovato una violazione di questo Articolo, la Corte considera che nella presente causa il modo più appropriato di riparare le conseguenze di questa violazione è di riaprire i procedimenti di cui si è lamentato. Siccome ne segue che il diritto nazionale permette che simile riparazione venga resa, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna ragione di assegnare al richiedente qualsiasi somma riguardo al danno materiale.
76. Alla luce delle considerazioni precedenti, la Corte respinge la rivendicazione del richiedente per danni materiali.
(b) danno morale
77. Riguardo alla rivendicazione per danni morali, la Corte considera che una costatazione di violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione costituisce di per sé una soddisfazione equa sufficiente in queste circostanze.
B. Costi e spese
78. Il richiedente ha chiesto anche EUR 1,000 per i costi e spese incorsi di fronte ai tribunali nazionali ed EUR 2,000 per quelli incorsi idi fronte alla Corte.
79. Il Governo non ha espresso un'opinione sulla questione.
80. La Corte nota che il richiedente non è riuscito a presentare un qualsiasi documento attinente a sostengono che provi che davvero abbia sostenuto i costi, benché fosse stato invitato a fare così. Ne segue che lui non riuscì ad attenersi alla lista di requisiti esposti nell’ Articolo 60 § 2 degli Articoli della Corte. La Corte respinge perciò la sua rivendicazione per costi e spese (Articolo 60 § 3).
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara l'azione di reclamo riguardo al diritto di proprietà ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che la costatazione di violazione costituisce di per sé soddisfazione equa sufficiente per il danno morale subito dal richiedente;
4. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per soddisfazione equa.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.