Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VONTAS AND OTHERS v. GREECE

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 35, P1-1

NUMERO: 43588/06/2009
STATO: Grecia
DATA: 05/02/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary damage - award


FIRST SECTION
CASE OF VONTAS AND OTHERS v. GREECE
(Application no. 43588/06)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
5 February 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Vontas and Others v. Greece,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nina Vajić, President,
Christos Rozakis,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 15 January 2009,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 43588/06) against the Hellenic Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by three Greek nationals, Mr C. V., Mrs A. K. and Mrs F. V. (“the applicants”), on 3 October 2006.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr S. T. and Mr N. C., lawyers practising in Athens. The Greek Government (“the Government”) were represented by their deputy Agents, Mr S. Spyropoulos, Adviser, State Legal Council, and Mrs Z. Hatzipavlou, Legal Assistant, State Legal Council.
3. On 12 November 2007 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. The applicants' property and their title deeds
4. The applicants are the owners of a house and a surrounding plot of land with a surface area of 769 square metres, located on the island of Spetses. The plot is adjacent to the promenade of the Port of Spetses. The title deeds relating to this property, duly deposited in the Land Registry, date back to 1912.
5. In particular, on 11 September 1912 G.P. bought the plot at a public auction conducted by the Registrar of the Spetses Magistrates' Court. On 5 January 1914 G.P. sold the plot to K.D., who sold it to her daughter F.V. on 8 April 1921. The latter donated a part of the plot to her daughter, the third applicant, on 16 June 1965. On 29 April 1975 F.V. donated the remaining part of the plot to her son, the first applicant. On 9 March 1990 the first applicant granted himself a life interest in the property and settled the remainder on his daughter, the second applicant.
6. All these transactions were executed by deeds of public notaries duly deposited in the transcription registry. The applicants have always declared the property to be in their ownership and have paid the relevant taxes on it.
B. The proceedings before the domestic courts
7. In autumn 1991 the first applicant applied to the Planning Office of the municipality of Spetses for a permit to start minor building works.
8. On 5 September 1991 the municipality of Spetses claimed that the northern part of the land in question constituted land for public use. On 6 July 1992 the Planning Office rejected the first applicant's request on the ground that the topographical survey submitted by the applicants was inaccurate, as it wrongly included public land among their property.
9. On 24 June and 15 December 1993 the municipality of Spetses and the applicants filed opposing claims with the Piraeus Court of First Instance, each asking to be declared the owners of the disputed piece of land.
10. In 1994 the Piraeus Court of First Instance delivered an interlocutory judgment ordering a number of expert assessments. In particular, the court appointed T.A., a civil engineer, to conduct an expert assessment in order to clarify whether the disputed land was included in the applicants' title deeds (decision no. 464/1994).
11. On 8 March 2002 T.A. took into consideration the applicants' title deeds, the planning legislation in force and the official topographical and planning charts of the Planning Office of the Piraeus Prefecture and produced his expert report. After having prepared a topographical survey, he concluded that the disputed land was included in the applicants' title deeds.
12. On 25 September 2003 the Piraeus Court of First Instance dismissed the applicants' claims, holding that an area of 220 square metres on the northern side of the applicants' garden constituted public land (judgment no. 4328/2003). In particular, the Piraeus Court of First Instance took into account several witnesses' testimonies and aerial photographs and attached particular importance to the fact that the applicants had never exercised any ownership rights over that part of the land, since they had never cultivated it or planted trees or erected a fence there.
13. On 24 November 2003 the applicants appealed to the Piraeus Court of Appeal.
14. On 28 February 2005 the Piraeus Court of Appeal dismissed the applicants' appeal (judgment no. 213/2005). In particular, it held that according to a rule of Byzantine-Roman law (vetustas), which had been applied in Greece before the introduction of the Civil Code in 1946, a property could be considered to be “for public use” (κοινόχρηστο) if it had been in common use for “an indefinite number of years in human memory” (αμνημονεύτου χρόνου αρχαιότητα). It further explained that, for this rule to be applied, two generations of people, each one spanning forty years had to remember that the disputed land had been in public use in the past. This eighty-year period in human memory must had to have been completed by 23 February 1946, the date on which the Civil Code had come into force, since the Code did not provide for such a rule.
15. Subsequently, the Piraeus Court of Appeal applied the above rule and found that it was proved from the testimonies of the witnesses put forward by the municipality of Spetses that the disputed land had been freely used by local people from 1866 to 1946 and had thus become public. It concluded that, independently of the question whether the disputed land was included in the applicants' title deeds, it had become land “for public use”, and thus part of the municipality's property. Furthermore, it considered that the fact that the land in issue did not appear as public property in the official planning charts of the island of Spetses was of no importance since the land had become public because of its public use.
16. On 14 June 2005 the applicants appealed to the Court of Cassation.
17. On 15 February 2006 the Court of Cassation dismissed the appeal. It held that the Piraeus Court of Appeal had correctly applied Byzantine-Roman law to the facts of the case. It accepted that it had been proved that the disputed land had been in common use since 1866 and concluded that the applicants had never become its owners (judgment no. 299/2006). Its judgment was “finalised” (καθαρoγραφή) on 12 April 2006.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
18. The applicants complained that the result of the proceedings before the Greek courts amounted to a deprivation of possessions contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
The Government's objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies
19. The Government argued that the applicants had failed to exhaust domestic remedies, since they had not claimed before the national courts, even in substance, that the application of the vetustas rule of Byzantine-Roman law violated their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. They asserted that neither the applicants nor their lawyer had alleged at any stage of the proceedings before the civil courts that the above rule was contrary to the principles of legal certainty and the rule of law.
20. The applicants claimed that according to the Court's case-law, the requirement of Article 35 was satisfied if the arguments presented before national courts covered the substance of the complaints under the Convention. In their submission, they had clearly raised before the national courts the issue concerning their right of property, since their dispute with the municipality of Spetses concerned the ownership of a piece of land.
21. The Court reiterates that in the context of machinery for the protection of human rights the rule on exhaustion of domestic remedies must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism. At the same time it requires in principle that the complaints intended to be made subsequently at international level should have been aired before those same courts, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law (see, among many other authorities, Azinas v. Cyprus [GC], no. 56679/00, § 38, ECHR 2004-III, and Fressoz and Roire v. France [GC], no. 29183/95, § 37, ECHR 1999-I).
