Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BIJELIC v. MONTENEGRO AND SERBIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 11890/05/2009
STATO: Serbia
DATA: 28/04/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award
SECOND SECTION
CASE OF BIJELIĆ v. MONTENEGRO AND SERBIA
(Application no. 11890/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
28 April 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Bijelić v. Montenegro and Serbia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Françoise Tulkens, President,
Ireneu Cabral Barreto,
Vladimiro Zagrebelsky,
Danutė Jočienė,
Dragoljub Popović,
Nona Tsotsoria,
Nebojša Vučinić, judges,
and Sally Dollé, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 7 April 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 11890/05) against the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by Ms N. B. (“the first applicant”), Ms S. B. (“the second applicant”) and Ms L. B. (“the third applicant”), all Serbian nationals, on 24 March 2005 and 31 January 2006, respectively.
2. The applicants complained, in particular, about the non-enforcement of a final eviction order and their consequent inability to live in the flat at issue.
3. On 28 November 2005, as regards the first applicant, and 7 February 2006, as regards the other two applicants, who were subsequently recognised as such, these complaints were communicated to the Government of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro.
4. On 7 April 2006 the said Government submitted their written observations and on 22 May 2006 the applicants responded.
5. On 3 June 2006 Montenegro declared its independence.
6. On 27 June 2006 the Court decided to adjourn the consideration of the application pending clarification of the relevant issues (see paragraphs 53-56 below).
7. On 9 August 2007, in response to the Court’s question, the applicants stated that they wished to proceed against both Montenegro and Serbia, as two independent States.
8. The applicants were represented by Mr M. S., a lawyer practising in Belgrade. The Montenegrin Government were represented by their Minister of Justice, Mr M. Radović, and the Serbian Government by their Agent, Mr S. Carić.
9. On 10 April 2008 the President of the Second Section decided to re-communicate the application, in its entirety, to the Governments of Montenegro and Serbia, respectively, informing them that, for reasons of clarity, no prior observations submitted by the parties would be taken into account. It was also decided that the merits of the application would be examined at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3). The parties replied in writing to each other’s observations. In addition, third-party comments were received from the Venice Commission and the Human Rights Action, a non-governmental human rights organisation based in Montenegro, which had both been granted leave to intervene in accordance with Article 36 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 44 § 2 (a) of the Rules of Court. The parties replied to those comments (Rule 44 § 5).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
10. The first, second and third applicants were born in 1950, 1973 and 1971, respectively, and currently live in Belgrade, Serbia.
11. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
A. The eviction suit
12. The first applicant, her husband and the other two applicants were holders of a specially protected tenancy concerning a flat in Podgorica (nosioci odnosno korisnici stanarskog prava), Montenegro, where they lived.
13. In 1989 the first applicant and her husband divorced and the former was granted custody of the other two applicants.
14. On 26 January 1994 the first applicant obtained a decision from the Court of First Instance (Osnovni sud u Podgorici) declaring her the sole holder of the specially protected tenancy on the family’s flat. In addition, her former husband (“the respondent”) was ordered to vacate the flat within fifteen days from the date when the decision became final.
15. On 27 April 1994 the decision of the Court of First Instance was upheld on appeal by the High Court (Viši sud u Podgorici) and thereby became final.
B. The enforcement proceedings
16. Given that the respondent did not comply with the court order to vacate the flat, on 31 May 1994 the first applicant instituted a formal judicial enforcement procedure before the Court of First Instance.
17. The enforcement order was issued on the same date.
18. On 8 July 1994 the bailiffs attempted to evict the respondent together with his new wife and minor children but the eviction was adjourned because he threatened to use force.
19. On 14 July 1994 they tried again, this time assisted by the police, but apparently the planned eviction was adjourned for the same reason.
20. On 15 July 1994 the first applicant bought the flat and became its owner.
21. On 26 October 1994 the bailiffs and the police once again failed to evict the respondent who kept threatening the first applicant in their presence and bore arms on his person. There also appear to have been additional weapons, ammunition and even a bomb in the flat at the time. The police took the respondent to their station but released him shortly afterwards without pressing charges.
22. On 28 November 1994 and 16 March 1995 another two scheduled evictions failed, the latter due to the “respondent’s request for the provision of social assistance” in respect of his minor children.
23. On 23 October 1995 the first applicant gifted the flat to the second and third applicants.
24. On 3 June 1996 and 1 August 1996, respectively, another two scheduled evictions failed.
25. On 3 June 1998 the Ministry of Justice informed the first applicant that the Court of First Instance had committed to enforce the eviction order before the end of the month.
26. On 27 October 1998 and 1 November 1999 another two scheduled evictions failed.
27. In the meantime, on 13 August 1999, the Real Estate Directorate (Direkcija za nekretnine) issued a formal decision recognising the second and the third applicants as the new owners of the flat in question.
28. In March of 2004 another eviction was attempted but failed. In the presence of police officers, fire fighters, paramedics, bailiffs and the enforcement judge herself, as well as his wife and their children, the respondent threatened to blow up the entire flat. His neighbours also seem to have opposed the eviction, some of them apparently going so far as to physically confront the police.
29. Throughout the years the first applicant complained to numerous State bodies about the non-enforcement of the judgment rendered in her favour, but to no avail.
30. On 9 February 2006 another scheduled enforcement failed because the respondent had threatened to “spill blood” rather than be evicted.
31. On 5 May 2006 and 31 January 2007, respectively, the enforcement judge sent letters to the Ministry of Internal Affairs, seeking assistance.
32. On 15 February 2007 the enforcement judge was told, at a meeting with the police, that the eviction in question was too dangerous to be carried out, that the respondent could blow up the entire building by means of a remote control device, and that the officers themselves were not equipped to deal with a situation of this sort. The police therefore proposed that the applicants be provided with another flat instead of the one in question.
33. On 19 November 2007 the enforcement judge urged the Ministry of Justice to secure the kind of police assistance needed for the respondent’s ultimate eviction.
C. Other relevant facts
34. On 26 March 2004 the second applicant, on her own behalf and on behalf of the third applicant, authorised the first applicant to sell the flat in question.
35. On 30 January 2006 the second and third applicants authorised the first applicant, inter alia, to represent them in the enforcement proceedings.
36. The applicants maintain that the gift contract of 1995 (see paragraph 23 above) and the said powers of attorney were submitted to the enforcement court. The first applicant was therefore the second and third applicants’ legal representative in the enforcement proceedings.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Constitutional Charter of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro (Ustavna povelja državne zajednice Srbija i Crna Gora; published in the Official Gazette of Serbia and Montenegro - OG SCG - no. 1/03)
37. The relevant provisions of this Charter read as follows:
Article 9 §§ 1 and 3
“The Member States shall regulate, ensure and protect human and minority rights and civic freedoms in their respective territories.
...
[The State Union of] ... Serbia and Montenegro shall monitor the implementation of human and minority rights and civic freedoms and ensure their protection if such protection has not been provided in the Member States.”
Article 60 §§ 4 and 5
“Should Montenegro break away from the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro, the international documents pertaining to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, particularly the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244, would concern and apply ... to Serbia as the successor.
The Member State which ... [breaks away] ... shall not inherit the right to international legal personality, and any disputable issues shall be regulated separately between the successor State and the newly independent State.”
B. Charter on Human and Minority Rights and Civic Freedoms of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro (Povelja o ljudskim i manjinskim pravima i građanskim slobodama državne zajednice Srbija i Crna Gora; published in OG SCG no. 6/03)
38. The relevant provisions of this Charter read as follows:
Article 2 § 3
“The human and minority rights guaranteed under this Charter shall be directly regulated, secured and protected by the constitutions, laws and policies of the Member States.”
C. Opinion issued by the Supreme Court of Montenegro on 26 June 2006 (Pravni stav Vrhovnog suda Republike Crne Gore; SU VI br. 38/2006)
39. The relevant part of this Opinion reads as follows:
“The domestic legal system offers no legal remedy against violations of the right to a hearing within a reasonable time, which is why the courts in the Republic of Montenegro have no jurisdiction to rule in respect of claims seeking non-pecuniary damages caused by a breach of this right. Any person who considers himself a victim of a violation of this right may therefore lodge an application with the European Court of Human Rights, within six months as of the adoption of the final judgment by the domestic courts.
[When asked to rule in respect of the compensation claims referred to above] ... the courts in the Republic of Montenegro must refuse jurisdiction ... and declare ... [them] ... inadmissible (pursuant to Article 19 para. 3 of the Civil Procedure Code).”
D. Constitution of Montenegro 2007 (Ustav Crne Gore; published in the Official Gazette of Montenegro - OGM - no. 1/07)
40. The relevant provisions of the Constitution read as follows:
Article 149
“The Constitutional Court shall ...
(3) ... [rule on a] ... constitutional appeal ... [filed in respect of an alleged] ... violation of a human right or freedom guaranteed by the Constitution, after all other effective legal remedies have been exhausted ...”
