Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BURDOV v. RUSSIA (NO. 2)

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 13, 34, 6, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 33509/04/2009
STATO: Russia
DATA: 15/01/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violation of Art. 6 ; Violation of P1-1 ; No violation of Art. 6 ; No violation of P1-1 ; Violation of Art. 13 ; Respondent State to take individual measures ; Respondent State to take measures of a general character ; Non-pecuniary damage - award ; Pecuniary damage - claim dismissed
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF BURDOV v. RUSSIA (No. 2)
(Application no. 33509/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
15 January 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Burdov v. Russia (no. 2),
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 16 December 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 33509/04) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mr A. T. B. (“the applicant”), on 15 July 2004.
2. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Ms V. Milinchuk, former Representative of the Russian Federation at the Court, and by Mr G. Matyushkin, Representative of the Russian Federation at the Court.
3. The applicant complained under Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 about the authorities’ failure to comply with judgments delivered by domestic courts in his favour.
4. On 22 November 2007 the President of the First Section decided to communicate the applicant’s complaint to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
5. On 3 July 2008 the Chamber decided, under Rule 54 § 2 (c) of the Rules of Court, to grant the case priority under Rule 41 and to invite the parties to submit further written observations on the above application. The Chamber furthermore decided to inform the parties that it was considering the suitability of applying a pilot-judgment procedure in the case (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 and the operative part, ECHR 2004-V, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC] no. 35014/97, ECHR 2006-... §§ 231-239 and the operative part). The applicant provided further observations on 11 August 2008 and the Government on 26 September 2008.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant, Mr A. T. B., is a Russian national who was born in 1952 and lives in Shakhty, in the Rostov region of the Russian Federation.
7. On 1 October 1986 the applicant was called up by the military authorities to take part in emergency operations at the site of the Chernobyl nuclear plant disaster. The applicant was engaged in the operations until 11 January 1987 and, as a result, suffered from extensive exposure to radioactive emissions. He is entitled to various social benefits in this connection.
8. Considering that the competent State authorities failed to pay these benefits in full and in due time, the applicant repeatedly sued them in domestic courts from 1997 onwards. The courts repeatedly granted the applicant’s claims but a number of their judgments remained unenforced for various periods of time.
A. The Court’s judgment of 7 May 2002 in Burdov v. Russia and further developments
1. The Court’s findings
9. On 20 March 2000 the applicant first complained before the Court about non-enforcement of domestic judicial decisions (application no. 59498/00). In its judgment of 7 May 2002, the Court found that the Shakhty City Court’s decisions of 3 March 1997, 21 May 1999 and 9 March 2000 had remained unenforced wholly or in part at least until 5 March 2001, when the Ministry of Finance took the decision to pay in full the debt owed to the applicant. The Court accordingly held that there had been violations of Article 6 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the authorities’ failure for years to take the necessary measures to comply with these decisions (Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, §§ 37-38, ECHR 2002-III).
2. Resolution ResDH(2004)85 of the Committee of Ministers concerning the Court’s judgment of 7 May 2002
10. Under the terms of Article 46 § 2 of the Convention, the Court’s judgment of 7 May 2002 in Burdov v. Russia was transmitted to the Committee of Ministers for the supervision of its execution. The Committee invited the Government to inform it of the measures which had been taken in consequence of the Court’s judgment of 7 May 2002, having regard to the Russian Federation’s obligation under Article 46 § 1 to abide by it. On 22 December 2004 the Committee adopted Resolution ResDH(2004)85 in this case. The measures taken by the Russian authorities were summarised by the Government in the appendix to this Resolution:
“(...) With regard to individual measures, the amounts due under the domestic judicial decisions were paid to the applicant on 5 March 2001. (...) Subsequently, a fresh indexation of the monthly allowance was ordered by the Shakhty City Court on 11 July 2003 (final on 1 October 2003). The social authorities continue to comply with the domestic judicial decisions by regularly paying the sums awarded.
In addition, the following general measures were adopted by the Russian authorities to comply with the European Court’s judgment.
a) Resolving similar cases
At the outset, the government paid the arrears accumulated as a result of the non-execution, as in the present case, of domestic judgments ordering the payment of compensation and allowances for the Chernobyl victims in the applicant position (a total of 2,846 million roubles were paid between January and October 2002).
5 128 other domestic judgments concerning the indexation of the allowances for the victims of Chernobyl were executed by the authorities.
The government has also improved its budgetary process to ensure that the necessary budgetary means are allocated to social security bodies (2,152,071,000 roubles were allocated for 2003, 2,538,280,500 roubles for 2004, and 2,622,335,000 for 2005) to allow them continuously to meet their financial obligations arising inter alia from similar judgments. (...)
b) New indexation system introduced through legislation
As regards the obligation of continuous indexation of the amounts awarded by domestic courts, the legislation in force at the relevant time provided for the cost of living as index for calculation of allowances. By decision of 19 June 2002, the Constitutional Court declared the relevant legislative provisions unconstitutional, insofar as this system was found to lack clarity and predictability; in this decision, the Constitutional Court referred, inter alia, to the conclusions of the European Court in the Burdov judgment. Consequently, on 2 April 2004, the Russian Parliament amended the legislation governing the social insurance of Chernobyl victims. The new law, which has been in force since 29 April 2004, provides for a new system of indexation of allowances, which is based on the inflation rate used for calculation of the federal budget for the next financial year.
c) Publication and dissemination of the judgment
The European Court’s judgment in [the] Burdov case has been published in Rossijskaia Gazeta (on 4 July 2002), the main official periodical publishing all laws and regulations of the Russian Federation and widely disseminated to all authorities. The judgment has also been published in a number of Russian legal journals and internet data bases, and is thus easily available to the authorities and the public.
d) Conclusion
In view of the foregoing, the Russian Government considers that the measures adopted following the present judgment will prevent new similar violations of the Convention in respect of the category of persons in the applicant’s position and that the Russian Federation has thus fulfilled its obligations under Article 46, paragraph 1, of the Convention in the present case.
The government also believes that the measures adopted constitute, moreover, a noticeable step towards resolving the more general problem of non-enforcement of domestic court decisions in various areas, as highlighted in particular by other cases brought before the European Court against the Russian Federation. The government continues to take measures to remedy this problem, not least in the context of the execution, under the Committee’s supervision, of other judgments of the European Court.”
11. The Committee was satisfied that on 16 July 2002, within the time-limit set, the Government had paid the applicant the sum of just satisfaction provided for in the judgment of 7 May 2002. It further noted, in particular, the measures taken in respect of the category of persons in the applicant’s position. Having regard to all the measures adopted, the Committee concluded that it had exercised its functions under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention in this case. The Committee recalled at the same time that the more general problem of non-execution of domestic court decisions in the Russian Federation was being addressed by the authorities, under the Committee’s supervision, in the context of other pending cases.
B. Enforcement of new domestic judgments in the applicant’s favour
1. Shakhty Town Court’s judgment of 17 April 2003
12. On 17 April 2003 the Shakhty Town Court ordered the Directorate of Labour and Social Development (Управление труда и социального развития) of Shakhty to pay the applicant 15,984.80 Russian Roubles (RUB) as compensation for delays in payment of benefits in accordance with Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure. On 9 July 2003 the judgment was upheld by the Rostov Regional Court and became final.
13. During 2003-2005 the applicant consecutively submitted the writ of execution to the defendant authority, to bailiffs, to the Federal Treasury and then again to the defendant authority. On 19 August 2005 the authorities transferred the amount of the court’s award to the applicant’s account.
2. Shakhty Town Court’s judgment of 4 December 2003
14. On 4 December 2003 the Shakhty Town Court ordered the Directorate of Labour and Social Development to pay the applicant RUB 68,463.54 as default interest for delays in payments between 1999 and 2001, in accordance with the Compulsory Social Insurance Act 1998 (no.125-ФЗ). The judgment was not appealed against and became final on 15 December 2003.
15. According to the applicant, he submitted the writ for execution to the respondent Department on the same date. On an unspecified date the writ was submitted to the Shakhty Bailiffs’ Department; the latter decided on 30 June 2004 that the judgment was impossible to enforce as the debtor’s possessions could not be seized.
16. On 14 November 2005 the Shakhty Town Court granted the defendant authority’s request for correction of an arithmetic error and reduced the award to RUB 68,308.42. On 9 March 2006 the same court granted the applicant’s request for correction of an arithmetic error and ordered the defendant authority to pay the applicant RUB 108,251.95. On 18 October 2006 the authorities paid the latter amount to the applicant.
3. Shakhty Town Court’s judgment of 24 March 2006
17. On 24 March 2006 the Shakhty Town Court ordered the Department of Labour and Social Development (Департамент труда и социального развития) of Shakhty to index-link the monthly food allowance due to the applicant as of 1 January 2006. The court set the amount of monthly payments at RUB 1,183.73 with subsequent indexation and ordered a one-off payment of RUB 36,877.06 for compensation for shortfalls in previous monthly payments. In addition, as of 1 January 2006 the Department was ordered to proceed with monthly payments of RUB 1,972.92 with subsequent indexation in respect of compensation for health damage. The court further ordered the defendant authority to pay the applicant RUB 4,980.24 and RUB 13,312.46 as compensation for shortfalls in monthly payments made between 2000 and 2005 for health damage and food allowance respectively and an additional indexation payment of RUB 1,652.35 for health damage. On 22 May 2006 the judgment was upheld by the Rostov Regional Court and became final.
18. On 20 July 2007 the Shakhty Town Court corrected an arithmetic error in its judgment and changed the initially awarded amount of RUB 4,980.24 to RUB 5,222.78.
19. On 2 November 2006 the judgment of 24 March 2006 was executed in its major part: a total of RUB 67,940.56 was credited to the applicant’s account. At the same time, the Ministry of Finance did not upgrade the monthly payments as ordered by the court’s judgment and the applicant continued to receive such payments at a lower level. On 1 July 2007 the Ministry decided to upgrade them. On 17 August 2007 the applicant received RUB 9,112.26 as compensation for shortfalls in monthly payments accumulated until that date.
4. Judgments of 22 May 2007 and 21 August 2007
20. On 22 May 2007 the Shakhty Town Court decided that the Department of Labour and Social Development was to pay the applicant as of 1 June 2007 the amount of RUB 17,219.43 monthly, with subsequent indexation, in respect of compensation for health damage. In addition, the Department was to pay RUB 188,566 as compensation for shortfalls in previous monthly payments. The judgment was not appealed against and became final on 4 June 2007. It was enforced on 5 December 2007.
21. On 21 August 2007, the Shakhty Town Court ordered the Federal Labour and Employment Agency to pay the applicant RUB 225,821.73 as compensation for certain delayed payments in respect of health damage between 2000 and 2007. The judgment was not appealed against and became final on 3 September 2007. It was enforced on 3 December 2007.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC MATERIAL
A. Execution of domestic judgments
1. Law on Enforcement Proceedings
22. Section 9 of the Federal Law on Enforcement Proceedings of 21 July 1997 (no. 119-ФЗ) as in force at the material time provided that a bailiff was to set a time-limit up to five days for the defendant’s voluntary compliance with a writ of execution. The bailiff was also to warn the defendant that coercive action would follow should the defendant fail to comply with the time-limit. Under section 13 of the Law, the enforcement proceedings had to be completed within two months of the receipt of the writ of execution by the bailiff.
2. Special execution procedure for the judgments delivered against the State and its entities
23. In 2001-2005 the judgments delivered against the public authorities were executed in accordance with a special procedure established, inter alia, by the Government’s Decree no. 143 of 22 February 2001 and, subsequently, by Decree no. 666 of 22 September 2002, entrusting execution to the Ministry of Finance (see further details in Pridatchenko and Others v. Russia, nos. 2191/03, 3104/03, 16094/03 and 24486/03, §§ 33-39, 21 June 2007). By a judgment of 14 July 2005 (no. 8-П), the Constitutional Court considered certain provisions governing the special execution procedure to be incompatible with the Constitution. Following the judgment, the Law of 27 December 2005 (no. 197-ФЗ) introduced a new Chapter in the Budget Code modifying this special procedure. The Law notably empowered the Federal Treasury to execute judgments against legal entities funded by the federal budget and the Ministry of Finance to execute judgments against the State. Under Article 242.2.6 of the Budget Code, the judgments must be executed within three months after receipt of the necessary documents.
24. Further special procedures governing payment of social benefits to persons who suffered from radioactive emissions in the Chernobyl disaster were set by Law no. 1244-1 of 15 May 1991 with subsequent amendments and by the Government’s decrees no. 607 of 21 August 2001, no. 73 of 14 February 2005 and no. 872 of 30 December 2006. In 2002-2004 compensation for health damage was ensured by the Ministry of Labour within the limits of the budgetary allocations provided for the relevant fiscal year. In 2005-2006 such compensation was ensured by territorial departments of the Federal Labour and Employment Agency and in 2007-2008 by the Agency itself on the basis of registers submitted by social welfare bodies and within the limits of the budgetary allocations provided to that effect.
3. Report of the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Russian Federation
25. The 2007 Activities Report of the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Russian Federation pointed out that the perception of domestic judgments as what one might call “non-compulsory recommendations” was still a widespread phenomenon not only in society but also in State bodies. It noted that the non-enforcement problem had also arisen in respect of judgments of the Constitutional Court. According to the report, the problem had been discussed between December 2006 and March 2007 at special meetings in all federal circuits involving regional authorities and representatives of the President’s Administration. An idea thus emerged of setting up a national filter mechanism that would allow for examination of Convention complaints at the domestic level. The Commissioner concluded that joint efforts should be deployed with a view to eliminating the roots of the problem rather than simply reducing the number of complaints.
B. Domestic remedies in respect of the non-execution or delayed execution of domestic judgments
1. Legal provisions
(a) Civil law
26. Chapter 25 of the Code of Civil Procedure provides a procedure for challenging State authorities’ acts or inaction in courts. If a court finds that the complaint is well-founded, it orders the State authority concerned to remedy the breach or unlawfulness found (Article 258).
27. Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure provides for “indexation” of judicial awards: the court which made the award may upgrade it upon a party’s request in line with the increase in the official retail price index until the date of effective payment. Default interest and other compensation for pecuniary damage may in addition be recovered from the debtor for non-compliance with a monetary obligation and use of another person’s funds (Article 395 of the Civil Code).
28. Damage caused by unlawful action or inaction of State or local authorities or their officials is subject to compensation from the Federal Treasury or a federal entity’s treasury (Article 1069). Compensation for damage caused to an individual by unlawful conviction, prosecution, detention on remand or prohibition on leaving his or her place of residence pending trial is granted in full regardless of the fault of the state officials concerned and following the procedure provided for by law (Article 1070 § 1). Damage caused by the administration of justice is compensated if the fault of the judge is established by a final judicial conviction (Article 1070 § 2).
29. A court may hold the tortfeasor liable for non-pecuniary damage caused to an individual by actions impairing his or her personal non-property rights or affecting other intangible assets belonging to him or her (Articles 151 and 1099 § 1). Compensation for non-pecuniary damage sustained through an impairment of an individual’s property rights is recoverable only in cases provided for by law (Article 1099 § 2 of the Civil Code). Compensation for non-pecuniary damage is payable irrespective of the tortfeasor’s fault if damage was caused to an individual’s life or limb, sustained through unlawful criminal prosecution, dissemination of untrue information and in other cases provided for by law (Article 1100 of the Civil Code).
(b) Criminal law
30. Article 315 of the Criminal Code provides for sanctions for persistent failure by any State official or civil servant to comply with a judicial decision that has entered into legal force. The sanctions include a fine, temporary suspension from service, community service (обязательные работы) for a maximum term of 240 hours or deprivation of liberty for a maximum term of two years.
2. Constitutional Court’s judgment of 25 January 2001
31. By Ruling no. 1-P of 25 January 2001, the Constitutional Court found that Article 1070 § 2 of the Civil Code was compatible with the Constitution in so far as it provided for special conditions on State liability for damage caused by the administration of justice. It clarified, nevertheless, that the term “administration of justice” did not cover judicial proceedings in their entirety but only judicial acts touching upon the merits of a case. Other judicial acts – mainly of a procedural nature – fell outside the scope of the notion “administration of justice”.
32. State liability for the damage caused by such procedural acts or failures to act, such as a breach of the reasonable time for court proceedings, could arise even in the absence of a final criminal conviction of a judge if the fault of the judge had been established in civil proceedings. The Constitutional Court emphasised, however, that the constitutional right to compensation by the State for the damage should not be tied in with the individual fault of a judge. An individual should be able to obtain compensation for any damage incurred through a violation by a court of his or her right to a fair trial within the meaning of Article 6 of the Convention.
33. The Constitutional Court held that Parliament should legislate on the grounds and procedure for compensation by the State for the damage caused by unlawful acts or failures to act of a court or a judge and determine territorial and subject-matter jurisdiction over such claims.
3. Supreme Court’s decision of 26 September 2008 and the new Compensation Bill
34. On 26 September 2008 the Plenum of the Supreme Court adopted a decision (no. 16) to submit to the State Duma of the Russian Federation a draft Constitutional Law on compensation by the State of damage caused by violations of the right to judicial proceedings within a reasonable time and of the right to the execution within a reasonable time of judicial decisions that have entered into legal force (hereinafter referred to as the “Compensation Bill”). The Supreme Court also decided to submit to the State Duma a second draft Law introducing changes in certain legal acts in connection with the adoption of the Compensation Bill. Both drafts were formally tabled in the State Duma on 30 September 2008.
35. The purpose of the Compensation Bill is to set up in Russia a domestic legal remedy in respect of violations of the rights to judicial proceedings within a reasonable time and to the execution of an enforceable judicial decision within a reasonable time (section 1 § 1). It is also provided that the applicants in cases which have not yet been declared admissible by the Court may apply for compensation of damage under the Bill within six months after its entry into force planned for 1 January 2010 (section 19). The Bill empowers courts of general jurisdiction to consider cases brought against the State on alleged violations of the aforementioned rights (section 3 § 1) and provides for specific rules to govern the proceedings in such cases. The State is represented in the proceedings by the Ministry of Finance (section 3 § 3). The latter has to prove that there was no violation of the reasonable time requirement, while the plaintiff has to prove the existence of pecuniary damage (section 11 § 1). To decide a case, the court assesses its complexity, the behaviour of the parties and other actors in the proceedings, and the acts or inaction of judicial or prosecution authorities, the parties to enforcement proceedings or the enforcement authorities. The court also assesses the duration of the violation and the importance of its consequences for the person affected (section 12). If the court finds a violation, it makes a monetary award for damage to be determined taking account of specific circumstances of the case, of the requirements of equity and of the Convention standards (section 14). The court may take a separate decision finding a breach of law by a court or State official and order specific procedural actions to be taken, with a request to report back within a month (section 15).
36. The Supreme Court’s explanatory memorandum sets out the needs for additional budgetary allocations to ensure the implementation of the Compensation Bill. The average compensation per case is estimated at EUR 3,050 having regard to the fact that the just satisfaction amounts awarded by the European Court of Human Rights in non-enforcement cases have usually ranged between EUR 1,200 and EUR 4,900.
37. The second draft Law introduces amendments to other legal acts. Under new Article 1070.1 of the Civil Code, damage caused by violations of the reasonable time requirement by State authorities in judicial proceedings or in the execution of judgments is compensated from the Federal Treasury. Under new Article 242.2 of the Budget Code, judicial decisions granting such compensation must be enforced within two months.
4. The Address by the President of the Russian Federation to the Federal Assembly
38. In his Address to the Federal Assembly delivered on 5 November 2008, the President of the Russian Federation stated in particular that it was necessary to establish a mechanism for compensation of damage caused by violations of citizens’ rights to trial within a reasonable time and to the full and timely implementation of court decisions. The President stressed that the execution of court decisions was still a huge problem, which concerned all courts including the Constitutional Court. He further stated that the problem was notably due to the lack of real accountability of officials and citizens who fail to execute court decisions and that this accountability was to be established.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL MATERIAL
A. Council of Europe
1. Committee of Ministers
39. On 3-5 December 2007 the Committee of Ministers resumed consideration under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention of the group of the Court’s judgments against Russia concerning failure to enforce or delays in the enforcement of domestic judgments (Timofeyev and others group, CM/Del/OJ/DH(2007)1013 Public). The following decision was adopted by the Committee on 19 December 2007 (CM/Del/Dec(2007)1013 FINAL):
“The Deputies, (...)
