Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF RASMUSSEN v. POLAND

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, 6, P1-1

NUMERO: 38886/05/2009
STATO: Polonia
DATA: 28/04/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection joined to merits and dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of Art. 6-3-b ; No violation of P1-1 ; Non-pecuniary damage - finding of violation sufficient
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF RASMUSSEN v. POLAND
(Application no. 38886/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
28 April 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Rasmussen v. Poland,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Ledi Bianku, judges,
Roman Wieruszewski, ad hoc judge,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 7 April 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 38886/05) against the Republic of Poland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Polish national, Ms A. R. (“the applicant”), on 5 October 2005.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr M. P., a lawyer practising in Warsaw. The Polish Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr J. Wołąsiewicz of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged that the lustration proceedings in her case had been unfair, in violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. She further complained, invoking Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, that as a result of the lustration proceedings she had been deprived of her special social insurance status as a retired judge.
4. On 13 September 2007 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. On 7 April 2009 the Court decided to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention with a view to examining the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
5. Mr L. Garlicki, the judge elected in respect of Poland, withdrew from sitting in the case (Rule 28 of the Rules of Court). The Government accordingly appointed Mr R. Wieruszewski to sit as an ad hoc judge (Rule 29).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1948 and lives in Szczecin.
7. The applicant had been a judge for twenty-seven years. By virtue of an amendment to the law on the System of Common Courts 1985, which came into effect on 17 October 1997, the status of a “retired judge” was created (see paragraph 24 below).
On 4 December 1997 the applicant who had retired on 8 July 1997 on grounds of ill health acquired the status of a “retired judge”. Under the applicable provisions of domestic law retired judges were entitled, as from 1 January 1998, to a special retirement pension equivalent to seventy-five per cent of their last full salary (sędziowski stan spoczynku) every month.
8. On 3 August 1997 the Lustration Act entered into force. By a further amendment to the 1985 Law of 17 December 1997, which came into effect on 15 August 1998, retired judges who had acquired the right to a special retirement pension were required to submit a declaration under that Act. In September 1998 the applicant made a declaration under the provisions of that Act to the effect that she had never secretly collaborated with the communist secret services.
9. Subsequently, on an unspecified date, the Commissioner of Public Interest applied to the Warsaw Court of Appeal, acting as the first-instance lustration court, to institute proceedings in the applicant’s case under the Lustration Act on the ground that she had lied in her lustration declaration by denying that she had collaborated with the secret services. He referred to documents showing that in 1986 the applicant had agreed to collaborate and from 1986 until 1988 had submitted fifteen written reports.
10. During the proceedings the applicant was represented by a lawyer. The case file could be consulted by the applicant and her lawyer in the secret registry of the lustration court. They were authorised to make notes. However, the notes could be made only in special notebooks which were subsequently sealed and deposited in the registry. It was possible for them to make notes, but not to take the notes from the registry.
11. On an unspecified date the Warsaw Court of Appeal, acting as the first-instance court, held a hearing in the applicant’s case. The hearing was not public. She was questioned by the court and commented on the evidence at the court’s disposal. The case file was composed of the applicant’s lustration declaration, copies of certain documents contained in the applicant’s file compiled by the communist secret police and the Commissioner’s application for lustration proceedings to be instituted.
12. On 7 April 2004 the court gave a judgment in which it found that the applicant had made an untrue lustration declaration because she had been a willing secret collaborator of the communist secret services. It observed that the documents in the case file were incomplete, but that they were nevertheless sufficient to find that the applicant had been a secret collaborator. The applicant appealed.
13. On 4 November 2004 the same court, acting as a court of appeal, upheld the contested judgment, holding that the evidence in the case file was sufficient to find that the applicant had knowingly and intentionally collaborated with the communist secret services. The applicant submitted a cassation appeal to the Supreme Court, which dismissed it by a judgment of 7 April 2005.
14. From January 1998 to May 2005 the applicant received 4,614 Polish zlotys (PLN) per month (PLN 3,738 after tax) as the special retirement pension.
15. Subsequently, on 19 May 2005, the National Judicial Council, acting upon a request submitted by the Minister of Justice, instituted proceedings to divest her of her status as a retired judge. It also decided that payment of the special retirement pension to the applicant should cease with effect from 19 May 2005.
16. In her pleadings submitted to the Council the applicant argued that a decision to divest her of her special pension was unlawful as the requirements of the Lustration Act did not apply to retired judges. Even supposing that retired judges were obliged to make a lustration declaration, they could not be divested of their status under the provisions of this Act. In any event, such a decision could only be given after disciplinary proceedings had been conducted under the provisions of the Act on General Courts, but no such proceedings had been conducted in her case. She requested that payment of her special pension be resumed.
17. On 20 July 2005 the National Judicial Council adopted a resolution by which the applicant was divested of the special pension to which she was entitled on account of her status as a retired judge. The applicant appealed, essentially reiterating the arguments which she had raised in her pleadings submitted to the Council.
18. On 7 December 2005 the Supreme Court dismissed her appeal against this resolution.
19. In August 2005 the applicant requested the social insurance authority to grant her an ordinary retirement pension. Her request was refused by a decision of 28 November 2005 on the ground that the applicant had not been working for the statutory period of thirty years necessary for an entitlement to a retirement pension to accrue.
20. Later on, in April 2006, she was granted a partial disability pension (renta z tytułu częściowej niezdolności do pracy) from 1 August 2005, the first day of the month when she had lodged a request for an ordinary social insurance pension, to 31 October 2008, when the applicant was to reach the statutory retirement age, in a monthly amount of PLN 1,351 (PLN 1,124 after tax).
21. As from 1 March 2008 the applicant’s pension was reassessed against inflation. From then on she was paid PLN 1,438 per month (PLN 1,196 after tax).
22. As from 1 October 2008 the applicant has received her monthly retirement pension in the amount of PLN 2,062 (PLN 1,693 after tax).
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
23. On 3 August 1997 the Lustration Act (Ustawa o ujawnieniu pracy lub służby w organach bezpieczeństwa państwa lub współpracy z nimi w latach 1944-1990 osób pełniących funkcje publiczne) entered into force. Its purpose was to ensure transparency as regards those people exercising public functions who had been secret collaborators with the secret service during the communist era. It lost its binding force on 15 March 2007. The relevant domestic law and practice have been extensively summarised in the following judgments: Matyjek v. Poland, no. 38184/03, §§ 27-38, 24 April 2007 ; Bobek v. Poland, no. 68761/01, §§ 18-43, 17 July 2007; and Luboch v. Poland, no. 37469/05, §§ 28-39, 15 January 2008).
24. On 17 October 1997 amendments of 28 August 1997 to the Law on the System of Common Courts 1985 (“the 1985 Law”) entered into force (“the October amendments”). The amendments introduced the status of a “retired judge”. By a further amendment which entered into force on 1 January 1998 it was provided that a judge, with the status of a retired judge, who had retired on grounds, inter alia, of age or ill-health should be entitled to remuneration equal to seventy-five per cent of his or her basic salary plus a bonus calculated on the basis of the years of service.
25. On 15 August 1998 further amendments of 17 December 1997 to the 1985 Law came into effect (“the December amendments”). The amendments provided, so far as relevant:
“Article 78 .... § 1. A retired judge shall be obliged to keep the dignity of the position of a judge.
§ 2. A retired judge shall take disciplinary responsibility for a failure to maintain the dignity of the position of judge after having retired and for any failures to maintain such dignity when serving as a judge.”
26. The December amendments further provided, inter alia, as follows:
“Article 7 § 6. Judges ... who have acquired the right to the retirement pension or disability pension shall submit the declaration envisaged under section 18 of [the Lustration Act 1997].
Article 8 § 1. Retired judges ... who worked for or served in the [State’s security services] or who have submitted untrue declarations concerning such service or employment or collaboration with [such services] shall lose the right to retired judge status and to remuneration in the retired status.
§ 3. The circumstances referred to in § 1 shall be ascertained according to the procedure laid down in [the Lustration Act 1997]. The loss of the rights shall occur from the date of issue of the decision.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
27. The applicant complained that the proceedings concerning her lustration declaration had been unfair. She relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which, in so far as relevant, reads:
“1. In the determination ... of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing ...by [a] ... tribunal...
3. Everyone charged with a criminal offence has the following minimum rights: …
(b) to have adequate time and facilities for the preparation of his defence”
A. Admissibility
28. The Government argued firstly that the applicant had made a specific complaint concerning access to the file and the possibility of making notes and copies only in her letter of 9 July 2007. They were of the view that her initial complaints related to the substantive issues involved in the lustration proceedings, namely to the assessment of the evidence and the application of substantive law on being a secret and willing collaborator with the security services. They concluded that this part of the application should be declared inadmissible for failure to comply with the six-month time-limit provided for by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention.
29. The applicant submitted that she had already, in her initial statement of application dated 5 October 2005, expressly complained that the lustration proceedings were unfair. She had also argued then that the procedural violations complained of had included, inter alia, a violation of the presumption of innocence. Her subsequent submissions were by way of supplementing and refining the substance of the complaint. They did not constitute a new complaint and did not extend the scope of the original one.
30. The Court reiterates that if an applicant raises outside the six-month time-limit complaints which are particular aspects of the initial complaints submitted in compliance with the six-month requirement, they should be deemed to have been submitted within that time-limit (see Paroisse gréco-catholique Sâmbăta Bihor v. Romania (dec.), no. 48107/99, 25 May 2004). The Court is of the view that in the present case the reference to the general unfairness of the proceedings was sufficient to hold that the applicant had complied with the time-limit. It follows that the Government’s objection must therefore be dismissed.
31. The Government further submitted that the applicant had failed to exhaust the domestic remedies available to her, as required under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention. They argued that she had not raised before the domestic courts, even in substance, specific allegations regarding the unfairness of the lustration proceedings. In particular, neither at the appellate nor at the cassation stage had she challenged the restrictions on her access to the case files and the alleged restrictions of her defense rights. The Government pointed out that this provision could be directly relied on in the proceedings before the domestic courts.
32. The Government argued that the applicant had not availed herself of the remedy under Article 79 §1 of the Constitution. They maintained that the Court had recognised that, even if the Constitutional Court was not competent to quash individual decisions because its role was to rule on the constitutionality of laws, its judgments declaring a statutory or other provision unconstitutional, gave rise to a right to have the relevant proceedings reopened in an individual case, or to have a final decision quashed (see Szott-Medyńska v. Poland, no. 47414/99, 9 October 2003).
33. The applicant disagreed with the Government’s arguments and submitted that in her case the individual constitutional complaint would not have been an effective remedy.
34. The Court considers that the question of whether the applicant could effectively challenge the set of legal rules governing access to the case file and setting out the features of the lustration proceedings is linked to the Court’s assessment of Poland’s compliance with the requirements of a “fair trial” under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see Bobek, cited above, § 48, and Matyjek, cited above, § 42). The Court accordingly joins the Government’s plea of inadmissibility on the ground of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies to the merits of the case.
35. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
36. The applicant complained that the proceedings concerning her lustration declaration had been unfair. They had not been held in public. The applicant had not had access to the case file to an extent sufficient to ensure equality of arms between her and the Commissioner of the Public Interest. She could not make and retain notes in the proceedings as the case file could be consulted only in the secret registry of the lustration court and she had not been allowed to take the notes out of the registry. Nor could she make copies of the documents in the case file and take them out of the court, other than the minutes of the court hearings. This had rendered her defence ineffective.
37. The Government argued that the applicant’s right to a fair trial and the principle of quality of arms had been fully respected. The applicant had had full access to all documents constituting evidence in her case, could take notes from them and use these notes at the hearings. Under the provisions of the Lustration Act procedural guarantees provided for by the Code of Criminal Proceedings were applicable to the lustration proceedings. The Constitutional Court had examined these guarantees on several occasions and found that they were compatible with the requirements of the fair hearing. Likewise, in her appeals the applicant complained about the alleged unfairness of the proceedings, but her appeals were dismissed by the domestic courts.
38. The Government acknowledged that under the 1999 Protection of Classified Information Act and Article 156 § 4 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, the evidence in the case had been regarded as classified information. However, the applicant had had full access to these documents throughout the proceedings. All documents on which the Commissioner of the Public Interest had relied when preparing the case against the applicant had been included in the case file. The only restriction imposed on the applicant and her lawyer was that they had to consult the file in the secret registry of the lustration court. There were no restrictions on how long the applicant and her lawyer could spend consulting and examining these documents at the registry. At the lustration court’s request, originals of the documents from the file of the communist secret police had also been submitted to the court and the applicant had had access to the originals.
39. The Government further submitted that the applicant had been allowed to make notes from the case file. The notes had had to be made in a special notebook which was subsequently placed in an envelope, sealed and deposited in the secret registry. The same procedure applied to all notes made during hearings. The envelope with the notebooks inside could be opened only by the person who had made the notes in it. The Government emphasised that the above rules had enabled the applicant to actively participate in the hearings and that both her lawyer and herself had actively availed themselves of this possibility. Moreover, all evidence had been disclosed to the applicant and her lawyer during the hearings. To sum up, the only restriction imposed on the applicant, namely an obligation to consult the classified documents in a secret registry of the lustration court and to deposit her notebook there, did not affect her ability to examine the evidence against her in a way that would have impaired her defence rights.
40. The Government concluded that there had been no violation of Article 6 § 1 in the present case.
2. The Court’s assessment
41. The Court first observes that its task is to determine whether in the proceedings instituted against the applicant under the Lustration Act 1997 she had a “fair hearing” within the meaning of Article 6 of the Convention. The Court reiterates that the procedural guarantees of Article 6 of the Convention under its criminal head apply to lustration proceedings (see Matyjek, cited above). It further observes that the guarantees in paragraph 3 of Article 6 are specific aspects of the right to a fair trial set forth in general in paragraph 1. For this reason it considers it appropriate to examine the applicant’s complaint under the two provisions taken together (see Edwards v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 16 December 1992, Series A no. 247-B, p. 34, § 33; and also the judgment in Matyjek, cited above, §§ 53-54).
42. According to the principle of equality of arms, as one of the features of the wider concept of a fair trial, each party must be afforded a reasonable opportunity to present his or her case under conditions that do not place the individual at a substantial disadvantage vis-à-vis the opponent (see, for example, Jespers v. Belgium, no. 8403/78, Commission decision of 15 October 1980, Decisions and Reports (DR) 27, p. 61; Foucher v. France, judgment of 18 March 1997, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II, § 34; and Bulut v. Austria, judgment of 22 February 1996, Reports 1996-II, p. 380-81, § 47). The Court further notes that, in order to ensure that the accused receives a fair trial, any difficulties caused to the defence by a limitation on its rights must be sufficiently counterbalanced by the procedures followed by the judicial authorities (see Doorson v. the Netherlands, judgment of 26 March 1996, Reports 1996-II, p. 471, § 72; and Van Mechelen and Others v. the Netherlands, judgment of 23 April 1997, Reports 1997-III, p. 712, § 54).
43. The Court has already dealt with the issue of lustration proceedings in the Turek v. Slovakia case (no. 57986/00, § 115, ECHR 2006-... (extracts)). In particular the Court held in that judgment that, unless the contrary is shown on the facts of a specific case, it cannot be assumed that there remains a continuing and actual public interest in imposing limitations on access to materials classified as confidential under former regimes. This is because lustration proceedings are, by their very nature, oriented towards the establishment of facts dating back to the communist era and are not directly linked to the current functions and operations of the security services. Lustration proceedings inevitably depend on the examination of documents relating to the operations of the former communist security agencies, the selection and disclosure of which documents is at the discretion of the current security service. If the party to whom the classified materials relate is denied access to all or most of the materials in question, the possibility of his or her contradicting the security agency’s version of the facts will be severely curtailed.
Those considerations remain relevant to the instant case despite some differences with the lustration proceedings in Poland (see also Matyjek, cited above, § 56; Bobek, cited above, § 57; and Luboch, cited above, § 62).
44. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court will first examine the applicant’s complaints relating to equality of arms in the proceedings concerned. In this connection, the Court first observes that it is not in dispute that materials from the communist-era security services were regarded as State secrets. The confidential status of such materials had been upheld by the State Security Bureau. Thus, at least part of the documents relating to the applicant’s lustration case had been covered by official secrecy. However, the Court reiterates that it has previously held that such a situation is inconsistent with the fairness of lustration proceedings, including the principle of equality of arms (see Turek, cited above, § 115; Matyjek, cited above, § 57; and Bobek, cited above, § 58).
45. Secondly, the Court notes that, at the pre-trial stage, the Commissioner of Public Interest had a right of access, in the secret registry of his office or of the Institute of National Remembrance, to all materials relating to the lustrated person created by the former security services. After the institution of the lustration proceedings, the applicant could also access her court file. However, pursuant to Article 156 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and section 52 (2) of the Protection of Classified Information Act 1999, no copies could be made of materials contained in the court file and confidential documents could be consulted only in the secret registry of the lustration court. The Court further notes that this was acknowledged by the Government.
46. The Court is not persuaded by the Government’s argument that at the trial stage the same limitations as regards access to confidential documents applied to the Commissioner of Public Interest. Under the domestic law, the Commissioner, who was a public body, had been vested with powers identical to those of a public prosecutor. Under section 17(e) of the Lustration Act, the Commissioner of Public Interest had a right of access to full documentation relating to the lustrated person created by, inter alia, the former security services. If necessary, he or she could hear witnesses and order expert opinions. The Commissioner also had at his or her disposal a secret registry, with staff who had obtained official clearance, allowing them access to documents considered to be State secrets, and were employed to analyse lustration declarations in the light of the existing documents and to prepare the case file for the lustration trial.
47. Furthermore, it was not in dispute between the parties that, when consulting her case file, the applicant had been authorised to make notes. However, any notes she took could be made only in special notebooks which were subsequently sealed and deposited in the registry’s secret section. The notebooks could not be removed from this registry and could be opened only by the person who had made notes in them. Similar constraints were imposed on any notes taken during the hearings. The Court observes that the Government did not rely on any provision of domestic law which would have given the applicant the right to remove the notebooks from the secret registry.
48. The Court reiterates that the accused’s effective participation in the criminal trial must equally include the right to compile notes in order to facilitate the conduct of the defence, irrespective of whether or not he or she is represented by counsel (see Pullicino v. Malta (dec.), no 45441/99, 15 June 2000). The fact that the applicant could not remove from the court her own notes, taken whether at the hearing or in the secret section of the registry, effectively prevented her from using the information contained in them fully and effectively, as in preparation of her defence she and her lawyer had to rely solely on her memory.
49. Regard being had to what was at stake for the applicant in the lustration proceedings - not only her good name but also her special status as a retired judge (see paragraphs 14-16 above) - the Court considers that it was important for her to have unrestricted access to the court files and unrestricted use of any notes she had made, including, if necessary, the possibility of obtaining copies of relevant documents (see Foucher, cited above, § 36).
50. The Court reiterates that, if a State adopts lustration measures, it must ensure that the persons affected thereby enjoy all the procedural guarantees of the Convention (see Turek, cited above, § 115; Matyjek, cited above, § 62; and Bobek, cited above, § 69). The Court accepts that there may be a situation in which there is a compelling State interest in maintaining the secrecy of some documents, even those produced under the former regime. Nevertheless, such a situation will arise only exceptionally, given the considerable time which has elapsed since the documents were created. It is for the Government to prove the existence of such an interest in the particular case, because what is accepted as an exception must not become the norm. The Court considers that a system under which the outcome of lustration trials depends to a considerable extent on the reconstruction of the actions of the former secret services, while most of the relevant materials remain classified as secret and the decision to maintain their confidentiality falls within the powers of the current secret services, creates a situation in which the lustrated person is put at a clear disadvantage.
51. In light of the above, the Court considers that, due to the confidentiality of the documents and the limitations on access to the case file by the lustrated person - in particular compared with the privileged position of the Commissioner of Public Interest in such proceedings - the applicant’s ability to have her case examined fairly was severely curtailed. Regard being had to the particular context of the lustration proceedings and to the cumulative application of those rules, the Court considers that they placed an unrealistic burden on the applicant in practice and did not satisfy the requirements of a fair hearing or equality of arms between the parties to the proceedings.
52. It remains to be ascertained whether the applicant could have successfully challenged the features of the lustration proceedings in her appeal and cassation appeal. Given the Government’s assertion that the rules on access to the materials classified as secret were regulated by the successive laws on State secrets and by the relevant provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, and that those legal provisions were complied with in this case, the Court is not persuaded that the applicant, in her appeals or cassation appeals, could have successfully challenged the decisions given in her case.
53. In so far as the Government rely on the constitutional complaint, the Court points, firstly, to the fact that the Lustration Act was on several occasions unsuccessfully challenged before the Constitutional Court (see Matyjek, cited above, and Bobek, cited above, §§ 38-43). The Court further notes that the Government have failed to indicate which provisions of domestic law the applicant should have challenged by way of a constitutional complaint. Moreover, the Court has held that a constitutional complaint was an effective remedy for the purposes of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention only in situations where the alleged violation of the Convention resulted from the direct application of a legal provision considered by the complainant to be unconstitutional (see Szott-Medyńska, cited above; Pachla v. Poland (dec.), no 8812/02, 8 November 2005; Wypych v. Poland (dec.), no. 2428/05, 25 October 2005; and Tereba v. Poland (dec.), no. 30263/04, 21 November 2006).
54. In this connection, the Court observes that the breach of the Convention complained of in the present case cannot be said to have originated from any single legal provision or even from a well-defined set of provisions. It rather resulted from the way in which the relevant laws were applied to the applicant’s case and, in particular, from the “special arrangements” referred to in Article 156 § 4 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, allowing the President of the Lustration Court to limit the applicant’s access to case files and her opportunities to take notes and copy documents. However, it follows from the case-law of the Polish Constitutional Court that it lacks jurisdiction to examine the way in which the provisions of domestic law were applied in an individual case.