41. This Constitution entered into force on 22 October 2007.
E. Constitutional Law on the Implementation of the Constitution of Montenegro (Ustavni zakon za sprovodjenje Ustava Crne Gore; published in OGM nos. 01/07, 9/08 and 4/09)
42. The relevant provisions of this Act read as follows:
Article 5
“Provisions of international treaties on human rights and freedoms, to which Montenegro acceded before 3 June 2006, shall be applied to legal relations which have arisen after their signature.”
43. This Act also entered into force on 22 October 2007.
F. Constitutional Court Act of Montenegro (Zakon o Ustavnom sudu Crne Gore; published in OGM no. 64/08)
44. Articles 48-59 provide additional details as regards the processing of constitutional appeals.
45. This Act entered into force in November 2008.
G. Right to a Trial within a Reasonable Time Act (Zakon o zaštiti prava na suđenje u razumnom roku; published in OGM no. 11/07)
46. This Act provides, under certain circumstances, for the possibility to have lengthy proceedings expedited, as well as an opportunity for the claimants to be awarded compensation therefor.
47. Article 44, in particular, provides that this Act shall be applied retroactively to all proceedings as of 3 March 2004, but that the duration of proceedings before that date shall also be taken into account.
48. This Act entered into force on 21 December 2007, but contained no reference to the applications involving procedural delay already lodged with the Court.
H. Police Act (Zakon o policiji; published in OGM no. 28/05)
49. Pursuant to Article 7 § 1 the police are obliged to assist other State bodies in the enforcement of their decisions if there is physical resistance or such resistance may reasonably be expected.
I. Enforcement Procedure Act (Zakon o izvršnom postupku; published in the Official Gazette of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia - OG FRY - no. 28/00, 73/00 and 71/01)
50. Article 4 § 1 provides that the enforcement court is obliged to proceed urgently.
51. Under Article 47, if needed, the bailiff may request police assistance; should the police fail to provide such assistance, the enforcement court shall inform thereof the Minister of Internal Affairs, the Government, or the competent parliamentary body.
52. Finally, Article 23 § 1 states that enforcement proceedings shall also be carried out at the request of a person not specifically named as the creditor in the final court decision, providing he or she can prove, by means of an “official or another legally certified document”, that the entitlement in question has subsequently been transferred to that individual from the original creditor.
III. THE CONVENTION STATUS OF THE FORMER STATE UNION OF SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO, AS WELL AS OF SERBIA AND OF MONTENEGRO, RESPECTIVELY, FOLLOWING THE LATTER’S DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
53. On 3 March 2004 the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 entered into force in respect of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro.
54. On 3 June 2006 the Montenegrin Parliament adopted its Declaration of Independence.
55. On 14 June 2006 the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, inter alia, noted that:
“1. ... the Republic of Serbia will continue the membership of the Council of Europe hitherto exercised by the ... [State Union] ... of Serbia and Montenegro, and the obligations and commitments arising from it;
2. ... the Republic of Serbia is continuing the membership of [the State Union of] Serbia and Montenegro in the Council of Europe with effect from 3 June 2006; ...
4. ... the Republic of Serbia was either a signatory or a party to the Council of Europe conventions referred to in the appendix ... to which [the State Union of] Serbia and Montenegro had been a signatory or party [including the European Convention on Human Rights]; ...”
56. Finally, on 7 and 9 May 2007 the Committee of Ministers decided, inter alia, that:
“2. ... a. ... the Republic of Montenegro is to be regarded as a Party to the European Convention on Human Rights and its Protocols No. 1, 4, 6, 7, 12, 13 and 14 thereto with effect from 6 June 2006; ...”
IV. STATUTE OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE
57. The relevant provisions of the Statute read as follows:
Article 4
“Any European State which is deemed to be able and willing to fulfil the provisions of Article 3 may be invited to become a member of the Council of Europe by the Committee of Ministers. Any State so invited shall become a member on the deposit on its behalf with the Secretary General of an instrument of accession to the present Statute.”
Article 16
“The Committee of Ministers shall, subject to the provisions of Articles 24, 28, 30, 32, 33 and 35, relating to the powers of the Consultative Assembly, decide with binding effect all matters relating to the internal organisation and arrangements of the Council of Europe. For this purpose the Committee of Ministers shall adopt such financial and administrative arrangements as may be necessary.”
V. UNITED NATIONS HUMAN RIGHTS COMMITTEE
58. The Human Rights Committee has made clear, in the context of obligations arising from the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, that fundamental rights protected by international treaties “belong to the people living in the territory of the State party” concerned. In particular, “once the people are accorded the protection of the rights under the Covenant, such protection devolves with territory and continues to belong to them, notwithstanding change in government of the State party, including dismemberment in more than one State or State succession” (General Comment No. 26: Continuity of obligations: 08/12/97, CCPR/C/21/Rev.1/Add. 8/ Rev.1).
THE LAW
59. The applicants complained about the non-enforcement of the final decision issued by the Court of First Instance on 26 January 1994, as well as their consequent inability to live in the flat at issue in that litigation.
60. The Court communicated these complaints under Articles 6 § 1 and 8 of the Convention, as well as under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which, in their relevant parts, read as follows:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal...”
Article 8
“Everyone has the right to respect for his ... home ...
There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
I. THE COMPATIBILITY OF THE APPLICATION WITH THE CONVENTION
61. As noted above, following the Montenegrin declaration of independence, the applicants stated that they wished to proceed against both Montenegro and Serbia, as two independent States. The President of the Second Section, therefore, decided to re-communicate the application to both Governments. One of the questions put to them read as follows: “Which State, Montenegro or Serbia, could be held responsible for the impugned inaction of the authorities between 3 March 2004 and 5 June 2006?” (see paragraphs 53-56 above).
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The Serbian Government
62. The Serbian Government firstly noted that each constituent republic of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro had the obligation to protect human rights in its own territory (see paragraph 37, Article 9 above). Secondly, the impugned enforcement proceedings were themselves solely conducted by the competent Montenegrin authorities. Thirdly, although the sole successor of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro (see paragraph 37, Article 60 above), Serbia cannot be deemed responsible for any violations of the Convention which might have occurred in Montenegro prior to its declaration of independence. Lastly, Serbia could not, within the meaning of Article 46 of the Convention, realistically be expected to implement any individual and/or general measures in the territory of another State. In view of the above, the Serbian Government concluded that the application as regards Serbia was incompatible ratione personae and maintained that, to hold otherwise, would be contrary to the universal principles of international law.
2. The Montenegrin Government
63. The Montenegrin Government “support[ed] the remarks presented to the Court” by the Serbian Government “relating to the issue of ... [succession as regards] ... the enforcement of the judgment ... [in question] ...”. In addition, the Government referred to Article 5 of the Constitutional Act on the Implementation of the Constitution of the Republic of Montenegro (see paragraph 42 above).
3. The applicants
64. The applicants reaffirmed that both Montenegro and Serbia should be held responsible for the non-enforcement of the judgement in question. The former due to the fact that the enforcement proceedings had taken place before Montenegrin authorities, and the latter because Serbia was the sole successor of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro.
4. The third-party interveners
(a) European Commission for Democracy through Law (“the Venice Commission”)
65. In its written opinion (adopted by the 76th Plenary Session held on 17-18 October 2008, CDL-AD (2008) 021), the Venice Commission maintained that it would both further the protection of European human rights and be in accordance with the Court’s earlier practice, if the Court were now to hold Montenegro responsible for the breaches of the applicants’ Convention rights which might have been caused by its authorities between 3 March 2004 and 5 June 2006. In the opinion of the Venice Commission, there are no difficulties of international or constitutional law which should lead the Court to a different conclusion. Accordingly, the Venice Commission did not consider it necessary for the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe to be requested to amend its decision of May 2007.
(b) The Human Rights Action
66. In their written submissions, the Human Rights Action argued that Montenegro should be deemed responsible for any and all violations of the Convention and/or its Protocols committed by its authorities as of 3 March 2004, which is when these instruments had entered into force in respect of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. In support of this argument they referred to practical considerations, the domestic and international context surrounding the Montenegrin declaration of independence, as well as the Court’s own established practice regarding similar issues following the separation of the Czech and Slovak republics.
B. The Court’s assessment
67. The Court notes at the outset that the Committee of Ministers has the power under Articles 4 and 16 of the Statute of the Council of Europe to invite a State to join the organisation as well as to decide “all matters relating to ... [the Council’s] ... internal organisation and arrangements” (see paragraph 57 above). The Court, however, notwithstanding Article 54 of the Convention, has the sole competence under Article 32 thereof to determine all issues concerning “the interpretation and application of the Convention”, including those involving its temporal jurisdiction and/or the compatibility of the applicants’ complaints ratione personae.