1. recalled that these judgments reveal various structural problems in the Russian legal system which, by their nature and scale, severely affect its effectiveness and cause very numerous violations of the Convention an increasing number of which are complained of before the Court;
2. took note, with interest, of various measures adopted or being taken by certain competent authorities to prevent new similar violations and to remedy those that have already occurred by setting up or improving appropriate domestic procedures, measures which remain to be taken;
3. emphasised anew that the problems revealed by the judgments require urgent solutions in order to ensure that the relevant Convention rights are adequately protected at the domestic level, thus preventing an exceedingly high number of similar applications to the Court;
4. invited the competent authorities to continue bilateral consultations with the Secretariat with a view to establishing a proper strategy for adoption of the necessary measures, including the setting up of effective domestic remedies; (...)”
40. The problems underlying the non-enforcement of domestic judgments in Russia and various measures taken or considered by the authorities in the context of the implementation of the Court’s judgments were addressed in detail in the Committee of Ministers’ documents CM/Inf/DH(2006)45 of 1 December 2006 and CM/Inf/DH(2006)19rev3 of 4 June 2007. The latter document presented the progress so far achieved by the Russian authorities, pointed at a number of outstanding questions and proposed further measures with a view to a comprehensive solution of the problem. The main avenues of action proposed were summarised as follows (see CM/Inf/DH(2006)19rev3, cited above, page 1):
“- Improvement of budgetary procedures and of practical implementation of the budget decisions;
- Identifying a specific state authority as a defendant;
- Ensuring effective compensation for delays (indexation, default interest, specific damages, penalties for delays);
- Increasing the effectiveness of domestic remedies for proper enforcement of judicial decisions;
- Improvement of the legal framework governing compulsory execution against the public authorities;
- Ensuring effective liability of civil servants for non-enforcement;
Special consideration is given to possible ways of ensuring coherence of the present execution mechanisms by allowing the Treasury and the bailiffs to act in a complementary manner in their respective fields of competence and under appropriate judicial review. A strong emphasis is also put on possible ways of preventing litigation against the State through improved budgetary proceedings, which would allow the State to timely comply with its pecuniary obligations.”
41. In Recommendation Rec(2004)6 to member states on the improvement of domestic remedies adopted on 12 May 2004, the Committee of Ministers recommended inter alia that:
“(...) member states review, following Court judgments which point to structural or general deficiencies in national law or practice, the effectiveness of the existing domestic remedies and, where necessary, set up effective remedies, in order to avoid repetitive cases being brought before the Court (...)”
42. The Appendix to the Recommendation further stated inter alia:
“(...) Remedies following a “pilot” judgment
13. When a judgment which points to structural or general deficiencies in national law or practice (“pilot case”) has been delivered and a large number of applications to the Court concerning the same problem (“repetitive cases”) are pending or likely to be lodged, the respondent state should ensure that potential applicants have, where appropriate, an effective remedy allowing them to apply to a competent national authority, which may also apply to current applicants. Such a rapid and effective remedy would enable them to obtain redress at national level, in line with the principle of subsidiarity of the Convention system.
14. The introduction of such a domestic remedy could also significantly reduce the Court’s workload. While prompt execution of the pilot judgment remains essential for solving the structural problem and thus for preventing future applications on the same matter, there may exist a category of people who have already been affected by this problem prior to its resolution. (...)
16. In particular, further to a pilot judgment in which a specific structural problem has been found, one alternative might be to adopt an ad hoc approach, whereby the state concerned would assess the appropriateness of introducing a specific remedy or widening an existing remedy by legislation or by judicial interpretation. (...)
18. When specific remedies are set up following a pilot case, governments should speedily inform the Court so that it can take them into account in its treatment of subsequent repetitive cases. (...)”
2. Parliamentary Assembly
43. In Resolution 1516 (2006) on implementation of the European Court’s judgments, adopted on 2 October 2006, the Parliamentary Assembly noted with grave concern the continuing existence in several states of major structural deficiencies which cause large numbers of repetitive findings of violations of the Convention and represent a serious danger to the rule of law in the states concerned. The Assembly listed among those deficiencies some major shortcomings in the judicial organisation and procedures in the Russian Federation, including chronic non-enforcement of domestic judicial decisions delivered against the State (see paragraph 10.2). The Assembly urged the authorities of the States concerned, including the Russian Federation, to resolve the issues of particular importance mentioned in the resolution and to give this action top political priority.
44. In the report of the Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights, the rapporteur, Mr Erik Jurgens, called for an urgent solution to the above-mentioned problems as they affect a very large number of people in Russia. He also warned that the influx of numerous clone cases in the Court was likely to undermine the effectiveness of the Convention mechanism (Doc. 11020). He further stated:
“ 58. The Rapporteur welcomes the frank and open position of most of the Russian officials and institutions he met in Moscow as well as their clear understanding that the above problems put at stake the effectiveness of the Russian judicial system, and indeed, of the State as a whole. It is perhaps indicative that especially the presidents of the Constitutional Court and of the Supreme Court showed a very constructive attitude, as both of them recognized the problems and encouraged the Rapporteur in his endeavours to help find a solution for them.
59. The authorities provided assurances that the most important problems would be addressed as a matter of priority and that appropriate steps would be taken to ensure rapid adoption of reforms required by the European Court’s judgments.
60. The Russian officials’ clear willingness to come to grips with the aforementioned important problems is most welcome. The Rapporteur stresses that the complexity of these issues is such as to require enhanced and concerted efforts of all actors within the Russian legal system.
61. Thorough reform strategies in this respect, however, still remain to be established. In view of the present problems raised in the judgments and others still to come, the Rapporteur has strongly recommended to the authorities to set up a special mechanism of interagency cooperation in the implementation of Strasbourg Court judgments. Constant involvement of Parliament and the Russian delegation to the Assembly in the implementation process is also necessary. The Rapporteur is convinced that his Russian parliamentary colleagues will seriously consider his recommendation to set up a specific mechanism and procedure for parliamentary oversight to implement Strasbourg Court judgments, as well as other relevant proposals made in the draft resolution. The Rapporteur also trusts that the members of the Russian delegation to the Assembly will promote and follow-up the adoption of the specific measures required by certain judgments (for details, see Appendix III, Part III).”
B. United Nations
45. In the preliminary observations following a visit to Russia from 19 to 29 May 2008, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers, Mr Leandro Despouy, voiced “important concerns at the fact that an important percentage of judicial decisions, including those against state officials, were not implemented”. He added that “problems with the implementation of judicial decisions in Russia had contributed to the poor image of the judiciary in the eyes of the population”.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
46. The applicant complained that the authorities’ prolonged failure to comply with the binding and enforceable judgments in his favour violated his right to a court under Article 6 of the Convention and his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which in so far as relevant read as follows:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by {a] ... tribunal...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law...”
A. Parties’ submissions
1. The Government
47. The Government initially argued in their observations that the applicant had not exhausted domestic remedies. However, in their further observations in response to those of the applicant, the Government did not maintain their objection as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
48. The Government also submitted that the applicant could no longer claim to be a victim of the alleged violations: the damage caused by enforcement delays had been compensated by additional indexation awards granted by courts under Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure. The Government supported their submission by reference to certain decisions of the Court (notably Nemakina v. Russia (dec.), no. 14217/04, 10 July 2007, and Derkach v. Russia (dec.), no. 3352/05, 3 May 2007).
49. The Government further argued that the complaints were manifestly ill-founded: in their view, the periods of time from receipt of the necessary documents by the competent authorities to the effective payment of judicial awards had ranged between thirteen days and nine months and were thus reasonable in the light of the Court’s case-law. The Government blamed the applicant for having repeatedly withdrawn the writ of execution concerning the judgment of 17 April 2003 and consecutively sent it to different authorities. The judgment of 4 December 2003 was enforced only six months after its rectification on 9 March 2006. Finally, the judgment of 24 March 2006 was enforced in two steps: on 2 November 2006 in its major part and on 17 August 2007 for the remainder, i.e. only nine months after the partial execution.
50. The Government lastly referred to the complexity of the enforcement proceedings in this case given that several judgments were involved. They also emphasised objective circumstances, such as the complexity of the federal multilevel budgetary system and legislative changes, which had led to delays in enforcement for which the Government were not responsible.
2. The applicant
51. The applicant submitted that he had complained before different State authorities including the Ministry of Finance, Federal Treasury, prosecutor’s office and bailiffs about insufficient regular payments and/or delays in enforcement of judgments in his favour. In his view, the State authorities should also have displayed diligence in this respect, but had failed to take the necessary action. He considered that the surprisingly short delays in the execution of the judgments of 22 May 2007 and 21 August 2007 were presumably a result of the Court’s decision to communicate his application to the Government.
52. As regards the other three judgments, the applicant disagreed with the Government’s calculation of the delays. He argued that an overall 31-month delay in the execution of the judgment of 17 April 2003 was imputable to various authorities; the writ of execution concerning the judgment of 4 December 2003 had remained for 21 months with the Shakhty Directorate of Labour and Social Development without any action being taken, before it applied to the court for correction of an arithmetic error; the judgment of 24 March 2006 remained unenforced, albeit in part, until August 2007. The applicant concluded that he was still a victim of violations of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Admissibility
53. The Court notes that the Government have explicitly dropped their objection as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies by the applicant and will not examine this question.
54. As regards the applicant’s victim status, the Court recalls that under Article 34 of the Convention, “the Court may receive applications from any person ... claiming to be the victim of a violation by one of the High Contracting Parties of the rights set forth in the Convention or the Protocols thereto ...”.
55. It falls first to the national authorities to redress any alleged violation of the Convention. In this regard, the question whether or not the applicant can claim to be a victim of the violation alleged is relevant at all stages of the proceedings under the Convention (see Burdov, cited above, § 30).
56. The Court reiterates that a decision or measure favourable to the applicant, such as the enforcement of a judgment after substantial delay, is not in principle sufficient to deprive him of his status as a “victim”, unless the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded redress for, the breach of the Convention (see Petrushko v. Russia, no. 36494/02, §§ 14-16, 24 February 2005, with further references). Redress so afforded must be appropriate and sufficient, failing which a party can continue to claim to be a victim of the violation (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 181, ECHR 2006-..., and Cocchiarella v. Italy [GC], no. 64886/01, § 72, ECHR 2006-...).
57. The Government argued that domestic courts granted the applicant compensation for delays in enforcement of the judgments in his favour by way of indexation of the initial awards under Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure. The applicant did not contest this fact, but argued that he retained the status of a victim. The Court has thus to consider whether the indexation awards amount to an acknowledgement of the violations of the Convention and constitute appropriate and sufficient redress in this respect.
58. The Court notes on the first point that the decisions referred to by the Government did not explicitly acknowledge violations of the Convention. They awarded compensation on the basis of an objective fact that a certain time had elapsed between the moment when the sums were due and the moment when they were paid. The question would thus arise of whether these decisions acknowledged the alleged violations in substance. However, the Court does not consider it necessary to rule on this issue, given its conclusion below as to whether redress granted was adequate and sufficient.
59. On the latter point, the Court observes that Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure only allows the courts to upgrade the amounts awarded in line with an official price index, thus compensating for depreciation of the national currency. The compensation so awarded thus covered only inflation-related losses but not any further damage sustained by the applicant, either pecuniary or non-pecuniary. The Government did not provide any argument to the contrary. The Court has already considered the issue in other cases concerning Russia and concluded that compensation for inflation losses alone, however accessible and effective in law and practice, does not constitute the adequate and sufficient redress required by the Convention (see Moroko v. Russia, no. 20937/07, § 27, 12 June 2008). As to the earlier decisions quoted by the Government (see paragraph 48 above), the Court reaffirms that they were taken in the specific circumstances of these individual cases (see Moroko, cited above, § 26) and must not be interpreted as establishing any general principle that would contradict the Court’s present conclusion.
60. The Court accordingly concludes that the applicant was not granted adequate and sufficient redress in respect of the alleged violations and can thus still claim to be a victim under Article 34 of the Convention. The Government objection must therefore be dismissed.
61. As regards other arguments submitted by the parties, the Court notes that they raise serious questions that require consideration on the merits. The Court accordingly considers that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
2. Merits
62. It is not disputed by the parties that the five judgments concerned by the present case were fully enforced but with certain delays. The only issue to be decided by the Court is whether these delays violated the Convention.
63. The parties disagreed on this point at least with regard to three of the five judgments: the Government considered that the delays were up to ten months and were in conformity with the Convention; the applicant considered the delays to be much longer and, therefore, in breach of the Convention.
64. Given these diverging positions, the Court considers it appropriate to recall and clarify the main principles established by its case-law that must guide the determination of the relevant issues under the Convention.
(a) General principles
65. The right to a court protected by Article 6 would be illusory if a Contracting State’s domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party. Execution of a judgment given by any court must therefore be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 (see Hornsby v. Greece, 19 March 1997, § 40, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II).
66. An unreasonably long delay in enforcement of a binding judgment may therefore breach the Convention (see Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, ECHR 2002-III). The reasonableness of such delay is to be determined having regard in particular to the complexity of the enforcement proceedings, the applicant’s own behaviour and that of the competent authorities, and the amount and nature of the court award (see Raylyan v. Russia, no. 22000/03, § 31, 15 February 2007).
67. While the Court has due regard to the domestic statutory time-limits set for enforcement proceedings, their non-respect does not automatically amount to a breach of the Convention. Some delay may be justified in particular circumstances but it may not, in any event, be such as to impair the essence of the right protected under Article 6 § 1 (see Burdov, cited above, § 35). Thus, the Court considered, for example, in a recent case concerning Russia, that an overall delay of nine months taken by the authorities to enforce a judgment was not prima facie unreasonable under the Convention (see Moroko, cited above, § 43). Such an assumption does not, however, obviate the need for an assessment in the light of the aforementioned criteria (see paragraph 66 above) and having regard to other relevant circumstances (see Moroko, cited above, §§ 44-45).
68. A person who has obtained a judgment against the State may not be expected to bring separate enforcement proceedings (see Metaxas v. Greece, no. 8415/02, § 19, 27 May 2004). In such cases, the defendant State authority must be duly notified of the judgment and is thus well placed to take all necessary initiatives to comply with it or to transmit it to another competent State authority responsible for execution. This is particularly relevant in a situation where, in view of the complexities and possible overlapping of the execution and enforcement procedures, an applicant may have reasonable doubts about which authority is responsible for the execution or enforcement of the judgment (see Akashev v. Russia, no. 30616/05, § 21, 12 June 2008).
69. A successful litigant may be required to undertake certain procedural steps in order to recover the judgment debt, be it during a voluntary execution of a judgment by the State or during its enforcement by compulsory means (see Shvedov v. Russia, no. 69306/01, § 29–37, 20 October 2005). Accordingly, it is not unreasonable that the authorities request the applicant to produce additional documents, such as bank details, to allow or speed up the execution of a judgment (see, mutatis mutandis, Kosmidis and Kosmidou v. Greece, no. 32141/04, § 24, 8 November 2007). The requirement of the creditor’s cooperation must not, however, go beyond what is strictly necessary and, in any event, does not relieve the authorities of their obligation under the Convention to take timely action of their own motion, on the basis of the information available to them, with a view to honouring the judgment against the State (see Akashev, cited above, § 22). The Court thus considers that the burden to ensure compliance with a judgment against the State lies primarily with the State authorities starting from the date on which the judgment becomes binding and enforceable.
70. The complexity of the domestic enforcement procedure or of the State budgetary system cannot relieve the State of its obligation under the Convention to guarantee to everyone the right to have a binding and enforceable judicial decision enforced within a reasonable time. Nor is it open to a State authority to cite the lack of funds or other resources (such as housing) as an excuse for not honouring a judgment debt (see Burdov, cited above, §35, and Kukalo v. Russia, no. 63995/00, § 49, 3 November 2005). It is for the Contracting States to organise their legal systems in such a way that the competent authorities can meet their obligation in this regard (see mutatis mutandis Comingersoll S.A. v. Portugal [GC], no. 35382/97, § 24, ECHR 2000-IV, and Frydlender v. France [GC], no. 30979/96, § 45, ECHR 2000-VII).
(b) Application of these principles to the present case
71. The Court will consider the delays in the execution of the five judgments concerned in this case on the basis of the above principles.
(i) Judgment of 17 April 2003
72. The Shakhty Town Court’s judgment of 17 April 2003 became binding and enforceable on 9 July 2003 and the defendant authority was or should have been aware of its obligation to pay the applicant the sum awarded as of that date. That the applicant submitted a writ of execution only a month later does not affect the starting point of the authority’s obligation to comply with the judgment. Indeed, he could not be expected to bring any enforcement or other similar proceedings (see paragraph 68 above). Starting from that date, the defendant authority had thus an obligation to take all necessary measures, either on its own or in cooperation with other responsible federal and/or local authorities, to ensure that the necessary funds were made available so as to honour the State’s debt. It appears indeed that the defendant authority had at its disposal all the necessary elements, such as the applicant’s address and bank details, to proceed with the payment at any moment.
73. The time taken by the authorities to comply with a judgment should accordingly be calculated from the moment on which it became final and enforceable, that is, on 9 July 2003, until the moment when the judicial award was paid to the applicant, that is, on 19 August 2005. The time taken to comply with the judgment of 17 April 2003 was thus two years and one month.
74. Such a long delay in payment of a judicial award is on its face incompatible with the Convention requirements stated above and the Court finds no circumstance to justify it.
75. It is noted, in particular, that the enforcement was not of any complexity: the judgment required payment of a sum of money. The applicant made no obstacle to the enforcement. Nor can he be blamed for his attempt to seek relief with the bailiffs and the Federal Treasury after having waited in vain for more than nine months for the defendant’s voluntary compliance with the judgment. On the other hand the Court notes that the writ of execution fruitlessly stayed with various authorities for lengthy periods, notably nine months with the defendant Department, four months with the bailiffs and eleven months with the Federal Treasury. The Court finds no justification for this inaction. The complexity of the multilevel budgetary system referred to by the Government cannot justify the lack of appropriate coordination between the authorities and their inaction during the above periods.
76. The above elements are sufficient for the Court to conclude that the State failed to enforce the judgment of 17 April 2003 within a reasonable time.
(ii) Judgment of 4 December 2003
77. The judgment of 4 December 2003 became final on 15 December 2003 and was enforced on 18 October 2006. The time taken by the authorities to comply with the judgment was two years and ten months. It is true, as pointed out by the Government, that the court modified this judgment twice. The first rectification was made on 14 November 2005 upon the defendant authority’s request to reduce the initial award by RUB 155 (EUR 4). However the need for such a rectification may explain only a tiny fraction of the overall delay, if any. Yet the Government offered no explanation for the almost two years which elapsed between 15 December 2003 and 14 November 2005. Nor did it inform the Court of any measure taken by the defendant authority to enforce the judgment during that period. Even assuming that the authority acted with more diligence at a later stage, such a long delay suffices for the Court to find a violation of the right to have this judgment enforced within a reasonable time.
(iii) Judgment of 24 March 2006
78. The Court finds it beyond any dispute that the judgment of 24 March 2006, which became binding on 22 May 2006, was executed on 2 November 2006, but only in part. The parties also agreed that the full execution of the judgment had only been effected on 17 August 2007.
79. While noting that the authorities acted with relative diligence by paying the awards in their major part within six months, the Court considers that Article 6 imposes an obligation to comply with a binding and enforceable judgment in full. The Court will thus assess the reasonableness of the whole period until full compliance. The time taken by the authorities to comply with the judgment in its entirety was thus one year and almost three months.
80. As it transpires notably from the Government’s submissions and the Shakhty Deputy Prosecutor’s letter of 29 April 2007 submitted by the applicant, the full enforcement of the judgment had not been possible given the absence of appropriate regulations or procedures at the federal level. Indeed, the upgrades decided by the Shakhty Town Court had not been paid to the applicant until the adoption of a specific procedure in that connection by the Ministry of Finance (see paragraph 19 above).