55. It follows that it has not been shown that the applicant had an effective remedy at her disposal under domestic law by which to challenge the legal framework setting out the features of lustration proceedings. Consequently, the Government’s objection as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies must be rejected.
56. In these circumstances the Court concludes that the lustration proceedings against the applicant, taken as a whole, cannot be considered to have been fair, within the meaning of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 6 § 3. There has accordingly been a breach of those provisions.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
57. The applicant complained that as a result of the judgments given in her case she had subsequently been deprived of the social insurance entitlement which the relevant domestic laws guaranteed to retired judges. She relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”.
A. Admissibility
58. The Government argued that the applicant had failed to exhaust relevant domestic remedies. She had not lodged an appeal against the decision of the Social Insurance Authorities of 28 November 2005 refusing to grant her an ordinary early entitlement pension (see paragraph 19 above). The applicant did not address this aspect of the case.
59. The Court notes that this part of the application does not relate to the proceedings which concerned the applicant’s entitlement to an ordinary retirement pension. It is focused solely on the decisions which resulted in the applicant’s being divested of her status as a retired judge and the consequential loss of her entitlements to a special pension. It has not been shown or argued that the applicant had any further remedies available to her in this respect after her cassation appeal was decided by the Supreme Court on 7 December 2005 (see paragraph 18 above).
60. For these reasons, the Government’s plea of inadmissibility on the ground of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must be dismissed.
61. The Court notes that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
62. The Government emphasised that there had been no interference with the applicant’s rights guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, because the special pension she received prior to the lustration decision was a special privilege attached to her position as a retired judge. Hence, its removal should not be regarded as an interference with an inalienable and irrevocable right. It should rather be seen as a refusal by the State to honour, in cases such as the applicant’s, the special privilege given to judges upon the termination of their service on condition that they continued to fulfil the moral qualifications that a judge should possess.
63. The Government further argued that, should the Court find that there had been an interference with the applicant’s rights, such interference was in the general interest within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The applicant had not been penalised for the fact that she had been a collaborator with the secret police. Rather, the purpose of the 1997 Lustration Act was to castigate those persons holding public office who had made untrue lustration declarations. Collaboration itself had not barred citizens from access to public office; only the truthfulness of the lustration declaration was in issue in the lustration proceedings. The principle of the protection of the citizen’s confidence in the State and law also militated in favour of the solution adopted in the applicant’s case. The requirements of social justice, guaranteed by Article 2 of the Constitution, had made it necessary to draw a distinction between judges who had made true declarations and those who had not. Trustworthiness was one of the values which deserved special protection by the State, especially in respect of judges.
64. The Government finally submitted that the interference had not been disproportionate. The applicant had lost her special status, but she remained eligible for social insurance protection under the general system. When she had applied for benefits under this system, her case had been examined on the basis of the generally applicable provisions of social insurance laws. Her request for an earlier retirement pension had been dismissed, because she had not been working for the requisite period of thirty years. She had also retained the right to apply again for an ordinary retirement pension when she reached the statutory retirement age of sixty. In any event, by a decision of 25 April 2006 she had been awarded the right to a disability pension on the basis of her partial disability, for the entire period between 1 August 2005 (when she lodged her request to be covered by the general insurance system) until October 2008. She had therefore not been deprived of her means of subsistence. The loss of the status of a retired judge had resulted only in the fact that the general rules of the social insurance system became applicable to her.
65. The applicant complained that as a result of the judgments given in her case she had been deprived of the social insurance entitlement which the relevant domestic laws guaranteed to retired judges. Retired judges received retirement pensions in the amount of seventy-five percent of their last full salary. After the resolution of the National Judicial Council of 20 July 2005 (paragraph 17 above) she lost her entitlement to that pension. Her position in society suffered greatly as a result. She had been working as a judge throughout her entire professional life. As a result of the decisions complained of she lost her privileged status and had not acquired an entitlement to the ordinary retirement pension provided for by the social insurance law.
66. The applicant argued that under the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe’s Resolution 1096 (1996) on measures to dismantle the heritage of former communist totalitarian systems, lustration should not have been construed as a form of revenge or punishment. The purpose of lustration was to prevent people who had collaborated with the communist secret services in the past from holding public office. In her case, the institution of the lustration proceedings had been unjustified, because when the 1997 Act had entered into force she no longer occupied a judicial post. Hence, none of the reasons for which the Lustration Act had been enacted, namely to exclude persons from exercising governmental power if they could not be trusted to exercise it in compliance with democratic principles, had applied to her situation. The fact that she had been deprived of her status as a retired judge had to be regarded as an act of a punitive character, incompatible with the above-mentioned 1996 Resolution.
67. The applicant submitted that the requirement for a retired judge to undergo lustration proceedings fifteen years after the fall of the communist regime had to be seen as an unnecessary and unacceptable limitation of her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions. The essential aim of lustration was to protect a newly emerged democracy, not to punish people presumed guilty. No one could reasonably contest after 1996 that Poland was a stable and relatively mature democracy, no longer threatened by the possibility of a post-communist coup d’état. Therefore, the severity and scope of acceptable lustration measures adopted in 1997 should have been less than what might have been acceptable in the early 1990s. In any event, in 1997 and later, the subjection to this requirement of retired judges, who no longer decided cases, could not be justified by the need to secure a new democracy.
2. The Court’s assessment
68. The Court has interpreted the applicant’s complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as having two aspects – first, that the application to her, as a retired judge, of the provisions of the Lustration Law, with the resulting loss of her entitlement to a special retirement pension, amounted to a breach of her rights guaranteed by this provision; and, secondly, that the proceedings which led to such deprivation in her case were, in any event, vitiated by unfairness in breach of the procedural requirements of Article 1.
69. It is not in dispute that, following the lustration decision in her case, the applicant lost her entitlement to her special status as a retired judge and, in consequence, to the special retirement pension which attached to that status. The Government argued that the removal from the applicant of that special status was not to be regarded as an interference with a property right but, rather, as a refusal by the State to honour, in cases such as the applicant’s, the special privilege given to judges upon termination of their service on condition that they continued to fulfill the moral qualifications that a judge should possess. The applicant disagreed. She argued that there had been an interference with her property rights in that, as a result of the application of the measures in question, she had been deprived of a valuable pecuniary benefit. In her view, the purpose of lustration was to prevent people who had collaborated with the communist secret services in the past from holding public office and that the institution of lustration proceedings against her served no legitimate purpose and was unjustified since she no longer occupied a judicial post when the Lustration Act came into effect.
70. The question which the Court must determine is whether the loss of her entitlement to the special retirement pension in the particular circumstances of this case amounted to an interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
71. The Court recalls that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not create a right to acquire property. It places no restriction on the Contracting States’ freedom to decide whether or not to have in place any form of social security system, or to choose the type or amount of benefits to provide under any such scheme However, where a Contracting State has in force legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit – whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions – that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (Stec and Others v the United Kingdom, [GC], (dec.) no. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 54, ECHR 2006-). Further, where the amount of a benefit is reduced or discontinued, this may constitute an interference with possessions which requires to be justified in the general interest (Kjartan Ásmundsson v. Iceland, judgment of 12 October 2004, ECHR 2004-IX). Where, however, the person concerned does not satisfy, or ceases to satisfy, the legal conditions laid down in domestic law for the grant of such benefits, there is no interference with the rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (Bellet, Huertas and Vialatte v. France, (dec.) no. 40832/98 27 April 1999).
72. The Court notes that in the present case the applicant lost her entitlement to a special retirement pension as a result of being divested of her status as a “retired judge” on the basis of the provisions of the Lustration Act 1997, which provisions were applied to those holding such status by virtue of the December amendments to the Law on the System of Common Courts 1985 (see paragraph 24 above). It further notes that the loss of her special pension did not deprive the applicant of any means of subsistence. She retained her rights to ordinary social security benefits, including, initially, disability benefits and, thereafter, a retirement pension. Moreover, the applicant does not in fact appear to have lost her special rights until December 2005 when the National Judicial Council decided that payment of the special retirement pension should cease (see paragraph 18 above).
73. The Court observes that under domestic law, the status of a “retired judge” which was created on 17 October 1997 was a special status. The status, which was voluntary and which a former judge could at any time resign, carried with it certain obligations including the obligation to comply with the lustration declaration requirements applicable to a sitting judge. The Government argued that, under domestic law, the status was linked with the constitutional principle of judicial independence and irremovability and that, even though a retired judge who acquired the privileged status no longer occupied a judicial post and had no active judicial role to play, he or she was regarded in domestic law as continuing to exercise a public function and the application of the lustration laws to the holder of such status was accordingly justified.
The Court does not find it necessary to determine whether the application of the lustration laws to those who were no longer in active service served a legitimate aim since, for the reasons which appear below, it finds that that there was in any event no interference with the applicant’s possessions for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
74. The Court observes that the applicant retired on 8 July 1997 shortly before the Lustration Act came into effect on 3 August 1997. On 4 December 1997 the applicant acquired the status of retired judge. On 17 December 1997 it became apparent from the amendment to the 1985 Act that those who wished to maintain the status and to enjoy the special pension rights attached to it would be required to submit a lustration declaration. The applicant was thus aware from an early stage, and before she had received any part of the pension, that her status as a retired judge and her right to receive a special retirement pension was conditional on her submitting a lustration declaration and that her special pension rights were defeasible if she were found to have submitted a false declaration. This was ultimately the case, as it was established in the lustration proceedings that the applicant did not satisfy the conditions which domestic law attached to the acquisition and retention of the status of a “retired judge” and to the related pension rights.
75. In this regard, the case bears a similarity to a series of cases against Poland in which the Commission declared inadmissible claims under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by applicants who had been deprived of their “veteran status” and related social insurance benefits under a law passed in 1991, many years after the grant of such status, on the grounds of their previous service as collaborators with the former internal security service. In rejecting the applications, the Commission recalled that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 could not be interpreted as conferring a right to a pension of a particular amount and noted that, although being deprived of their special social insurance benefits, the applicants had retained their rights to their ordinary retirement benefits due under the general social insurance system. It was observed that the 1991 Act was partly intended as a condemnation of the political role which the communist security service had played in repressing political opposition to the communist system and that such considerations of public policy, even if they resulted in the reduction of social insurance benefits, did not affect the property rights stemming from the social insurance system in a manner contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. I. (see Styk v. Poland (dec.), no. 28356/95, 16 April 1998; Szumilas v. Poland (dec.), no 35187/97, 1 July 1998; Bieńkowski v. Poland (dec.), no. 33889/97, 9 September 1998). The same approach was followed by the Court itself in the case of Domalewski, in which it was noted that “the applicant’s pecuniary rights stemming from the contributions paid into her pension scheme remained the same” and that “the applicant’s right to derive benefits from the social insurance scheme was [not] infringed in a manner contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, especially as the loss of “veteran status” did not result in the essence of his pension rights being impaired (see Domalewski v. Poland (dec.), no. 34610/97, ECHR 1999-V; see also, Slavičinsky v. the Czech Republic (dec. ), no. 10072/05, 20 November 2006).