68. With this in mind and in addition to the events detailed at paragraphs 53-56 above, the Court observes, as regards the present case, that:
(i) the only reasonable interpretation of Article 5 of the Constitutional Act on the Implementation of the Constitution of the Republic of Montenegro (see paragraph 42 above), the wording of Article 44 of the Montenegrin Right to a Trial within a Reasonable Time Act (see paragraphs 46-48 above), and indeed the Montenegrin Government’s own observations, would all suggest that Montenegro should be considered bound by the Convention, as well as the Protocols thereto, as of 3 March 2004, that being the date when these instruments had entered into force in respect of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro;
(ii) the Committee of Ministers had itself accepted, apparently because of the earlier ratification of the Convention by the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro, that it was not necessary for Montenegro to deposit its own formal ratification of the Convention;
(iii) although the circumstances of the creation of the Czech and Slovak Republics as separate States were clearly not identical to the present case, the Court’s response to this situation is relevant: namely, notwithstanding the fact that the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic had been a party to the Convention since 18 March 1992 and that on 30 June 1993 the Committee of Ministers had admitted the two new States to the Council of Europe and had decided that they would be regarded as having succeeded to the Convention retroactively with effect from their independence on 1 January 1993, the Court’s practice has been to regard the operative date in cases of continuing violations which arose before the creation of the two separate States as being 18 March 1992 rather than 1 January 1993 (see, for example, Konečný v. the Czech Republic, nos. 47269/99, 64656/01 and 65002/01, § 62, 26 October 2004).
69. In view of the above, given the practical requirements of Article 46 of the Convention, as well as the principle that fundamental rights protected by international human rights treaties should indeed belong to individuals living in the territory of the State party concerned, notwithstanding its subsequent dissolution or succession (see, mutatis mutandis, paragraph 58 above), the Court considers that both the Convention and Protocol No. 1 should be deemed as having continuously been in force in respect of Montenegro as of 3 March 2004, between 3 March 2004 and 5 June 2006 as well as thereafter (see paragraphs 53-56 above).
70. Lastly, given the fact that the impugned proceedings have been solely within the competence of the Montenegrin authorities, the Court, without prejudging the merits of the case, finds the applicants’ complaints in respect of Montenegro compatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention and Protocol No. 1 thereto. For the same reason, however, their complaints in respect of Serbia are incompatible ratione personae, within the meaning of Article 35 § 3, and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
A. Admissibility
1. As regards the first applicant
71. In the Court’s view, although the Montenegrin Government have not raised an objection as to the Court’s competence ratione personae in this respect, the first applicant’s victim status nevertheless calls for its consideration (see, mutatis mutandis, Blečić v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 67, ECHR 2006-...). The Court, therefore, observes that on 23 October 1995 the first applicant had transferred ownership of the flat in question to the second and third applicants (see paragraph 23 above) and concludes that the first applicant’s complaint in respect of Montenegro is incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Kuljanin v. Croatia (dec.), no. 77627/01, 3 June 2004).
2. As regards the second and third applicants
(a) Compatibility ratione personae
72. The Court further considers that it must also, of its own motion, examine the compatibility of the second and third applicants’ complaints ratione personae and notes that the said two applicants have been the owners of the flat at issue since 23 October 1995, which is why, without prejudging the merits of the case, their complaints in respect of Montenegro are compatible ratione personae with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Marčić and Others v. Serbia, no. 17556/05, § 49, 30 October 2007).
(b) Exhaustion of domestic remedies
73. The Montenegrin Government submitted that the second and third applicants had not exhausted all effective domestic remedies. In particular, they had failed to lodge an appeal with the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 40 above), and make use of the newly adopted Right to a Trial within a Reasonable Time Act (see paragraphs 46-48 above).
74. The applicants contested the effectiveness of these remedies, particularly in view of the fact that they were introduced long after their application had been lodged.
75. The Court reiterates that, according to Article 35 § 1 of the Convention, it may only deal with a complaint after all domestic remedies have been exhausted and recalls that it is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one, available in theory and in practice at the relevant time (see, inter alia, Vernillo v. France, judgment of 20 February 1991, Series A no. 198, pp. 11–12, § 27, and Dalia v. France, judgment of 19 February 1998, Reports 1998-I, pp. 87-88, § 38).
76. In the present case, the impugned enforcement proceedings had already been pending domestically for more than thirteen years before the legislation referred to at paragraph 73 above had entered into force. Furthermore, these proceedings are currently still ongoing and the Montenegrin Government have failed to provide any case-law to the effect that the remedies in question can be deemed effective in a case such as the one here at issue. The Court considers, therefore, that it would be disproportionate to now require the second and third applicants to try those avenues of redress (see, mutatis mutandis, Parizov v. “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, no. 14258/03, § 46, 7 February 2008).
77. It follows that the Montenegrin Government’s objection must be dismissed.
(c) Conclusion
78. The Court notes that the first and second applicants’ complaints in respect of Montenegro are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits as regards the second and third applicants
79. The applicants reaffirmed their complaints whilst the Montenegrin Government maintained that efforts were being made to have the judgment in question enforced.
80. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 guarantees, inter alia, the right of property, which includes the right to enjoy one’s property peacefully, as well as the right to dispose of it (see, among many other authorities, Marckx v. Belgium, 13 June 1979, § 63, Series A no. 31).
81. By virtue of Article 1 of the Convention, each Contracting Party “shall secure to everyone within [its] jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in [the] Convention”. The discharge of this general duty may entail positive obligations inherent in ensuring the effective exercise of the rights guaranteed by the Convention.
82. In the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, those positive obligations may require the State to take the measures necessary to protect the right of property (see, for example, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 143, ECHR 2004-V), particularly where there is a direct link between the measures which an applicant may legitimately expect the authorities to undertake and the effective enjoyment of his or her possessions (see Öneryıldız v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 134, ECHR 2004-XII).
83. It is thus the State’s responsibility to make use of all available legal means at its disposal in order to enforce a final court decision, notwithstanding the fact that it has been issued against a private party, as well as to make sure that all relevant domestic procedures are duly complied with (see, mutatis mutandis, Marčić and Others v. Serbia, cited above, § 56).
84. Turning to the present case, the Court firstly notes that the inability of the second and third applicants to have the respondent evicted from the flat in question amounts to an interference with their property rights (see paragraph 80 above). Secondly, the judgment at issue had become final by 27 April 1994 (see paragraph 15 above), its enforcement had been sanctioned on 31 May 1994 (see paragraphs 16 and 17 above), and Protocol No. 1 had entered into force in respect of Montenegro on 3 March 2004 (see paragraph 69 above), meaning that the impugned non-enforcement has been within the Court’s competence ratione temporis for a period of almost five years, another ten years having already elapsed before that date. Lastly, but most importantly, the police themselves conceded that they were unable to fulfil their duties under the law (see paragraphs 32, 49 and 51 above), which is what ultimately caused the delay in question.
85. In view of the foregoing, the Court finds that the Montenegrin authorities have failed to fulfil their positive obligation, within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, to enforce the judgment of 31 May 1994. There has, accordingly, been a violation of the said provision.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
A. As regards the first applicant
86. The Court notes that, as of October 1995, the first applicant was neither the holder of the protected tenancy nor the owner of the flat in question (see paragraph 23 above). Further, on 30 January 2006 the second and third applicants authorised the first applicant to represent them in the impugned proceedings (see paragraph 35 above). Finally, this never became an issue before the enforcement court itself, which is why the second and third applicants may be deemed to have implicitly assumed the role of creditors in the first applicant’s stead (see paragraph 52 above).
87. It follows that the first applicant’s complaint in respect of Montenegro is incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention and must be rejected pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 (see Kuljanin v. Croatia (dec.), cited above).
B. As regards the second and third applicants
88. Having regard to its findings in relation to Article 1 Protocol No. 1 and the fact that it was the non-enforcement which was at the heart of the applicants complaints, the Court considers that, whilst this complaint is admissible, it is not necessary to examine separately the merits of whether, in this case, there has also been a violation of Article 6 § 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Davidescu v. Romania, no. 2252/02, § 57, 16 November 2006).
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THE CONVENTION
89. The Court refers to its case-law concerning the notion of a home. In the case of Gillow v. the United Kingdom (judgment of 24 November 1986, Series A no. 109), the Court held that the applicants, who had owned but not lived in their house for nineteen years, could call it their “home” within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention. This was because, despite the length of their absence, they had always intended to return and had retained sufficient continuing links with the property. Moreover, in the case of Menteş and Others v. Turkey (judgment of 28 November 1997, § 73, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-VIII), it was clarified that there was also no need for the applicant to be the owner of the flat or even for his or her presence there to be permanent in order for it to be considered “home”, provided that the individual had lived there “for significant periods on an annual basis” and had a “strong family connection” to the premises.