81. However, the Court has not found in the Government’s submissions any reason justifying more than one year’s delay in the adoption by the Ministry of Finance of the new procedure. Nor can the Court attribute the delay to objective difficulties referred to by the Government: the matter appeared to be under the sole control of the Government. In any event, the lack of general regulations or procedures on a federal level cannot per se justify such a long delay in compliance with a binding and enforceable judgment. In the Court’s view, the right to a court would not be effective if the execution of a binding and enforceable judgment in a particular case were made conditional on the adoption by the administration of general procedures or regulations in the area concerned.
82. Finally, as regards the nature of the award, the Government argued that the benefits in question were not the applicant’s only income and were thus of less importance. The Court cannot agree with this argument given that at least some of these awards concerned substantial amounts of compensation for health damage sustained by the applicant at the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster and leading to his life-long disability. In the Court’s view, such awards can by no means be qualified as being marginal or insignificant in nature.
83. In view of these circumstances, the Court concludes that the authorities’ failure for one year and almost three months to fully comply with the judgment of 24 March 2006 also violated the applicant’s right to a court.
(iv) Judgments of 22 May 2007 and 21 August 2007
84. The Court notes that the Shakhty Town Court’s judgments of 22 May 2007 and 21 August 2007 became final on 4 June 2007 and 3 September 2007 respectively; they were enforced on 5 December 2007 and 3 December 2007 respectively. The time taken by the authorities to enforce the judgments was six months and three months respectively.
85. The applicant referred to certain initial difficulties in obtaining enforcement of the former judgment which were swiftly resolved following the communication of his application by the Court to the Government. Be that as it may, the Court is satisfied that the periods of 6 and 3 months respectively taken by the authorities to enforce these judgments do not in themselves appear unreasonable; furthermore the Court finds no particular circumstance showing that these delays impaired the essence of the applicant’s right to a court.
(v) Conclusions
86. In view of the foregoing, the Court concludes that by delaying the execution of the Shakhty Town Court’s judgments of 17 April 2003, 4 December 2003 and 24 March 2006 the authorities failed to respect the applicant’s right to a court. There is accordingly a violation of Article 6 of the Convention.
87. Given that the binding and enforceable judgments created an established right to payment in the applicant’s favour, which should be considered as a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Vasilopoulou v. Greece, no. 47541/99, § 22, 21 March 2002), the authorities’ prolonged failure to comply with these judgments also violated the applicant’s right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions (see Burdov, cited above, § 41). There is accordingly also a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
88. In view of its findings in paragraphs 84-85 above, the Court concludes that there is no violation of Article 6 and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the enforcement of the judgments of 22 May 2007 and 21 August 2007.
II. EXISTENCE OF EFFECTIVE DOMESTIC REMEDIES AS REQUIRED BY ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
89. The applicant did not allege the lack of effective domestic remedies in respect of his complaint about prolonged non-enforcement by the authorities of domestic judgments in his favour. The Court observed nonetheless that alleged ineffectiveness of domestic remedies was being increasingly complained of before the Court in cases concerning non-enforcement or delayed enforcement of domestic judgments. It therefore decided of its own motion to examine this question under Article 13 in the present case and requested the parties to submit observations. Article 13 provides as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The parties’ submissions
90. The applicant did not submit any specific argument on the existence of domestic remedies and their effectiveness. In his earlier observations, he mentioned that he had unsuccessfully submitted his grievances to various authorities, including the Ministry of Finance, Federal Treasury, Prosecutor’s Office and Bailiffs.
91. The Government argued that there were several effective domestic remedies against non-enforcement that had not been tested by the applicant in the present case. Firstly, the Constitution guarantees to everyone judicial protection and the right to challenge State authorities’ acts or inaction in courts. Law no. 4866-1 of 27 April 1993 and Chapter 25 of the Code of Civil Procedure allow such actions or inaction to be condemned by courts, thus opening a way for claiming damages and bringing criminal proceedings under Article 315 of the Criminal Code against those responsible for enforcement delays. An example of case-law was provided: by a decision of 13 July 2007 the Leninskiy District Court of Cheboksary, Republic of Chuvashiya, found inaction by the regional treasury department to be unlawful and ordered payment of the judicial award within one working day.
92. Secondly, the Government submitted that Chapter 59 of the Civil Code provided grounds for claiming both pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage for enforcement delays and that this remedy had proven its effectiveness in practice. Four examples of case-law awarding compensation for non-pecuniary damage were provided or quoted (decision of 23 October 2006 in the case of Khakimovy by the Novo-Savinovskiy District Court of Kazan, Republic of Tatarstan; decisions delivered on unspecified dates in the case of Akuginova and others by the Elista City Court, Republic of Kalmykiya; decision of 3 August 2004 in the case of Butko by the Kirovskiy District Court of Astrakhan; decision of 28 March 2008 in the case of Shubin by the Beloretsk Town Court, Republic of Bashkortostan).
93. Thirdly, the Government referred to Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure and Article 395 of the Civil Code as providing grounds for compensation of pecuniary damage. The former allows index-linking of judicial awards and its application is not conditional on the establishment of fault for delays; several examples of its successful application were provided. The latter allows the claiming of default interest and further compensation for additional pecuniary damage arising from delayed enforcement; two Supreme Court decisions applying this provision in non-enforcement cases in 2002 and 2006 were provided.
94. Lastly, the Government submitted that the Supreme Court had prepared a draft constitutional law introducing a domestic remedy against excessive length of judicial proceedings and delayed enforcement of judgments and that it would shortly be considered by the Government.
95. The Government concluded that Russian law provided for an aggregate of various remedies which should be considered as a whole; they were formulated with clarity and applied in practice as required by Article 13.
B. Court’s assessment
1. General principles
96. The Court recalls that Article 13 gives direct expression to the States’ obligation, enshrined in Article 1 of the Convention, to protect human rights first and foremost within their own legal system. It therefore requires that the States provide a domestic remedy to deal with the substance of an “arguable complaint” under the Convention and to grant appropriate relief (see Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 152, ECHR 2000-XI).
97. The scope of the Contracting States’ obligations under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant’s complaint; the “effectiveness” of a “remedy” within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant. At the same time, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law in the sense either of preventing the alleged violation or its continuation, or of providing adequate redress for any violation that has already occurred. Even if a single remedy does not by itself entirely satisfy the requirements of Article 13, the aggregate of remedies provided for under domestic law may do so (see Kudła, cited above, §§ 157-158, and Wasserman v. Russia (no. 2), no. 21071/05, § 45, 10 April 2008).
98. As regards more particularly length-of-proceedings cases, a remedy designed to expedite the proceedings in order to prevent them from becoming excessively lengthy is the most effective solution (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 183, ECHR 2006-...). Likewise, in cases concerning non-enforcement of judicial decisions, any domestic means to prevent a violation by ensuring timely enforcement is, in principle, of greatest value. However, where a judgment is delivered in favour of an individual against the State, the former should not, in principle, be compelled to use such means (see, mutatis mutandis, Metaxas, cited above, § 19): the burden to comply with such a judgment lies primarily with the State authorities, which should use all means available in the domestic legal system in order to speed up the enforcement, thus preventing violations of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Akashev, cited above, §21-22).
99. States can also choose to introduce only a compensatory remedy, without that remedy being regarded as ineffective. Where such a compensatory remedy is available in the domestic legal system, the Court must leave a wider margin of appreciation to the State to allow it to organise the remedy in a manner consistent with its own legal system and traditions and consonant with the standard of living in the country concerned. The Court is nonetheless required to verify whether the way in which the domestic law is interpreted and applied produces consequences that are consistent with the Convention principles, as interpreted in the light of the Court’s case-law (see Scordino, cited above, § 187-191). The Court has set key criteria for verification of the effectiveness of a compensatory remedy in respect of the excessive length of judicial proceedings. These criteria, which also apply to non-enforcement cases (see Wasserman, cited above, §§ 49 and 51), are as follows:
•an action for compensation must be heard within a reasonable time (see Scordino, cited above, § 195 in fine);
•the compensation must be paid promptly and generally no later than six months from the date on which the decision awarding compensation becomes enforceable (ibid., § 198);
•the procedural rules governing an action for compensation must conform to the principle of fairness guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention (ibid., § 200);
•the rules regarding legal costs must not place an excessive burden on litigants where their action is justified (ibid., § 201);
•the level of compensation must not be unreasonable in comparison with the awards made by the Court in similar cases (ibid., §§ 202-206 and 213).
100. On this last criterion, the Court indicated that, with regard to pecuniary damage, the domestic courts are clearly in a better position to determine the existence and quantum. The situation is, however, different with regard to non-pecuniary damage. There exists a strong but rebuttable presumption that excessively long proceedings will occasion non-pecuniary damage (see Scordino, cited above, §§ 203-204, and Wasserman, cited above, §50). The Court considers this presumption to be particularly strong in the event of excessive delay in enforcement by the State of a judgment delivered against it, given the inevitable frustration arising from the State’s disregard for its obligation to honour its debt and the fact that the applicant has already gone through judicial proceedings and obtained success.
2. Application of the principles to the present case
(a) Preventive remedies
101. The Court recalls that it has already found in several cases that there was no preventive remedy in the Russian legal system which could have expedited the enforcement of a judgment against a State authority (see Lositskiy v. Russia, no. 24395/02, §§ 29-31, 14 December 2006, and Isakov v. Russia, no. 20745/04, § 21-22, 19 June 2008). It found in particular that the bailiffs did not have power to compel the State to pay the judgment debt.
102. The bailiffs’ incapacity to influence in any way the enforcement of the judgments in the applicant’s favour, let alone to bring him relief, was also demonstrated in the present case. In April and June 2004 enforcement proceedings were instituted by bailiffs in respect of the judgments of 14 April and 4 December 2003. In July 2004 they were discontinued without bringing any result. The Rostov Regional Directorate of the Ministry of Justice informed the applicant by a letter of 12 July 2004 that the bailiffs did not have power to seize funds from the debtor authority’s main bank account (лицевой счет), while its settlements account (расчетный счет), on which bailiffs could seize funds, contained none.
103. The Government further considered that another remedy provided for by Chapter 25 of the Code of Civil Procedure was capable of producing a preventive effect. Yet the Court has already assessed its effectiveness and concluded that a judicial appeal against the debtor authority’s inaction would yield a declaratory judgment reiterating what was in any event evident from the original judgment, namely that the State was to honour its debt (see Moroko, cited above, § 25). As to courts’ capacity to order remedial action under Article 258 of the Code of Civil Procedure, this new judgment would not bring the applicant closer to his desired goal, that is the actual payment of the judicial award (see Jasiūnienė v. Lithuania (dec.), no. 41510/98, 24 October 2000, and Plotnikovy v. Russia, no. 43883/02, § 16, 24 February 2005). It is indicative that, in the only example of application of this provision submitted to the Court (see paragraph 91 above), the Government did not specify if the defendant authority had effectively complied with the domestic court’s order to pay the judicial award within one working day. The Court therefore considers that this remedy does not allow effective prevention of a violation on account of non-enforcement of a judgment against the State.
104. As to Article 315 of the Criminal Code mentioned by the Government and the wide array of sanctions it provides for, the Court does not exclude that such coercive action may contribute to change the attitude of those who unacceptably delay the execution of judgments. The Court has, however, seen no evidence of its effectiveness in practice. On the contrary, no use of this provision was made despite the applicant’s repeated complaints to the competent authorities, including prosecutors (see paragraph 80 above). In these circumstances, the Court cannot consider this provision to be effective both in theory and in practice as required by Article 13 of the Convention.
(b) Compensatory remedies
(i) Pecuniary damage
105. The Court has also considered on several occasions the question of the effectiveness of certain compensatory remedies relied on by the Government.
106. As regards the compensation of pecuniary damage for delays in enforcement, the Government referred to the possibilities offered by Article 395 of the Civil Code and by Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure. As regards the former, the Court has been provided with little evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of this remedy. The two judgments quoted by the Government are far from showing the existence of a widespread and consistent case-law in this regard. On the contrary, in one of the two cases mentioned lower courts thrice rejected the claim for compensation lodged under Article 395 on the ground that the creditor had not proved that the debtor institution had used the unpaid sum for itself and was thus responsible under that provision. In this connection the Court refers to its finding that a remedy the use of which is conditional on the debtor’s fault is impracticable in cases of non-enforcement of judgments by the State (see Moroko, cited above, § 29, and paragraphs 111-113 below).
107. The situation is different as regards the remedy provided for by Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure allowing index-linking of monetary awards. The Court notes that individuals, like the applicant, were frequently awarded compensation for inflation losses on the basis of Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure. Of particular importance is the fact emphasised by the Government and illustrated by specific examples that this compensation was calculated and awarded in a straightforward procedure without requiring the authorities’ fault or unlawful action to be evidenced by the plaintiff. The Court further notes that this compensation is calculated on the basis of an objective official index of retail prices, which actually reflects the depreciation of the national currency (compare Akkuş v. Turkey, 9 July 1997, §§ 30-31, Reports 1997-IV, and Aka v. Turkey, 23 September 1998, §§ 48-51, Reports 1998-VI). This remedy is thus capable of adequately compensating inflation losses. That the applicant was awarded such compensation on numerous occasions also tends to confirm that the provision is applicable by courts in non-enforcement cases.
108. On the other hand, the payment of such compensation awards was delayed in the present case, thus severely undermining the effectiveness of this remedy in practice. The Court accepts that the authorities need time in which to make payment. It recalls, however, that the period should not generally exceed six months from the date on which the decision awarding compensation becomes enforceable (see Scordino, cited above, § 198). Having regard to all the material at its disposal, the Court is not convinced that this requirement is systematically satisfied in respect of payment of compensation awarded by domestic courts under Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure. However, even assuming that the requirement of speedy payment of such compensation is met, this remedy alone would not provide sufficient redress as it can only compensate damage resulting from monetary depreciation (see paragraph 59 above).
(ii) Non-pecuniary damage
109. The Court has next to consider whether Chapter 59 of the Civil Court referred to by the Government constitutes an effective remedy for compensation of non-pecuniary damage in the event of non-enforcement of a judicial decision. The Court recalls that it has already assessed the effectiveness of this remedy in several recent cases in the context of both Article 35 § 1 and Article 13 of the Convention.
110. The Court found that, while the possibility of such compensation was not totally excluded, this remedy did not offer reasonable prospects of success, being notably conditional on the establishment of the authorities’ fault (see Moroko, cited above, §§ 28-29). The Government did not contest in the present case that compensation under Chapter 59 was subject to this condition, unlike the indexation under Article 208 of the Code of Civil Procedure (see paragraph 107 above).
111. The Court refers in this respect to a very strong, albeit rebuttable, presumption that an excessive delay in execution of a binding and enforceable judgment will occasion non-pecuniary damage (see paragraph 100 above). That compensation of non-pecuniary damage in non-enforcement cases is conditional on the respondent authority’s fault is difficult to reconcile with this presumption. Indeed, enforcement delays found by the Court are not necessarily due to failings of the respondent authority in a given case but may be attributable to deficient mechanisms at the federal and/or local level, not least to excessive complexities and formalism of the budgetary and financial procedures which considerably delay transfers of funds between responsible authorities and their subsequent payment to final beneficiaries.
112. The Court notes that the Civil Code lists a very limited number of situations in which compensation for non-pecuniary damage is recoverable irrespective of the respondent’s fault (notably Articles 1070 § 1 and 1100). Neither excessively lengthy proceedings nor delays in enforcement of judicial decisions appear in this list. The Code provides, in addition, for damage caused by the administration of justice to be compensated if the fault of the judge is established by a final judicial conviction (Article 1070 § 2).
113. Against this background, the Constitutional Court held in 2001 that the constitutional right to compensation by the State for the damage caused by procedural acts, including excessively lengthy proceedings, should not be tied in with the individual fault of a judge. Referring, inter alia, to Article 6 of the Convention, the Constitutional Court held that Parliament should legislate on the grounds and procedure for such compensation. The Court notes, however, that no legislation has yet been enacted to that effect.
114. The Government argued nonetheless that Chapter 59 had been successfully applied in practice, quoting four specific examples of domestic case-law. The Court notes that the same examples have been quoted by the Government in other similar cases and confirms its view that they appear as exceptional and isolated instances rather than evidence of established and consistent case-law. They cannot therefore alter the Court’s earlier conclusion that the remedy in issue is not effective in both theory and practice.
115. Moreover, the Court notes that even in such exceptional cases of application of Chapter 59, the level of the compensation awarded for non-pecuniary damage was at times unreasonably low in comparison with the awards made by the Court in similar non-enforcement cases. For instance, in the case of Butko quoted by the Government, the plaintiff received RUB 2,000 (EUR 55) in respect of non-pecuniary damage (decision of 3 August 2004). The same amount was awarded under this head to V. M. in the case of Akuginova and others also mentioned by the Government (decision of 22 January 2006). The Court further recalls that it has already found in two other cases that the amounts awarded to the applicants in respect of non-pecuniary damage incurred through belated enforcement of judgments were manifestly unreasonable in the light of the Court’s case-law (see Wasserman, cited above, § 56, and Gayvoronskiy v. Russia, no. 13519/02, § 39, 25 March 2008). The compensation was, in addition, awarded in excessively lengthy proceedings in the former case and was itself paid with considerable delay in the latter.
116. Having regard to the aforementioned shortcomings, the Court considers that the remedy provided for by Chapter 59 of the Civil Code cannot be considered as effective both in theory and in practice as required by Article 13 of the Convention.
(c) Conclusion
117. The Court concludes that there was no effective domestic remedy, either preventive or compensatory, that allows for adequate and sufficient redress in the event of violations of the Convention on account of prolonged non-enforcement of judicial decisions delivered against the State or its entities. There is accordingly a violation of Article 13 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
118. Relying on Article 14 of the Convention, the applicant complained of discrimination on account on the authorities’ alleged failure to apply the Compulsory Social Insurance Act 1998 (No.125-ФЗ) to the liquidators of the Chernobyl disaster on the same terms as to other professional groups. He submitted in particular that he had not received default interest as provided for by this Act. The Government argued that this question concerned the application of domestic law and was solely within the competence of the domestic courts.
119. The Court notes that the Shakhty Town Court’s judgment of 4 December 2003 granted the applicant’s claim under the aforementioned Act (see paragraph 14 above). In any event, the applicant’s complaint about alleged discrimination, should first have been submitted to the domestic courts under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention. The applicant failed to demonstrate that he had exhausted domestic remedies in this regard. Nor did he substantiate his allegation before the Court. The Court therefore finds no appearance of a violation of Article 14 and rejects this complaint.
IV. ALLEGED SHORTFALL IN PAYMENT OF JUST SATISFATION DUE UNDER THE COURT’S JUDGMENT OF 7 MAY 2002
120. The applicant also complained about the authorities’ failure to pay him the full amount of just satisfaction awarded by the Court’s judgment of 7 May 2002. According to his calculation, the sum of EUR 3,000 awarded was equivalent at the date of payment to RUB 94,981.50, while he only received RUB 92,724.60. He accordingly claimed a shortfall of RUB 2,256.90.
121. The Court reiterates that under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention, the supervision of the execution of its judgments is entrusted to the Committee of Ministers (see paragraphs 10-11 above). The Court has no competence to examine this complaint, which should have been submitted to the Committee of Ministers (see Haase and others v. Germany (dec.), no. 34499/04, 7 February 2008).
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
122. The Court notes at the outset that non-enforcement or delayed enforcement of domestic judgments constitutes a recurrent problem in Russia that has led to numerous violations of the Convention. The Court has already found such violations in more than 200 judgments since the first such finding in the Burdov case in 2002. The Court therefore finds it timely and appropriate to consider this second case brought by the same applicant under Article 46 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Article 46 Binding force and execution of judgments
1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
A. The parties’ submissions
123. The applicant submitted that the Russian authorities’ recurrent failure to enforce domestic judicial decisions delivered against them constituted a systemic problem as demonstrated by repeated non-enforcement of such decisions in his case.