76. In these circumstances, the Court finds that the loss of the applicant’s status as a retired judge and of the special retirement pension attached to that status, as a result of the submission of a false lustration declaration, did not amount to an interference with the property rights of the applicant under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
77. As regards the second aspect of the applicant’s complaint, the Court notes that the applicant was held to have submitted a false declaration following a procedure which the Court has found above to have been unfair and to have violated Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. The Court recalls in this regard that, although Article 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements, an applicant who is liable to be deprived of property rights must be afforded a reasonable opportunity of putting his or her case (see, AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, 24 October 1986, § 55). The Court has found above that the applicant was not deprived of a property right. Insofar as the applicant complains that the procedures which led to the finding by the National Judicial Council that she had submitted a false declaration were unfair, and that she was not afforded a reasonable opportunity to assert her claim to retain her special status and retirement pension, the Court considers that the complaint is directly connected with that already examined under Article 6 of the Convention. Having regard to its conclusion that there was an infringement of the applicant’s right to a fair hearing for the reasons stated above, the Court finds that it is not necessary to examine the applicant’s further complaint based on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for example, Glod v. Romania, no. 41134/98, § 46, 16 September 2003; Albina v. Romania, no. 57808/00, § 43, 28 April 2005; Mitrevski v. The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 33046/02, § 41, 21 June 2007).
78. Having regard to the circumstances of the case seen as a whole, the Court therefore finds that there has been no violation of the Convention.
III. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
79. Lastly, the applicant complained under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention that the courts had failed to take sufficient account of the definition of collaboration with the communist secret services formulated in the case-law of the Constitutional Court. The evidence before the courts had been insufficient to find that she had been a willing collaborator and the courts had, in any event, failed to assess the evidence correctly and failed to take into account the fact that she had been coerced into collaborating.
80. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
81. However, the Court, having regard to its reasons for finding a violation of Article 6 (paragraphs 41-56 above) does not consider it necessary to examine this complaint separately.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
82. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
83. The applicant claimed 5,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage for distress and anguish which she had suffered as a result of the lustration proceedings conducted against her.
84. The Government contested that claim and considered it excessive.
85. The Court considers that, in the particular circumstances of the case, the finding of a violation constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction for any non-pecuniary damage which the applicant may have sustained (Matyjek, cited above, § 69; Bobek, cited above, § 79).
B. Costs and expenses
86. The applicant made no claim for costs and expenses.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Joins to the merits the Government’s preliminary objection to the admissibility of the complaint under Article 6 § 1 taken in conjunction with Article 6 § 3 (b) of the Convention;
2. Declares the application admissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 6 § 3 (b) of the Convention and dismisses in consequence the Government’s preliminary objection;
4. Holds that it is not necessary to examine separately the applicant’s other complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
5. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
6. Holds that the finding of a violation constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction for any non-pecuniary damage sustained by the applicant.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 28 April 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Obiezione preliminare congiunta ai meriti e respinta( non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione dell’ Art. 6-3-b; Nessuna violazione di P1-1; danno morale - costatazione di violazione sufficiente
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA RASMUSSEN C. POLONIA
(Richiesta n. 38886/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
28 aprile 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Rasmussen c. Polonia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson Ján Šikuta, Ledi Bianku giudici,Roman Wieruszewski giudice ad hoc,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione
Avendo deliberato in privato il 7 aprile 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 38886/05) contro la Repubblica della Polonia depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino polacco, la Sig.ra A. R. (“il richiedente”), il 5 ottobre 2005.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. M. P., un avvocato che pratica a Varsavia. Il Governo polacco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. J. Wołąsiewicz del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. Il richiedente addusse che i procedimenti di lustrazione nella sua causa erano stati ingiusti, in violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Si lamentò inoltre, invocando l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che come un risultato dei procedimenti di lustrazione lei era stata privata del suo status di previdenza sociale speciale in qualità di giudice pensionato.
4. Il 13 settembre 2007 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Il 7 aprile 2009 la Corte decise di applicare l’Articolo29 § 3 della Convenzione nella prospettiva did esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
5. Il Sig. L. Garlicki, il giudice eletto a riguardo della Polonia, si ritirò dal riunirsi nella causa (Articolo 28 degli Articoli di Corte). Il Governo nominò di conseguenza il Sig. R. Wieruszewski per riunirsi come giudice ad hoc (Articolo 29).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1948 e vive a Szczecin.
7. Il richiedente è stato giudice per ventisette anni. In virtù di un emendamento alla legge sul Sistema dei Tribunali Comuni del 1985 che entrò in vigore 17 ottobre 1997 fu creato lo status di “giudice pensionato” (vedere paragrafo 24 sotto).
4 Nel dicembre 1997 il richiedente che era andato in pensione l’8 luglio 1997 per motivi di cattiva salute acquisì lo status di “giudice pensionato.” Sotto le disposizioni applicabili di diritto nazionale ai giudici andati in pensione fu concessa, a partire dal 1 gennaio 1998, una pensione di pensionamento speciale equivalente al settantacinque per cento del loro ultimo pieno stipendio (sędziowski stan spoczynku) ogni mese.
8. Il 3 agosto 1997 l'Atto di Lustrazione entrò in vigore. Con un ulteriore emendamento alla Legge del 1985 del 17 dicembre 1997 che entrò in vigore il 15 agosto 1998 i giudici andati in pensione che avevano acquisito il diritto ad una pensione di pensionamento speciale furono costretti a presentare una dichiarazione sotto quell'Atto. Nel settembre 1998 il richiedente fece una dichiarazione sotto le disposizioni di quell’ Atto all'effetto che lei non aveva collaborato mai segretamente coi servizi segreti comunisti.
9. Successivamente in una data non specificata, il Commissario dell’ Interesse Pubblico fece appello alla Corte d'appello di Varsavia, che agiva come tribunale di lustrazione di prima istanza, per avviare procedimenti nella causa del richiedente sotto L’atto di Lustrazione per fatto che lei aveva mentito nella sua dichiarazione di lustrazione con negando di aver collaborato coi servizi segreti. Lui si riferì all’ esposizione di documenti a cui il richiedente nel 1986 aveva accettato di collaborare e dal 1986 al 1988 aveva presentato quindici rapporti scritti.
10. Durante i procedimenti il richiedente fu rappresentato da un avvocato. L'archivio della causa avrebbe potuto essere consultato dal richiedente e dal suo avvocato presso la cancelleria segreta della corte di lustrazione. Furono autorizzati ad apporvi delle note. Comunque, le note avrebbero potuto essere fatte solamente su quaderni speciali che furono successivamente sigillati e depositati alla cancelleria. Era possibile che loro facessero una nota, ma non prendere una nota dalla cancelleria.
11. In una data non specificata la Corte d'appello di Varsavia, agendo come corte di prima istanza, sostenne un'udienza nella causa del richiedente. L'udienza non era pubblica. Lei fu interrogata dalla corte e fece commenti sulle prove a disposizione della corte. L'archivio della causa fu composto dalla dichiarazione di lustrazione del richiedente, copie di certi documenti contenuti nell'archivio del richiedente compilati dalla polizia segreta comunista e la richiesta del Commissario affinché venissero avviati dei procedimenti di lustrazione.
12. Il 7 aprile 2004 la corte rese una sentenza nella quale trovò che il richiedente aveva fatto una dichiarazione di lustrazione falsa perché era stata una collaboratrice segreta e disponibile dei servizi segreti comunisti. Osservò che i documenti nell'archivio della causa erano incompleti, ma che ciononostante erano sufficienti alla costatazione che il richiedente era stato un collaboratore segreto. Il richiedente si oppose.
13. Il 4 novembre 2004 la stessa corte, agendo come una corte d'appello, sostenne la sentenza contestata, sostenendo che la prova nell'archivio della causa era sufficiente a costatare che il richiedente aveva collaborato di proposito ed intenzionalmente coi servizi segreti comunisti. Il richiedente presentò un ricorso di cassazione alla Corte Suprema che lo respinse con una sentenza del 7 aprile 2005.
14. Dal gennaio 1998 al maggio 2005 il richiedente ricevette 4,614 zloty polacchi (PLN) al mese (PLN 3,738 al netto) come pensione di pensionamento speciale.
15. Successivamente, il 19 maggio 2005, il Consiglio Giudiziale e Nazionale agendo su una richiesta presentata dal Ministro della Giustizia,avviò dei procedimenti per spossessarla del suo status di giudice pensionato. Decise anche che il pagamento della pensione di pensionamento speciale al richiedente avrebbe dovuto cessare con effetto dal 19 maggio 2005.
16. Nelle sue note presentate al Consiglio il richiedente dibatté che la decisione di spossessarla della sua pensione speciale era illegale siccome i requisiti dell'Atto di Lustrazione non si applicava a giudici pensionati. Supponendo anche che i giudici andati in pensione fossero obbligati a fare una dichiarazione di lustrazione, non potevano essere spossessati del loro status sotto le disposizioni di questo Atto. In qualsiasi caso, tale decisione avrebbe potuto essere data solamente dopo che procedimenti disciplinari fossero stati condotti sotto le disposizioni dell'Atto sui Tribunali Generali, ma nessun procedimento simile era stato condotto nel suo caso. Richiese che pagamento della sua pensione speciale venisse ripreso.
17. Il 20 luglio 2005 il Consiglio Giudiziale Nazionale adottò una decisione con cui il richiedente fu spossessato della pensione speciale che le fu concessa sul conto del suo status come giudice pensionato. Il richiedente si oppose, reiterando essenzialmente gli argomenti che aveva sollevato nelle sue note presentate al Consiglio.
18. Il 7 dicembre 2005 la Corte Suprema respinse il suo ricorso contro questa decisione.
19. Nell’ agosto 2005 il richiedente richiese all'autorità di previdenza sociale di accordarle una pensione di pensionamento ordinaria. La sua richiesta fu rifiutata con una decisione del 28 novembre 2005 per il fatto che il richiedente non aveva lavorato per il periodo legale di trenta anni necessario affinché si accumuli un diritto ad una pensione di pensionamento.
20. Più tardi, nell’ aprile 2006, le fu accordata una pensione di invalidità parziale (renta z tytułu częściowej niezdolności do pracy) dal 1 agosto 2005, il primo giorno del mese quando lei aveva depositato una richiesta per una pensione di previdenza sociale ordinaria, al 31 ottobre 2008 quando il richiedente aveva raggiunto l'età di pensionamento legale, per un importo mensile di PLN 1,351 (PLN 1,124 al netto).