22. In the present case, the Court points out that the applicants instituted proceedings before the civil courts, asking to be declared the owners of the disputed piece of land, and that the subject matter of their claims undoubtedly concerned the protection of their property rights. Furthermore, by appealing to the Court of Cassation they exercised all the ordinary remedies available to them in that respect. In the Court's view, by asking to be recognised as the owners of the disputed land and by challenging the State's ownership, the applicants also contested, albeit implicitly, the application of the vetustas rule. Therefore, it cannot be said that they did not afford the domestic courts the opportunity to redress by their own means the alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Consequently, the Court dismisses the Government's objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
23. Moreover, the Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The submissions of the parties
24. The Government submitted that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 did not apply in the present case, since the applicants could not claim to be the owners of a “possession” within the meaning of that provision. None of their claims had been recognised and determined by a judicial decision having final effect. Yet that was the condition for a claim to be certain, enforceable and, accordingly, protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Furthermore, they pointed out that the national courts had thoroughly examined the applicants' claims for recognition as the owners of the disputed land and had dismissed them in conformity with the legislation. In their submission, the relevant decisions had duly indicated the reasons relied upon.
25. In the alternative, the Government claimed that even if Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 were applicable in the present case, the requirements of that provision, namely the requirements of legal certainty, had been satisfied in full. Relying on the case of J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom, they alleged that the vetustas rule of Byzantine-Roman law was precise, foreseeable in its application and justified by the demands of the general interest of the community.
26. The applicants claimed that it was beyond any doubt that they had a property right or at least an exceptionally strong legitimate expectation for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, since they had acquired the disputed property through lawful transactions and were in possession of title deeds dating back to 1912. Furthermore, they alleged that the Greek State had always treated them and their ancestors, at least since 1912, as the owners of the disputed land. Accordingly, the applicants claimed that they had a substantive interest which fell within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
27. The applicants further submitted that although they had every reason to believe that their rights as owners would be recognised and respected by the authorities, the authorities and the national courts had deprived them of their rights by applying a rule of Byzantine-Roman law that did not satisfy the requirements of legal certainty. In their submission, the Greek courts had based their conclusion on the testimony of witnesses who claimed that the land was public. Moreover, the applicants pointed out that the present case was not similar to the J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd case, contrary to the Government's assertion, since it did not concern the application of a clear and foreseeable rule on adverse possession. Lastly, the applicants pointed out that if the judgments of the Greek courts were found to be compatible with the Convention then no property was safe in Greece.
2. The Court's assessment
(a) Whether there was a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
28. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is independent from the formal classification in domestic law (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000-I). The issue that needs to be examined is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicants title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 60, ECHR 2000-XII).
29. Turning to the facts of the present case, the Court points out that according to the title deeds, the property in question has belonged to the applicants and their predecessors from at least 1912. This view is confirmed by the civil engineer's expert report, which concluded that the disputed land was included in the applicants' title deeds. Furthermore, it is undisputed that both the public auction and the subsequent transfers of the disputed property were conducted by public officials and were formally registered in compliance with the publicity requirements established by the relevant law.
30. Furthermore, the Court cannot overlook the fact that at least until 1991, when the municipality of Spetses claimed for the first time that the land in question constituted land for public use, the Greek State always treated the applicants as the lawful owners of the disputed land. In particular, not only did the land in question appear as private property in the official planning charts of the island of Spetses, but the applicants also paid taxes on it.
31. In view of all the above, it emerges that the applicants were the owners of the disputed land. Therefore, the Court is of the opinion that they have a substantive interest that constitutes a “possession” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which is applicable to the instant case.
(b) Whether there has been an interference with the right of property
32. Having accepted that the applicants peacefully enjoyed possession of the disputed land, based on title deeds dating back to 1912, the Court considers that the Piraeus Court of Appeal's judgment no. 213/2005 qualifying the disputed land as being “for public use” constituted an interference with the applicants' right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions which amounted to a “deprivation” of possessions within the meaning of the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
33. The Court must therefore examine whether the interference in issue complied with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(c) Whether the interference was justified
34. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
35. The requirement of lawfulness, within the meaning of the Convention, presupposes, among other things, that domestic law must provide a measure of legal protection against arbitrary interferences by the public authorities with the rights safeguarded by the Convention (see Hasan and Chaush v. Bulgaria [GC], no. 30985/96, § 84, ECHR 2000-XI). However, the mere existence of a basis in domestic law does not satisfy the requirements of legal certainty. The Court is also called upon to examine the quality of the law in question, namely the existence of rules that are accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see, among many other authorities, Apostolidi and Others v. Turkey, no. 45628/99, § 70, 27 March 2007). Furthermore, in the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court has held that the States are under a positive obligation to provide judicial procedures that offer the necessary procedural guarantees and therefore enable the domestic courts and tribunals to adjudicate effectively and fairly any cases concerning property matters (see, mutatis mutandis, Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine, no. 48553/99, § 96, ECHR 2002-VII; Bistrović v. Croatia, no. 25774/05, § 33, 31 May 2007).
36. This means in particular that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 implies that any interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must be accompanied by procedural guarantees affording to the individual or entity concerned a reasonable opportunity of presenting their case to the relevant authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision (see Capital Bank AD v. Bulgaria, no. 49429/99, § 134, ECHR 2005-XII). In ascertaining whether this condition has been satisfied, a comprehensive view must be taken of the applicable judicial and administrative procedures (see Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002-IV).
37. Turning to the facts of the present case, the Court observes that the municipality of Spetses brought proceedings against the applicants, without their action being subject to time-limits, and claimed that the land was public despite the applicants' title deeds. In fact, the Greek courts found the State to be the rightful owner of the disputed land on the basis of a rule of Byzantine-Roman law: the vetustas rule, which had been applied in Greece before the introduction of the Civil Code in 1946, and which provided that if a piece of land had been in common use for “an indefinite number of years in human memory”, namely an eighty-year period completed before the Civil Code's entry into force, then it belonged to the local municipality. The Court notes that in using the vetustas rule the applicants, as well as any other property owners, could not consider themselves to be the rightful owners, despite their valid title deeds, unless they could prove that between 1866 and 1946 the disputed land was not in public use.