90. However, in the present case, the Court observes that on 26 March 2004 the second applicant, on her own behalf and on behalf of the third applicant, authorised the first applicant to sell the flat in question (see paragraph 34 above). It follows that from then on, at the latest, the applicants, who now all appear to be residents of Belgrade, clearly had no intention of returning to live in the flat. They thus cut the family’s connection to the property. Accordingly, the Court finds that by the time the applicants lodged their case with the Court, that property could no longer be considered to have been their “home” for the purposes of Article 8. The Court therefore finds that the applicants’ complaints in respect of Montenegro must be rejected as being incompatible ratione materiae with the Convention, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLES 41 AND 46 OF THE CONVENTION
91. Articles 41 and 46 read as follows:
Article 41
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
Article 46
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
A. Damage
92. The applicants claimed 97,200 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage.
93. The Montenegrin Government did not comment in this respect.
94. The Court considers that the second and third applicants in the present case have certainly suffered some non-pecuniary damage, in respect of which it awards them, jointly, the sum of EUR 4,500. In addition, the Montenegrin Government must secure, by appropriate means, the speedy enforcement of the final judgment adopted by the Court of First Instance on 26 January 1994 (see, mutatis mutandis, Ilić v. Serbia, no. 30132/04, § 112, 9 October 2007).
95. Should the Montenegrin Government fail to enforce the said domestic decision, within three months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final, that Government should pay the second and third applicants, jointly, the global sum of EUR 92,000, instead of the lesser award of EUR 4,500 made in the preceding paragraph (see, mutatis mutandis, Papamichalopoulos and Others v. Greece (Article 50), 31 October 1995, Series A no. 330-B). The Court has so decided on an equitable basis, in view of the very specific circumstances of the present case, and the fact that the Montenegrin Government have themselves not commented on the applicants’ claim for damages (see, mutatis mutandis, Jasar v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 69908/01, § 71, 15 February 2007).
B. Costs and expenses
96. The applicants also claimed EUR 4,500 for the costs and expenses incurred before the Court.
97. The Montenegrin Government did not comment in this respect.
98. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were also reasonable as to their quantum (see, for example, Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000-XI).
99. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, as well as the fact that the applicants have already been granted EUR 850 under the Council of Europe’s legal aid scheme, the Court considers it reasonable to award the second and third applicant, jointly, the additional sum of EUR 700 for the proceedings before it.
C. Default interest
100. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously admissible the second and third applicants’ complaints in respect of Montenegro, considered under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
2. Declares unanimously the remainder of the application inadmissible;
3. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 by Montenegro;
4. Holds unanimously that it is not necessary to examine separately the complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
5. Holds by 6 votes to 1
(a) that the Government of Montenegro shall ensure, by appropriate means, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the enforcement of the final judgment adopted by the Court of First Instance on 26 January 1994;
(b) that the Government of Montenegro is to pay the second and third applicants, jointly, within the same three month period, the following sums:
(i) EUR 4,500 (four thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, for the non-pecuniary damage suffered, and
(ii) EUR 700 (seven hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the said two applicants, for costs and expenses;
(c) that, failing the enforcement ordered under (a) above, the Government of Montenegro is to pay, within the same three month period, the second and third applicants, jointly, the global sum of EUR 92,000 (ninety-two thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable (instead of the award of 4,500 under (b)(i) above) ;
(d) that from the expiry of the said time-limit until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses unanimously the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 28 April 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione di P1-1; danno Materiale e non-materiale - assegnazione
SECONDA SEZIONE
CAUSA BIJELIĆ C. MONTENEGRO E SERBIA
(Richiesta n. 11890/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
28 aprile 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Bijelić c. Montenegro e Serbia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Seconda Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Françoise Tulkens, Presidente, Ireneu Cabral Barreto, Vladimiro Zagrebelsky, Danutė Jočienė, Dragoljub Popović, Nona Tsotsoria, Nebojša Vučinić, giudici,
e Sally Dollé, Cancelliera di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 7 aprile 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 11890/05) contro l'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) dalla Sig.ra N. B. (“il primo richiedente”), dalla Sig.ra S. B. (“il secondo richiedente”) ed dalla Sig.ra L. B. (“il terzo richiedente”), tutte cittadine serbe, rispettivamente il 24 marzo 2005 e il 31 gennaio 2006 .
2. I richiedenti si lamentarono, in particolare, della non-esecuzione di un ordine definitivo di sfratto e la loro conseguente incapacità di vivere nell'appartamento in questione.
3. Il 28 novembre 2005, riguardo al primo richiedente, e il 7 febbraio 2006, riguardo agli altri due richiedenti che furono riconosciuti tali successivamente ,queste azioni di reclamo furono comunicate al Governo dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro.
4. Il 7 aprile 2006 il detto Governo presentò le sue osservazioni scritte ed il 22 maggio 2006 richiedenti hanno risposto a queste.
5. Il 3 giugno 2006 il Montenegro dichiarò la sua indipendenza.
6. Il 27 giugno 2006 la Corte decise di aggiornare la considerazione dell’applicazione della chiarificazione pendente dei problemi attinenti (vedere paragrafi 53-56 sotto).
7. Il 9 agosto 2007, i richiedenti affermarono in risposta alla questione della Corte, che loro auspicavano procedere contro Montenegro e Serbia, come due Stati indipendenti.
8. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. M. S., un avvocato che pratica a Belgrado. Il Governo montenegrino fu rappresentato dal suo Ministro di Giustizia, il Sig. M. Radović, ed il Governo serbo dal suo Agente, il Sig. S. Carić.
9. Il 10 aprile 2008 il Presidente della Seconda Sezione decise di ricomunicare la richiesta, nella sua interezza ai Governi di Montenegro e Serbia, informandoli rispettivamente che, per ragioni di chiarezza, nessuna osservazione precedente presentata dalle parti sarebbe stata presa in considerazione. Si decise anche che i meriti della richiesta sarebbero stati esaminati allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3). Le parti risposero per iscritto alle reciproche osservazioni. Inoltre, commenti da parte di terzi furono ricevuti dalla Commissione di Venezia e dalla Azione dei Diritti umani, un'organizzazione di diritti umani non-governativa con sede nel Montenegro a cui era stato accordato il permesso d’ intervenire in conformità con l’Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione e Articoloe 44 § 2 (a) degli Articoli di Corte. Le parti risposero a quei commenti (Articolo 44 § 5).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
10. Il primo, il secondo e il terzo richiedente nacquero rispettivamente nel 1950, 1973 e 1971 ed attualmente vivono a Belgrado, Serbia.
11. I fatti della causa, come presentati dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.
A. L'azione di sfratto
12. Il primo richiedente, suo marito e gli altri due richiedenti erano possessori di una comproprietà specialmente protetta riguardo ad un appartamento a Podgorica (nosioci odnosno korisnici stanarskog prava), Montenegro, dove vivevano.
13. Nel 1989 il primo richiedente e suo marito divorziarono e al primo fu accordata custodia degli altri due richiedenti.
14. Il 26 gennaio 1994 il primo richiedente ottenne una decisione dal Giudice di prima istanza (Osnovni sud u Podgorici) dichiarandolo il solo possessore della comproprietà specialmente protetta sull'appartamento della famiglia. Inoltre, al suo precedente marito (“il convenuto”) fu ordinato di sgombrare l'appartamento entro quindici giorni dalla data in cui la decisione divenne definitiva.
15. Il 27 aprile 1994 la decisione del Giudice di prima istanza fu sostenuta su ricorso dall’Alta Corte (Viši sud u Podgorici) e con ciò divenne definitiva.
B. I procedimenti di esecuzione
16. Dato che il convenuto non si attenne all'ordine della corte di sgombrare l'appartamento, il 31 maggio 1994 il primo richiedente avviò una procedura di esecuzione giudiziale e formale di fronte al Giudice di prima istanza.
17. L'ordine di esecuzione fu emesso nella stessa data.
18. L’ 8 luglio 1994 gli ufficiali giudiziari tentarono di sfrattare il convenuto insieme con la sua nuova moglie e i figli minorenni ma lo sfratto fu rimandato perché lui minacciò di usare la forza.
19. Il 14 luglio 1994 tentarono di nuovo, questa volta assistiti dalla polizia, ma apparentemente lo sfratto progettato fu rimandato per la stessa ragione.
20. Il 15 luglio 1994 il primo richiedente comprò l'appartamento e divenne il suo proprietario.
21. Il 26 ottobre 1994 gli ufficiali giudiziari e la polizia ancora una volta andarono a vuoto nel sfrattare il convenuto che continuò a minacciare il primo richiedente in loro presenza e portava su di sé delle armi. Sembra anche che ci fossero delle armi supplementari, munizioni ed anche una bomba nell'appartamento a quel tempo. La polizia portò il convenuto presso la loro stazione ma lo rilasciarono subito dopo senza accuse pressanti.