21. A partire dal 1 marzo 2008 la pensione del richiedente è stata rivalutata contro l'inflazione. Da quel momento in poi le furono pagati PLN 1,438 per mese (PLN 1,196 al netto).
22. A partire dal 1 ottobre 2008 il richiedente ha ricevuto la sua pensione di pensionamento mensile nell'importo di PLN 2,062 (PLN 1,693 al netto).
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
23. Il 3 agosto 1997 l’Atto di Lustrazione (Ustawa o ujawnieniu pracy lub służby w organach bezpieczeństwa państwa lub współpracy z nimi w latach 1944-1990 osób pełniących funkcje publiczne) entrò in vigore. Il suo fine era assicurare trasparenza riguardo a quelle persone che esercitavano funzioni pubbliche che erano state collaboratori segreti col servizio segreto durante l'era comunista. Perse la sua forza vincolante il 15 marzo 2007. Il diritto nazionale attinente e la pratica sono state riassunte estensivamente nelle seguenti sentenze: Matyjek c. Polonia (n. 38184/03, §§ 27-38 del 24 aprile 2007); Bobek c. Polonia, (n. 68761/01, §§ 18-43 del 17 luglio 2007); e Luboch c. Polonia,( n. 37469/05, §§ 28-39 del 15 gennaio 2008).
24. Il17 ottobre 1997 gli emendamenti del 28 agosto 1997 alla Legge sul Sistema dei Tribunali Comuni 1985 (“la Legge del 1985”) entrò in vigore (“gli emendamenti di ottobre”). Gli emendamenti introdussero lo status di “giudice pensionato.” Con un ulteriore emendamento che entrò in vigore il 1 gennaio 1998 fu previsto che ad un giudice, con lo status di giudice pensionato che era andato in pensione per motivi inter alia, di età o di cattiva salute si sarebbe dovuto concedere la rimunerazione uguale al settanta-cinque per cento del suo stipendio di base più un bonus calcolato sulla base degli anni di servizio.
25. Il 15 agosto 1998 ulteriori emendamenti del 17 dicembre 1997 alla Legge del 1985 entrarono in vigore (“gli emendamenti di dicembre”). Gli emendamenti prevedevano, nella parte attinente:
“Articolo 78.... § 1. Un giudice pensionato sarà obbligato a tenere la dignità della posizione di giudice.
§ 2. Un giudice pensionato prenderà la responsabilità disciplinare di un insuccesso nel mantenere la dignità della posizione di giudice dopo essere andato in pensione e per qualsiasi insuccesso nel mantenere simile dignità quando in servizio come giudice.”
26. Gli emendamenti di dicembre inoltre prevedevano, inter alia, ciò che segue:
“L'Articolo 7 § 6. I giudici... che hanno acquisito il diritto alla pensione di pensionamento o pensione di invalidità presenteranno la dichiarazione prevista sotto la sezione 18 di [l’Atto di Lustrazione 1997].
Articolo 8 § 1. I giudici pensionati... che hanno lavorato o prestato servizio per [i servizi di sicurezza di Stato] o che hanno presentato dichiarazioni false concernenti simili servizi o lavori o collaborazioni con [tali servizi] perderanno il diritto allo status di giudice pensionato ed alla rimunerazione nello status di pensionato.
§ 3. Le circostanze citate in § 1 verranno accertate secondo la procedura stabilita [nell’Atto di Lustrazione 1997]. La perdita dei diritti accadrà dalla data dell’emissione della decisione.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
27. Il richiedente si lamentò che i procedimenti concernenti la sua dichiarazione di lustrazione erano stati ingiusti. Si appellò all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, si legge:
“1. Nella determinazione... di qualsiasi accusa criminale contro di lui, ad ognuno viene concessa un’udienza equa e pubblica... da parte di [un]... tribunale...
3. Ognuno accusato di un reato penale ha i seguenti diritti minimi: …
(b) avere tempo adeguato e mezzi per la preparazione della sua difesa”
A. Ammissibilità
28. Il Governo dibatté in primo luogo che il richiedente aveva fatto una specifica azione di reclamo riguardo all’ accesso all'archivio e alla possibilità di fare note e copie solamente nella sua lettera del 9 luglio 2007. Era dell’opinione che le sue azioni di reclamo iniziali si riferivano ai problemi effettivi coinvolti nei procedimenti di lustrazione, vale a dire alla valutazione della prova e alla richiesta di diritto sostanziale sull’ essere un collaboratore segreto e disponibile dei servizi di sicurezza. Concluse che questa parte della richiesta dovrebbe essere dichiarata inammissibile per inosservanza col tempo-limite dei sei mesi previsto dall’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione.
29. Il richiedente presentò di essersi già, nella sua dichiarazione iniziale della richiesta datata 5 ottobre 2005, espressamente lamentata del fatto che i procedimenti di lustrazione erano ingiusti. Lei aveva dibattuto anche poi che le violazioni procedurali di cui si lamentava includevano, inter alia, una violazione della presunzione d'innocenza. Le sue susseguenti osservazioni erano state fatte in modo da completare e raffinare la sostanza dell'azione di reclamo. Loro non costituirono un'azione di reclamo nuova e non estendono la sfera dell'originale.
30. La Corte reitera che se un richiedente solleva delle azioni di reclamo fuori il tempo limite di sei mesi che sono particolari aspetti delle azioni di reclamo iniziali presentate in ottemperanza del requisito dei sei mesi, dovrebbero essere ritenute come presentatei entro quel tempo limite (vedere Paroisse gréco-catholique Sâmbăta Bihor c. Romania (dec.), n. 48107/99, 25 maggio 2004). La Corte è del parere che nella presente causa il riferimento all'iniquità generale dei procedimenti era sufficiente per sostenere che il richiedente aveva rispettato il tempo limite. Ne segue che l'obiezione del Governo deve essere perciò respinta.
31. Il Governo presentò inoltre che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali a lei disponibile, come richiesto sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione. Dibatté che non aveva sollevato di fronte ai tribunali nazionali, anche in sostanza le specifiche dichiarazioni riguardo all'iniquità dei procedimenti di lustrazione. In particolare, né in appello né allo stadio di cassazione aveva impugnato le restrizioni sul suo accesso all’archivio della causa e le restrizioni addotte dei suoi diritti di difesa. Il Governo indicò che ci si sarebbe potuti opporsi a questa disposizione direttamente nei procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali nazionali.
32. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non si era giovato a delle via di ricorso sotto l’Articolo 79 §1 della Costituzione. Sosteneva che la Corte aveva riconosciuto che, anche se la Corte Costituzionale non era competente per annullare delle decisioni individuali perché il suo ruolo era decidere sulla costituzionalità delle leggi, le sue sentenze che dichiaravano una disposizione legale o un’ altra incostituzionale generavano il diritto di ottenere la riapertura dei procedimenti attinenti in una causa individuale, o di ottenere l’annullamento di una decisione definitiva (vedere Szott-Medyńska c. Polonia, n. 47414/99, 9 ottobre 2003).
33. Il richiedente non era d'accordo con gli argomenti del Governo e presentò che nella sua causa l'azione di reclamo costituzionale individuale non sarebbe stata una via di ricorso efficace.
34. La Corte considera che la questione del fatto se il richiedente possa impugnare efficacemente il set di normative legali che disciplinavano l’accesso all'archivio di causa che stabilivano le caratteristiche dei procedimenti di lustrazione è collegato alla valutazione della Corte dell'ottemperanza della Polonia coi requisiti di un “ processo equo” sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere Bobek, citata sopra, § 48, e Matyjek, citata sopra, § 42). La Corte unisce di conseguenza la dichiarazione del Governo sull'inammissibilità a causa del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali ai meriti della causa.
35. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
36. Il richiedente si lamentò che i procedimenti concernenti la sua dichiarazione di lustrazione erano stati ingiusti. Non erano stati tenuti in pubblico. Il richiedente non aveva avuto accesso all'archivio della causa in una misura sufficiente per assicurare l’uguaglianza delle armi fra lei ed il Commissario dell'Interesse Pubblico. Non aveva potuto fare e trattenere delle note nei procedimenti siccome l'archivio di causa poteva essere consultato solamente nella cancelleria segreta della corte di lustrazione e non le era stato concesso di portare le note fuori dalla cancelleria. Né lei aveva potuto fare delle copie dei documenti nell’archivio della causa e portarli fuori dal tribunale, se non per i pochi minuti delle udienze in tribunale. Questo aveva reso la sua difesa inefficace.
37. Il Governo dibatté che il diritto del richiedente ad un processo equo ed il principio di qualità delle armi era stato rispettato pienamente. Il richiedente aveva avuto il pieno accesso a tutti i documenti che costituivano una prova nella sua causa, aveva potuto prendere nota di loro e utilizzare queste note alle udienze. Sotto le disposizioni dell’Atto di Lustrazione le garanzie procedurali previste dal Codice di Procedura Penale erano applicabili ai procedimenti di lustrazione. La Corte Costituzionale aveva esaminato queste garanzie in molte occasioni e trovato che erano compatibili coi requisiti di un’udienza equa. Nei suoi ricorsi il richiedente si lamentò similmente, dell'iniquità addotta dei procedimenti, ma i suoi ricorsi furono respinti dai tribunali nazionali.
38. Il Governo ammise che sotto l’Atto di Protezione delle Informazioni Riservate del 1999 e l’Articolo 156 § 4 del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale, la prova nella causa era stata considerata come informazione riservata. Comunque, il richiedente aveva avuto il pieno accesso a questi documenti in tutti i procedimenti. Tutti i documenti su cui il Commissario dell'Interesse Pubblico si era appellato istruendo il processo contro il richiedente erano stati inclusi nell'archivio di causa. La sola restrizione imposta sul richiedente ed sul suo avvocato era che loro dovevano consultare l'archivio nella cancelleria segreta della corte di lustrazione. Non c'erano restrizioni in merito al tempo che il richiedente ed il suo avvocato avrebbero potuto spendere consultando ed esaminando questi documenti alla cancelleria. Su richiesta della corte di lustrazione, anche gli originali dei documenti dall'archivio della polizia segreta comunista erano stati presentati alla tribunale ed il richiedente aveva avuto accesso agli originali.
39. Il Governo presentò inoltre che al richiedente era stato permesso di fare note dall'archivio di causa. Le note dovevano essere fatte in un quaderno speciale che fu messo successivamente in una busta, sigillato e depositato presso la cancelleria segreta. La stessa procedura si applicava a tutte le note fatte durante le udienze. La busta coi quaderni avrebbe potuta essere aperta solamente dalla persona stessa che aveva fatto le note . Il Governo enfatizzò che gli articoli sopra avevano abilitato il richiedente a partecipare attivamente alle udienze e che sia il suo avvocato che lei si erano attivamente giovate di questa possibilità. Inoltre, ogni prova era stata rivelata al richiedente ed al suo avvocato durante le udienze. Riassumendo , la sola restrizione imposta sul richiedente, vale a dire un obbligo di consultare i documenti riservati in una cancelleria segreta della corte di lustrazione e depositare il suo quaderno là, non ha colpito la sua capacità di esaminare la prova contro di lei in un modo che avrebbe danneggiato i suoi diritti di difesa.