38. Therefore, contrary to the Government's submissions, the present case is different from the J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd case, which concerned the applicant companies' loss of ownership of agricultural land through “adverse possession” to a neighbour who had used the land for more than twelve years without permission. In that case, the Court accepted that even where title to real property was registered, the legislature could attach more weight to lengthy, unchallenged possession than to the formal fact of registration (see J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 74, 30 August 2007). However, the present case does not concern the applicants' loss of ownership through “adverse possession” to the municipality due to the fact that the land in question was subsequently used by local people for a certain period of time. In the present case, the domestic courts concluded that the applicants had never acquired ownership because the land had previously been in public use.
39. Having said that, the Court stresses that it is not its task to examine whether the domestic courts have rightfully applied domestic law, but it must examine whether the manner in which that law was applied to the applicants in the particular circumstances would violate the protection offered to them under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
40. In doing so, the Court is satisfied that the procedural guarantees offered by domestic law satisfied the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Furthermore, the Court does not find it necessary to determine whether the interference was “lawful”. The Court notes, however, that the Court of Appeal reached the conclusion that the disputed land had been freely used by local people from 1866 to 1946 basing itself mainly on the testimonies of the witnesses put forward by the municipality of Spetses. It disregarded several weighty items of evidence submitted by the applicants – such as the existence of title deeds covering a period between 1912 and 1990, the report drafted by the expert designated by the Piraeus Court of First Instance, confirming that the disputed land was part of the applicants' land, and the official planning charts of the island of Spetses, in which the land in issue appeared as private property. In fact, in the present case, the only reason the Court of Appeal put forward in disregarding the applicants' title deeds, the expert's report and the official planning charts of the island was that this evidence was of no importance since the land had become public under Roman-Byzantine law. This approach was confirmed in the judgment of the Court of Cassation.
41. The Court finds that the way in which the domestic courts assessed the elements submitted before them when applying the vetustas rule and the consequences this had for the applicants amounted to an unjustified interference with their property rights. It recalls that in most contemporary legal systems property rights are clearly defined by law and a system of title deeds exists in order to ensure legal certainty as to the ownership of land. Subsequently, these titles can be relied upon by owners as proof that a piece of land belongs to them. The fact that in the present case the domestic courts ignored concrete evidence pointing to the applicants' ownership and concluded that the disputed land had become part of the municipality's property because the applicants were unable to prove events which took place in the distant past was in the Court's view and in the circumstances of this case contrary to the principle of legal certainty and has led to injustice (see, to similar effect, Stubbings and Others v. the United Kingdom, 22 October 1996, § 51, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV, and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd, cited above, §§ 68-69).
42. In the light of the foregoing, the Court concludes that the Greek courts' interpretation of domestic law led to an interference with the applicants' rights which was not justified for any of the reasons set out in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Valová, Slezák and Slezák v. Slovakia, no. 44925/98, § 54, 1 June 2004).
43. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
44. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage and costs and expenses
45. The applicants pointed out that the municipality of Spetses had started further proceedings, which were still pending, in order to enforce the judgment of the Court of Cassation. Thus, they asked the Court to invite the domestic courts to dismiss the enforcement proceedings. In their view this was the most appropriate remedy in the present case. If nonetheless the Court would consider that they should be awarded monetary compensation, they stressed that an expert report was required in order to assess the market value of the disputed land.
46. The applicants further claimed 4,560 euros (EUR) in reimbursement of the fees paid to the municipality of Spetses by order of the domestic courts, and EUR 7,200 for their lawyers' fees in the proceedings before the Court. In support of their claim the applicants produced two bills of costs, and a disbursement bill in the amount of EUR 733, charged by the expert who had prepared the valuation report for the proceedings before the Piraeus Court of First Instance, amounting to EUR 12,493 in total.
47. The Government stressed that it was not the Court's task to substitute itself for the domestic authorities and that it was primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to resolve problems of interpretation of domestic legislation and assessment of evidence. They argued that in the present case the domestic courts had found that the applicants were not the owners of the disputed land. Therefore, there was no room for restitutio in integrum, since that would amount to reversing the judgment of the domestic courts and ruling in favour of the applicants. The Government also argued that the applicants should not be awarded any sum in respect of pecuniary damage, since they had not specified their claim.
48. As regards costs and expenses, the Government submitted that there was no causal link between the amounts claimed in respect of the domestic proceedings and the alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They further stated that the legal fees for the proceedings before the Court were excessive and that a total sum not exceeding EUR 3,000 would be appropriate in respect of legal costs.
49. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach. The Contracting States that are parties to a case are in principle free to choose the means whereby they will comply with a judgment in which the Court has found a breach. This discretion as to the manner of execution of a judgment reflects the freedom of choice attaching to the primary obligation of the Contracting States under the Convention to secure the rights and freedoms guaranteed (Article 1). If the nature of the breach allows of restitutio in integrum, it is for the respondent State to effect it. If, on the other hand, national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made for the consequences of the breach, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Papamichalopoulos and Others v. Greece (Article 50), 31 October 1995, § 34, Series A no. 330-B).
50. In view of the circumstances of the present case and the specific reasons which have led it to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that the restoration of the applicants' ownership rights would put them as far as possible in a situation equivalent to the one in which they would have been if there had not been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
51. Further, the Court notes that according to its established case-law, costs and expenses will not be awarded under Article 41 unless it is established that they were actually incurred, were necessarily incurred and were also reasonable as to quantum (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000-XI).
52. In the present case, having regard to the evidence before it and the above-mentioned criteria, the Court finds that the costs and expenses in the proceedings brought in Greece and at Strasbourg to prevent or redress the situation it has held to be contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 were necessarily incurred, are reasonable as to quantum and have been fully substantiated. Therefore, the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicants jointly the sums claimed for the proceedings before the domestic courts and the Court in full, namely EUR 12,493 plus any tax that may be chargeable to them on that amount.
B. Default interest
53. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares the application admissible unanimously;
2. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds by 6 votes to 1 that the respondent State is to restore, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the applicants' ownership rights over the disputed land;
4. Holds unanimously
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants jointly, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 12,493 (twelve thousand four hundred and ninety-three euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 5 February 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Nina Vajić
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the partly dissenting opinion of Judge Malinverni is annexed to this judgment.
S.N.
N.V.
PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION
OF JUDGE MALINVERNI
(Translation)
1. I voted with the majority in favour of a finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. As the judgment rightly states, this violation is to be found in the manner in which the Greek courts interpreted, then applied the domestic law.