124. The Government argued that no such problem existed in respect of either enforcement of judgments or domestic remedies. They argued that the Constitutional Court had not contested the existence of a special procedure for the execution of judicial decisions against the State (judgment of 14 July 2005). There were further specific regulations governing payment of benefits to Chernobyl victims. In 2007 considerable budgetary allocations were additionally made to pay outstanding debts under domestic judgments and the actual needs in such funds were reflected in the 2007 budget. The Government concluded that there were clear mechanisms for enforcement of such decisions, notably in respect of Chernobyl victims. The complexity of these mechanisms was attributable to the multilevel structure of the budgetary system and to the need for coordination between federal and local authorities. The Government submitted, in addition, some statistical information about enforcement of judgments provided by federal ministries and bailiffs.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. General principles
125. The Court recalls that Article 46 of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of Article 1, imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to implement, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, appropriate general and/or individual measures to secure the right of the applicant which the Court found to be violated. Such measures must also be taken in respect of other persons in the applicant’s position, notably by solving the problems that have led to the Court’s findings (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000 VIII; Christine Goodwin v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 28957/95, § 120, ECHR 2002 VI; Lukenda v. Slovenia, no. 23032/02, § 94, ECHR 2005-X; and S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom [GC], nos. 30562/04 and 30566/04, § 134, ECHR 2008 ...). This obligation was consistently emphasised by the Committee of Ministers in the supervision of the execution of the Court’s judgments (see, among many authorities, Interim Resolutions DH(97)336 in cases concerning the length of proceedings in Italy; DH(99)434 in cases concerning the action of the security forces in Turkey; ResDH(2001)65 in the case of Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy; ResDH(2006)1 in the cases of Ryabykh and Volkova).
126. In order to facilitate effective implementation of its judgments along these lines, the Court may adopt a pilot-judgment procedure allowing it to clearly identify in a judgment the existence of structural problems underlying the violations and to indicate specific measures or actions to be taken by the respondent state to remedy them (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 and the operative part, ECHR 2004-V, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC] no. 35014/97, ECHR 2006-... §§ 231-239 and the operative part). This adjudicative approach is however pursued with due respect for the Convention organs’ respective functions: it falls to the Committee of Ministers to evaluate the implementation of individual and general measures under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski v. Poland (friendly settlement) [GC], no. 31443/96, § 42, ECHR 2005-IX, and Hutten-Czapska v. Poland (friendly settlement) [GC], no. 35014/97, § 42, 28 April 2008).
127. Another important aim of the pilot-judgment procedure is to induce the respondent State to resolve large numbers of individual cases arising from the same structural problem at the domestic level, thus implementing the principle of subsidiarity which underpins the Convention system. Indeed, the Court’s task, as defined by Article 19, that is to “ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the High Contracting Parties in the Convention and the Protocols thereto”, is not necessarily best achieved by repeating the same findings in large series of cases (see, mutatis mutandis, E.G. v. Poland (dec.), no. 50425/99, § 27, 23 September 2008, § 27). The object of the pilot-judgment procedure is to facilitate the speediest and most effective resolution of a dysfunction affecting the protection of the Convention rights in question in the national legal order (see Wolkenberg and Others v. Poland (dec.), no. 50003/99, § 34, ECHR 2007-... (extracts)). While the respondent State’s action should primarily aim at the resolution of such a dysfunction and at the introduction, where appropriate, of effective domestic remedies in respect of the violations in question, it may also include ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers in line with the Convention requirements. The Court may decide to adjourn examination of all similar cases, thus giving the respondent State an opportunity to settle them in such various ways (see, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski, cited above, § 198, and Xenides-Arestis v. Turkey, no. 46347/99, § 50, 22 December 2005).
128. If, however, the respondent State fails to adopt such measures following a pilot judgment and continues to violate the Convention, the Court will have no choice but to resume examination of all similar applications pending before it and to take them to judgment so as to ensure effective observance of Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, E.G., cited above, § 28).
2. Application of the principles to the present case
(a) Application of the pilot-judgment procedure
129. The Court notes that the present case can be distinguished in some respects from certain previous “pilot cases”, such as Broniowski and Hutten-Czapska, for example. In fact, persons in the same position as the applicant do not necessarily belong to “an identifiable class of citizens” (compare Broniowski, cited above, § 189, and Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 229). Furthermore, the two aforementioned judgments were the first to identify new structural problems at the root of numerous similar follow-up cases, while the present case comes to be considered after some 200 judgments have amply highlighted the non-enforcement problem in Russia.
130. Notwithstanding these differences, the Court considers it appropriate to apply the pilot-judgment procedure in this case, given notably the recurrent and persistent nature of the underlying problems, a large number of people affected by them in Russia and the urgent need to grant them speedy and appropriate redress at the domestic level.
(b) Existence of a practice incompatible with the Convention
131. The Court finds, at the outset, that the violations found in the present judgment were neither prompted by an isolated incident, nor attributable to a particular turn of events in this case, but were rather the consequence of regulatory shortcomings and/or administrative conduct of the authorities in the execution of binding and enforceable judgments ordering monetary payments by State authorities (compare Broniowski, cited above, § 189, and Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 229).
132. Although the Government denied such a situation in their additional observations, their submissions in the present case appear to run against an almost undisputed recognition at both domestic and international level of the existence of structural problems in this field (see paragraphs 25 and 38-45 above). The problems appear, in addition, to have been acknowledged by the Russian competent authorities (see notably CM/Inf/DH(2006)45, cited above) and are being repeatedly emphasised by the Committee of Ministers. The Committee’s recent decisions noted, in particular, that the structural problems in question in the Russian legal system severely affected, by their nature and scale, its effectiveness and caused very numerous violations of the Convention (see paragraph 39 above).
133. The important concerns voiced and the findings made by various authorities and institutions are consonant with some 200 judgments of the Court which highlighted the multiple aspects of the underlying structural problems, which do not affect only Chernobyl victims, as in the present case, but also other large groups of the Russian population, including particularly some vulnerable groups. The State has thus been very frequently found to considerably delay the execution of judicial decisions ordering payment of social benefits such as pensions or child allowances, of compensation for damage sustained during military service or of compensation for wrongful prosecution. The Court cannot ignore the fact that approximately 700 cases concerning similar facts are currently pending before it against Russia and that some of the cases, like the present one, lead the Court to find a second set of violations of the Convention in respect of the same applicants (see Wasserman (no. 2), cited above, and Kukalo v. Russia (no. 2), no. 11319/04, 24 July 2008). Moreover, the victims of non-enforcement or delayed enforcement dispose of no effective remedy, either preventive or compensatory, that allows for adequate and sufficient redress at the domestic level (see paragraphs 101-117 above).
134. The Court’s findings, taken in conjunction with the other material in its possession, thus clearly indicate that such breaches reflect a persistent structural dysfunction. The Court notes with grave concern that the violations found in the present judgment occurred several years after its first judgment of 7 May 2002, notwithstanding Russia’s obligation under Article 46 to adopt, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, the necessary remedial and preventive measures, both at individual and general levels. The Court notes in particular that non-compliance with one of the judgments in the applicant’s favour lasted until August 2007, not least because of the competent authorities’ failure to adopt the necessary procedures (see paragraphs 80-81 above).
135. In view of the foregoing, the Court concludes that the present situation must be qualified as a practice incompatible with the Convention (see Bottazzi v. Italy [GC], no. 34884/97, § 22, ECHR 1999-V).
(c) General measures
136. The Court notes that the problems at the basis of the violations of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 found in this case are large-scale and complex in nature. Indeed, they do not stem from a specific legal or regulatory provision or a particular lacuna in Russian law. They accordingly require the implementation of comprehensive and complex measures, possibly of a legislative and administrative character, involving various authorities at both federal and local level. Subject to monitoring by the Committee of Ministers, the respondent State remains free to choose the means by which it will discharge its legal obligation under Article 46 of the Convention, provided that such means are compatible with the conclusions set out in the Court’s judgment (see Scozzari and Giunta, cited above, § 249).
137. The Court notes that the adoption of such measures has been thoroughly considered by the Committee of Ministers in cooperation with the Russian competent authorities (see decisions and documents cited in paragraphs 39-40 above). The Committee’s decisions and documents show that although the implementation of the necessary measures is far from being completed, further actions are being considered or taken in this respect (see the main avenues outlined in paragraph 40 above). The Court notes that this process raises a number of complex legal and practical issues which go, in principle, beyond the Court’s judicial function. It will thus abstain in these circumstances from indicating any specific general measure to be taken. The Committee of Ministers is better placed and equipped to monitor the necessary reforms to be adopted by Russia in this respect. The Court therefore leaves it to the Committee of Ministers to ensure that the Russian Federation, in accordance with its obligations under the Convention, adopts the necessary measures consistent with the Court’s conclusions in the present judgment.
138. The Court observes, however, that the situation is different as regards the violation of Article 13 on account of the lack of effective domestic remedies. In accordance with Article 46 of the Convention, the Court’s findings in paragraphs 101-117 above clearly require the setting up of an effective domestic remedy or a combination of remedies allowing adequate and sufficient redress to be granted to large numbers of people affected by the violations in question. It appears highly unlikely in the light of the Court’s conclusions that such an effective remedy can be set up without changing the domestic legislation on certain specific points.
139. In this respect, the Court attaches considerable importance to the findings of the Russian Constitutional Court, which has invited Parliament since January 2001 to set up a procedure for compensation of damage arising, inter alia, from excessively lengthy proceedings. Of particular importance is the finding made by reference notably to Article 6 of the Convention that such compensation should not be conditional on the establishment of fault (see paragraph 32-33 above). The Court also welcomes the legislative initiative recently taken by the Supreme Court in this area and notes the bills tabled in Parliament on 30 September 2008 with a view to introducing remedies in respect on the violations in question (see paragraphs 34-36 above). The Court notes with interest the reference to the Convention standards as a basis for determining compensation for damage, and that the average amounts of compensation for delayed enforcement were calculated by reference to the Court’s case-law (see paragraphs 35 and 36 above).
140. It is not, however, for the Court to assess the overall adequacy of the ongoing reform, nor to specify what would be the most appropriate way to set up the necessary domestic remedies (see Hutten-Czapska, cited above, § 239). The State may either amend the existing range of legal remedies or add new remedies to secure genuinely effective redress for the violation of the Convention rights concerned (see Lukenda, cited above, § 98; Xenides-Arestis, cited above, § 40). It is also for the State to ensure, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, that a new remedy or a combination of remedies respects both in theory and in practice the requirements of the Convention as set out in the present judgment (see notably §§ 96-100). In so doing, the authorities may also have due regard to the Committee of Ministers’ Recommendation Rec(2004)6 to member states on the improvement of domestic remedies.
141. The Court accordingly concludes that the respondent State must introduce a remedy which secures genuinely effective redress for the violations of the Convention on account of the State authorities’ prolonged failure to comply with judicial decisions delivered against the State or its entities. Such a remedy must conform to the Convention principles as laid down notably in the present judgment and be available within six months from the date on which the present judgment becomes final (compare Xenides-Arestis, cited above, § 40 and point 5 of the operative part).
(d) Redress to be granted in similar cases
142. The Court recalls that one of the aims of the pilot-judgment procedure is to allow the speediest possible redress to be granted at the domestic level to the large numbers of people suffering from the structural problem identified in the pilot judgment (see paragraph 127 above). It may thus be decided in the pilot judgment that the proceedings in all cases stemming from the same structural problem be adjourned pending the implementation of the relevant measures by the respondent State. The Court considers it appropriate to adopt a similar approach following the present judgment, while differentiating between the cases already pending before the Court and those that could be brought in the future.
(i) Applications lodged after the delivery of the present judgment
143. The Court will adjourn the proceedings on all new applications lodged with the Court after the delivery of the present judgment, in which the applicants complain solely of non-enforcement and/or delayed enforcement of domestic judgments ordering monetary payments by State authorities. The adjournment will be effective for a period of one year after the present judgment will become final. The applicants in these cases would be informed accordingly.
(ii) Applications lodged before the delivery of the present judgment
144. The Court decides, however, to follow a different course of action in respect of the applications lodged before the delivery of the judgment. In the Court’s view, it would be unfair if the applicants in such cases, who have allegedly been suffering for years of continuing violations of their right to a court and sought relief in this Court, were compelled yet again to resubmit their grievances with the domestic authorities, be it on the grounds of a new remedy or otherwise.
145. The Court therefore considers that the respondent State must grant adequate and sufficient redress, within one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final, to all victims of non-payment or unreasonably delayed payment by State authorities of a domestic judgment debt in their favour who lodged their applications with the Court before the delivery of the present judgment and whose applications were communicated to the Government under Rule 54 § 2(b) of the Rules of the Court. It is recalled that delays in the enforcement of judgments should be calculated and assessed by reference to the Convention requirements and, notably, in accordance with the criteria as defined in the present judgment (see in particular paragraphs 66-67 and 73 above). In the Court’s view, such redress may be achieved through implementation proprio motu by the authorities of an effective domestic remedy in these cases or through ad hoc solutions such as friendly settlements with the applicants or unilateral remedial offers in line with the Convention requirements (see paragraph 127 above).
146. Pending the adoption of domestic remedial measures by the Russian authorities, the Court decides to adjourn adversarial proceedings in all these cases for one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final. This decision is without prejudice to the Court’s power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list following a friendly settlement between the parties or the resolution of the matter by other means in accordance with Articles 37 or 39 of the Convention.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
147. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
148. The applicant claimed a global sum of EUR 40,000 in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage. He referred to sufferings caused by the State’s repeated and persistent failure to comply with the domestic judgments notwithstanding his first successful application to the Court. He supported his claim for pecuniary damage by the authorities’ alleged failure to pay him default interest under the Compulsory Social Insurance Act 1998 (see paragraph 118 above).
149. The Government submitted that the applicant had suffered no pecuniary damage and that a finding of a violation would provide adequate just satisfaction for any damage sustained. They referred to certain non-enforcement cases in which the Court had either awarded modest amounts (Plotnikovy v. Russia, no. 43883/02, § 34, 24 February 2005) in respect of non-pecuniary damage or decided that the finding of a violation was sufficient (Poznakhirina v. Russia, no. 25964/02, 24 February 2005; Shapovalova v. Russia, no. 2047/03, 5 October 2006; Shestopalova and Others v. Russia, no. 39866/02, 17 November 2005; and Bobrova v. Russia, no. 24654/03, 17 November 2005).
150. The Court recalls that it has rejected the applicant’s complaint about non-payment of default interest under the Compulsory Social Insurance Act 1998 (see paragraph 119 above); it therefore also rejects the applicant’s claim for pecuniary damage in this regard.
151. As regards non-pecuniary damage, the Court accepts that the applicant suffered mental distress and frustration on account of the violations found. The Court furthermore considers that the question is ready for decision and may be considered in the present judgment without waiting for the adoption of general measures as decided above (see paragraph 141 above).
152. The Court cannot agree with the Government that a finding of a violation would provide adequate just satisfaction. The Court refers in this respect to a very strong presumption that the authorities’ non-compliance or delayed compliance with a binding and enforceable judgment will occasion non-pecuniary damage (see paragraphs 100 and 111 above). It transpires clearly from the great majority of its judgments that such violations of the Convention give rise, in principle, to frustration and distress that cannot be compensated by the mere finding of a violation.
153. Against this background, the cases referred to by the Government appear rather exceptional. Indeed, the Court’s position in these cases may be explained by their very specific circumstances, not least by the small size of domestic court awards (less than EUR 100 in most of the cases) and the marginal significance of the awards in relation to the applicants’ incomes (see Poznakhirina, cited above, § 35).
154. The Court recalls that it determines the size of awards for non-pecuniary damage taking into account such factors as the applicant’s age, personal income, the nature of the domestic court awards, the length of the enforcement proceedings and other relevant aspects (see Plotnikovy, cited above, §34). The applicant’s health is also taken into account, as well as the number of the judgments that failed to be properly and/or timeously enforced. All these factors may affect in various degrees the Court’s award in respect of non-pecuniary damage and even lead, exceptionally, to no award at all. At the same time, it is demonstrated rather clearly by the Court’s case-law that such awards are, in principle, directly proportionate to the period during which a binding and enforceable judgment remained unenforced.
155. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court recalls that by the judgment of 7 May 2002 it awarded the same applicant EUR 3,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage sustained on account of enforcement delays ranging between almost one and three years within the Court’s jurisdiction and concerning three domestic judgments (see Burdov, cited above, §§36 and 47).
156. In the instant case the same applicant suffered from comparable enforcement delays in respect of similar judicial awards under three other domestic judgments. Accordingly, the violations found by the Court would, in principle, call for a just satisfaction award equal or very close to the one decided by the judgment of 7 May 2002. The Court will, in addition, bear in mind that distress and frustration arising from non-enforcement of domestic judgments may be heightened by the existence of a practice incompatible with the Convention since it seriously undermines, as a matter of principle, the citizens’ confidence in the judicial system. This factor has however to be carefully balanced against the respondent State’s attitude and efforts to combat such a practice with a view to meeting its obligations under the Convention (see paragraph 137 above). The Court must also take account of additional special circumstances in the present case. Indeed, it must be accepted that the applicant’s distress and frustration were exacerbated by the authorities’ persistent failure to honour their debts under the domestic judgments notwithstanding the first finding of violations by the Court in his case. As a result, the applicant had no choice but again to seek relief through time-consuming international litigation before the Court. In view of this important element, the Court considers that an increased award would be appropriate in respect of non-pecuniary damage in the present case.
157. Having regard to the foregoing and making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards the applicant EUR 6,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
158. The applicant did not claim any compensation for costs and expenses. The Court therefore makes no award under this head.
C. Default interest
159. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares admissible the complaint concerning the authorities’ prolonged failure to comply with binding and enforceable judgments in the applicant’s favour and the remainder of the applicant’s complaints inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the State’s prolonged failure to enforce three domestic judgments ordering monetary payments by the authorities to the applicant;
3. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the enforcement of the judgments of 22 May 2007 and 21 August 2007;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention on account of the lack of effective domestic remedies in respect of non-enforcement or delayed enforcement of judgments in the applicant’s favour;
5. Holds that the above violations originated in a practice incompatible with the Convention which consists in the State’s recurrent failure to honour judgment debts and in respect of which aggrieved parties have no effective domestic remedy;
6. Holds that the respondent State must set up, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, an effective domestic remedy or combination of such remedies which secures adequate and sufficient redress for non-enforcement or delayed enforcement of domestic judgments in line with the Convention principles as established in the Court’s case-law;
7. Holds that the respondent State must grant such redress, within one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final, to all victims of non-payment or unreasonably delayed payment by State authorities of a judgment debt in their favour who lodged their applications with the Court before the delivery of the present judgment and whose applications were communicated to the Government under Rule 54 § 2(b) of the Rules of the Court;
8. Holds that pending the adoption of the above measures, the Court will adjourn, for one year from the date on which the judgment becomes final, the proceedings in all cases concerning solely the non-enforcement and/or delayed enforcement of domestic judgments ordering monetary payments by the State authorities, without prejudice to the Court’s power at any moment to declare inadmissible any such case or to strike it out of its list following a friendly settlement between the parties or the resolution of the matter by other means in accordance with Articles 37 or 39 of the Convention;
9. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, EUR 6,000 (six thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into Russian Roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
10. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 January 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione dell’ Art. 6; violazione di P1-1; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 6; nessuna violazione di P1-1; Violazione dell’ Art. 13; Stato rispondente deve prendere misure individuali; Stato Rispondente deve prendere misure di carattere generale; danno morale - assegnazione; danno Materiale - richiesta respinta
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA BURDOV C. RUSSIA (N.RO 2)
(Richiesta n. 33509/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
15 gennaio 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Burdov c. Russia (n. 2),
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
ed André Wampach, Cancelliere di Sezione Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 16 dicembre 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 33509/04) contro la Federazione russa depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, il Sig. A. T. B. (“il richiedente”), il 15 luglio 2004.
2. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra V. Milinchuk, Rappresentante precedente della Federazione russa presso la Corte e dal Sig. G. Matyushkin, Rappresentante della Federazione russa presso la Corte.
3. Il richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 dell’ inosservanza delle autorità di sentenze consegnate da tribunali nazionali a suo favore.