22. Il28 novembre 1994 e il 16 marzo 1995 altri due sfratti programmati andarono a vuoto, il secondo a causa della“ richiesta del convenuto per la disposizione di assistenza sociale” a riguardo dei suoi figli minori.
23. Il 23 ottobre 1995 il primo richiedente donò l'appartamento al secondo e al terzo richiedente.
24. Rispettivamente il 3 giugno 1996 e il 1 agosto 1996 altri due sfratti programmati andarono a vuoto.
25. Il 3 giugno 1998 il Ministero della Giustizia informò il primo richiedente che il Giudice di prima istanza aveva ordinato di eseguire l'ordine di sfratto prima della fine del mese.
26. Il 27 ottobre 1998 e il 1 novembre 1999 altri due sfratti programmati andarono a vuoto.
27. Nel frattempo, il 13 agosto 1999, la Direzione dei Beni immobili (Direkcija za nekretnine) emise una decisione formale che riconosceva il secondo ed il terzo richiedente come inuovi proprietari dell'appartamento in oggetto.
28. Nel marzo del 2004 un altro sfratto fu tentato ma fallì. In presenza di agenti di polizia, pompieri, paramedici, ufficiali giudiziari ed il giudice di esecuzione stesso, così come sua moglie ed i loro figli, il convenuto minacciò di far esplodere l'appartamento intero. Anche i suoi vicini di casa sembravano essersi opposti allo sfratto, alcuni di loro arrivando apparentemente come a confrontarsi fisicamente con la polizia.
29. Nel corso degli anni il primo richiedente si lamentò con numerose entità Statali della non-esecuzione della sentenza resa a suo favore, ma inutilmente.
30. Il 9 febbraio 2006 un'altra esecuzione programmata andò a vuoto perché il convenuto aveva minacciato di “spargere sangue” piuttosto di essere sfrattato.
31. Rispettivamente il 5 maggio 2006 e il 31 gennaio 2007, il giudice di esecuzione spedì lettere al Ministero degli Affari Interni, chiedendo assistenza.
32. Il 15 febbraio 2007 fu detto al giudice di esecuzione, in una riunione con la polizia che lo sfratto in oggetto era troppo pericoloso per essere eseguito, che il convenuto poteva far esplodere l’intero edificio tramite un'apparecchiatura di telecomando, e che gli ufficiali stessi non erano equipaggiati per trattare una situazione di questo genere. La polizia propose perciò che ai richiedenti venisse offerto un altro appartamento invece di quello in oggetto.
33. Il 19 novembre 2007 il giudice di esecuzione esortò il Ministero di Giustizia a garantire qualche tipo di assistenza di polizia necessaria per l'ultimo sfratto del convenuto.
C. Gli altri fatti attinenti
34. Il 26 marzo 2004 il secondo richiedente, per suo proprio conto e per conto del terzo richiedente, autorizzò il primo richiedente a vendere l'appartamento in oggetto.
35. Il 30 gennaio 2006 il secondo e il terzo richiedente autorizzarono il primo richiedente, inter alia, a rappresentarli nei procedimenti di esecuzione.
36. I richiedenti sostengono che il contratto di donazione del 1995 (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra) e le suddette procure furono presentate alla corte di esecuzione. Il primo richiedente era perciò il rappresentante legale del secondo e del terzo richiedente nei procedimenti di esecuzione.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Statuto Costituzionale dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro (Ustavna povelja državne zajednice Srbija i Crna Gora; pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale di Serbia e Montenegro - OG SCG - n. 1/03)
37. Le disposizioni attinenti di questo Statuto si leggono come segue:
Articolo 9 §§ 1 e 3
“Gli Stati Membri regoleranno, assicureranno e proteggeranno i diritti umani e delle minoranze e le libertà civiche nei loro rispettivi territori.
...
[L'Unione Statale di]... Serbia e Montenegro esamineranno l'attuazione dei diritti umani e delle minoranze e le libertà civiche ed assicurano la loro protezione se simile protezione non è stata offerta negli Stata Membra.”
Articolo 60 §§ 4 e 5
“Se il Montenegro dovesse separarsi dall'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro, i documenti internazionali concernenti la Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia in particolare la Risoluzione 1244 del Consiglio di Sicurezza delle Nazioni Unite, riguarderebbe e si applicherebbe... alla Serbia come successore.
Lo Stato membro che... [si separa]... non erediterà il diritto alla personalità legale ed internazionale, e qualsiasi questione disputabile sarà regolata separatamente lo Stato successore il nuovo Stato indipendente.”
B. Carattere sui Diritti umani e delle minoranze e sulle Libertà Civiche dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro (Povelja o ljudskim i manjinskim pravima i građanskim slobodama državne zajednice Srbija i Crna Gora; pubblicato sull’ OG SCG n. 6/03)
38. Le disposizioni attinenti di questo Statuto si leggono come segue:
Articolo 2 § 3
“I diritti umani e delle minoranze garantiti sotto questo Statuto saranno direttamente regolati, garantiti e protetti dalle costituzioni, leggi e politiche degli Stati Membri.”
C. Opinione emessa dalla Corte Suprema del Montenegro il 26 giugno 2006 2006 (Pravni stav Vrhovnog suda Republike Crne Gore; SU VI br. 38/2006)
39. La parte attinente di questa Opinione si legge come segue:
“L'ordinamento giuridico nazionale non offre vie di ricorso legali contro le violazioni del diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole ecco perché i tribunali nella Repubblica del Montenegro non hanno nessuna giurisdizione per decidere a riguardo di rivendicazioni che chiedono danni morali causati da una violazione di questo diritto. Qualsiasi persona che si considera una vittima di una violazione di questo diritto può depositare perciò una richiesta con la Corte europea di Diritti umani, entro sei mesi dall'adozione della sentenza definitive da parte dei tribunali nazionali.
[Quando chiamati a decidere riguardo alle rivendicazioni di risarcimento citate sopra]... i tribunali nella Repubblica del Montenegro devono rifiutare la giurisdizione... e dichiarare... [loro]... inammissibili (facendo seguito all’ Articolo 19 paragrafo. 3 del Codice di Procedura Civile).”
D. Costituzione del Montenegro del 2007 (Ustav Crne Gore; published in the Official Gazette of Montenegro - OGM - no. 1/07)
40. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione si leggono come segue:
Articolo 149
“La Corte Costituzionale può...
(3)... [decidere su un]... ricorso costituzionale... [introdotto a riguardo di una]... violazione [addotta] di un diritto umano o libertà garantiti dalla Costituzione, dopo che tutte le altre vie di ricorso legali efficaci sono state esaurite...”
41. Questa Costituzione entrò in vigore il 22 ottobre 2007.
E. Legge Costituzionale sull'Implementazione della Costituzione del Montenegro (Ustavni zakon za sprovodjenje Ustava Crne Gore; pubblicata sull’ OGM N. 01/07, 9/08 e 4/09)
42. Le disposizioni attinenti di questo Atto si leggono come segue:
Articolo 5
“Disposizioni di trattati internazionali su diritti umani e le libertà ai quali il Montenegro acconsentì prima del 3 giugno 2006, saranno applicate a relazioni legali che sono sorte dopo la loro firma.”
43. Anche questo Atto entrò in vigore il 22 ottobre 2007.
F. Atto della Corte Costituzionale del Montenegro ((Zakon o Ustavnom sudu Crne Gore; pubblicato sull’ OGM n. 64/08)
44. Gli Articoli 48-59 offrono dettagli supplementari riguardo al trattamento di ricorsi costituzionali.
45. Questo Atto entrò in vigore nel novembre 2008.
G. Atto del Diritto ad un Processo all'interno di un tempo Ragionevole (Zakon o zaštiti prava na suđenje u razumnom roku; pubblicato sull’ OGM n. 11/07)
46. Questo Atto prevede, sotto certe circostanze, la possibilità velocizzare la lunghezza dei procedimenti così come un'opportunità per i rivendicatori di vedersi assegnare un risarcimento.
47. L’Articolo 44, in particolare, prevede che questo Atto sarà applicato retroattivamente a tutti i procedimenti al 3 marzo 2004, ma che sarà presa in considerazione anche la durata di procedimenti prima di questa data.
48. Questo Atto entrò in vigore il 21 dicembre 2007, ma non conteneva alcun riferimento alle richieste che comportano ritardo procedurale già depositate con la Corte.
H. Atto della Polizia (Zakon o policiji; pubblicato sull’OGM n. 28/05)
49. Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 7 § 1 la polizia è obbligata ad assistere le altre entità Statali nell'esecuzione delle loro decisioni se c'è resistenza fisica o ci si possa ragionevolmente aspettare una simile resistenza.