2. I also share the majority view that the Court's finding of a violation of the Convention “imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach” (§ 49) (restitutio in integrum).
3. It is also exact that “if the nature of the breach allows of restitutio in integrum, it is for the respondent State to effect it” (idem).
4. Where I am unable to follow my colleagues is when they affirm that “[i]n view of the circumstances of the present case and the specific reasons which have led it to find a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that the restoration of the applicants' ownership rights would put them as far as possible in a situation equivalent to the one in which they would have been if there had not been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1” (§50).
5. The majority based its reasoning on the fact that the land at issue actually belonged to the applicants (paragraphs 31 and 41). The authorities therefore had an obligation to return it to them. However, that was not the opinion of the Greek courts.
6. Upholding the judgment of the first-instance court, the Piraeus Court of Appeal held that “independently of the question whether the disputed land was included in the applicants' title deeds, it had become land “for public use”, and thus part of the municipality's property” (§ 15). The case was then referred to the Court of Cassation, which found that “the applicants had never become [the land's] owners” (§ 17). We may therefore conclude that, in the opinion of the Greek courts, “the applicants had never acquired ownership” (§ 38).
7. If, as the Greek courts maintain, the applicants never owned the disputed land, it is difficult to see how the Court could order the authorities to return it to them. The authorities could rely on the judgments of the domestic courts recognising their ownership rights, which have since become res judicata. Without a reopening of the domestic proceedings, which does not appear to be possible in Greek law, the solution proposed by the majority (restitutio in integrum) is not the most appropriate in casu. For that reason I voted against point 3 of the operative part.
8. In my opinion the Court should rather, in this case, have ordered the payment of compensation to the applicants for the damage sustained as a result of the unfair hearing they were given, which “has led to injustice” (§41). In this case the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is of a far more procedural than substantive nature. It was the incorrect application of domestic law (the vetustas rule instead of other rules) that led to a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione: obiezione preliminare respinta (non esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne); violazione di P1-1; Danno materiale : concessione

PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA VONTAS ED ALTRI C. GRECIA
(Richiesta n. 43588/06)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
5 febbraio 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Vontas ed Altri c. Grecia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nina Vajić, Presidente, Christos Rozakis, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 15 gennaio 2009,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 43588/06) contro la Repubblica Ellenica depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da tre cittadini greci, il Sig. C. V., la Sig.ra A. K. ed la Sig.ra F. V. (“i richiedenti”), il 3 ottobre 2006.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. S. T. ed dal Sig. N. C., avvocati che praticano ad Atene. Il Governo greco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dai suoi Agenti aggiunti, il Sig. S. Spyropoulos, Consulente , Consiglio Legale dello Stato, ed la Sig.ra Z. Hatzipavlou, Assistente Legale, Consiglio Legale dello Stato.
3. Il 12 novembre 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. la proprietà di I richiedenti ed i loro atti del titolo di proprietà
4. I richiedenti sono i proprietari di un alloggio ed una porzione circostante di terra con un'area di superficie di 769 metri quadrati, localizzata sull'isola di Spetses. L'area è adiacente al lungomare del Porto di Spetses. Gli atti del titolo relativi a questa proprietà, depositò debitamente presso la Cancelleria Terriera, risalivano al 1912.
5. In particolare, l’11 settembre 1912 G.P aveva comprato l'area ad un'asta pubblica condotta dal Cancelliere della Corte dei Magistrati di Spetses. Il 5 gennaio 1914 G.P ha venduto l'area a K.D. che la vendette a sua figlia F.V. l’8 aprile 1921. Quest’ultima donò una parte dell'area a sua figlia, il terzo richiedente il 16 giugno 1965. Il 29 aprile 1975 F.V ha donato la parte rimanente dell'area a suo figlio, il primo richiedente. Il 9 marzo 1990 il primo richiedente si garantì un interesse a vita sulla proprietà e diede il resto a sua figlia, il secondo richiedente.
6. Tutti queste operazioni sono state eseguite con atti notarili pubblici depositati debitamente presso la cancelleria di trascrizione. I richiedenti hanno sempre dichiarato che la proprietà era di loro possesso e hanno pagato le tasse attinenti a questa.
B. I procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali nazionali
7. Nell’autunno 1991 il primo richiedente fece domanda presso l’ Ufficio di Pianificazione del municipio di Spetses per una licenza per avviare lavori minori di costruzione.
8. Il 5 settembre 1991 il municipio di Spetses chiese che la parte settentrionale della terra in oggetto terra fosse adibita ad uso pubblico. Il 6 luglio 1992 l’ Ufficio di Pianificazione respinse la richiesta del primo richiedente sulla base che l'esame topografico presentato dai richiedenti era impreciso, siccome includeva erroneamente nella loro proprietà della terra pubblica.
9. Il 24 giugno e il 15 dicembre 1993 il municipio di Spetses ed i richiedenti registrarono delle rivendicazioni in opposizione presso il Giudice di prima istanza di Pireo, ognuno delle quali chiedeva che fossero dichiarati proprietari dell'appezzamento di terreno contestato.
10. Nel 1994 il Giudice di prima istanza di Pireo consegnò una sentenza interlocutoria che ordinava un numero di valutazioni competenti. In particolare, la corte nominò T.A., un ingegnere civile, per condurre una valutazione competente per chiarificare se la terra contestata fosse inclusa negli atti di titolo dei richiedenti ( decisione n. 464/1994).
11. L’8 marzo 2002 T.A prese in esame gli atti di titolo dei richiedenti, la legislazione vigente di pianificazione e le carte topografiche e di pianificazione ufficiali dell’ Ufficio di Pianificazione della Prefettura di Pireo e produsse il suo rapporto competente. Dopo avere preparato un esame topografico, lui concluse, che la terra contestata fosse inclusa negli atti di titolo dei richiedenti.
12. Il 25 settembre 2003 il Giudice di prima istanza del Pireo respinse le rivendicazioni dei richiedenti, sostenendo che un'area di 220 metri quadrati sul lato settentrionale del giardino dei richiedenti costituiva terra pubblica ( sentenza n. 4328/2003). In particolare, il Giudice di prima istanza del Pireo prese in considerazione le testimonianze di molti testimoni e fotografie aeree e la particolare importanza collegata al fatto che i richiedenti non avessero mai esercitato qualsiasi diritto di proprietà su quella parte di terra, poiché loro non l'avevano mai coltivata o avevano piantato alberi o avevano eretto un recinto là.