4. Il 22 novembre 2007 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di comunicare l'azione di reclamo del richiedente al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
5. Il 3 luglio 2008 la Camera decise, sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2 (c) degli Articoli di Corte, di accordare la priorità di causa sotto l’Articolo 41 ed inoltre di invitare le parti a presentare osservazioni scritte sulla richiesta qui sopra. La Camera decise inoltre di informare le parti che stava considerando l'appropriatezza di applicare una procedura di sentenza-pilota alla causa (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 e la parte operativa, ECHR 2004-V, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC] n. 35014/97, ECHR 2006 -... §§ 231-239 e la parte operativa). Il richiedente offrì ulteriori osservazioni l’11 agosto 2008 ed il Governo il 26 settembre 2008.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente, il Sig. A. T. B. è un cittadino russo che nacque nel 1952 e vive a Shakhty, nella regione di Rostov della Federazione russa.
7. Il 1 ottobre 1986 il richiedente fu chiamato con le autorità militari a prendere parte ad operazioni d’emergenza nel sito del disastro dell’impianto nucleare di Chernobyl. Il richiedente prese parte alle operazioni sino all’ 11 gennaio 1987 e, di conseguenza, subì una grande esposizione ad emissioni radioattive. A lui sono stati concessi vari sussidi sociali in questo collegamento.
8. Considerando che le autorità Statali competenti non sono riusciti a pagare questi sussidi in pieno e nel tempo dovuto, il richiedente li chiamò in giudizio ripetutamente presso tribunali nazionali dal 1997 in avanti. I tribunali accolsero ripetutamente le rivendicazioni del richiedente ma un certo numero delle loro sentenze rimase non esecutivo per diversi periodi di tempo.
A. la sentenza della Corte del 7 maggio 2002 in Burdov c. Russia e ulteriori sviluppi
1. Le sentenze della Corte
9. Il 20 marzo 2000 il richiedente prima si lamentò di fronte alla Corte della non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali (richiesta n. 59498/00). Nella sua sentenza del 7 maggio 2002, la Corte ha trovato che le decisioni della Corte Urbana di Shakhty del 3 marzo 1997, del 21 maggio 1999 e del 9 marzo 2000 erano rimaste completamente non esecutive o in parte almeno sino al 5 marzo 2001, quando il Ministero delle Finanze prese la decisione di pagare in pieno il debito dovuto al richiedente. La Corte sostenne di conseguenza che c'erano state violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa dell'insuccesso delle autorità per anni nel prendere le misure necessarie per attenersi a queste decisioni (Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, §§ 37-38 ECHR 2002-III).
2. Decisione ResDH(2004)85 del Comitato dei Ministri riguardo alla sentenza della Corte del 7 maggio 2002
10. Sotto i termini dell’ Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione, la sentenza della Corte del 7 maggio 2002 in Burdov c. Russia fu trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri per la soprintendenza della sua esecuzione. Il Comitato invitò il Governo ad informarlo delle misure che erano state prese come conseguenza della sentenza della Corte del 7 maggio 2002, avendo riguardo all'obbligo della Federazione russa sotto l’Articolo 46 § 1 di attenervisi. Il 22 dicembre 2004 il Comitato adottò la Decisione ResDH(2004)85 in questa causa. Le misure prese dalle autorità russe sono state riassunte dal Governo nell'appendice di questa Decisione:
“(...) Con riguardo a misure individuali, gli importi dovuti sotto le decisioni giudiziali nazionali sono stati pagati al richiedente il 5 marzo 2001. (...) Successivamente, una nuova indicizzazione della retribuzione mensile fu ordinata dalla Corte Civica di Shakhty l’11 luglio 2003 (definitiva il 1 ottobre 2003). Le autorità sociali continuano ad attenersi alle decisioni giudiziali nazionali pagando regolarmente le somme assegnate.
In oltre, le misure generali seguenti furono adottate dalle autorità russe per attenersi alla sentenza della Corte europea.
a) Risoluzione di cause simili
All'inizio, il governo pagò gli arretrati accumulati come risultato della non-esecuzione, come nella presente causa, di sentenze nazionali che ordinavano il pagamento del risarcimento ed assegni per le vittime di Chernobyl nella posizione del richiedente (un totale di 2,846 milioni di rubli fu pagato fra gennaio ed ottobre 2002).
5 128 altre sentenze nazionali riguardo l'indicizzazione degli assegni per le vittime di Chernobyl furono eseguite dalle autorità.
Il governo ha migliorato anche la sua elaborazione budgetaria per assicurare che i necessari mezzi budgetari vengano assegnati a corpi di previdenza sociale (2,152,071,000 rubli furono assegnati per il 2003, 2,538,280,500 rubli per il 2004 e 2,622,335,000 per il 2005) per concedere loro di soddisfare i loro obblighi finanziari che sorgevano continuamente inter alia da sentenze simili. (...)
b) Nuovo sistema di indicizzazione introdotto tramite la legislazione
Riguardo all'obbligo di indicizzazione continua degli importi assegnati dai tribunali nazionali, la legislazione vigente al tempo attinente prevedeva il costo della vita come indice per il calcolo delle assegnazioni. Con la decisione del 19 giugno 2002, la Corte Costituzionale dichiarò le disposizioni legislative attinenti incostituzionali, siccome questo sistema fu trovato manchevole di chiarezza e prevedibilità; in questa decisione, la Corte Costituzionale fece riferimento, inter alia, alle conclusioni della Corte europea nella sentenza Burdov. 2 aprile 2004, il Parlamento russo corresse di conseguenza, la legislazione che regolava l'assicurazione sociale delle vittime di Chernobyl. La nuova legge che è in vigore dal 29 aprile 2004 prevede un nuovo sistema di indicizzazione di concessioni che è basato sul tasso di inflazione usato per il calcolo del bilancio federale l’ anno finanziario successivo.
c) Pubblicazione e disseminazione della sentenza
La sentenza della Corte europea [nella] causa Burdov è stata pubblicata sulla Rossijskaia Gazetta (4 luglio 2002), il principale periodico ufficiale che pubblica tutte le leggi e regolamentazioni della Federazione russa e diffusa estesamente a tutte le autorità. La sentenza è stata pubblicata anche in un numero di giornali legali russi e banche dati di internet, ed è così facilmente disponibile alle autorità ed al pubblico.
d) la Conclusione
In prospettiva di ciò che precede, il Governo russo considera, che le misure adottate a seguito della presente sentenza ostacolerà nuove violazioni simili della Convenzione riguardo alla categoria di persone nella posizione del richiedente e che la Federazione russa ha adempiuto così ai suoi obblighi sotto l’Articolo 46 , paragrafo 1 nella causa presente, della Convenzione.
Il governo crede anche che le misure adottate costituiscano, inoltre, un passo ben visibile verso la risoluzione del problema più generale di non-esecuzione di decisioni dei tribunali nazionali nelle varie aree, come accentuato in particolare da altre cause portate di fronte alla Corte europea contro la Federazione russa. Il governo continua a prendere misure per rimediare a questo problema, non come ultima cosa nel contesto dell'esecuzione, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato di altre sentenze della Corte europea.”
11. Il Comitato fu soddisfatto del fatto che il 16 luglio 2002 ,all'interno del tempo-limite stabilito, il Governo aveva pagato al richiedente la somma della soddisfazione equa prevista per nella sentenza del 7 maggio 2002. Notò inoltre, in particolare, le misure prese a riguardo della categoria di persone nella posizione del richiedente. Avendo riguardo a tutte le misure adottate, il Comitato concluse, che aveva esercitato le sue funzioni sotto l’Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione in questa causa. Il Comitato richiamò allo stesso tempo che il problema più generale di non-esecuzione di decisioni di tribunali nazionali nella Federazione russa era stato preso in considerazione dalle autorità, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato, nel contesto di altre cause pendenti.
B. Esecuzione di nuove sentenze nazionali a favore del richiedente
1. La sentenza della Corte Civica di Shakhty del 17 aprile 2003
12. Il 17 aprile 2003 la Corte Civica di Shakhty ordinò della corte al Consiglio d'amministrazione dei Lavori e dello Sviluppo Sociale (Управление труда и социального развития) di Shakhty di pagare al richiedente 15,984.80 Rubli russi (RUB) come risarcimento per i ritardi nel pagamento di sussidi in conformità con l’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile. Il 9 luglio 2003 la sentenza fu sostenuta dalla Corte Regionale di Rostov e divenne definitiva.
13. Durante il 2003-2005 il richiedente presentò consecutivamente l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza all'autorità di imputato, ad ufficiali giudiziari alla Tesoreria Federale e poi di nuovo all'autorità imputata. Il 19 agosto 2005 le autorità trasferirono l'importo dell'assegnazione della corte sul conto del richiedente.
2. La sentenza della Corte Civica di Shakhty del 4 dicembre 2003
14. Il 4 dicembre 2003 la Corte Civica di ordinò al Consiglio d'amministrazione dei Lavori e dello Sviluppo Sociale di pagare al richiedente RUB 68,463.54 come interesse di mora per i ritardi nei pagamenti fra il 1999 ed il 2001, in conformità con l’Atto di Assicurazione Sociale Obbligatoria del 1998 (no.125-ÔÇ). Nessuno fece ricorso contro la sentenza e divenne definitiva il 15 dicembre 2003.
15. Secondo il richiedente presentò il documento per l’esecuzione al Settore rispondente nella stessa data. In una data non specificata il documento fu presentato al Dipartimento degli Ufficiali giudiziari di Shakhty; quest’ultimo decise il 30 giugno 2004 che la sentenza era impossibile da eseguire siccome le proprietà del debitore non poteva essere sequestrate.
16. Il 14 novembre 2005 la Corte Civica di Shakhty accordò la richiesta dell'autorità imputata di correggere un errore di calcolo e ridurre l'assegnazione a RUB 68,308.42. Il 9 marzo 2006 la stessa corte accordò la richiesta del richiedente per la correzione di un errore di calcolo ed ordinò l'autorità imputata di pagare a l richiedente RUB 108,251.95. Il 18 ottobre 2006 le autorità pagarono l'ultimo importo al richiedente.
3. La sentenza di Shakhty Città Corte di 24 marzo 2006
17. Il 24 marzo 2006 la Corte Civica di Shakhty ordinò al Settore dei Lavori e dello Sviluppo Sociale (Департамент труда и социального развития) di Shakhty di collegare all’indicizzazione l'assegno per il cibo mensile dovuto al richiedente a partire dal 1 gennaio 2006. La corte stabilì l'importo di pagamenti mensili a RUB 1,183.73 con indicizzazione susseguente ed ordinò un pagamento in un’unica soluzione di RUB 36,877.06 per il risarcimento per gli ammanchi nei pagamenti mensili precedenti. Inoltre, a partire dal 1 gennaio 2006 al Settore fu ordinato di procedere con pagamenti mensili di RUB 1,972.92 con indicizzazione susseguente riguardo il risarcimento per danno di salute. La corte inoltre ordinò all'autorità imputata di pagare al richiedente RUB 4,980.24 e RUB 13,312.46 come risarcimento per gli ammanchi nei pagamenti mensili fatti rispettivamente fra il 2000 ed il 2005 per danno di salute ed assegno per il cibo ed un pagamento di indicizzazione supplementare di RUB 1,652.35 per danno di salute. Il 22 maggio 2006 la sentenza fu sostenuta dalla Corte Regionale di Rostov e divenne definitiva.
18. Il 20 luglio 2007 la Corte Civica di Shakhty corresse un errore di calcolo nella sua sentenza e cambiò l'importo inizialmente assegnato di RUB 4,980.24 a RUB 5,222.78.
19. Il 2 novembre 2006 la sentenza del 24 marzo 2006 fu eseguita nella sua parte maggiore: un totale di RUB 67,940.56 fu accreditato sul conto del richiedente. Allo stesso tempo, il Ministero delle Finanze non aumentò i pagamenti mensili come ordinato dalla sentenza della corte ed il richiedente continuò a ricevere simile pagamenti ad un livello più basso. Il 1 luglio 2007 il Ministero decise di aumentarli. Il 17 agosto 2007 il richiedente ricevette RUB 9,112.26 come risarcimento per gli ammanchi nei pagamenti mensili accumulati sino a quella data.
4. Sentenze del 22 maggio 2007 e del 21 agosto 2007
20. Il 22 maggio 2007 la Corte Civica di Shakhty decise che il Settore dei Lavori e dello Sviluppo Sociale dovevano pagare al richiedente a partire dal 1 giugno 2007 l'importo di RUB 17,219.43 mensili, con indicizzazione susseguente, riguardo al risarcimento per danno di salute. Inoltre, il Settore doveva pagare RUB 188,566 come risarcimento per gli ammanchi nei precedenti pagamenti mensili. Nessuno fece ricorso contro la sentenza e divenne definitiva il 4 giugno 2007. Fu eseguita il 5 dicembre 2007.
21. Il 21 agosto 2007, la Corte Civica di Shakhty ordinò all’ Agenzia Federale dell’impiego e del Lavoro di pagare al richiedente RUB 225,821.73 come risarcimento per certi pagamenti ritardati riguardo il danno di salute fra il 2000 ed il 2007. Nessuno fece ricorso contro la sentenza e divenne definitiva il 3 settembre 2007. Fu eseguita il 3 dicembre 2007.
II. MATERIALE NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Esecuzione delle sentenze nazionali
1. Legge sui Procedimenti di Esecuzione
22. La Sezione 9 della Legge Federale sui Procedimenti di Esecuzione del 21 luglio 1997 (n. 119-ÔÇ) come in vigore al tempo attinente prevedeva che un ufficiale giudiziario dovesse predisporre un tempo-limite di cinque giorni per l'ottemperanza volontaria dell'imputato ad un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza. L'ufficiale giudiziario doveva anche avvertire l'imputato circa quale azione coercitiva sarebbe seguita se l'imputato non fosse riuscito ad attenersi al tempo-limite. Sotto la sezione 13 della Legge, i procedimenti di esecuzione dovevano essere completati entro due mesi dal ricevimento dell'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza da parte del l'ufficiale giudiziario.
2. Procedura di esecuzione speciale per le sentenze consegnate contro lo Stato e i suoi enti
23. Nel 2001-2005 le sentenze consegnate contro le autorità pubbliche furono eseguite in conformità con una procedura speciale stabilita, inter l'alia, dal Decreto del Governo n. 143 del 22 febbraio 2001 e, successivamente, dal Decreto n. 666 del 22 settembre 2002, affidando l’esecuzione al Ministero delle Finanze (vedere gli ulteriori dettagli in Pridatchenko ed Altri c. Russia, N. 2191/03, 3104/03 16094/03 e 24486/03, §§ 33-39 del 21 giugno 2007). Con una sentenza del 14 luglio 2005 (n. 8-Ï), la Corte Costituzionale considerò certe disposizioni che disciplinavano la procedura di esecuzione speciale come incompatibili con la Costituzione. A seguito della sentenza, la Legge del 27 dicembre 2005 (n. 197-ÔÇ) introdusse un nuovo Capitolo nel Codice di Bilancio che cambiava questa procedura speciale. La Legge conferiva notevoli poteri alla Tesoreria Federale per l’esecuzione di sentenze contro persone giuridiche finanziate dal bilancio federale ed al Ministero delle Finanze per l’esecuzione di sentenze contro lo Stato. Sotto l’Articolo 242.2.6 del Codice di Bilancio, le sentenze devono essere eseguite entro tre mesi dopo il ricevimento dei documenti necessari.
24. Ulteriori procedure speciali che governavano il pagamento di sussidi sociali a persone che subirono emissioni radioattive nel disastro di Chernobyl furono stabilite dalla Legge n. 1244-1 del 15 maggio 1991 con susseguenti emendamenti e coi decreti del Governo n. 607 del 21 agosto 2001, n. 73 del 14 febbraio 2005 e n. 872 del 30 dicembre 2006. Nel 2002-2004 il risarcimento per danno di salute fu assicurato dal Ministero dei Lavori all'interno dei limiti delle allocazioni budgetarie previste per l'esercizio finanziario attinente. Nel 2005-2006 simile risarcimento fu assicurato dai reparti territoriali dell’ Agenzia Federale del Lavoro e dell’impiego e nel 2007-2008 dall’ Agenzia stessa sulla base di registri presentati da enti per il benessere sociale ed all'interno dei limiti delle allocazioni budgetarie previste per quel fine.
3. Relazione del Commissario per i Diritti umani della Federazione russa
25. La Relazione dell’ Attività del 2007 del Commissario per i Diritti umani della Federazione russa ha indicato che fosse probabile che la percezione di sentenze nazionali di quelle che possono essere chiamate “raccomandazioni non obbligatorie” era ancora non solo un fenomeno molto esteso nella società ma anche nei corpi Statali. Notò che il problema della non-esecuzione era sorto anche riguardo a sentenze della Corte Costituzionale. Secondo il rapporto, il problema era stato discusso fra il dicembre 2006 e il marzo 2007 in riunioni speciali in tutti i circuiti federali che coinvolgevano autorità regionali e rappresentanti dell'Amministrazione del Presidente. Emerse così un'idea di stabilire un meccanismo di filtro nazionale che avrebbe lasciato spazio all’ esame di azioni di reclamo della Convenzione a livello nazionale. Il Commissario concluse che degli sforzi congiunti avrebbero dovuto essere schierati nella prospettiva di eliminare le radici del problema piuttosto che di ridurre semplicemente il numero delle azioni di reclamo.
B. via di ricorso Nazionali riguardo la non-esecuzione o l’esecuzione ritardata di sentenze nazionali
1. Disposizioni legali
(a) il diritto civile
26. Il Capitolo 25 del Codice di Procedura Civile offre una procedura per impugnare l’attività delle autorità Statali e l’ inazione nei tribunali. Se la corte costata che l'azione di reclamo è fondata, ordina all'autorità Statale riguardata di rimediare alla violazione o all'illegalità trovata (Articolo 258).
27. L’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile prevede “l'indicizzazione” di assegnazioni giudiziali: la corte che ha fatto l'assegnazione può aumentarla su richiesta di una parte in linea con l'aumento dell'indice di prezzo al dettaglio ufficiale sino alla data effettiva di pagamento. Un interesse di mora e un'altro risarcimento per danno materiale possono inoltre essere recuperato dal debitore per inadempienza di un obbligo valutario e l’uso dei finanziamenti di un'altra persona (Articolo 395 del Codice civile).
28. Il danno causato da azione illegale o inazione dello Stato o di autorità locali o dei loro ufficiali è soggetto al risarcimento dalla Tesoreria Federale o la tesoreria di un'entità federale (Articolo 1069). Il risarcimento per danno causato ad un individuo da condanna illegale, accusa, detenzione per carcerazione preventiva o proibizione di lasciare la sua residenza o processo pendente è accordata in pieno a prescindere dalla colpa degli ufficiali statali riguardati e seguendo la procedura prevista dalla legge (Articolo 1070 § 1). Il danno causato dall'amministrazione della giustizia si compensa se la colpa del giudice viene stabilita con una condanna giudiziale definitiva (Articolo 1070 § 2).
29. Un tribunale può ritenere il disonesto come responsabile per danno morale causato ad un individuo con azioni che danneggiano i suoi diritti personali di non-proprietà o che colpiscono gli altri beni intangibili che gli appartengono ( Articoli 151 e 1099 § 1). Il risarcimento per danno morale subito per un danneggiamento dei diritti di proprietà di un individuo è recuperabile solamente in casi previsti dalla legge (Articolo 1099 § 2 del Codice civile). Il risarcimento per danno morale è pagabile a prescindere dalla colpa del disonesto se è stato causato danno alla vita di un individuo o membro, subito tramite azione penale illegale, disseminazione di informazioni false e in altri casi previsti dalla legge (Articolo 1100 del Codice civile).
(b) il diritto penale
30. L’Articolo 315 del Codice Penale prevede sanzioni per l’insuccesso persistente da parte di qualsiasi ufficiale Statale o funzionario nell’ attenersi ad una decisione giudiziale che è entrata in vigore. Le sanzioni economiche includono una multa, una sospensione provvisoria dal servizio ,il servizio alla comunità (обязательные работы) per un termine massimo di 240 ore o la privazione della libertà per un termine massimo di due anni.