I. Atto della Procedura di esecuzione (Zakon o izvršnom postupku; pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Federale dell'Iugoslavia - OG Fry - n. 28/00, 73/00 e 71/01)
50. L’Articolo 4 § 1 prevede che il tribunale di esecuzione sia obbligato a procedere urgentemente.
51. Sotto l’Articolo 47, se ce ne fosse bisogno, l'ufficiale giudiziario può richiedere l’assistenza della polizia; se la polizia dovesse andare a vuoto nell’ offrire simile assistenza, il tribunale d’ esecuzione informerà a riguardo il Ministro degli Affari Interni, il Governo, o il corpo parlamentare competente.
52. Infine, l’Articolo 23 § 1 stabilisce che procedimenti di esecuzione saranno eseguiti anche non specificamente su richiesta di una persona non specificatamente designata come creditore nella decisione definitiva del tribunale, prevedendo che possa provare, tramite un “ufficiale o un altro documento giuridicamente certificato”, che il diritto in oggetto è stato trasferito successivamente a d un individuo dal creditore originale.
III. LO STATUS DELLA CONVENZIONE DELA PRECEDENTE UNIONE STATALE DI SERBIA E MONTENEGRO, COSÌ COME RISPETTIVAMENTE DI SERBIA E DI MONTENEGRO, A SEGUITO DELL’ULTIMA DICHIARAZIONE D’INDIPENDENZA
53. Il 3 marzo 2004 la Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 entrarono in vigore a riguardo dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro.
54. Il 3 giugno 2006 il Parlamento Montenegrino adottò la sua Dichiarazione di indipendenza.
55. Il 14 giugno 2006 il Comitato dei Ministri del Consiglio dell'Europa, inter alia, notarono che:
“1. ... la Repubblica di Serbia continuerà l'appartenenza al Consiglio dell'Europa esercitata fin qui dall’... [Unione statale]... di Serbia e Montenegro, e gli obblighi ed impegni che sorgono da questa;
2. ... la Repubblica di Serbia continua l'appartenenza all’ [l'Unione Statale di] Serbia e Montenegro nel Consiglio dell'Europa con effetto dal 3 giugno 2006;...
4. ... la Repubblica di Serbia era sia un firmatario sia una parte, delle convenzioni del Consiglio d’Europa a cui si fa riferimento nell'appendice... a cui [l'Unione Statale di] Serbia e Montenegro era stata o un firmatario o una parte [incluso la Convenzione europea sui Diritti umani];...”
56. Infine, il 7 e il 9 maggio 2007 il Comitato dei Ministri ha deciso, inter alia che:
“2. ... a. ... la Repubblica del Montenegro sarà considerata una Parte alla Convenzione europea dei Diritti umani e inoltre dei suoi Protocolli N.ro 1, 4, 6 7, 12 13 e 14 con effetto dal 6 giugno 2006;...”
IV. STATUTO DELL CONSIGLIO DELL'EUROPA
57. Le disposizioni attinenti dello Statuto si leggono come segue:
Articolo 4
“Qualsiasi Stato europeo che è ritenuto di essere in grado e disposto ad adempiere le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 3 può essere invitato a diventare un membro del Consiglio d'Europa tramite il Comitato dei Ministri. Qualsiasi Stato così invitato diverrà un membro sul deposito per conto suo con ill Segretario Generale di un strumento di accessione al presente Statuto.”
Articolo 16
“Il Comitato dei Ministri può, soggetto alle disposizioni degli Articoli 24, 28, 30, 32 , 33 e 35, relativi ai poteri della Riunione Consultiva deciderà con effetto vincolante tutte le questioni relative all'organizzazione interna e alle disposizioni del Consiglio dell'Europa. A questo fine il Comitato dei Ministri adotterà disposizioni sia finanziarie che amministrative come potrebbe rendersi necessario.”
C. COMITATO DEI DIRITTI UMANI DELLE NAZIONI UNITE
58. Il Comitato dei Diritti umani ha reso chiaro, nel contesto degli obblighi che sorgono dal Patto Internazionale sui Diritti Civili e Politici che i diritti essenziali protetti da trattati internazionali “appartengono alle persone che vivono nel territorio dello Stato parte” interessato. In particolare, “una volta che alle persone viene concessa la protezione dei diritti sotto il Patto, simile protezione viene associata con il territorio e continua ad appartenere a loro, ciononostante i cambi di governo dello Stato parte, incluso lo smembramento in più di uno Stato o successione di Stato” (Commento Generale N.ro 26: La continuità degli obblighi: 08/12/97, CCPR/C/21/Rev.1/Add. 8 / Rev.1).
LA LEGGE
59. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione della decisione definitiva emessa dal Giudice di prima istanza il 26 gennaio 1994, così come della loro conseguente incapacità di vivere nell'appartamento in questione in quella causa.
60. La Corte comunicò queste azioni di reclamo sotto gli Articoli 6 § 1 e 8 della Convenzione, così come sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che, nelle loro parti attinenti, si leggono come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”


Articolo 8
“Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua... abitazione...
Non ci sarà interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto eccetto nel caso sia in conformità con la legge e sia necessaria in una società democratica nell’interesse della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disordine o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”

I. LA COMPATIBILITÀ DELLA RICHIESTA CON LA CONVENZIONE
61. Come notato sopra, a seguito della dichiarazione di indipendenza del Montenegro, i richiedenti affermarono che si sarebbero auspicati di procedere contro il Montenegro e Serbia, come due Stati indipendenti. Il Presidente della Seconda Sezione, perciò decise di ricomunicare la richiesta ad ambo i Governi. Una delle domande poste a loro si legge come segue: “Quale Stato, Montenegro o Serbia potrebbe essere ritenuto responsabile per l'inazione contestata dalle autorità fra il 3 marzo 2004 e il 5 giugno 2006 ?” (vedere paragrafi 53-56 sopra).
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. Il Governo serbo
62. Il Governo serbo notò in primo luogo che ogni repubblica costituente dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro aveva l'obbligo di proteggere i diritti umani nel suo proprio territorio (vedere paragrafo 37, Articolo 9 sopra). In secondo luogo, i procedimenti di esecuzione contestati erano condotti solamente dalle autorità competenti del Montenegro. In terzo luogo, benché il solo successore dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro (vedere paragrafo 37, Articolo 60 sopra), la Serbia non può essere ritenuta per responsabile di qualsiasi violazioni della Convenzione che sarebbe accaduta nel Montenegro prima della sua dichiarazione di indipendenza. Infine,non ci si poteva realisticamente aspettare che la Serbia, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 46 della Convenzione, implementasse qualsiasi misura individuale e/o generale nel territorio di un altro Stato. In prospettiva di ciò che precede , il Governo serbo concluse, che la richiesta nella misura in cui riguardava la Serbia era ratione personae incompatibile e sostenne che, sostenere altrimenti, sarebbe stato contrario ai principi universali del diritto internazionale.
2. Il Governo del Montenegro
63. Il Governo del Montenegro “sostenne i commenti presentati alla Corte” dal Governo serbo “relativi al problema di... [successione riguardo all’]... esecuzione della sentenza... [in oggetto]....” Inoltre, il Governo ha fatto riferimento all’ Articolo 5 dell'Atto Costituzionale sull'Attuazione della Costituzione della Repubblica del Montenegro (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra).
3. I richiedenti
64. I richiedenti riaffermarono che sia Montenegro che Serbia, dovrebbero essere ritenuti per responsabili della non-esecuzione del giudizio in oggetto. Il precedente a causa del fatto che i procedimenti di esecuzione avevano avuto luogo di fronte alle autorità del Montenegro, ed il secondo perché la Serbia era il solo successore dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro.
4. Gli interventi delle terze parti
(a) Commissione europea per la Democrazia attraverso la Legge (“la Commissione di Venezia”)
65. Nella sua opinione scritta (adottata dalla 76 Sessione Plenaria tenutasi il 17-18 ottobre 2008, CDL-ad (2008) 021), la Commissione di Venezia sostenne che favorirebbe la protezione dei diritti umani europei e sarebbe in conformità con la precedente pratica della Corte, se la Corte ora dovesse ritenere il Montenegro responsabile per le violazioni dei diritti della Convenzione dei richiedenti che sarebbero state causati dalle sue autorità fra il3 marzo 2004 e il 5 giugno 2006 . Secondo la Commissione di Venezia, non c’è nessuna difficoltà di legge internazionale o costituzionale che dovrebbe condurre la Corte ad una conclusione diversa. Di conseguenza, la Commissione di Venezia non ha considerato necessario richiedere al Comitato dei Ministri del Consiglio d'Europa di correggere la sua decisione di maggio 2007.