13. Il 24 novembre 2003 i richiedenti fecero appello alla Corte d'appello del Pireo.
14. Il 28 febbraio 2005 la Corte d'appello del Pireo respinse il ricorso dei richiedenti ( sentenza n. 213/2005). In particolare, sostenne che secondo un articolo di legge bizantino-romana (vetustas) che era stato applicato in Grecia prima dell'introduzione del Codice civile nel 1946 si potrebbe considerare che una proprietà sia, “ad uso pubblico” (κοινόχρηστο) se fosse stata in uso comune per “un numero indefinito di anni a memoria umana” (αμνημονεύτου χρόνου αρχαιότητα). Spiegò inoltre che, perche venisse applicato questo articolo, due generazioni di persone ogni uno delle quali di almeno quaranta anni dovesse ricordare che la terra contestata era stata in uso pubblico nel passato. Questo periodo di ottanta anni di memoria umana doveva essere completato entro il 23 febbraio 1946, data in cui il Codice civile era entrato in vigore poiché il Codice non prevedeva tale articolo.
15. Successivamente, la Corte d'appello del Pireo applicò l'articolo sopra e trovò che era provato dalle testimonianze di testimoni rese dal municipio di Spetses che la terra contestata era stata usata liberamente da persone locali dal 1866 al 1946 ed era divenuta così pubblica. Concluse che, indipendentemente della questione se la terra contestata fosse inclusa negli atti di titolo dei richiedenti, era divenuta terra “ad uso pubblico”, e così parte della proprietà del municipio. Inoltre, considerò che il fatto che la terra in questione non sembrasse di proprietà pubblica nelle carte di pianificazione ufficiali dell'isola di Spetses non era di nessuna importanza poiché la terra era divenuta pubblica a causa del suo uso pubblico.
16. Il 14 giugno 2005 i richiedenti fecero appello alla Corte di Cassazione.
17. Il 15 febbraio 2006 la Corte di Cassazione respinse il ricorso. Sostenne che la Corte d'appello del Pireo avesse applicato correttamente la legge bizantino-romana ai fatti della causa. Accettò che era stato provato che la terra contestata fosse d’ uso comune dal 1866 e concluse che i richiedenti non erano mai divenuti i suoi proprietari (sentenza n. 299/2006). La sua sentenza fu “resa definitiva” (καθαρoγραφή) il 12 aprile 2006.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
18. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il risultato dei procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali greci corrispose ad una privazione di proprietà contraria all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Ammissibilità
L'obiezione del Governo del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali
19. Il Governo dibatté che i richiedenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali, poiché loro non avevano detto di fronte ai tribunali nazionali, almeno in sostanza che l’applicazione dell'articolo vetustas della legge bizantino-romana violò il loro diritto al tranquillo godimento delle loro proprietà. Asserirì che né i richiedenti né il loro avvocato, avevano addotto a qualsiasi stadio dei procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali civili che l'articolo sopra fosse contrario ai principi della certezza legale e delle norme legislative.
20. I richiedenti affermarono che secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, il requisito dell’ Articolo 35 fu soddisfatto, se gli argomenti presentati di fronte ai tribunali civili coprivano la sostanza delle azioni di reclamo sotto la Convenzione. Nella loro osservazione, loro chiaramente avevano sollevato di fronte ai tribunali nazionali il problema concernente il loro diritto di proprietà, fin dalla loro controversia col municipio di Spetses che riguardava la proprietà di un appezzamento di terreno.
21. La Corte reitera che nel contesto del sistema per la protezione dei diritti umani l'articolo sull'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali deve essere applicato con un certo grado di flessibilità e senza un eccessivo formalismo. Allo stesso tempo richiede in principio che le azioni di reclamo che si intende fare successivamente a livello internazionale dovrebbero essere ventilate di fronte agli stessi tribunali , almeno in sostanza ed in ottemperanza coi requisiti formali e i limiti di tempo stabiliti in diritto nazionale (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Azinas c. Cipro [GC], n. 56679/00, § 38, ECHR 2004-III, e Fressoz e Roire c. Francia [GC], n. 29183/95, § 37 ECHR 1999-io).
22. Nella presente causa, la Corte indica che i richiedenti avviarono procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali civili, chiedendo di essere dichiarati proprietari dell'appezzamento di terreno contestato, e che l'argomento delle loro rivendicazioni concerneva indubbiamente la protezione dei loro diritti di proprietà. Inoltre, loro esercitarono tutte le vie di ricorso ordinarie disponibili a loro facendo appello alla Corte di Cassazione a quel riguardo. Secondo la prospettiva della Corte, chiedendo di essere riconosciuti come proprietari della terra contestata ed impugnando la proprietà dello Stato, i richiedenti contestarono anche, benché implicitamente, l’applicazione dell'articolo vetustas. Perciò, non si può dire che loro non avessero riconosciuto ai tribunali nazionali l'opportunità di riparare tramite i loro propri mezzi la violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge l'obiezione del Governo del non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali.
23. Inoltre, la Corte nota che la richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
24. Il Governo presentò che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non si applicava alla presente causa poiché i richiedenti non potevano pretendere di essere i proprietari di una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. Nessuna delle loro rivendicazioni era stata riconosciuta e determinata con una decisione giudiziale avente effetto definitivo. Ancora quella era la condizione perché una rivendicazione fosse certa, esecutive e, di conseguenza, protetta dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Inoltre, indicò che i tribunali nazionali avevano completamente esaminato le rivendicazioni dei richiedenti per il riconoscimento come proprietari della terra contestata e le avevano respinte in conformità alla legislazione. Nella sua osservazione, le decisioni attinenti avevano debitamente indicato le ragioni a cui si era appellato.
25. In alternativa, il Governo chiese, che anche se l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 fosse stato applicabile nella presente causa, i requisiti di questa disposizione, vale a dire i requisiti di certezza legale erano stati soddisfatti in pieno. Appellandosi alla causa J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd c. Regno Unito, addusse che la norma vetustas della legge bizantino-romana fosse precisa, prevedibile nella sua applicazione e giustificata dalle richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità.