2. La sentenza della Corte costituzionale de 25 gennaio 2001
31. Con la norma n. 1-P 25 del gennaio 2001, la Corte Costituzionale trovò che Articolo 1070 § 2 del Codice civile era compatibile con la Costituzione in quanto prevedeva le condizioni speciali sulla responsabilità dello Stato per danni causati dall'amministrazione della giustizia. Chiarificò, ciononostante, che il termine “amministrazione della giustizia” non copriva i procedimenti giudiziali nella loro interezza ma solamente atti giudiziali riguardanti i meriti di una causa. Altri atti giudiziali -principalmente di natura procedurale- non rientrano nella sfera della nozione “amministrazione della giustizia.”
32. Così la responsabilità statale per il danno causato da atti procedurali od omissioni di atti, come una violazione del termine ragionevole per i procedimenti nei tribunali, potrebbe sorgere anche in assenza di una condanna penale definitiva di un giudice se la colpa del giudice fosse stata stabilita in procedimenti civili. Comunque, la Corte Costituzionale enfatizzò che il diritto costituzionale al risarcimento dello Stato per il danno non dovrebbe essere legato alla colpa individuale di un giudice. Un individuo dovrebbe essere in grado di ottenere risarcimento per qualsiasi danno in cui è incorso per una violazione da parte di un tribunale del suo diritto ad un processo equo all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
33. La Corte Costituzionale sostenne che il Parlamento avrebbe dovuto legiferare nell’ambito e sulla procedura per il risarcimento dello Stato per il danno causato da atti illegali od omissioni di atto di un tribunale o da un giudice e determinare una giurisdizione territoriale e di materia-natura su simili rivendicazioni.
3. La decisione della Corte suprema del 26 settembre 2008 ed il nuovo Programma di Risarcimento
34. Il 26 settembre 2008 il Plenum della Corte Suprema adottò la decisione (n. 16) di presentare alla Duma Statale della Federazione russa una bozza della Legge Costituzionale sul risarcimento da parte dello Stato del danno causato da violazioni del diritto a procedimenti giudiziali all'interno di un termine ragionevole e del diritto all'esecuzione all'interno di un termine ragionevole di decisioni giudiziali che sono entrate in vigore (in seguito chiamato “il Programma di Risarcimento”). La Corte Suprema decise anche di presentare alla Duma Statale una seconda bozza di Legge che introduceva cambi in certi atti legali in collegamento con l'adozione del Programma di Risarcimento. Entrambe le bozze furono proposte formalmente nella Duma Statale il 30 settembre 2008.
35. Il fine del Programma di Risarcimento è stabilire in Russia una via di ricorso legale nazionale a riguardo di violazioni dei diritti a procedimenti giudiziali all'interno di un termine ragionevole ed all'esecuzione di una decisione giudiziale definitiva all'interno di un termine ragionevole ( sezione 1 § 1). Si prevede anche che i richiedenti in cause che non sono state dichiarate ancora ammissibili dalla Corte possono fare domanda per il risarcimento di danno sotto il Programma di Risarcimento entro sei mesi dopo che la sua entrata in vigore programmata per il 1 gennaio 2010 (sezione 19). Il Programma di Risarcimento conferisce poteri ai tribunali di giurisdizione generale di considerare cause portate contro lo Stato su violazioni addotte dei diritti summenzionati ( sezione 3 § 1) e prevede specifici articoli per disciplinare i procedimenti in simili cause. Lo Stato è rappresentato nei procedimenti dal Ministero delle Finanze ( sezione 3 § 3). Il secondo deve provare che non c'era nessuna violazione del requisito del termine ragionevole, mentre il querelante deve provare l'esistenza del danno materiale ( sezione 11 § 1). Nel decidere una causa, la corte valuta la sua complessità, il comportamento delle parti e gli altri attori nei procedimenti e gli atti o l’inazione di autorità giudiziali o esecutive, le parti a procedimenti di esecuzione o le autorità di esecuzione. La corte valuta anche la durata della violazione e l'importanza delle sue conseguenze per la persona colpita (sezione 12). Se la corte trova una violazione, stabilisce un'assegnazione valutaria perché il danno venga determinato prendendo conto delle specifiche circostanze della causa, dei requisiti d'equità e degli standard della Convenzione (sezione 14). La corte può prendere una decisione separata trovando una violazione di legge da part di un tribunale ufficiale Statale ed ordinare le specifiche azioni procedurali da prendere, con la richiesta di fare di nuovo rapporto entro un mese (sezione 15).
36. Il memorandum esplicativo della Corte Suprema espone la necessità per le allocazioni budgetarie supplementari di assicurare l'attuazione del Programma di Risarcimento. Il risarcimento medio per causa è valutato a EUR 3,050 avendo riguardo al fatto che gli importi di soddisfazione equa assegnati dalla Corte europea dei Diritti umani in cause di non-esecuzione di solito varia fra EUR 1,200 ed EUR 4,900.
37. La seconda bozza di Legge introduce emendamenti agli altri atti giuridici. Sotto l’Articolo 1070.1 del nuovo Codice civile, il danno causato da violazioni del requisito del termine ragionevole da parte di autorità Statali in procedimenti giudiziali o nell'esecuzione di sentenze viene compensato dalla Tesoreria Federale. Sotto l’Articolo 242.2 del nuovo Codice di Bilancio, decisioni giudiziali che accordano simile risarcimento devono essere eseguite entro due mesi.
4. L'Indirizzo da parte del Presidente della Federazione russa alla Riunione Federale
38. Nel suo Indirizzo alla Riunione Federale consegnato il 5 novembre 2008, il Presidente della Federazione russa affermò in particolare che era necessario stabilire un meccanismo per il risarcimento del danno causato da violazioni di diritti di cittadini alla prova all'interno di un termine ragionevole ed all’attuazione piena e tempestiva delle decisioni di corte. Il Presidente sottolineò che l'esecuzione delle decisioni della corte era ancora un problema enorme che concerneva tutte le corti incluso la Corte Costituzionale. Lui affermò inoltre che il problema era a causa della mancanza di vera responsabilità di ufficiali e cittadini che non riuscivano ad eseguire decisioni di corte e che questa responsabilità sarebbe stata stabilita.
III. MATERIALE INTERNAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. Consiglio dell'Europa
1. Comitato dei Ministri
39. Il 3-5 dicembre 2007 il Comitato dei Ministri riprese la considerazione sotto l’Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione del gruppo delle sentenze della Corte contro la Russia riguardo all’ insuccesso nell’esecuzione o al ritardo nell'esecuzione di sentenze nazionali (gruppo Timofeyev ed altri , CM/Del/OJ/DH(2007)1013 Pubblico). La seguente decisione fu adottata dal Comitato il 19 dicembre 2007 (CM/Del/Dec(2007)1013 Definitivo):
“Deputati (...)
1. ricordato che queste sentenze rivelano i vari problemi strutturali nell'ordinamento giuridico russo che, per la loro natura e scala, severamente colpiscono la sua efficacia e causano numerose violazioni della Convenzione un numero in aumento di cui ci si è lamentati di fronte alla Corte;
2. preso nota, con interesse, di varie misure adottate o che sono in adozione da certe autorità competenti per ostacolare simili nuove violazioni e rimediare a quelle che già si sono verificate stabilendo o migliorando procedure nazionali appropriate, misure che devono ancora essere prese;
3. enfatizzato di nuovo che i problemi rivelati dalle sentenze richiedono soluzioni urgenti per assicurare che i diritti della Convenzione attinenti vengano adeguatamente protetti a livello nazionale, prevenendo così un numero molto alto di richieste simili alla Corte;
4. invitato le autorità competenti a continuare le consultazioni bilaterali col Segretariato nella prospettiva di stabilire una strategia corretta per l'adozione delle misure necessarie, incluso la determinazione di vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci; (...)”
40. I problemi sottostanti alla non-esecuzione di sentenze nazionali in Russia e le varie misure prese o considerate dalle autorità nel contesto dell'attuazione delle sentenze della Corte furono presi in considerazione in dettaglio nei documenti del Comitato dei Ministri ,CM/Inf/DH(2006)45 del 1 dicembre 2006 e CM/Inf/DH(2006)19rev3 del 4 giugno 2007. Quest’ultimo documento presentò il progresso finora realizzato dalle autorità russe, puntando ad un numero di questioni insolute ed ulteriori misure proposte nella prospettiva di una soluzione ampia del problema. Le principali vie di azione proposte furono riassunti come segue (vedere CM/Inf/DH(2006)19rev3, citato sopra, pagina 1):
“- Miglioramento di procedure budgetarie e dell’ attuazione pratica delle decisioni di bilancio;
- Identificare una specifica autorità statale come imputato;
- Assicurare il risarcimento efficace per i ritardi (indicizzazione, interesse di mora, specifici danni , sanzioni penali per ritardi);
- Aumentare l'efficacia delle vie di ricorso nazionali per l’esecuzione corretta di decisioni giudiziali;
- Miglioramento della struttura legale che disciplina l’esecuzione obbligatoria contro le autorità pubbliche;
- Accertamento della responsabilità effettiva dei funzionari per non-esecuzione;
Considerazione speciale è data ai possibili modi per garantire la coesione dei meccanismi di esecuzione presenti che permettono alla Tesoreria e agli ufficiali giudiziari di agire in una maniera complementare nei loro rispettivi campi di competenza e sotto il controllo giurisdizionale appropriato. Una forte enfasi è fissata anche su possibili modi per prevenire cause contro lo Stato tramite procedimenti budgetari emigliorati che concederebbero allo Stato di attenersi in modo opportuno a suoi obblighi materiali.”
41. Nella Raccomandazione Rec(2004)6 agli stati membro sul miglioramento delle via di ricorso nazionali adottata il 12 maggio 2004, il Comitato dei Ministri raccomandò inter alia che:
“(...) gli stati membro fanno una revisione, a seguito di sentenze della Corte che evidenziano delle deficienze strutturali o generali nella legge o nella pratica nazionali, l'efficacia delle vie di ricorso nazionali esistenti e, dove necessario, predispongano vie di ricorso efficaci per evitare cause ripetitive che vengono portate di fronte alla Corte (...)”
42. L'Appendice alla Raccomandazione inoltre afferma inter alia:
“(...) Le via di ricorso che seguono una sentenza “guida”
13. Quando una sentenza che evidenzia delle deficienze strutturali o generali nella legge o pratica nazionali (“causa guida”) è stato consegnata e un gran numero di richieste alla Corte riguardanti lo stesso problema (“cause ripetitive”) è pendente o è probabile che vengano depositate, lo stato rispondente dovrebbe assicurare che i potenziali richiedenti abbiano, dove appropriato, una via di ricorso efficace che conceda loro di rivolgersi ad un'autorità nazionale competente che si possa applicare anche ai correnti richiedenti. Tale via di ricorso rapida ed efficace li abiliterebbe ad ottenere compensazione a livello nazionale, in linea col principio di sussidiarietà del sistema di Convenzione.
14. L'introduzione di tale via di ricorso nazionale potrebbe ridurre anche significativamente il carico di lavoro della Corte. Mentre una esecuzione pronta della sentenza guida resta essenziale per risolvere il problema strutturale e così per ostacolare le future richieste sulla stessa questione, può esistere una categoria di persone che sono state già colpite da questo problema prima della sua decisione. (...)
16. In particolare, oltre ad una sentenza guida nella quale è stato trovato uno specifico problema strutturale, un'alternativa sarebbe adottare un approccio ad hoc, con cui lo stato riguardò valuterebbe l'appropriatezza di introdurre una specifica via di ricorso o allargare una via di ricorso esistente tramite legislazione o tramite interpretazione giudiziale. (...)
18. Quando le specifiche vie di ricorso che seguono una causa guida vengono preparate, i governi dovrebbero informare velocemente la Corte così che possa prenderli in considerazione nel suo trattamento di cause ripetitive e susseguenti. (...)”
2. Riunione parlamentare
43. Nella Decisione 1516 (2006) sull’ attuazione delle sentenze della Corte europea, adottata il 2 ottobre 2006, la Riunione Parlamentare notò con grave preoccupazione l'esistenza continua in molti stati di notevoli deficienze strutturali che provocavano grandi numeri di sentenze ripetitive di violazioni della Convenzione e rappresentavano un pericolo serio all’ordinamento legislativo negli stati riguardati. La Riunione elencò fra quelle deficienze dei difetti maggiore nell'organizzazione giudiziale e nelle procedure nella Federazione russa, incluso la non-esecuzione cronica di decisioni giudiziali nazionali consegnate contro lo Stato (vedere paragrafo 10.2). La Riunione esortò le autorità Statali riguardate, incluso la Federazione russa a chiarire i problemi di particolare importanza menzionati nella decisione e dare a questa azione priorità politica assoluta.
44. Nel rapporto del Comitato sugli Affari Legali e Diritti umani, il relatore, il Sig. Erik Jurgens richiese una soluzione urgente ai problemi summenzionati siccome loro riguardavano un numero molto grande di persone in Russia. Lui avvertì anche che era probabile che l'afflusso di numerose cause ripetitive alla Corte minasse l'efficacia del meccanismo della Convenzione (Doc. 11020). Lui affermò inoltre:
“58. Il Relatore accoglie bene la posizione franca ed aperta della maggior parte degli ufficiali russi ed delle istituzioni che ha riscontrato a Mosca così come la loro comprensione chiara che i problemi sopra hanno messo in pericolo l'efficacia del sistema giudiziale russo, e davvero, dello Stato nell'insieme. Forse è indicativo che specialmente i presidenti della Corte Costituzionale e della Corte Suprema hanno mostrato un atteggiamento molto positivo, siccome entrambi hanno riconosciuto i problemi ed incoraggiato il Relatore nei suoi sforzi per aiutare a trovare una soluzione per loro.
59. Le autorità hanno offerto assicurazioni per cui i più importanti problemi sarebbero stati trattati come una questione di priorità e che dei passi appropriati sarebbero stati presi per assicurare l'adozione rapida di riforme richieste dalle sentenze della Corte europea.
60. La chiara buona volontà degli ufficiali russi di venire alle prese con gli importanti problemi summenzionati è benvenuta. Il Relatore sottolinea che la complessità di questi problemi è tale da richiedere sforzi concertati e potenziati di tutti gli attori all'interno dell'ordinamento giuridico russo.
61. Rimane ancora comunque da stabilire le strategie di riforma complete a questo riguardo. In prospettiva dei problemi presenti sollevati nelle sentenze e in altre nell’avvenire, il Relatore ha raccomandato fortemente ancora alle autorità di preparare un meccanismo speciale di cooperazione tra agenzie nell'attuazione di sentenze della Corte di Strasbourg. Il continuo coinvolgimento del Parlamento e della delegazione russa all’Assemblea nel processo d’implementazione è anche necessario. Il Relatore si convince che i suoi colleghi parlamentari russi considereranno la sua raccomandazione di preparare un specifico meccanismo e una procedura con la supervisione parlamentare per implementare seriamente le sentenze della Corte di Strasburgo, così come le altre proposte attinenti rese nella bozza della decisione. Il Relatore anche fiducie che i membri della delegazione russa alla Riunione promuoveranno e seguito l'adozione delle specifiche misure richiesta con le certe sentenze (per dettagli, veda Appendice III, Parte III).”
B. Nazioni Unite
45. Nelle osservazioni preliminari successive a una visita in Russia dal 19 al 29 maggio 2008, il Relatore Speciale delle Nazioni Unite sull'indipendenza dei giudici ed degli avvocati, il Sig. Leandro Despouy, riportò “ importanti preoccupazioni per il fatto che un'importante percentuale di decisioni giudiziali, incluso quelle contro ufficiali statali non fosse stata perfezionata.” Lui aggiunse che “problemi con l'attuazione di decisioni giudiziali in Russia avevano contribuito all'immagine povera dell'ordinamento giudiziario agli occhi della popolazione.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
46. Il richiedente si lamentò che la prolungata inosservanza delle autorità delle sentenze vincolanti ed esecutive al suo favore ha violato il suo diritto ad un tribunale sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed il suo diritto al pacifico tranquillo delle sue proprietà sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che nelle loro parti attinenti si leggono come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale…”

A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. Il Governo
47. Il Governo dibatté inizialmente nelle sue osservazioni che il richiedente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali. Nelle sue ulteriori osservazioni in risposta a quelle del richiedente, il Governo non sostenne comunque, la sua obiezione riguardo al non-esaurimento delle via di ricorso nazionali.
48. Il Governo presentò anche che il richiedente non poteva più chiedere di essere una vittima delle violazioni addotte: il danno causato dai ritardi di esecuzione era stato compensato con assegnazioni di indicizzazione supplementari accordate dai tribunali sotto l’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile. Il Governo sostenne la sua osservazione con riferimento a certe decisioni della Corte (in particolare Nemakina c. Russia (dec.), n. 14217/04, 10 luglio 2007, e Derkach c. Russia (dec.), n. 3352/05, 3 maggio 2007).
49. Il Governo dibatté inoltre che le azioni di reclamo erano manifestamente mal-fondate: secondo lui , i periodi di tempo dal ricevimento dei documenti necessari da parte delle autorità competenti al pagamento effettivo di assegnazioni giudiziali variava fra tredici giorni e i nove mesi ed erano stati così ragionevoli alla luce della giurisprudenza della Corte. Il Governo biasimò il richiedente per avere ritrattato ripetutamente l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza riguardo alla sentenza del 17 aprile 2003 e di averlo spedito consecutivamente ad autorità diverse. La sentenza del 4 dicembre 2003 fu eseguita solo sei mesi dopo la sua rettifica il 9 marzo 2006. Infine, la sentenza del 24 marzo 2006 fu eseguita in due passi: il 2 novembre 2006 nella sua parte principale e il 17 agosto 2007 per il resto, cioè solamente nove mesi dopo l'esecuzione parziale.
50. Il Governo si riferì alla complessità dei procedimenti di esecuzione in questa causa dato che ultimamente molte sentenze sono state coinvolte. Enfatizzo anche circostanze obiettive, come la complessità del sistema budgetario federale multilivello e cambi legislativi che avevano condotto a ritardi nell’ esecuzione per cui il Governo non sarebbe responsabile.
2. Il richiedente
51. Il richiedente presentò che lui si era lamentato di fronte a diverse autorità Statali incluso il Ministero delle Finanze, la Tesoreria Federale, l'ufficio dell’ accusatore ed degli ufficiali giudiziari circa dei pagamenti regolari insufficiente e/o ritardi nell’ esecuzione delle sentenze a suo favore. Secondo lui , le autorità Statali avrebbero dovuto mostrare anche diligenza a questo riguardo, ma non erano riusciti a prendere l’azione necessaria. Lui considerò che i ritardi sorprendentemente brevi nell'esecuzione delle sentenze del 22 maggio 2007 e del 21 agosto 2007 erano presumibilmente un risultato della decisione della Corte di comunicare la sua richiesta al Governo.
52. Riguardo alle altre tre sentenze, il richiedente non era d'accordo col calcolo del Governo dei ritardi. Lui dibatté che un ritardo di 31 mesi complessivi nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 17 aprile 2003 era imputabile alle varie autorità; l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza riguardo alla sentenza del 4 dicembre 2003 è rimasta 21 mesi col Consiglio d'amministrazione di Shakhty dei Lavori e dello Sviluppo Sociale senza che nessuna azione fosse presa, prima di ricorrere al tribunale per la correzione di un errore di calcolo; la sentenza del 24 marzo 2006 è rimasta non eseguita, benché in parte, sino all’agosto 2007. Il richiedente concluse che lui era ancora una vittima delle violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
B. la valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
53. La Corte nota che il Governo ha lasciato cadere esplicitamente la loro obiezione riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali da parte del richiedente e non esaminerà questa questione.
54. Riguardo allo status di vittima del richiedente, la Corte richiama che sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione, “la Corte può ricevere le richieste da qualsiasi persona... che chiede di essere la vittima di una violazione da parte di una delle Alte Parti Contraenti ed dei diritti stabiliti dalla Convenzione o dai Protocolli inoltre....”