40. Il Governo concluse che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 nella presente causa.
2. La valutazione della Corte
41. La Corte prima osserva che il suo compito è determinare se nei procedimenti avviati contro il richiedente sotto L’Atto di Lustrazione 1997 c’era stata un’“udienza corretta” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione. La Corte reitera che le garanzie procedurali dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione sotto il suo capo penale si applicano ai procedimenti di lustrazione (vedere Matyjek, citata sopra). Osserva inoltre che le garanzie nel paragrafo 3 dell’ Articolo 6 sono specifici aspetti del diritto ad un processo equo esposto in generale nel paragrafo 1. Per questa ragione considera appropriato esaminare l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto le due disposizioni prese insieme (vedere Edwards c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 16 dicembre 1992 Serie A n. 247-B, p. 34, § 33; ed anche la sentenza Matyjek, citata sopra, §§ 53-54).
42. Secondo il principio dell'uguaglianza delle armi, come una delle caratteristiche del concetto più ampio di un processo equo, ad ogni parte deve essere riconosciuta un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare la sua causa sotto condizioni che non mettono l'individuo in uno svantaggio sostanziale vis-à-vis dell'oppositore (vedere, per esempio, Jespers c. Belgio, n. 8403/78, decisione della Commissione del 15 ottobre 1980, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 27, p. 61; Foucher c. Francia, sentenza del 18 marzo 1997, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II § 34; e Bulut c. Austria, sentenza del 22 febbraio 1996, Relazioni 1996-II, p. 380-81, § 47). La Corte nota inoltre che per assicurare che l'accusato riceva un processo equo qualsiasi difficoltà causate alla difesa da una limitazione dei suoi diritti deve essere sufficientemente controbilanciata dalle procedure seguite dalle autorità giudiziali (vedere Doorson c. Paesi Bassi, sentenza del 26 marzo 1996, Relazioni 1996-II, p. 471, § 72; e Van Mechelen ed Altri c. i Paesi Bassi, sentenza del 23 aprile 1997, Relazioni 1997-III, p. 712, § 54).
43. La Corte ha già trattato il problema di procedimenti di lustrazione nella causa Turek c. Slovacchia (n. 57986/00, § 115 ECHR 2006 -... (gli estratti)). In particolare la Corte sostenne in quella sentenza che, a meno che non venga mostrato il contrario sui fatti di una specifica causa, non può si può presumere che rimanga un interesse pubblico, continuo ed effettivo nelle limitazioni imposte sull’accesso a materiali classificati come riservati sotto i regimi precedenti. Ecco perché procedimenti di lustrazione sono, per loro molta natura, diretti verso la determinazione di fatti risalenti all'era comunista e non collegati direttamente alle funzioni correnti ed alle operazioni dei precedenti servizi di sicurezza. I procedimenti di Lustrazione dipendono inevitabilmente dall'esame di documenti relativi alle operazioni delle agenzie di sicurezza comuniste, la selezione e la rivelazione dei cui documenti sono a discrezione del servizio di sicurezza corrente. Se alla parte a cui i materiali riservati si riferiscono viene negato l’accesso a tutti o alla maggior parte dei materiali in oggetto, la possibilità di contraddire da parte sua la versione dell'agenzia di sicurezza dei fatti verrà gravemente ridotta.
Queste considerazioni rimangono attinenti alla presente causa nonostante delle differenze coi procedimenti di lustrazione in Polonia (vedere anche Matyjek, citata sopra, § 56; Bobek, citata sopra, § 57; e Luboch, citata sopra, § 62).
44. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte esaminerà prima le azioni di reclamo del richiedente relative all'uguaglianza delle armi nei procedimenti riguardati. In questo collegamento, la Corte prima osserva, che non è in controversia che i materiali dai servizi di sicurezza dell’era comunista sono stati considerati segreti di Stato. Lo status riservato a simili materiali era stato sostenuto dall’Ufficio Sicurezza Statale. Almeno parte dei documenti relativi alla causa di lustrazione del richiedente era stata così coperta, da segretezza ufficiale. Comunque, la Corte reitera che prima ha sostenuto che tale situazione era incoerente con l'equità di procedimenti di lustrazione, incluso il principio dell'uguaglianza delle armi (vedere Turek, citata sopra, § 115; Matyjek, citata sopra, § 57; e Bobek, citata sopra, § 58).
45. In secondo luogo, la Corte nota che, allo stadio di pre-processo, il Commissario dell’ Interesse Pubblico aveva un diritto di accesso, nella cancelleria segreta del suo ufficio o dell'Istituto dei Ricordi Nazionale, a tutti i materiali relativi alla persona coinvolta nella lustrazione creati dai servizi di sicurezza precedenti. Dopo l'istituzione dei procedimenti di lustrazione, anche il richiedente avrebbe potuto accedere al suo archivio del tribunale. Comunque, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 156 del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale e sezione 52 (2) dell’Atto della Protezione di Informazioni riservate 1999, nessuna copia avrebbe potuta essere fatta dei materiali contenuti nell'archivio del tribunale e dei documenti riservati avrebbero potuto essere consultati solamente presso la cancelleria segreta della corte di lustrazione. La Corte nota inoltre che questo fu ammesso dal Governo.
46. La Corte non è persuasa dell'argomento del Governo secondo cui allo stadio del processo le stesse limitazioni riguardo all’ accesso a documenti riservati si applica al Commissario dell’ Interesse Pubblico. Al Commissario che era un organo pubblico erano stati assegnati legalmente dei poteri identici a quelli sotto il diritto nazionale, di un accusatore pubblico. Sotto la sezione 17(e) dell'Atto di Lustrazione, il Commissario dell’ Interesse Pubblico aveva un diritto di accesso alla piena documentazione relativa alla persona coinvolta nella lustrazione creata, inter alia, dai servizi di sicurezza precedenti. Se necessario, avrebbe potuto ascoltare testimoni ed ordine pareri competenti. Il Commissario aveva anche a sua disposizione una cancelleria segreta, con personale che aveva ottenuto autorizzazione ufficiale concedendogli accesso a documenti considerati come segreti di Stato, ed aveva il compito di analizzare dichiarazioni di lustrazione alla luce dei documenti esistenti e preparare l'archivio di causa per il processo di lustrazione.
47. Inoltre, non era in controversia fra le parti che, consultando il suo archivio di causa, il richiedente era stato autorizzato a fare delle note. Comunque qualsiasi nota avesse fatti avrebbe potuto essere fatta solamente su quaderni speciali che venivano successivamente sigillati e depositati nella sezione segreta della cancelleria. I quaderni non potevano essere rimossi da questa cancelleria e avrebbero potuto essere aperti solamente dalla persona che aveva fatto la nota in questi. Costrizioni simili furono imposte su qualsiasi nota fatta durante le udienze. La Corte osserva che il Governo non si appellò a nessuna disposizione di diritto nazionale che avrebbe dato al richiedente il diritto di rimuovere i quaderni dalla cancelleria segreta.
48. La Corte reitera che la partecipazione efficace dell'accusato nel processo penale deve includere ugualmente il diritto a compilare una nota per facilitare la condotta della difesa, irrispettoso del fatto che sia o meno rappresentato da un consigliere (vedere Pullicino c. Malta (dec.), numero 45441/99, 15 giugno 2000). Il fatto che il richiedente non potesse rimuovere dal tribunale le proprie note, fatte o all'udienza o nella sezione segreta della cancelleria, gli ha impedito di usare in pieno ed efficacemente le informazioni contenute in loro, siccome nella preparazione della sua difesa lei ed il suo avvocato dovevano fare appello solamente alla loro memoria.
49Avuto riguardo a ciò che era in gioco per il richiedente nei procedimenti di lustrazione - non solo il suo buon nome ma anche il suo status speciale come giudice pensionato (vedere paragrafi 14-16 sopra) - la Corte considera che era importante per lei per avere accesso senza restrizioni all’archivio del tribunale ed all’ uso senza restrizioni di qualsiasi nota che aveva fatto, incluso, se necessario, la possibilità di ottenere copie di documenti attinenti (vedere Foucher, citata sopra, § 36).
50. La Corte reitera che, se un Stato adotta una misura di lustrazione, deve assicurare che le persone colpite da questa godano di tutte le garanzie procedurali della Convenzione (vedere Turek, citata sopra, § 115; Matyjek, citata sopra, § 62; e Bobek, citata sopra, § 69). La Corte accetta che ci può essere una situazione in cui c'è un interesse di Stato irresistibile nel mantenere la segretezza di alcuni documenti, anche quelli prodotti sotto il regime precedente. Tale situazione comunque sorgerà solamente eccezionalmente , dato il tempo considerevole che è passato dal momento in cui i documenti furono creati. Spetta al Governo provare l'esistenza di tale interesse nella particolare causa, perché ciò che è accettato come un'eccezione non deve divenire la norma. La Corte considera che un sistema sotto il quale la conseguenza di processi di lustrazione dipende in misura considerevole dalla ricostruzione delle azioni dei servizi segreti precedenti, mentre la maggior parte dei materiali attinenti rimangono classificati come segreti e la decisione di mantenere la loro riservatezza rientra all'interno dei poteri dei servizi segreti correnti, crea una situazione nella quale la persona coinvolta nella lustrazione è posta in un chiaro svantaggio.
51. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte considera, che, a causa della riservatezza dei documenti e delle limitazioni sull’ accesso all'archivio della causa da parte della persona coinvolta nella lustrazione - in particolare in confronto alla posizione privilegiata del Commissario dell’ Interesse Pubblico in simili procedimenti - la capacità del richiedente di fare esaminare la sua causa in modo equo fu ridotta drasticamente. Avuto riguardo al particolare contesto dei procedimenti di lustrazione ed all’applicazione cumulativa di queste norme, la Corte considera, che hanno posto un carico sproporzionato sul richiedente in pratica e non hanno soddisfatto i requisiti di un'udienza corretta o dell'uguaglianza delle armi fra le parti ai procedimenti.
52. Rimane da accertare se il richiedente avesse potuto impugnare con successo le caratteristiche dei procedimenti di lustrazione nel suo ricorso in cassazione. Data l'asserzione del Governo che le norme relative all’ accesso ai materiali classificati come segreti erano regolate da leggi successive sui segreti di Stato e dalle disposizioni attinenti del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale, e che queste disposizioni legali erano attinenti a questa causa, la Corte non è persuasa che il richiedente, nei suoi ricorsi o appelli in cassazione, avrebbe potuto impugnare con successo le decisioni date nella sua causa.