26. I richiedenti affermarono che fosse al di là di qualsiasi dubbio che loro avessero un diritto di proprietà o almeno un'aspettativa legittima eccezionalmente forte ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, poiché loro avevano acquisito la proprietà contestata tramite operazioni legali ed avevano il possesso di atti di titolo di proprietà datati fin dal 1912. Inoltre, loro addussero che lo Stato greco aveva sempre trattato loro ed i loro antenati, almeno fin dal 1912, come i proprietari della terra contestata. Di conseguenza, i richiedenti affermarono che loro avevano un interesse effettivo che rientrava all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
27. I richiedenti presentarono inoltre che benché loro avessero ogni ragione di credere che i loro diritti come proprietari sarebbero stati riconosciuti e sarebbero stati rispettati dalle autorità, le autorità e i tribunali nazionali li avevano spogliati dei loro diritti applicando un articolo di legge bizantino-romana che non soddisfaceva i requisiti di certezza legale. Nella loro osservazione, i tribunali greci avevano basato la loro conclusione sulla testimonianza di testimoni che sostenevano che la terra fosse pubblica. Inoltre, i richiedenti indicarono che la presente causa non era simile ala causa J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd, contrariamente all'asserzione del Governo, poiché non riguardava l’applicazione di un articolo chiaro e prevedibile su una proprietà controversa. Infine, i richiedenti indicarono che se le sentenze dei tribunali greci fossero trovate poi compatibili con la Convenzione nessuna proprietà sarebbe sicura in Grecia.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Se c'era una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
28. La Corte reitera che il concetto di “ proprietà” nella prima parte dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che è indipendente dalla classificazione formale nel diritto nazionale (vedere Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 100 ECHR 2000-I). Il problema che bisogna esaminare è se le circostanze della causa, considerate nell'insieme, conferirono sul titolo dei richiedenti un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Former King of Greece ed Altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 60 ECHR 2000-XII).
29. Rivolgendosi ai fatti della presente causa, la Corte indica che secondo gli atti di titolo, la proprietà in oggetto appartiene ai richiedenti ed ai loro predecessori da almeno 1912. Questa prospettiva è confermata dal rapporto di expertise dell'ingegnere civile che concluse che la terra contestata fosse inclusa negli atti di titolo dei richiedenti. Inoltre, è incontrastato che sia l'asta pubblica che i susseguenti trasferimenti della proprietà contestata furono condotti da ufficiali pubblici e furono registrati formalmente in ottemperanza coi requisiti di pubblicità stabiliti dalla legge attinente.
30. Inoltre, la Corte non può trascurare il fatto che almeno fino al 1991, quando il municipio di Spetses chiese per la prima volta che la terra in oggetto costituisse terra ad uso pubblico, lo Stato greco trattò sempre i richiedenti come i proprietari legali della terra contestata. In particolare, non solo la terra in oggetto appariva come proprietà privata nelle carte ufficiali di pianificazione dell'isola di Spetses, ma i richiedenti pagarono anche le tasse su questa.
31. In prospettiva di tutto il sopra, emerge, che i richiedenti fossero i proprietari della terra contestata. Perciò, la Corte è dell'opinione che loro abbiano un interesse effettivo che costituisce una “proprietà” ai fini dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che è applicabile alla presente causa.
(b) Se c'è stata un'interferenza col diritto di proprietà
32. Avendo accettato che i richiedenti goderono pacificamente della proprietà della terra contestata, basata su atti di titolo datati dal 1912, la Corte considera che la sentenza della Corte d'appello del Pireo n. 213/2005 che qualificava la terra contestata come “ad uso pubblico” costituì un'interferenza col diritto dei richiedenti al godimento tranquillo delle loro proprietà al quale corrispose una “ privazione” di proprietà all'interno del significato della seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
33. La Corte deve esaminare perciò se l'interferenza in questione si sia attenuta ai requisiti dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(c) Se l'interferenza è stata giustificata
34. La Corte reitera che il primo e il più importante requisito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col godimento tranquillo della proprietà debba essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione di proprietà solamente “soggetta alle condizioni previste dalla legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto a controllare l'uso della proprietà eseguendo “ leggi.” Inoltre, la regola di diritto , uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
35. Il requisito della legalità, all'interno del significato della Convenzione presuppone, fra le altre cose, che il diritto nazionale debba fornire una misura di tutela giuridica contro interferenze arbitrarie da parte delle autorità pubbliche con i diritti salvaguardati dalla Convenzione (vedere Hasan e Chaush c. Bulgaria [GC], n. 30985/96, § 84 ECHR 2000-XI). Comunque, la mera esistenza di una base in diritto nazionale non soddisfa i requisiti di certezza legale. La Corte è chiamata anche ad esaminare la qualità della legge in oggetto, vale a dire l'esistenza di norme che siano accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Apostolidi ed Altri c. Turchia, n. 45628/99, § 70 del 27 marzo 2007). Inoltre, nel contesto dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte ha sostenuto che gli Stati sono sotto l’obbligo positivo di offrire procedure giudiziali che offrano le garanzie procedurali necessarie e perciò abilitino le corti nazionali e tribunali di giudicare efficacemente ed equamente qualsiasi causa riguardo alle questioni di proprietà (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Sovtransavto Holding c. Ucraina, n. 48553/99, § 96 ECHR 2002-VII; Bistrović c. Croatia, n. 25774/05, § 33 31 maggio 2007).
36. Questo vuole dire in particolare che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 implica che qualsiasi interferenza col godimento tranquillo della proprietà debba essere accompagnata da garanzie procedurali che riconoscano all'individuo o all'ente riguardati un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare la loro causa alle autorità attinenti al fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantiti da questa disposizione (vedere Capital Bank Ad c. Bulgaria, n. 49429/99, § 134 ECHR 2005-XII). Nell'accertare se questa condizione è stata soddisfatta, deve essere presa una prospettiva comprensiva delle procedure giudiziali ed amministrative applicabili (vedere Jokela c. Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 45 ECHR 2002-IV).