55. Spetta alle autorità nazionali compensare da prima qualsiasi violazione addotta della Convenzione. A questo riguardo, la questione se il richiedente può chiedere o meno di essere una vittima della violazione addotta è attinente a tutti gli stadi dei procedimenti sotto la Convenzione (vedere Burdov, citata sopra, § 30).
56. La Corte reitera che una decisione o misura favorevole al richiedente, come l'esecuzione di una sentenza dopo un ritardo sostanziale non è in principio sufficiente a spogliarlo del suo status come “vittima”, a meno che le autorità nazionali abbiano ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, e poi riconosciuto una compensazione per, la violazione della Convenzione (vedere Petrushko c. Russia, n. 36494/02, §§ 14-16, 24 febbraio 2005 con gli ulteriori riferimenti). Il compenso così riconosciuto deve essere appropriato e sufficiente, poiché fallendo in una parte può continuare a chiedere di essere una vittima della violazione (vedere Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 181 ECHR 2006 -..., e Cocchiarella c. Italia [GC], n. 64886/01, § 72 ECHR 2006 -...).
57. Il Governo dibatté che i tribunali nazionali accordarono il risarcimento al richiedente per i ritardi nell’ esecuzione delle sentenze a suo favore tramite indicizzazione delle assegnazioni iniziali sotto l’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile. Il richiedente non contestò questo fatto, ma dibatté che lui mantenne lo status di vittima. La Corte deve così considerare se l' importo dell’indicizzazione corrisponde ad un riconoscimento delle violazioni della Convenzione e costituisce compensazione appropriata e sufficiente a questo riguardo.
58. La Corte nota sul primo punto che le decisioni a cui ha fatto riferimento il Governo non riconoscono esplicitamente le violazioni della Convenzione. Assegnò il risarcimento sulla base di un fatto obiettivo che un certo tempo era passato fra il momento in cui le somme erano dovute ed il momento in cui furono pagate. La questione sorgerebbe così se queste decisioni hanno in sostanza riconosciuto le violazioni addotte. Comunque, la Corte non considera necessario decidere su questo problema, data la sua conclusione sotto riguardo a se il compensi accordata fosse adeguato e sufficiente.
59. Sul secondo punto, la Corte osserva, che l’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile permette ai tribunali solamente di aumentare gli importi assegnati in linea con un indice dei prezzi ufficiale, compensando così il deprezzamento della valuta nazionale. Il risarcimento così assegnato copre così perdite relative solamente all’inflazione- ma non qualsiasi ulteriore danno subito dal richiedente, materiale o morale. Il Governo non ha fornito nessun argomento a contrario. La Corte già ha considerato il problema nelle altre cause riguardo alla Russia e ha concluso che il risarcimento per perdite di inflazione da solo, comunque accessibile ed efficace in legge e pratica, non costituisca una compensazione sufficiente e adeguato richiesta dalla Convenzione (vedere Moroko c. Russia, n. 20937/07, § 27 del 12 giugno 2008). Riguardo alle più prime decisioni citate dal Governo (vedere paragrafo 48 sopra), la Corte riafferma che loro furono prese nelle specifiche circostanze di queste cause individuali (vedere Moroko, citata sopra, § 26) e non devono essere interpretate come se stabilissero un qualsiasi principio generale che contraddirebbe la presente conclusione della Corte.
60. La Corte conclude di conseguenza che al richiedente non fu accordata una compensazione adeguata e sufficiente riguardo le violazioni addotte e può chiedere così ancora di essere una vittima sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione. L'obiezione del Governo deve essere perciò respinta.
61. Riguardo agli altri argomenti presentati dalle parti, la Corte nota che loro pongono questioni serie che richiedono la considerazione sui meriti. La Corte considera di conseguenza che l'azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
2. Meriti
62. Non è contestato dalle parti che le cinque sentenze hanno riguardanti la presente causa furono eseguite in pieno ma coi certi ritardi. Il solo problema da decidere da parte della Corte è se questi ritardi violarono la Convenzione.
63. Le parti non furono d'accordo almeno su questo punto riguardo a tre delle cinque sentenze: il Governo considerò che i ritardi erano di dieci mesi ed erano in conformità con la Convenzione; il richiedente considerò che i ritardi fossero molto più lunghi e, perciò, in violazione della Convenzione.
64. Dato queste posizioni divergenti, la Corte considera appropriato richiamare e chiarificare i principi principali stabiliti dalla sua giurisprudenza che deve guidare la determinazione dei problemi attinenti sotto la Convenzione.
(a) principi Generali
65. Il diritto ad una corte protetto dall’Articolo 6 sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di un Stato Contraente concedesse ad una decisione giudiziale definitiva e vincolante di rimanere in operativa a danno di una parte. L’esecuzione di una data sentenza da parte di qualsiasi tribunale deve essere considerata perciò una parte integrante della “ prova” ai fini delll’ Articolo 6 (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, 19 marzo 1997, § 40 Relazioni dlle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II).
66. Un ritardo irragionevolmente lungo nell’ esecuzione di una sentenza vincolante può violare perciò la Convenzione (vedere Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, ECHR 2002-III). La ragionevolezza di simile ritardo che ha sarà determinata con riguardo in particolare alla complessità dei procedimenti di esecuzione, il comportamento sia del richiedente che delle autorità competenti, e l'importo e la natura dell'assegnazione del tribunale (vedere Raylyan c. Russia, n. 22000/03, § 31 del 15 febbraio 2007).
67. Mentre la Corte ha il dovuto riguardo ai tempi-limite legali nazionali stabiliti per procedimenti di esecuzione, il loro non-rispetto non corrisponde automaticamente ad una violazione della Convenzione. Del ritardo può essere giustificato in particolari circostanze ma non può essere in qualsiasi caso, tale da danneggiare l'essenza del diritto protetto sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 (vedere Burdov, citata sopra, § 35). Così, la Corte considerò, per esempio, in una recente causa riguardo alla Russia che un ritardo complessivo di nove mesi impiegato dalle autorità per eseguire una sentenza non era prima facie irragionevole sotto la Convenzione (vedere Moroko, citata sopra, § 43). Comunque, tale assunzione non risolve il bisogno di una valutazione alla luce del criterio summenzionato (vedere paragrafo 66 sopra) ed avendo riguardo alle altre circostanze attinenti (vedere Moroko, citata sopra, §§ 44-45).
68. Una persona che ha ottenuto una sentenza contro lo Stato non può essere aspettatasi di portare procedimenti di esecuzione separati (vedere Metaxas c. Grecia, n. 8415/02, § 19 del 27 maggio 2004). In simili cause,si deve debitamente notificare all’ autorità imputata di Stato la sentenza in modo da essere ben collocata per prendere tutte le iniziative necessarie per attenersi a questa o trasmetterla ad un'altra autorità Statale competente responsabile per l’esecuzione. Questo è particolarmente attinente in una situazione in cui, in prospettiva della complessità e la possibile sovrapposizione dell'esecuzione e procedure di esecuzione, un richiedente può avere dubbi ragionevoli circa quali autorità siano responsabili dell'esecuzione o l’applicazione della sentenza (vedere Akashev c. Russia, n. 30616/05, § 21 12 giugno 2008).
69. Un contendente che ha avuto successo può essere costretto ad intraprendere certi passi procedurali per recuperare il debito della sentenza, sia durante un'esecuzione volontaria di una sentenza da parte dello Stato che durante la sua esecuzione tramite mezzo obbligatori (vedere Shvedov c. Russia, n. 69306/01, § 29–37 del 20 ottobre 2005). Di conseguenza, non è irragionevole che le autorità richiedano al richiedente di produrre documenti supplementari, come dettagli bancari per permettere o accellerare l'esecuzione di una sentenza (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Kosmidis e Kosmidou c. Grecia, n. 32141/04, § 24 dell’8 novembre 2007). Il requisito della cooperazione del creditore non deve, comunque,andare oltre ciò che è strettamente necessario ed in qualsiasi caso, non solleva le autorità del loro obbligo sotto la Convenzione di intentare una causa opportuna di loro propria istanza, sulla base delle informazioni disponibili a loro, nella prospettiva di onorare la sentenza contro lo Stato (vedere Akashev, citata sopra, § 22). La Corte considera così che il carico per garantire l’ottemperanza con una sentenza risieda primariamente presso le autorità Statali cominciando dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene vinclante ed esecutiva.
70. La complessità della procedura di esecuzione nazionale o del sistema budgetario Statale non può sollevare lo Stato dal suo obbligo sotto la Convenzione di garantire ad ognuno il diritto ad avere una decisione giudiziale vincolante ed esecutiva eseguita all'interno di un termine ragionevole. Né è permesso ad un'autorità Statale citare la mancanza di finanziamenti o di altre risorse (come l’ alloggio) come una scusa per non onorare un debito di sentenza (vedere Burdov, citata sopra, §35, e Kukalo c. Russia, n. 63995/00, § 49 del 3 novembre 2005). Spetta agli Stati Contraenti organizzare i loro ordinamenti giuridici in modo tale che le autorità competenti possano soddisfare il loro obbligo a questo riguardo (vedere mutatis mutandis Comingersoll S.A. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 35382/97, § 24, ECHR 2000-IV, e Frydlender c. Francia [GC], n. 30979/96, § 45 ECHR 2000-VII).
(b) L’applicazione di questi principi alla presente causa
71. La Corte considererà i ritardi nell'esecuzione delle cinque sentenze riguardate in questa causa sulla base dei principi sopra.
(i) Sentenza del 17 aprile 2003
72. La sentenza della Corte Civica di Shakhty del 17 aprile 2003 divenne vincolante ed esecutiva il 9 luglio 2003 e l'autorità imputata era o avrebbe dovuto essere consapevole del suo obbligo di pagare al richiedente la somma assegnata in quella data. Il fatto che il richiedente presentò solamente un mese più tardi un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza non intacca il punto iniziale dell'obbligo dell'autorità di attenersi alla sentenza. Effettivamente, non ci si poteva aspettare da lui di portare qualsiasi esecuzione o altri procedimenti simili (vedere paragrafo 68 sopra). Cominciando da quella data, l'autorità imputata aveva così un obbligo di prendere tutte le misure necessarie, o da sola o in cooperazione con altre autorità locali e/o federali responsabili, per assicurare che i finanziamenti necessari sono stati resi disponibili così come per onorare il debito dello Stato. Sembra davvero che l'autorità imputata avesse a sua disposizione tutti gli elementi necessari, come l'indirizzo del richiedente e i dettagli bancari per procedere col pagamento in qualsiasi momento.
73. Il tempo preso dalle autorità per attenersi con una sentenza dovrebbe essere calcolato di conseguenza dal momento in cui divenne definitiva ed esecutiva, cioè, il 9 luglio 2003, sino al momento in cui l'assegnazione giudiziale fu pagata al richiedente che è il 19 agosto 2005. Il tempo impiegato per attenersi alla sentenza del 17 aprile 2003 era così di due anni ed un mese.
74. Tale lungo ritardo nel pagamento di un'assegnazione giudiziale è in complesso incompatibile coi requisiti della Convenzione affermati sopra e la Corte non trova nessuna circostanza per giustificarlo.
75. Si nota, in particolare, che l'esecuzione non presentava alcuna complessità: la sentenza richiedeva il pagamento di una somma di denaro. Il richiedente non pose ostacoli all'esecuzione. Né lui può essere biasimato per il suo tentativo di chiedere l’esonero degli ufficiali giudiziari e della Tesoreria Federale dopo avere aspettato invano più di nove mesi per l'ottemperanza volontaria dell'imputato alla sentenza. Dall’altra parte la Corte nota che l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza rimase fermo senza ottenere risultati presso varie autorità per lunghi periodi, in particolare nove mesi presso il Dipartimento imputato, quattro mesi presso gli ufficiali giudiziari ed undici mesi presso la Tesoreria Federale. La Corte non trova giustificazione per questa inazione. La complessità del sistema budgetario a vari livelli a cui fa riferimento il Governo non può giustificare la mancanza i coordinazione appropriata fra le autorità e la loro inazione durante i periodi sopra.
76. Gli elementi sopra sono sufficienti per la Corte per concludere che lo Stato andò a vuoto nell’eseguire la sentenza del 17 aprile 2003 all'interno di un termine ragionevole.
(ii) Sentenza del 4 dicembre 2003
77. La sentenza del 4 dicembre 2003 divenne definitiva il 15 dicembre 2003 e fu eseguita il 18 ottobre 2006. Il tempo preso dalle autorità per attenersi alla sentenza era di due anni e dieci mesi. È vero, come indicato dal Governo, che la corte cambiò due volte questa sentenza. La prima rettifica fu resa il 14 novembre 2005 su richiesta dell'autorità imputata per ridurre l'assegnazione iniziale di RUB 155 (EUR 4). Comunque il bisogno di tale rettifica può spiegare solamente una piccola frazione del ritardo complessivo. Ancora il Governo non offrì chiarimenti per i quasi due anni che passarono fra il 15 dicembre 2003 e il 14 novembre 2005. Né informò la Corte di qualsiasi misura presa dall'autorità imputata per eseguire la sentenza durante quel periodo. Presumendo anche che l'autorità agì con più diligenza in uno stadio più avanzato, tale lungo ritardo basta alla Corte per trovare una violazione del diritto fare eseguire questa sentenza all'interno di un termine ragionevole.
(iii) Sentenza del 24 marzo 2006
78. La Corte lo trova al di là di qualsiasi controversia che la sentenza del 24 marzo 2006 che divenne vincolante il 22 maggio 2006 è stata eseguita il 2 novembre 2006, ma solamente in parte. Le parti concordarono anche che la piena esecuzione della sentenza era stata effettuata solamente il 17 agosto 2007.
79. Mentre nota che le autorità agirono con una certa diligenza nel pagamento delle assegnazioni per la maggior parte entro sei mesi, la Corte considera che l’Articolo 6 impone un obbligo di attenersi ad una sentenza esecutiva e vincolante in pieno. La Corte valuterà così la ragionevolezza del periodo intero sino alla piena ottemperanza. Il tempo impiegato dalle autorità per attenersi alla sentenza nella sua interezza era così di quasi un anno e tre mesi.
80. Come trapela in particolare dalle osservazioni del Governo e dalla lettera dell’ Accusatore Aggiunto di Shakhty del 29 aprile 2007 presentata dal richiedente, la piena esecuzione della sentenza non era stata possibile dato l'assenza di regolamentazioni appropriate o procedure a livello federale. Effettivamente, gli aggiornamenti decisi dalla Corte Civica di Shakhty non erano stati pagati al richiedente sino all'adozione di una specifica procedura in quel collegamento da parte del Ministero delle Finanze (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra).
81. Comunque, la Corte non ha trovato nelle osservazioni del Governo qualsiasi ragione che giustifichi il ritardo di più di un anno nell'adozione da parte del Ministero delle Finanze della nuova procedura. Né può la Corte attribuire il ritardo alle difficoltà obiettive a cui fa riferimento il Governo: la questione sembrava essere solo sotto il controllo del Governo. In qualsiasi caso, la mancanza di regolamentazioni generali o di procedure a livello federale non può di per sé giustificare tale ritardo lungo in ottemperanza ad una sentenza esecutiva e vincolante . Nella prospettiva della Corte, il diritto ad un tribunale non sarebbe efficace se l'esecuzione di una sentenza esecutiva e vincolante in una particolare causa fosse resa condizionale all'adozione da parte dell'amministrazione di procedure generali o regolamentazioni nell'area riguardata.
82. Infine, riguardo alla natura dell'assegnazione, il Governo dibatté che i benefit in oggetto non erano il solo reddito del richiedente ed erano così di minore importanza. La Corte non può confarsi con questo argomento dato che almeno alcune di queste assegnazioni concernevano importi sostanziali del risarcimento per danno di salute subito dal richiedente nel sito del disastro nucleare di Chernobyl e che ha provocato la sua invalidità permanente . Nella prospettiva della Corte, simili assegnazioni non possono essere in nessun modo qualificati di natura marginale o insignificante.
83. In prospettiva di queste circostanze, la Corte conclude, che l'insuccesso delle autorità per circa un anno e tre mesi per attenersi in pieno anche alla sentenza del 24 marzo 2006 violò il diritto del richiedente ad un tribunale.
(iv) Sentenze del 22 maggio 2007 e del 21 agosto 2007
84. La Corte nota che le sentenze della Corte Civica di Shakhty del22 maggio 2007 e del 21 agosto 2007 i divennero definitive rispettivamente il4 giugno 2007 e il 3 settembre 2007; loro furono eseguite rispettivamente il 5 dicembre 2007 e il 3 dicembre 2007 . Il tempo impiegato dalle autorità per eseguire le sentenze era rispettivamente di sei mesi e tre mesi.
85. Il richiedente fece riferimento a certe difficoltà iniziali nell'ottenere l’esecuzione della sentenza precedente che fu risolta rapidamente a seguito della comunicazione della sua richiesta con la Corte al Governo. Essendo così, la Corte è soddisfatta che i periodi rispettivamente di 6 e 3 mesi impiegati dalle autorità per eseguire queste sentenze non sembrano di per sé irragionevoli; inoltre la Corte non trova nessuna particolare circostanza che mostra che questi ritardi danneggiarono l'essenza del diritto del richiedente ad un tribunale.
(v) le Conclusioni
86. In prospettiva di ciò che precede, la Corte conclude, che rimandando l'esecuzione delle sentenze della Corte Civica di Shakhty del 17 aprile 2003, del 4 dicembre 2003 e del 24 marzo 2006 le autorità sono andate a vuoto nel rispettare il diritto del richiedente ad un tribunale. C'è di conseguenza una violazione dell’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
87. Dato che le sentenze esecutive e vincolanti hanno creato un diritto stabilito al pagamento a favore del richiedente che dovrebbe essere considerato una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Vasilopoulou c. Grecia, n. 47541/99, § 22 del 21 marzo 2002), le prolungata inosservanza delle autorità di queste sentenze violò anche il diritto del richiedente al pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà (vedere Burdov, citata sopra, § 41). C'è di conseguenza anche una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
88. In prospettiva delle sue sentenze nei paragrafi 84-85 sopra, la Corte conclude che non c'è nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo al'esecuzione delle sentenze del 22 maggio 2007 e 21 agosto 2007 .
II. ESISTENZA DI VIE DI RICORSO NAZIONALI EFFICACI COME RICHIESTO DALL’ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
89. Il richiedente non addusse la mancanza di vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci riguardo la sua azione di reclamo sulla non-esecuzione prolungata da parte delle autorità di sentenze nazionali a suo favore. La Corte osservò nondimeno che ci si lamentava in modo crescente dell’addotta inefficacia delle vie di ricorso nazionali di fronte alla Corte in cause riguardo alla non-esecuzione o all’esecuzione ritardata di sentenze nazionali. Decise perciò di sua propria istanza di esaminare questa questione sotto l’Articolo 13 nella presente causa e richiese alle parti di presentare osservazioni. L’Articolo 13 prevede come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”

A. Le osservazioni delle parti
90. Il richiedente non presentò alcun specifico argomento sull'esistenza di vie di ricorso nazionali e sulla loro efficacia. Nelle sue prime osservazioni, lui menzionò, di aver inutilmente presentato i suoi danni alle varie autorità, incluso il Ministero delle Finanze, la Tesoreria Federale, l'Ufficio dell’ Accusatore e gli Ufficiali giudiziari.
91. Il Governo dibatté che c'erano molte vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci contro la non-esecuzione che non erano state esaminate dal richiedente nella presente causa. In primo luogo, la Costituzione garantisce ad ognuno la protezione giudiziale ed il diritto ad impugnare gli atti o l’ inazione delle autorità Statali nei tribunali. La Legge n. 4866-1 del 27 aprile 1993 e il Capitolo 25 del Codice di Procedura Civile permettono a simili azioni o inazioni di essere condannate da tribunali, aprendo così un modo per richiedere danni e portare procedimenti penali sotto l’Articolo 315 del Codice Penale contro i responsabile per i ritardi di esecuzione. Un esempio di giurisprudenza viene offerto: con una decisione del 13 luglio 2007 la Corte distrettuale di Leninskiy di Cheboksary, Repubblica Chuvashiya, trovò che l’inerzia del reparto della tesoreria regionale fosse illegale ed ordinò il pagamento dell'assegnazione giudiziale all'interno di una giornata lavorativa.