53. Nel momento in cui il Governo si appella all'azione di reclamo costituzionale, la Corte sottolinea, in primo luogo, il fatto che l'Atto di Lustrazione è stato in molte occasioni inutilmente impugnato di fronte alla Corte Costituzionale (vedere Matyjek, citata sopra, e Bobek, citata sopra, §§ 38-43). La Corte nota inoltre che il Governo è andato a vuoto nell’indicare quale disposizione di diritto nazionale il richiedente avrebbe dovuto impugnare tramite un'azione di reclamo costituzionale. Inoltre, la Corte ha sostenuto che un'azione di reclamo costituzionale era solamente una via di ricorso efficace ai fini dell’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione in situazioni in cui la violazione addotta della Convenzione erail risultato dell’applicazione diretta di una disposizione legale considerata dal reclamante come incostituzionale (vedere Szott-Medyńska, citata sopra; Pachla c. Polonia (dec.), numero 8812/02, 8 novembre 2005; Wypych c. Polonia (dec.), n. 2428/05, 25 ottobre 2005; e Tereba c. Polonia (il dec.), n. 30263/04, 21 novembre 2006).
54. In questo collegamento, la Corte osserva che non si può dire che la violazione della Convenzione di cui ci si lamenta nella presente causa sia nato da una qualsiasi singola disposizione legale o anche da un set ben definito di disposizioni. Piuttosto fu il risultato del modo in cui le leggi attinenti furono applicate alla causa del richiedente e, in particolare, dalle “disposizioni speciali” a cui si fa riferimento nell’ Articolo 156 § 4 del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale, che permettevano che il Presidente della Corte di Lustrazione limitasse l'accesso del richiedente all’archivio della causa e le sue opportunità di prendere nota e copiare documenti. Comunque, segue dalla giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale polacca che manca di giurisdizione per esaminare il modo in cui le disposizioni di diritto nazionale furono applicate in una causa individuale.
55. Ne segue che non è stato mostrato che il richiedente aveva una via di ricorso efficace a sua disposizione sotto diritto nazionale con cui impugnare la struttura legale che stabilisce le caratteristiche dei procedimenti di lustrazione. Di conseguenza, l'obiezione del Governo riguardo all'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
56. In queste circostanze la Corte conclude che i procedimenti di lustrazione contro il richiedente, presi nell'insieme, non possono essere considerati equi, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione presa in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 6 § 3. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di quelle disposizioni.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
57. Il richiedente si lamentò che come risultato delle sentenze rese nella sua causa di essere stata privata successivamente del diritto di previdenza sociale che i diritti nazionali attinenti garantivano ai giudici pensionati. Lei si appellò all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
58. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali ed attinenti. Non aveva depositato un ricorso contro la decisione delle Autorità di Previdenza Sociale del 28 novembre 2005 che rifiutava di accordarle un diritto ad pensione ordinaria anticipata (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra). Il richiedente non si rivolse questo aspetto della causa.
59. La Corte nota che questa parte della richiesta non si riferisce ai procedimenti concernenti il diritto del richiedente ad una pensione di pensionamento ordinario. Riguarda solamente le decisioni che diedero luogo al fatto che il richiedente venisse spossessato del suo status come giudice pensionato e la conseguente perdita dei suoi diritti ad una pensione speciale. Non è stato mostrato o dibattuto che il richiedente aveva qualsiasi ulteriore via di ricorso disponibile a lei a questo riguardo dopo che il suo ricorso in cassazione fu deciso dalla Corte Suprema il 7 dicembre 2005 (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra).
60. Per queste ragioni, la dichiarazione del Governo dell'inammissibilità sulla base del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere respinta.
61. La Corte nota che questa parte della richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
62. Il Governo enfatizzò che non c'era stata interferenza coi diritti del richiedente garantiti dall’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, perché la pensione speciale che lei aveva ricevuto prima della decisione di lustrazione era un diritto speciale collegato alla sua posizione come giudice pensionato. Quindi, il suo allontanamento non dovrebbe essere considerato come un'interferenza con un diritto inalienabile ed irrevocabile. Dovrebbe essere considerato piuttosto come un rifiuto da parte dello Stato di onorare, in casi come quello del richiedente il diritto speciale dato ai giudici sulla conclusione del loro servizio a condizione che loro continuino ad adempiere le qualifiche morali che un giudice dovrebbe possedere.
63. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che, se la Corte dovesse costatare che c'era stata un'interferenza coi diritti del richiedente, simile interferenza era nell'interesse generale all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Il richiedente non era stato penalizzato per il fatto che lei era stata una collaboratrice con la polizia segreta. Piuttosto, il fine dell'Atto di Lustrazione del 1997 era castigare quelle persone che occupavano una carica pubblica che avevano fatto dichiarazioni di lustrazione false. La collaborazione stessa non aveva impedito ai cittadini un accesso ad una carica pubblico; solo la veridicità della dichiarazione di lustrazione era in causa nei procedimenti di lustrazione. Il principio della protezione della fiducia del cittadino nello Stato e nella legge ha militato anche in favore della soluzione adottata nella causa del richiedente. I requisiti di giustizia sociale, garantiti dall’ Articolo 2 della Costituzione avevano reso necessario tracciare una distinzione fra i giudici che avevano fatto delle dichiarazioni vere e quelli che non le avevano fatte. La fedeltà era uno dei valori che meritavano protezione speciale da parte dello Stato, specialmente a riguardo dei giudici.
64. Il Governo infine presentò che l'interferenza non era stata sproporzionata. Il richiedente aveva perso il suo status speciale, ma rimase eleggibile per la protezione di previdenza sociale sotto il sistema generale. Quando aveva fatto domanda dei benefici sotto questo sistema, la sua causa era stata esaminata sulla base delle disposizioni generalmente applicabili dei diritti della previdenza sociale. La sua richiesta per una pensione di pensionamento anticipata era stata respinta, perché lei non aveva lavorato per il periodo richiesto di trenta anni. Lei aveva mantenuto anche il diritto di richiedere di nuovo una pensione di pensionamento ordinaria quando fosse giunta all'età di pensionamento legale di sessanta anni. In qualsiasi caso, con una decisione del 25 aprile 2006 le era stato assegnato il diritto ad una pensione di invalidità sulla base della sua invalidità parziale, per l’ intero periodo fra il 1 agosto 2005 (quando lei depositò la sua richiesta di essere coperto dal sistema di previdenza generale) sino all’ottobre 2008. Non era stata privata perciò dei suoi mezzi di sussistenza. La perdita dello status di giudice pensionato aveva dato luogo solamente al fatto che gli articoli generali del sistema di previdenza sociale divenissero applicabili a lei.
65. Il richiedente si lamentò che come risultato delle sentenze date nella sua causa lei era stata privata del diritto di previdenza sociale che i diritti nazionali attinenti garantivano ai giudici pensionati. I giudici pensionati ricevevano pensioni di pensionamento nell'importo del settantacinque percento del loro ultimo pieno salario. Dopo la decisione del Consiglio Giudiziale e Nazionale del 20 luglio 2005 (paragrafo 17 sopra) perse il suo diritto a quella pensione. La sua posizione nella società ne risentì enormemente come conseguenza. Ha lavorato come giudice per tutta la sua intera vita professionale. Come risultato delle decisioni si lamentò di aver perso il suo status privilegiato e di non aver acquisito un diritto alla pensione di pensionamento ordinaria prevista dal diritto della previdenza sociale.
66. Il richiedente dibatté che sotto l’Assemblea Parlamentare della Risoluzione1096 del Consiglio d’ Europa (1996) sulle misure per smantellare l'eredità dei precedenti sistemi totalitari comunisti , la lustrazione non avrebbe dovuto essere costruita come una forma di vendetta o punizione. Il fine della lustrazione era di ostacolare le persone che avevano collaborato coi servizi segreti comunisti in passato nel sostenere cariche pubbliche. Nel suo caso, l'istituzione dei procedimenti di lustrazione era stata ingiustificata, perché quando l'Atto del 1997 era entrato in vigore lei non occupava più un posto giudiziale. Quindi, nessuna delle ragioni per cui l'Atto di Lustrazione era stato decretato, vale a dire escludere le persone dall'esercitare il potere governativo nel caso non si avesse avuto fiducia nel fatto che potessero esercitare in ottemperanza con i principi democratici, si poteva applicare alla sua situazione. Il fatto che lei era stata privata del suo status come giudice pensionato doveva essere considerato un atto di un carattere punitivo, incompatibile con la Decisione summenzionata del 1996.
67. Il richiedente presentò che il requisito per un giudice pensionato di subire procedimenti di lustrazione quindici anni dopo la caduta del regime comunista doveva essere considerato una limitazione non necessaria ed inaccettabile del suo diritto al pacifico godimento della sua proprietà. Lo scopo essenziale della lustrazione era proteggere una democrazia di recente emersa, non castigare persone presunte colpevoli. Nessuno potrebbe contestare ragionevolmente dopo il 1996 che la Polonia era una democrazia stabile e relativamente matura, non più minacciata dalla possibilità di un colpo di stato post-comunista. La gravità e lo scopo delle misure di lustrazione accettabili adottate nel 1997 avrebbero dovuto essere perciò inferiori, a ciò che sarebbe stato accettabile nei primi anni ’90. In qualsiasi caso, nel 1997 e più tardi, l ‘assoggettamento a questo requisito dei giudici pensionati che non decidevano più cause non poteva essere giustificata col bisogno di garantire una nuova democrazia.
2. La valutazione della Corte
68. La Corte ha interpretato l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 come avente due aspetti- in primo luogo, che l’applicazione a lei, come giudice pensionato delle disposizioni della Legge di Lustrazione, con la risultante perdita del suo diritto ad una pensione di pensionamento speciale corrispose ad una violazione dei suoi diritti garantiti da questa disposizione; e, in secondo luogo, che i procedimenti che condussero a simile privazione nella sua causa erano in qualsiasi caso, viziati d’ iniquità in violazione dei requisiti di procedura dell’ Articolo 1.
69. Non è in controversia che, a seguito della decisione di lustrazione nella sua causa, il richiedente perse il suo diritto al suo status speciale come giudice pensionato e, di conseguenza, alla pensione di pensionamento speciale a cui era collegato quello status. Il Governo dibatté che l'allontanamento dal richiedente di questo status speciale non poteva essere considerato un'interferenza con un diritto di proprietà ma, piuttosto, come un rifiuto dello Stato di onorare, in casi come quello del richiedente il diritto speciale dato ai giudici alla conclusione del loro servizio a condizione che loro continuino ad adempiere alle qualifiche morali che un giudice dovrebbe possedere. Il richiedente non era d'accordo. Dibatté che c'era stata un'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà in quanto, come risultato dell’applicazione delle misure in oggetto, lei era stata privata di un beneficio materiale e prezioso. Secondo lei, il fine della lustrazione era di impedire alle persone che avevano collaborato coi servizi segreti comunisti in passato di sostenere cariche pubbliche e che l'istituzione di procedimenti di lustrazione contro lei non giustificavano un fine legittimo ed era ingiustificata poiché lei non occupava più un posto giudiziale quando l'Atto di Lustrazione entrò in vigore.