37. Rivolgendosi ai fatti della presente causa, la Corte osserva che il municipio di Spetses intentò procedimenti contro i richiedenti, senza che la loro azione fosse soggetta a limiti di tempo ed affermò che la terra fosse pubblica nonostante gli atti di titolo dei richiedenti. Infatti, i tribunali greci trovarono che lo Stato fosse il proprietario giusto della terra contestata sulla base di un articolo di diritto bizantino-romano: gli articoli vetustas che era stato applicato in Grecia prima dell'introduzione del Codice civile nel 1946 e che prevedevano che se un appezzamento di terreno fosse stato d’uso comune per “un numero indefinito di anni a memoria umana”, vale a dire un periodo di ottanta anni completato prima dell'entrata in vigore del Codice civile, poi sarebbe appartenuto al municipio locale. La Corte nota che nell'usare la legge vetustas i richiedenti, così come qualsiasi altro proprietario, non avrebbero potuto considerarsi i proprietari legittimi, nonostante i loro atti di titolo validi a meno che loro avessero potuto provare che fra il 1866 ed il 1946 la terra contestata non era d’ uso pubblico.
38. Perciò, contrariamente alle osservazioni del Governo, la presente causa è diversa dalla causa J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd che riguardava la perdita delle società richiedente di proprietà di terra agricola “proprietà controversa” a favore di un vicino di casa che aveva usato la terra per più di dodici anni senza permesso. In quel caso, la Corte accettò che anche nel caso in cui il titolo relativo a beni immobili fosse stato registrato, la legislatura avrebbe potuto dare più peso alla proprietà incontestata da lungo tempo, che al fatto formale della registrazione (vedere J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 44302/02, § 74 30 agosto 2007). Comunque, la presente causa non concerne la perdita di proprietà dei richiedenti per “proprietà controversa” nei confronti del municipio a causa del fatto che la terra in oggetto era stata usata successivamente da persone locali per un certo periodo di tempo. Nella presente causa, i tribunali nazionali conclusero che i richiedenti non avevano acquisito mai la proprietà perché la terra prima era stata d’uso pubblico.
39. Avendo detto questo, la Corte sottolinea che non è suo compito esaminare se i tribunali nazionali hanno applicato giustamente il diritto nazionale, ma deve esaminare se il modo in cui questa legge fu applicata ai richiedenti nelle particolari circostanze ha violato la protezione proposta a loro sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
40. Nel fare così, la Corte è soddisfatta che le garanzie procedurali offerte dal diritto nazionale hanno soddisfatto i requisiti dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Inoltre, la Corte non trova necessario determinare se l'interferenza fosse “legale.” Comunque, la Corte nota che la Corte d'appello giunse alla conclusione che la terra contestata era stata usata liberamente da persone locali dal 1866 a 1946 basandosi principalmente su testimonianze di testimoni rese note dal municipio di Spetses. Trascurò molti articoli di prova di gran peso presentati dai richiedenti -come l'esistenza di atti di titolo che coprono un periodo fra il 1912 ed il 1990, il rapporto redatto dall'esperto designato dal Giudice di prima istanza del Pireo che confermava che la terra contestata era parte della terra dei richiedenti, e le carte ufficiali di pianificazione dell'isola di Spetses nelle quali la terra in questione appariva come proprietà privata. Infatti, nella presente causa, la sola ragione che la Corte d'appello evidenziò nel trascurare gli atti di titolo dei richiedenti, il rapporto dell'esperto e le carte ufficiali di pianificazione dell'isola era che questa prova non fosse di nessuna importanza poiché la terra era divenuta pubblica sotto la legge romano-bizantino. Questo approccio fu confermato nella sentenza della Corte di Cassazione.
41. La Corte costata che il modo in cui i tribunali nazionali valutarono gli elementi presentati di fronte a loro applicando l’articolo vetustas e le conseguenze che questo aveva per i richiedenti corrispose ad un'interferenza ingiustificata coi loro diritti di proprietà. Ricorda che nella maggior parte degli ordinamenti giuridici contemporanei i diritti di proprietà vengono definiti chiaramente dalla legge ed un sistema di atti di titolo esiste per assicurare la certezza legale riguardo alla proprietà della terra. Successivamente, questi titoli possono i proprietari possono appellarsi a questi regolamenti come prova che un appezzamento di terreno appartiene a loro. Il fatto che nella presente causa i tribunali nazionali ignorarono la prova concreta che evidenziava la proprietà dei richiedenti e conclusero che la terra contestata era divenuta parte della proprietà del municipio perché i richiedenti non erano stati in grado di provare eventi che ebbero luogo in un passato distante era secondo la Corte e nelle circostanze di questa causa contrario al principio della certezza legale e ha condotto all'ingiustizia (vedere, a simile effetto, Stubbings ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 22 ottobre 1996 § 51, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV e J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd, citata sopra, §§ 68-69).
42. Alla luce di ciò che precede, la Corte conclude, che l'interpretazione dei tribunali greci del diritto nazionale condusse ad un'interferenza coi diritti dei richiedenti che non fur giustificata per nessuna delle ragioni esposte nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Valová, Slezák e Slezák c. Slovacchia, n. 44925/98, § 54 1 giugno 2004).
43. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
44. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno e costi e spese
45. I richiedenti indicarono che il municipio di Spetses aveva avviato ulteriori procedimenti che erano ancora pendenti per eseguire la sentenza della Corte di Cassazione. Così, loro chiesero alla Corte di invitare i tribunali nazionali a respingere i procedimenti di esecuzione. Nella loro prospettiva questa era la via di ricorso più appropriata della presente causa. Se nondimeno nel caso in cui la Corte avesse considerato che avrebbe dovuto essere assegnato a loro un risarcimento valutario, loro sottolinearono che si rendeva necessario un rapporto competente per valutare il valore di mercato della terra contestata.
46. I richiedenti chiesero inoltre 4,560 euro (EUR) in rimborso delle parcelle pagate al municipio di Spetses per ordine dei tribunali nazionali, ed EUR 7,200 per le parcelle dei loro avvocati nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte. In appoggio delle loro rivendicazioni i richiedenti produssero due note spese, ed un conto di pagamento nell'importo di EUR 733, addebitato dall'esperto che aveva preparato il rapporto di valutazione per i procedimenti di fronte al Giudice di prima istanza del Pireo, corrispondente ad EUR 12,493 in totale.
47. Il Governo sottolineò che non era compito della Corte sostituirsi alle autorità nazionali e che spettava primariamente alle autorità nazionali, in particolare i tribunali, chiarire problemi di interpretazione della legislazione nazionale e la valutazione delle prove. Dibatté che nella presente causa i tribunali nazionali avevano trovato che i richiedenti non fossero i proprietari della terra contestata. Non c'era perciò, spazio per la restitutio in integrum, poiché questa avrebbe corrisposto ad un’inversione della sentenza dei tribunali nazioali e una decisione a favore dei richiedenti. Il Governo dibatté anche che ai richiedenti non dovrebbe essere assegnata nessuna somma riguardo il danno materiale, poiché loro non avevano specificato la loro rivendicazione.