(b) L’Azione dei Diritti umani Azione
66. Nelle loro osservazioni scritte, l’ Azione dei Diritti umani dibatté, che il Montenegro avrebbe dovuto essere ritenuto responsabile per qualsiasi e tutte le violazioni della Convenzione e/o dei suoi Protocolli commesse dalle sue autorità dal 3 marzo 2004 momento in cui questi strumenti sono entrati in vigore a riguardo dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro. In appoggio a questo argomento ha fatto riferimento a considerazioni pratiche, il contesto nazionale ed internazionale che circondano la dichiarazione di indipendenza del Montenegro, così come la pratica propria della Corte ha stabilito riguardo a problemi simili a seguito della separazione delle repubbliche ceche e slovacche.
B. La valutazione della Corte
67. La Corte nota all'inizio che il Comitato dei Ministri ha il potere sotto gli Articoli 4 e 16 dello Statuto del Consiglio d'Europa di invitare uno Stato a unirsi all'organizzazione così come a decidere “tutte le questioni relative all’ organizzazione interna e alle disposizioni... [del Consiglio]...” (vedere paragrafo 57 sopra). Comunque, la Corte nonostante l’Articolo 54 della Convenzione, ha la sola competenza sotto l’Articolo 32 per determinare tutti i problemi riguardati “l'interpretazione e l’applicazione della Convenzione”, incluso quelli che coinvolgono la sua giurisdizione temporale e/o la compatibilità delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti ratione personae.
68. Con questo in mente ed oltre agli eventi dettagliati eni paragrafi 53-56 sopra, la Corte osserva, riguardo alla presente causa che:
(i) la sola interpretazione ragionevole dell’ Articolo 5 dell'Atto Costituzionale sull'Attuazione della Costituzione della Repubblica del Montenegro (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra), l'enunciazione dell’ Articolo 44 dell’ Atto del Diritto del Montenegro ad un Processo all'interno di un Tempo Ragionevole (vedere paragrafi 46-48 sopra), e in realtà le osservazioni proprie del Governo del Montenegro, tutto suggerisce che il Montenegro dovrebbe essere considerato legato alla Convenzione, così come ai Protocolli inoltre, dal 3 marzo 2004, data in cui questi strumenti sono entrati in vigore riguardo l'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro;
(ii) il Comitato dei Ministri aveva accettato, apparentemente a causa della sua precedente ratifica della Convenzione dell'Unione Statale di Serbia e Montenegro, che non era necessario che il Montenegro depositasse la sua propria ratifica formale della Convenzione;
(iii) benché le circostanze della creazione delle Repubbliche ceche e slovacche come Stati separati non fossero esplicitamente identiche alla presente causa, la risposta della Corte a questa situazione è attinente: vale a dire, nonostante il fatto che i cechi e Repubblica Federale slovacca fossero state parti alla Convenzione fin dal 18 marzo 1992 e che il 30 giugno 1993 il Comitato dei Ministri aveva ammesso i nuovi due Stati al Consiglio d'Europa ed aveva deciso che sarebbero stati considerati come aver succeduto retroattivamente alla Convenzione per effetto dalla loro indipendenza il 1 gennaio 1993, la pratica della Corte deve riguardare la data operativa in cause di continue violazioni insorte prima della creazione dei due Stati separati come essendo il 18 marzo 1992 piuttosto che il 1 gennaio 1993 (vedere, per esempio, Konečný c. Repubblica ceca, N. 47269/99, 64656/01 e 65002/01, § 62 26 ottobre 2004).
69. In prospettiva di ciò che precede, dato i requisiti pratici dell’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, così come il principio che diritti essenziali protetti da trattati di diritti umani internazionali dovrebbero in realtà appartenere ad individui che vivono nel territorio dello Stato parte riguardato, nonostante la sua susseguente dissoluzione o successione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, paragrafi 58 sopra), la Corte considera che sia la Convenzione che il Protocollo N.ro 1 dovrebbero essere considerati come in vigore riguardo al Montenegro dal 3 marzo 2004, fra il 3 marzo 2004 e il 5 giugno 2006 così come da allora in poi (vedere paragrafi 53-56 sopra).
70. Infine, dato il fatto che i procedimenti contestati sono stati solamente all'interno della competenza delle autorità del Montenegro, la Corte, senza giudicare prematuramente i meriti della causa trova inoltre le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti riguardo alla ratione personae del Montenegro compatibili con le disposizioni della Convenzione e del Protocollo N.ro 1. Per la stessa ragione, comunque le loro azioni di reclamo riguardo la Serbia sono ratione personae incompatibili, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3, e devono essere respinte facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
A. Ammissibilità
1. Riguardo al primo richiedente
71. Secondo la Corte, benché il Governo del Montenegro non abbia sollevato difficoltà riguardo di competenza della Corte alla della ratione personae a questo riguardo, lo status di vittima del primo richiedente richiama ciononostante la sua considerazione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Blečić c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 67 ECHR 2006 -...). La Corte, perciò osserva che il 23 ottobre 1995 il primo richiedente aveva trasferito la proprietà dell'appartamento in oggetto al secondo e al terzo richiedente (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra) e conclude che l'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente riguardo al Montenegro è incompatibile ratione personae con le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vederea, mutatis mutandis, Kuljanin c. Croatia (dec.), n. 77627/01, 3 giugno 2004).
2. Riguardo al secondo e terzi richiedenti
(a) Compatibilità ratione personae
72. La Corte considera inoltre che deve anche, di sua propria iniziativa, esaminare la compatibilità ratione personae delle azioni di reclamo del secondo e del terzo richiedente e nota che i due suddetti richiedenti sono stati i proprietari dell'appartamento in questione fin dal 23 ottobre 1995 ecco perché, senza giudicare prematuramente i meriti della causa, le loro azioni di reclamo riguardo il Montenegro sono compatibili ratione personae con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedeerre, mutatis mutandis, Marèiæ ed Altri c. Serbia, n. 17556/05, § 49 30 ottobre 2007).
(b) Esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
73. Il Governo del Montenegro presentò che il secondo e il terzo richiedente non avevano esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali del tutto efficaci. In particolare, non erano riusciti a depositare un ricorso con la Corte Costituzionale (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra), ed avvalersi dell’Atto di recente adottato del Diritto ad un Processo all'interno di un Termine Ragionevole (vedere paragrafi 46-48 sopra).
74. I richiedenti contestarono l'efficacia di queste vie di ricorso, particolarmente nella prospettiva del fatto che furono introdotte molto dopo che la loro richiesta era stata depositata.
75. La Corte reitera che, secondo l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, può trattare un'azione di reclamo solamente dopo che tutte le vie di ricorso nazionali sono state esaurite e richiama che spetta allo Stato rivendicare il non-esaurimento per soddisfare la Corte che la via di ricorso era efficace, disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente (vedere, inter alia, Vernillo c. Francia, sentenza del 20 febbraio 1991 Serie A n. 198, pp. 11–12, § 27, e Dalia c. Francia, sentenza del 19 febbraio 1998 Relazioni 1998-i, pp. 87-88, § 38).
76. Nella presente causa, i procedimenti di esecuzione contestati erano già pendenti a livello nazionale da più di tredici anni di fronte alla legislazione citata al paragrafo 73 sopra fosse entrata in vigore. Questi procedimenti sono inoltre, attualmente ancora in corso ed il Governo del Montenegro è andato a vuoto nel prevedere qualsiasi giurisprudenza all'effetto che le via di ricorso in oggetto possa essere ritenuta efficace in una causa simile a quella in questione. La Corte considera, perciò, che sarebbe sproporzionato per ora costringere il secondo e il terzo richiedente a provare quelle vie di compensazione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Parizov c. “ precedente Repubblica iugoslava di Macedonia”, n. 14258/03, § 46 7 febbraio 2008).
77. Ne segue che l'obiezione del Governo del Montenegro deve essere respinta.
(c) Conclusione
78. La Corte nota che le azioni di reclamo del primo e del secondo richiedente a riguardo del Montenegro non sono manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo. Devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti riguardo al secondo e al terzo richiedente
79. I richiedenti riaffermarono le loro azioni di reclamo mentre il Governo del Montenegro sostenne che degli sforzi erano stati fatti per far eseguire la sentenza in oggetto.
80. L’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 garantisce, inter alia, il diritto di proprietà che include il diritto di godere pacificamente della propria proprietà così come il diritto di disporre di questa (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Marckx c. Belgio, 13 giugno 1979, § 63 Serie A n. 31).
81. In virtù dell’Articolo 1 della Convenzione, ogni Parte Contraente “garantirà a ciascuno all’interno della [sua] giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definite [nella] Convenzione.” L’assolvimento di questo dovere generale può comportare degli obblighi positivi inerenti ad assicurare l'esercizio efficace dei diritti garantiti dalla Convenzione.
82. Nel contesto dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, quegli obblighi positivi possono costringere lo Stato a prendere delle misure necessarie a proteggere il diritto di proprietà (vedere, per esempio, Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 143 il 2004-V di ECHR), particolarmente dove c'è un collegamento diretto fra le misure che un richiedente può legittimamente aspettarsi che le autorità prendano ed il godimento pacifico della sua o delle sue proprietà (vedere Öneryıldız c. Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 134 ECHR 2004-XII).