70. La questione che deve determinare la Corte è se la perdita del suo diritto alla pensione di pensionamento speciale nelle particolari circostanze di questa causa corrispose ad un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al pacifico godimento della sua proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
71. La Corte richiama che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non crea un diritto di acquisire proprietà. Non mette alcuna restrizione sulla libertà degli Stati Contraenti di decidere se mettere in opera o meno una qualsiasi forma di sistema di previdenza sociale, o scegliere il tipo o l’importo dei sussidi da prevedere sotto un qualsiasi schema di questo tipo. Comunque, nel caso in cui uno Stato Contraente ha in legislazione il potere di prevede di pieno diritto il pagamento di un sussidio di benessere sociale -sia condizionale o meno al pagamento precedente di contributi-questa legislazione deve essere considerata come generante un interesse di proprietà che incorre all'interno dell'ambito dell’Articolo 1 per le persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (Stec ed Altri c Regno Unito, [GC], (dec.) n. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 54 ECHR 2006 -). Inoltre, dove l'importo di un sussidio viene ridotto o viene annullato, questo può costituire un'interferenza con la proprietà che richiede di essere giustificata nell'interesse generale (Kjartan Ásmundsson c. Islanda, sentenza del 12 ottobre 2004 ECHR 2004-IX). Comunque, dove la persona riguardata non soddisfa, o cessa di soddisfare, le condizioni legali stabilite in diritto nazionale per la concessione di simili sussidi, non c'è interferenza coi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (Bellet, Huertas e Vialatte c. Francia, (dec.) n. 40832/98 27 aprile 1999).
72. La Corte nota che nella presente causa il richiedente perse il suo diritto ad una pensione di pensionamento speciale come risultato dell’ essere spossessato dal suo status come “giudice pensionato” sulla base delle disposizioni dell’Atto di Lustrazione 1997 le cui disposizioni si applicavano a coloro che detenevano simile status in virtù degli emendamenti di dicembre alla Legge sul Sistema dei Tribunali Comuni 1985 (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). Nota inoltre che la perdita della sua pensione speciale non spogliò il richiedente di ogni mezzo di sussistenza. Mantenne i suoi diritti ai sussidi di previdenza sociale ordinari, incluso, inizialmente, i sussidi d’invalidità e, da allora in poi, una pensione di pensionamento. Inoltre, il richiedente non sembra infatti avere perso i suoi diritti speciali sino al dicembre 2005 quando il Consiglio Giudiziale Nazionale decise che il pagamento della pensione di pensionamento speciale avrebbe dovuto cessare (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra).
73. La Corte osserva che sotto il diritto nazionale, lo status di “giudice pensionato” che fu creato il 17 ottobre 1997 era uno status speciale. Lo status che era volontario e che da cui un giudice precedente poteva in qualsiasi tempo dimettersi, portava con sé certi obblighi incluso l'obbligo di attenersi ai requisiti di dichiarazione di lustrazione applicabili ad un giudice di seduta. Il Governo dibatté che, sotto il diritto nazionale, lo status era collegato al principio costituzionale dell'indipendenza giudiziale e dell’irremovibilità e che, anche se un giudice pensionato che aveva acquisito lo status privilegiato non occupava più un posto giudiziale e non aveva nessun ruolo giudiziale attivo da giocare, veniva considerato in diritto nazionale come se continuasse ad esercitare una funzione pubblica e l’applicazione delle leggi di lustrazione al possessore di simile status fosse di conseguenza giustificata.
La Corte non trova necessario determinare se l’applicazione delle leggi di lustrazione a coloro che non erano più in servizio attivo serviva uno scopo legittimo poiché, per le ragioni che appaiono sotto trova che in qualsiasi caso non c’era nessuna interferenza con la proprietà del richiedente ai sensi dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
74. La Corte osserva che il richiedente andò in pensione l’8 luglio 1997 poco prima dell'Atto di Lustrazione entrato in vigore il 3 agosto 1997. Il 4 dicembre 1997 il richiedente acquisì lo status di giudice pensionato. Il 17 dicembre 1997 divenne evidente dall'emendamento all'Atto del 1985 che coloro che auspicavano mantenere lo status e godere dei diritti di pensione speciale collegati a questo sarebbero stati costretti a presentare una dichiarazione di lustrazione. Il richiedente era così consapevole sin da una fase iniziale, e prima che di ricevere una qualsiasi parte della pensione che il suo status come giudice pensionato ed il suo diritto a ricevere una pensione di pensionamento speciale era condizionale alla sua presentazione di una dichiarazione di lustrazione e che i suoi diritti di pensione speciale dovevano terminare nel caso in cui avessero scoperto che aveva presentato una dichiarazione falsa. Questa è stato il caso alla fine, siccome fu stabilito nei procedimenti di lustrazione che il richiedente non aveva soddisfatto le condizioni a cui il diritto nazionale collegava l'acquisizione e il mantenimento dello status di “giudice pensionato” ed i relativi diritti di pensione.
75. A questo riguardo, la causa presenta una somiglianza ad una serie di cause contro la Polonia in cui la Commissione dichiarò le rivendicazioni inammissibili sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 da parte di richiedenti che erano stati privati del loro “status di veterani” e dei relativi sussidi di previdenza sociale sotto una legge passata nel 1991, molti anni dopo la concessione di simile status, per motivi del loro precedente servizio come collaboratori col precedente servizio di sicurezza interno. Nel respingere le richieste, la Commissione richiamò, che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non si poteva interpretare come se conferisse un diritto ad una pensione di un particolare importo e notò che, benché privati dei loro sussidi di previdenza sociale, i richiedenti avevano mantenuto i loro diritti ai loro sussidi di pensionamento ordinari dovuti sotto il sistema generale di previdenza sociale. Si osservò che l'Atto del 1991 fu proposto in parte come una condanna del ruolo politico che il servizio di sicurezza comunista aveva avuto nel reprimere l’opposizione politica al sistema comunista e che simili considerazioni di politica pubblica, anche se diedero luogo alla riduzione di sussidi di previdenza sociale, non colpivano i diritti di proprietà che scaturivano dal sistema di previdenza sociale in modo contrario all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. (vedere Styk c. Polonia (dec.), n. 28356/95, 16 aprile 1998; Szumilas c. Polonia (dec.), numeri 35187/97, 1 luglio 1998; Bieńkowski c. Polonia (dec.), n. 33889/97, 9 settembre 1998). Lo stesso approccio fu seguito dalla Corte stessa nella causa Domalewski nella quale fu notato che “i diritti materiali del richiedente che scaturivano dai contributi pagati nel suo schema pensionistico rimanevano gli stessi” e che “il diritto del richiedente a trarre dei i sussidi dal piano di previdenza sociale [non] veniva infranto in modo contrario all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, soprattutto perché la perdita dello “status di veterano” non dava luogo al danneggiamento dell’essenza dei suoi diritti di pensione (vedere Domalewski c. Polonia (dec.), n. 34610/97, il 1999-V dell’ ECHR; vedere anche, Slavičinsky c. Repubblica ceca (dec. ), n. 10072/05, 20 novembre 2006).
76. In queste circostanze, la Corte costata che la perdita dello status del richiedente come giudice pensionato e della pensione di pensionamento speciale collegata a questo status, come risultato della costatazione di una dichiarazione di lustrazione falsa non corrispose ad un'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
77. Riguardo al secondo aspetto dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente, la Corte nota che si considerò che il richiedente avesse presentato una dichiarazione falsa seguendo una procedura che la Corte ha trovato sopra essere stata ingiusta ed avere violato l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. La Corte richiama a questo riguardo il fatto che, benché l’Articolo 1 non contenga requisiti procedurali espliciti, ad un richiedente che è passibile di essere privato dei diritti di proprietà deve essere riconosciuto un'opportunità ragionevole di fissare la sua causa (vedere, AGOSI c. il Regno Unito, 24 ottobre 1986 § 55). La Corte ha trovato sopra che il richiedente non fu privato di un diritto di proprietà. Dal momento che il richiedente si lamenta che le procedure che hanno condotto alla costatazione del Consiglio Giudiziale Nazionale che lei aveva presentato una dichiarazione falsa erano ingiuste, e che non le fu riconosciuta un'opportunità ragionevole di sostenere la sua rivendicazione per mantenere il suo status speciale e la pensione di pensionamento, la Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo è connessa direttamente con quella già esaminata sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Avendo riguardo alla sua conclusione per cui c'era una violazione del diritto del richiedente ad un'udienza equa per le ragioni affermate sopra , la Corte costata che non è necessario esaminare l'ulteriore azione di reclamo del richiedente basata sull’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, per esempio, Glod c. Romania, n. 41134/98, § 46 del 16 settembre 2003; Albina c. Romania, n. 57808/00, § 43 del 28 aprile 2005; Mitrevski c. Precedente Repubblica iugoslava e della Macedonia, n. 33046/02, § 41 del 21 giugno 2007).
78. Avendo riguardo alle circostanze della causa viste nell'insieme, la Corte perciò costata che non c'è stata nessuna violazione della Convenzione.
III. ALTRE VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DELLA CONVENZIONE
79. Il richiedente si lamentò infine, sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che i tribunali erano andati a vuoto nel prendere sufficiente in conto la definizione della collaborazione coi servizi segreti comunisti formulata nella giurisprudenza della Corte Costituzionale. Le prove di fronte ai tribunali erano state insufficienti a costatare che lei era stata una collaboratrice disponibile e i tribunali erano in qualsiasi caso, riusciti a valutare correttamente la prova e non erano riusciti a prendere in considerazione il fatto che lei era stata costretta alla collaborazione.
80. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
81. Comunque, la Corte, avendo riguardo alle sue ragioni per la costatazione di una violazione dell’Articolo 6 ( paragrafi 41-56 sopra) non considera necessario esaminare separatamente questa azione di reclamo.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
82. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
83. Il richiedente ha chiesto 5,000 euro (EUR) riguardo il danno morale per l'angoscia e lo stress di cui ha sofferto come risultato dei procedimenti di lustrazione condotti contro di lei.
84. Il Governo contestò questa rivendicazione e la considerò eccessiva.
85. La Corte considera che, nelle particolari circostanze della causa, la costatazione di una violazione costituisce di per sé una soddisfazione equa sufficiente per qualsiasi danno morale che ha potuto subire il richiedente (Matyjek, citata sopra, § 69; Bobek, citata sopra, § 79).
B. Costi e spese
86. Il richiedente non ha fatto alcuna rivendicazione di costi e spese.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Unisce ai meriti l'obiezione preliminare del Governo all'ammissibilità dell'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 6 § 3 (b) della Convenzione;
2. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 6 § 3 (b) della Convenzione e respinge di conseguenza l'obiezione preliminare del Governo;
4. Sostiene che non è necessario esaminare separatamente le altre azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’rticolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
6. Sostiene che la costatazione di una violazione costituisce di per sé una soddisfazione equa sufficiente per qualsiasi danno morale subito dal richiedente.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 28 aprile 2009, facendo seguito agli Articoli 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.