48. Riguardo ai costi e spese, il Governo presentò, che non c'era collegamento causale fra gli importi chiesti riguardo ai procedimenti nazionali e la violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Affermò inoltre che le parcelle legali per i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte fossero eccessive e che una somma totale che non eccedesse EUR 3,000 sarebbe stata appropriata riguardo le spese processuali.
49. La Corte reitera che una sentenza in cui si trova una violazione impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale per porre fine alla violazione e costituire una riparazione delle sue conseguenze in tale modo da ripristinare il più possibile la situazione esistente prima della violazione. Gli Stati Contraenti che sono parti in una causa sono in principio liberi scegliere i mezzi da utilizzare per attenersi ad una sentenza in cui la Corte ha trovato una violazione. Questa discrezione riguardo al metodo di esecuzione di una sentenza riflette la libertà di scelta collegata all'obbligo primario degli Stati Contraenti sotto la Convenzione per garantire i diritti e le libertà garantite (Articolo 1). Se la natura della violazione concede una restitutio in integrum, lo Stato rispondente deve effettuarla. Se, d'altra parte la legge nazionale non concede -o concede solamente che venga fatta una riparazione parziale delle conseguenze della violazione, l’Articolo 41 conferisce potere alla Corte di riconoscere alla vittima simile soddisfazione come le sembra più appropriato (vedere Papamichalopoulos ed Altri c. Grecia (Articolo 50), 31 ottobre 1995, § 34 Serie A n. 330-B).
50. Nella prospettiva delle circostanze della presente causa e le specifiche ragioni che l'hanno condotta a trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che la restituzione dei diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti li metterebbe il più possibile in una situazione equivalente a quella nella quale sarebbero stati se non ci fosse stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
51. Inoltre, la Corte nota che secondo la sua giurisprudenza stabilita, costi e spese non saranno assegnati sotto l’Articolo 41 a meno che venga stabilito che loro davvero furono sostenuti, che erano necessari ed erano anche ragionevoli riguardo al quantum (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 2000-XI).
52. Nella presente causa, avendo riguardo alla prova di fronte a sé ed al criterio summenzionato, la Corte trova, che i costi e spese nei procedimenti intrapresi in Grecia ed a Strasburgo per prevenire o compensare la situazione che è stata ritenuta contraria all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 siano stati sostenuti necessariamente , siano stati ragionevoli riguardo al quantum e siano stati provati in pieno . Perciò, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare in pieno congiuntamente ai richiedenti le somme chieste per i procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali nazionali e la Corte, vale a dire EUR 12,493 più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitata loro su quell'importo.
B. Interesse di mora
53. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui si dovrebbero aggiungere tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene all’unanimità che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene per 6 voti a 1 che lo Stato rispondente debba ripristinare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti sulla terra contestata;
4. Sostiene all’unanimità
(a) che lo Stato rispondente debba pagare congiuntamente ai richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 12,493 (dodici mila quattrocento e novanta tre euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti, riguardo i costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 5 febbraio 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Nina Vajić
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte, l'opinione in parte dissentente del Giudice Malinverni è annessa a questa sentenza.
S.N.
N.V.
OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENTE
DEL GIUDICE MALINVERNI
( traduzione)
1. Io votai con la maggioranza a favore di una costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Come la sentenza enuncia esattamente, questa violazione deve essere trovata nel modo in cui interpretarono greci interpretarono, poi applicarono il diritto nazionale.
2. Io condivido anche la prospettiva della maggioranza per cui la costatazione della Corte di una violazione della Convenzione “impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale di porre fine alla violazione e costituire riparazione delle sue conseguenze in tal da ripristinare il più possibile la situazione che esisteva prima della violazione” (§ 49) (restitutio in integrum).
3. È anche esatto che “se la natura della violazione concede una restitutio in integrum, lo Stato rispondente debba per effettuarla” (idem).
4. Dove non sono in grado di seguire i miei colleghi è quando loro affermano che “[nella] prospettiva delle circostanze della presente causa e le specifiche ragioni che l'hanno condotta a trovare una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che la restituzione dei diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti li metterebbe il più possibile in una situazione equivalente a quella in cui sarebbero stati se non ci fosse stata una violazione diell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1” (§50).
5. La maggioranza basò il suo ragionamento sul fatto che la terra in questione davvero fosse appartenuta ai richiedenti (paragrafi 31 e 41). Le autorità avevano perciò un obbligo di restituirla a loro. Comunque, questa non era l'opinione dei tribunali greci.
6. Sostenendo la sentenza della corte di prima -istanza, la Corte d'appello del Pireo sostenne che “indipendentemente della questione se la terra contestata fosse inclusa negli atti di titolo dei richiedenti, era divenuta terra “ad uso pubblico”, e così parte della proprietà del municipio” (§ 15). La causa si fu assegnata poi alla Corte di Cassazione che trovò che “i richiedenti non fossero mai divenuti i proprietari [della terra]” (§ 17). Noi possiamo concludere perciò che, secondo i tribunali greci, “i richiedenti non avessero mai acquisito la proprietà” (§ 38).
7. Se, come sostengono i tribunali greci, i richiedenti non possedettero mai la terra contestata, è difficile vedere come la Corte potrebbe ordinare alle autorità di restituirla a loro. Le autorità potrebbero appellarsi alle sentenze dei tribunali nazionali che hanno riconosciuto i loro diritti di proprietà che sono divenuti da allora res judicata. Senza una riapertura dei procedimenti nazionali che non sembra essere possibile secondo la legge greca la soluzione proposta dalla maggioranza (restitutio in integrum) non è la più appropriata in casu. Per questa ragione ho votato contro il punto 3 della parte operativa.
8. Secondo me la Corte deve piuttosto, in questa caso, ordinare il pagamento del risarcimento ai richiedenti per il danno subito come risultato dell'udienza ingiusta che fu data loro che “ha condotto all'ingiustizia” (§41). In questa caso la violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è di natura più procedurale che effettiva. E’ stata l’applicazione incorretta del diritto nazionale (l’articolo vetustas invece degli altri articoli) che ha condotto ad una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.