83. È quindi responsabilità dello Stato di avvalersi di ogni mezzo legale a sua disposizione per eseguire una decisione definitiva di un tribunale, nonostante il fatto che sia stata emessa contro una parte privata, così come garantire che le procedure nazionali del tutto attinenti siano state debitamente osservate (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Marčić ed Altri c. Serbia, citata sopra, § 56).
84. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte nota in primo luogo che l'incapacità del secondo e del terzo richiedente di far sfrattare il convenuto dall'appartamento in oggetto corrisponde ad un'interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà (vedere paragrafo 80 sopra). In secondo luogo, la sentenza in questione era divenuta definitiva il 27 aprile 1994 (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra), la sua esecuzione era stata ratificata il 31 maggio 1994 (vedere paragrafi 16 e 17 sopra), ed il Protocollo N.ro 1 era entrato in vigore a riguardo del Montenegro il 3 marzo 2004 (vedere paragrafo 69 sopra), il che significa che la non-esecuzione contestata è all'interno della competenza ratione temporis della Corte da un periodo di pressoché cinque anni, altri dieci anni essendo già passati prima quella data. Infine, ma più importante, la polizia stessa ha ammesso di non essere stata in grado di adempiere ai loro doveri sotto la legge (vedere paragrafi 32, 49 e 51 sopra) che è ciò che ultimamente provocò il ritardo.
85. In prospettiva di ciò che precede, la Corte trova, che le autorità del Montenegro sono andate a vuoto nell’ adempiere il loro obbligo positivo, all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, di eseguire la sentenza del 31 maggio 1994. Là, di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione della detta disposizione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
A. Riguardo al primo richiedente
86. La Corte nota che, all’ ottobre 1995, il primo richiedente né era il possessore della comproprietà protetta né il proprietario dell'appartamento in oggetto (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra). Inoltre, il 30 gennaio 2006 il secondo e il terzo richiedente autorizzarono il primo richiedente a rappresentarli nei procedimenti contestati (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra). Questo infine non divenne mai, una questione di fronte al tribunale di esecuzione stesso ecco perché il secondo e il terzo richiedente possono essere ritenuti di avere assunto implicitamente il ruolo di creditori al posto del primo richiedente (vedere paragrafo 52 sopra).
87. Ne segue che l'azione di reclamo del primo richiedente riguardo a Montenegro è incompatibile ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione e deve essere respinta facendo seguito all’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 (vedere Kuljanin c. Croatia (dec.), citata sopra).
B. Riguardo al secondo e al terzo richiedente
88. Avendo riguardo alle sue sentenze in relazione all’ Articolo 1 Protocollo N.ro 1 ed al fatto che la non-esecuzione stessa era al centro delle azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti, la Corte considera che, mentre questa azione di reclamo è ammissibile, non è necessario esaminare separatamente i meriti del fatto se, in questa causa, c’è stata anche una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Davidescu c. Romania, n. 2252/02, § 57 16 novembre 2006).
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 8 DELLA CONVENZIONE
89. La Corte si riferisce alla sua giurisprudenza riguardo alla nozione di casa. Nella causa Gillow c. Regno Unito (sentenza del 24 novembre 1986, Serie A n. 109), la Corte sostenne che i richiedenti che possedevano ma non vivevano in un loro alloggio da diciannove anni, avrebbero potuta chiamarla loro “casa” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 8 della Convenzione. Questo perché, nonostante la lunghezza della loro assenza, loro avevano sempre voluto ritornare ed avevano intrattenuto legami continui e sufficienti con la proprietà. Inoltre, nella causa Menteş ed Altri c. Turchia (sentenza del 28 novembre 1997, § 73 Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-VIII), si chiarificò che non c'era anche bisogno per il richiedente di essere il proprietario dell'appartamento o anche che la la sua presenza là fosse permanente per essere considerata “la casa”, purché l'individuo avesse vissuto là “per periodi significativi su una base annuale” ed avesse un “legame famigliare forte” con i locali.
90. Comunque, nella presente causa, la Corte osserva che il 26 marzo 2004 il secondo richiedente, per suo proprio conto ed a favore del terzo richiedente, ha autorizzato il primo richiedente a vendere l'appartamento in oggetto (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra). Ne segue che da quel momento in avanti, almeno, i richiedenti che ora sembrano essere tutti residenti a Belgrado, chiaramente non avevano nessuna intenzione di ritornare a vivere nell'appartamento. Tagliarono così il legame della famiglia alla proprietà. Di conseguenza, la Corte constata che al tempo che i richiedenti depositarono la loro causa con la Corte si potrebbe considerare che proprietà non fosse più stata, la loro “ casa” ai fini dell’ Articolo 8. La Corte perciò constata che le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti a riguardo del Montenegro devono essere respinte come incompatibile ratione materiae con la Convenzione, facendo seguito all’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4.
C. L’APPLICAZIONE DEGLI ARTICOLI 41 E 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
91. Gli Articoli 41 e 46 si leggono come segue:
Articolo 41
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
Articolo 46
“1. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa in cui sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione.”
A. Danno
92. I richiedenti chiesero 97,200 euro (EUR) a riguardo del danno materiale e morale.
93. Il Governo del Montenegro non fece commenti a questo riguardo.
94. La Corte considera che il secondo e il terzo richiedente nella presente causa hanno sofferto di un danno morale certo, a riguardo del quale assegna loro, congiuntamente la somma di EUR 4,500. Inoltre, il Governo del Montenegro deve garantire, con appropriati mezzi, l'esecuzione veloce della sentenza definitiva adottata dal Giudice di prima istanza il 26 gennaio 1994 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Ilić c. Serbia, n. 30132/04, § 112 9 ottobre 2007).
95. Se il Governo del Montenegro dovesse andare a vuoto nell’ eseguire la suddetta decisione nazionale , entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva il Governo stesso dovrebbe pagare al secondo e al terzo richiedente, congiuntamente la somma globale di EUR 92,000, invece della assegnazione inferiore di EUR 4,500 fatta nel paragrafo precedente (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Papamichalopoulos ed Altri c. la Grecia (Articolo 50), 31 ottobre 1995, Serie A n. 330-B). La Corte ha deciso così su una base equa, in prospettiva delle circostanze molto specifiche della presente causa ed al fatto che il Governo del Montenegro non ha fatto commenti sulla richiesta di danni dei richiedenti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Jasar c. la precedente Repubblica iugoslava di Macedonia, n. 69908/01, § 71 15 febbraio 2007).
B. Costi e spese
96. I richiedenti chiesero anche EUR 4,500 per costi e spese incorsi di fronte alla Corte.
97. Il Governo del Montenegro non fece commenti a questo riguardo.
98. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, ad un richiedente viene concesso un rimborso solamente di costi e spese solo dal momento che si dimostra che questi siano stati davvero e necessariamente sostenuti e siano stati anche ragionevoli in merito al loro quantum (vedere, per esempio, Iatridis c Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 2000-XI).
99. Nella presente causa, avuto riguardo ai documenti in suo possesso ed ai suddetti criteri , così come al fatto che ai richiedenti sono già stati accordati EUR 850 sotto lo schema di patrocinio gratuito del Consiglio d'Europa, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare al secondo e al terzo richiedente, congiuntamente la somma supplementare di EUR 700 per i procedimenti di fronte a sé.
C. Interesse di mora
100. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora debba essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui si dovrebbero aggiungere tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità ammissibile le azioni di reclamo del secondo e del terzo richiedentr a riguardo del Montenegro, considerate sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
2. Dichiara all’unanimità il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
3. Sostiene all’unanimità che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 del Montenegro;
4. Sostiene all’unanimità che non è necessario esaminare separatamente l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene per 6 voti a 1
(a) che il Governo del Montenegro assicurerà, con appropriati mezzi, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva, in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, l'esecuzione della sentenza definitiva adottata dal Giudice di prima istanza il 26 gennaio 1994;
(b) che il Governo del Montenegro deve pagare il secondo e il terzo richiedente, congiuntamente entro lo stesso periodo di tre mesi, le seguenti somme:
(i) EUR 4,500 (quattro mila cinquecento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, per il danno morale subito e
(ii) EUR 700 (settecento euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei due suddetti richiedenti, per costi e spese;
(c) che, fallendo l'esecuzione ordinata sotto (a) sopra, il Governo del Montenegro deve pagare, all'interno dello stesso periodo di tre mesi , il secondo e il terzo richiedente, congiuntamente la somma globale di EUR 92,000 (novanta-due mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile (invece dell'assegnazione di 4,500 sotto (b) (i) sopra);
(d) che dalla scadenza del suddetto tempo-limite sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge all’unanimità il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 28 aprile 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Sally Dollé Françoise Tulkens
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.