92. In secondo luogo, il Governo presentò che il Capitolo 59 del Codice civile forniva i motivi per chiedere il danno sia materiale che morale per il ritardo dell’esecuzione e che questa via di ricorso aveva provato la sua efficacia in pratica. Quattro esempi di giurisprudenza che assegnarono il risarcimento per danno morale furono offerti o furono citati (decisione del 23 ottobre 2006 nella causa Khakimovy della Corte distrettuale di Novo-Savinovskiy di Kazan, Repubblica di Tatarstan; decisioni consegnate in date non specificate, nella causa Akuginova ed altri da parte della CorteCivica di Elista, Repubblica di Kalmykiya; decisione del 3 agosto 2004 nella causa Butko della Corte distrettuale di Kirovskiy di Astrakhan; decisione del 28 marzo 2008 nella causa Shubin della Corte Civica di Beloretsk, Repubblica di Bashkortostan).
93. In terzo luogo, il Governo fece riferimento all’ Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile ed all’Articolo 395 del Codice civile per offrire i motivi per il risarcimento del danno materiale. Il primo concede assegnazioni giudiziali collegate all’indicizzazione e la sua applicazione non è condizionale alla costituzione di colpa per ritardi; molti esempi della sua applicazione ben riuscita furono offerti. Il secondo concede la richiesta di interessi di mora e l'ulteriore risarcimento per danno materiale supplementare che sorge da un’ esecuzione ritardata; furono fornite due decisioni delle Corti Supreme che applicavano questa disposizione in cause di non-esecuzione nel 2002 e 2006.
94. Infine, il Governo presentò che la Corte Suprema aveva preparato una bozza di una legge costituzionale che introduceva una via di ricorso nazionale contro la lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti giudiziali e l’esecuzione ritardata di sentenze e che sarebbe stata considerata brevemente col Governo.
95. Il Governo concluse che legge russa prevedeva un insieme di varie vie di ricorso che dovrebbero essere considerate globalmente ; sono state formulate con chiarezza e si applicavano in pratica come richiesto dall’ Articolo 13.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1. Principi Generali
96. La Corte richiama che l’Articolo 13 dà espressione diretta al primo e più importante obbligo degli Stati , custodito nell’Articolo 1 della Convenzione, di proteggere i diritti umani all'interno del loro proprio ordinamento giuridico. Richiede perciò che gli Stati offrano una via di ricorso nazionale per trattare la sostanza di un’ “azione di reclamo difendibile” sotto la Convenzione ed accordare il sollievo appropriato (vedere Kudła c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 152 ECHR 2000-XI).
97. La sfera degli obblighi degli Stati Contraenti sotto l’Articolo 13 variano a seconda della natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente; “l'efficacia” di una “ via di ricorso” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 13 non dipende dalla certezza di un risultato favorevole per il richiedente. Allo stesso tempo, la via di ricorso richiesta dall’ Articolo 13 deve essere, “efficace” in pratica così come in legge nel senso sia di prevenire la violazione addotta o la sua perpetrazione, sia di offrire compensazione adeguata per qualsiasi violazione che si è già verificata. Anche se una sola via di ricorso non soddisfa da sola completamente i requisiti dell’ Articolo 13, un insieme di vie di ricorso previsto sotto il diritto nazionale può riuscirci (vedere Kudła, citata sopra, §§ 157-158, e Wasserman c. Russia (n. 2), n. 21071/05, § 45 del 10 aprile 2008).
98. Riguardo più in particolare a cause di lunghezza del procedimento, una via di ricorso progettata per accelerare i procedimenti per impedire loro di divenire smodatamente lunghi è la soluzione più efficace (vedere Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 183 ECHR 2006 -...). Similmente, in cause riguardo alla non-esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali qualsiasi mezzo per prevenire una violazione che assicura l’esecuzione opportuna è, in principio, di più grande valore. Comunque, dove una sentenza è consegnata a favore di un individuo contro lo Stato, il primo non dovrebbe, in principio, essere obbligato ad utilizzare simili mezzi (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Metaxas citata sopra, § 19): il carico per attenersi a tale di sentenza è posto primariamente sulle autorità Statali che dovrebbero usare tutti i mezzi disponibili nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale in modo da accellerare l'esecuzione, prevenendo così violazioni della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Akashev citata sopra, §21-22).
99. Gli Stati possono scegliere anche di introdurre solamente una via di ricorso compensativa, senza che questa via di ricorso venga considerata inefficace. Dove è disponibile nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale tale via di ricorso compensativa, la Corte deve lasciare un margine più ampio di valutazione allo Stato per concedergli di organizzare la via di ricorso in modo coerente col suo proprio ordinamento giuridico e le sue tradizioni e consone allo standard di vita nel paese riguardato. La Corte è costretta nondimeno a verificare se il modo in cui il diritto nazionale viene interpretato e viene applicato produce conseguenze che sono coerenti coi principi della Convenzione, come interpretato alla luce della giurisprudenza della Corte (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 187-191). La Corte ha stabilito un criterio chiave per la verifica dell'efficacia di una via di ricorso compensativa riguardo alla lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti giudiziali. Questi criterio che si applica anche a cause di non-esecuzione (vedere Wasserman, citata sopra, §§ 49 e 51), è come segue:
•un'azione per il risarcimento deve essere ascoltata all'interno di un termine ragionevole (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 195 in fine);
•il risarcimento deve essere pagato prontamente e generalmente non al più tardi di sei mesi dalla data in cui la decisione che assegna il risarcimento diviene esecutiva (ibid., § 198);
•le regole procedurali che disciplinano un'azione per il risarcimento devono adattarsi al principio dell'equità garantito dall’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (l'ibid., § 200);
•gli articoli riguardo alle spese processuali non devono mettere un carico eccessivo sui contendenti nel caso in cui la loro azione sia giustificata (ibid., § 201);
•il livello del risarcimento non deve essere irragionevole rispetto alle assegnazioni fatte dalla Corte in cause simili (ibid., §§ 202-206 e 213).
100. In merito a questo ultimo criterio, la Corte indicò, che, riguardo al danno materiale, i tribunali nazionali chiaramente sono in una posizione migliore per determinarne l'esistenza e il quantum. Comunque, la situazione è diversa riguardo al danno morale. Là esiste una presunzione forte ma respingibile che procedimenti smodatamente lunghi causino un danno morale (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, §§ 203-204, e Wasserman, citata sopra, §50). La Corte considera che questa presunzione sia particolarmente forte nel caso di ritardo eccessivo nell’ esecuzione da parte dello Stato di una sentenza consegnata contro lui stesso, dato la frustrazione inevitabile che sorge dalla noncuranza dello Stato per il suo obbligo ad onorare il suo debito ed il fatto che il richiedente ha già superato procedimenti giudiziali ed ottenuto il successo.
2. L’applicazione dei principi alla presente causa
(a) vie di ricorso Preventive
101. La Corte richiama che già ha trovato in molte cause che non c'era una via di ricorso preventiva nell'ordinamento giuridico russo che avrebbe potuto accelerare l'esecuzione di una sentenza contro un'autorità Statale (vedere Lositskiy c. Russia, n. 24395/02, §§ 29-31, del 14 dicembre 2006, ed Isakov c. Russia, n. 20745/04, § 21-22 del 19 giugno 2008). Trovò in particolare che gli ufficiali giudiziari non avevano il potere di obbligare lo Stato a pagare il debito della sentenza.
102. L'incapacità degli ufficiali giudiziari di influenzare in qualsiasi il modo l'esecuzione delle sentenze a favore del richiedente, se non fosse per concedergli sollievo, fu dimostrata anche nella presente causa. Nell’aprile e nel giugno 2004 i procedimenti di esecuzione furono avviati da ufficiali giudiziari riguardo alle sentenze del 14 aprile e del 4 dicembre 2003. Nel luglio 2004 furono cessati senza portare nessun risultato. Il Consiglio d'amministrazione Regionale di Rostov del Ministero di Giustizia informò il richiedente con una lettera del 12 luglio 2004 che gli ufficiali giudiziari non avevano il potere di prendere finanziamenti dal conto bancario principale dell'autorità debitrice (лицевой счет), mentre il suo conto liquidazione (расчетный счет) da cui gli ufficiali giudiziari potrebbero prendere i finanziamenti, non conteneva nulla.
103. Il Governo considerò inoltre che un'altra via di ricorso prevista dal Capitolo 25 del Codice di Procedura Civile era capace di produrre un effetto preventivo. Ancora la Corte ha già valutato la sua efficacia e ha concluso che un ricorso giudiziale contro l'inerzia dell'autorità debitrice avrebbe prodotto una sentenza dichiaratoria che reiterava ciòe che era in qualsiasi caso evidente dalla sentenza originale, vale a dire che lo Stato dovesse onorare il suo debito (vedere Moroko, citata sopra, § 25). Riguardo alla capacità dei tribunali di ordinare un’azione riparatrice sotto l’Articolo 258 del Codice di Procedura Civile, questa nuova sentenza non porterebbe il richiedente più vicino alla sua meta desiderata che è il pagamento effettivo dell'assegnazione giudiziale (vedere Jasiūnienė c. Lituania (dec.), n. 41510/98, 24 ottobre 2000, e Plotnikovy c. Russia, n. 43883/02, § 16 del 24 febbraio 2005). È indicativo che, nel solo esempio dell’applicazione di questa disposizione presentato alla Corte (vedere paragrafo 91 sopra), il Governo non specificò se l'autorità imputata si fosse attenuta efficacemente all'ordine del tribunale nazionale di pagare l'assegnazione giudiziale all'interno di una giornata lavorativa. La Corte considera perciò che questa via di ricorso non concede prevenzione efficace di una violazione causata dalla non-esecuzione di una sentenza contro lo Stato.
104. Riguardo all’ Articolo 315 del Codice Penale menzionato dal Governo e l' ampio schieramento di sanzioni da prevedere, la Corte non esclude, che un’azione così coercitiva può contribuire a cambiare l'atteggiamento di coloro che hanno in modo non accettabilmente ritardato l'esecuzione delle sentenze. Comunque, la Corte non ha visto nessuna prova della sua efficacia in pratica. Al contrario, non ci si avvalse di nessuna di queste disposizioni nonostante le azioni di reclamo ripetute del richiedente alle autorità competenti, incluso gli accusatori (vedere paragrafo 80 sopra). La Corte non può considerare che questa disposizione sia efficace in queste circostanze, sia in teoria che in pratica come richiesto dall’Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
(b) vie di ricorso Compensative
(i) danno Materiale
105. La Corte ha considerato anche in molte occasioni che la questione dell'efficacia di certe vie di ricorso compensative su cui faceva affidamento il Governo.
106. Riguardo al risarcimento del danno materiale per i ritardi nell’ esecuzione, il Governo si riferì alle possibilità offerte dall’ Articolo 395 del Codice civile e dall’ Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile. Riguardo a ciò che precede, alla Corte è stata fornita la piccola prova che dimostra l'efficacia di questa via di ricorso. Le due sentenze citate dal Governo sono lontane dal mostrare l'esistenza di una giurisprudenza molto ampia e coerente a questo riguardo . Al contrario, in una delle due cause menzionate sopra i tribunali più bassi hanno respinto tre volte la rivendicazione per il risarcimento depositato sotto l’Articolo 395 per il fatto che il creditore non aveva provato che l'istituzione debitrice avesse usato la somma non retribuita per sé ed era stata così responsabile sotto quella disposizione. In questo collegamento la Corte si riferisce alla sua sentenza per cui una via di ricorso il cui uso è condizionale alla colpa del debitore è impraticabile in cause di non-esecuzione di sentenze da parte dello Stato (vedere Moroko, citata sopra, § 29, e paragrafi 111-113 sotto).
107. La situazione è diversa riguardo alla via di ricorso prevista dall’ Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile che concede assegnazioni valutarie collegate all’indicizzazione. La Corte nota che frequentemente ad individui, come il richiedente fu assegnato il risarcimento per perdite d’inflazione sulla base dell’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile. Di particolare importanza è il fatto enfatizzato dal Governo ed illustrato da specifici esempi che questo risarcimento è stato calcolato ed assegnato in una procedura diretta senza richiedere la colpa delle autorità o un’azione illegale che il querelante deve evidenziare. La Corte nota inoltre che questo risarcimento è calcolato sulla base di un indice ufficiale ed obiettivo dei prezzi al dettaglio che davvero riflettono il deprezzamento della valuta nazionale (confrontare Akkuş c. Turchia, 9 luglio 1997 §§ 30-31, Relazioni 1997-IV e Aka c. Turchia, 23 settembre 1998, §§ 48-51 Relazioni 1998-VI). Questa via di ricorso è così capace di compensare adeguatamente perdite d’inflazione. Il fatto che al richiedente fu assegnato anche simile risarcimento in numerose occasioni tende a confermare che la disposizione è applicabile dai tribunali in cause di non-esecuzione.
108. D'altra parte il pagamento di simili assegnazioni di risarcimento fu posticipato nella presente causa, minando severamente così l'efficacia di questa via di ricorso in pratica. La Corte accetta che le autorità hanno bisogno di tempo per effettuare il pagamento. Comunque, ricorda che il periodo generalmente non dovrebbe eccedere sei mesi dalla data in cui la decisione che assegna il risarcimento diviene esecutiva (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 198). Avendo riguardo a tutto il materiale a sua disposizione, la Corte non è convinta, che questo requisito venga soddisfatto sistematicamente riguardo al pagamento del risarcimento assegnato dai tribunali nazionali sotto l’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile. Comunque, presumendo anche che il requisito di pagamento veloce di simile risarcimento venga soddisfatto, questa via di ricorso non offrirebbe compensazione sufficiente siccome da sola può compensare solamente un danno che è il risultato del deprezzamento valutario (vedere paragrafo 59 sopra).
(ii) danno morale
109. La Corte deve considerare in seguito se il Capitolo 59 della Corte Civile a cui ha fatto riferimento il Governo costituisce una via di ricorso efficace per il risarcimento del danno morale nel caso di non-esecuzione di una decisione giudiziale. La Corte richiama che ha già valutato l'efficacia di questa via di ricorso in molte recenti cause nel contesto sia dell'Articolo 35 § 1 che dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
110. La Corte trovò che, mentre la possibilità di simile risarcimento non è stata esclusa totalmente, questa via di ricorso non offriva prospettive ragionevoli di successo, essendo notevolmente condizionale alla costituzione della colpa delle autorità (vedere Moroko, citata sopra, §§ 28-29). Il Governo non contestò nella presente causa che il risarcimento sotto il Capitolo 59 era soggetto a questa condizione, diversamente dall’ indicizzazione sotto l’Articolo 208 del Codice di Procedura Civile (vedere paragrafo 107 sopra).
111. La Corte assegna a questo riguardo una presunzione molto forte, benché respingibile, che un ritardo eccessivo nell’ esecuzione di una sentenza esecutiva e vincolante causerà un danno morale (vedere paragrafo 100 sopra). Il fatto che il risarcimento del danno morale in cause di non-esecuzione sia condizionale alla colpa dell'autorità rispondente è difficile da riconciliare con questa presunzione. I ritardi di esecuzione trovati dalla Corte non sono necessariamente dovuti alle debolezze dell'autorità rispondente in una data causa ma possono essere attribuibile a meccanismi deficienti a livello federale e/o locale, non meno alla complessità eccessiva ed al formalismo delle procedure budgetarie e finanziarie che ritardano notevolmente i finanziamenti fra le autorità responsabili ed il loro susseguente pagamento ai beneficiari finali.
112. La Corte nota che il Codice civile elenca un numero molto limitato di situazioni in cui il risarcimento per danno morale è recuperabile senza tener conto della colpa del convenuto (in particolare gli Articoli 1070 § 1 e 1100). Nessun procedimenti smodatamente lungo né ritardo nell’esecuzione delle decisioni giudiziali appare in questa lista . Il Codice prevede, inoltre, che il danno causato dall'amministrazione della giustizia venga compensato se la colpa del giudice viene stabilita da una condanna giudiziale definitiva (Articolo 1070 § 2).
113. A fronte di questo background, la Corte Costituzionale sostenne nel 2001 che il diritto costituzionale al risarcimento dello Stato per il danno causato da atti procedurali, incluso i procedimenti smodatamente lunghi, non dovrebbe essere legato alla colpa individuale di un giudice. Facendo riferimento, inter alia, all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione la Corte Costituzionale ha sostenuto che il Parlamento dovrebbe legiferare nell’ambito e sulla procedura di simile risarcimento. Comunque, la Corte nota che nessuna legislazione è stata decretata ancora a quell'effetto.
114. Il Governo dibatté nondimeno che il Capitolo 59 era stato applicato con successo in pratica, citando quattro specifici esempi di giurisprudenza nazionale. La Corte nota che gli stessi esempi che sono stati citati dal Governo in altre cause simili confermano la sua prospettiva che appaiono come casi eccezionali ed isolati piuttosto che una prova di giurisprudenza stabilita e coerente. Loro non possono alterare perciò la precedente conclusione della Corte per cui la via di ricorso in questione non è efficace in teoria e in pratica.
115. Inoltre, la Corte nota che anche in cause così eccezionali di applicazione del Capitolo 59 il livello del risarcimento assegnato per danno morale fosse a volte irragionevolmente basso rispetto alle assegnazioni rese dalla Corte in simili cause di non-esecuzione. Per esempio, nella causa Butko citata dal Governo il querelante ha ricevuto RUB 2,000 (EUR 55) riguardo il danno morale (decisione del 3 agosto 2004). Lo stesso importo fu assegnato anche sotto questo capo a V. M. nella causa Akuginova ed altri menzionata dal Governo (decisione del 22 gennaio 2006). La Corte richiama ulteriormente che ha già trovato in due altre cause che gli importi assegnati ai richiedenti riguardo al danno morale incorse per esecuzione tarda di sentenze fossero manifestamente irragionevoli alla luce della giurisprudenza della Corte (vedere Wasserman, citata sopra, § 56, e Gayvoronskiy c. Russia, n. 13519/02, § 39 25 marzo 2008). Il risarcimento era, inoltre, assegnò in procedimenti smodatamente lunghi nella prima causa e era stato pagato con considerevole ritardo nella seconda.
116. Avendo riguardo ai difetti summenzionati, la Corte considera, che la via di ricorso prevista dal Capitolo 59 del Codice civile non può essere considerata come efficace sia in teoria che in pratica come richiesto dall’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
(c) la Conclusione
117. La Corte conclude che non c'era nessuna via di ricorso nazionale efficace, preventiva o compensativa che lasciasse spazio ad una compensazione adeguata e sufficiente nel caso di violazioni della Convenzione per la non-esecuzione prolungata di decisioni giudiziali consegnate contro lo Stato o i suoi enti. C'è di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
118. Appellandosi all’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione, il richiedente si lamentò della discriminazione per il fallimento addotto delle autorità nell’applicazione dell’ Atto di Assicurazione Sociale Obbligatoria del 1998 (No.125-ÔÇ) ai liquidatori del disastro di Chernobyl negli stessi termini degli altri gruppi professionali. Lui presentò in particolare che lui non aveva ricevuto l’interesse di mora come previsto da questo Atto. Il Governo dibatté che questa questione concerneva l’applicazione del diritto nazionale e rientrava solamente all'interno della competenza dei tribunali nazionali.
119. La Corte nota che la sentenza della Corte Civica di Shakhty del 4 dicembre 2003 ha concesso la rivendicazione del richiedente sotto l'Atto summenzionato (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). In qualsiasi caso, l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sulla discriminazione addotta avrebbe dovuto essere presentata prima ai tribunali nazionali sotto l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione. Il richiedente non riuscì a dimostrare che lui aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali a questo riguardo . Né lui provò la sua dichiarazione di fronte alla Corte. La Corte non trova perciò nessuna parvenza di violazione dell’Articolo 14 e respinge questa azione di reclamo.
IV. AMMANCO ADDOTTO NEL PAGAMENTO DELLA SODDISFAZIONE EQUO DOVUTA SOTTO LA SENTENZA DELLA CORTE DEL 7 MAGGIO 2002
120. Il richiedente si lamentò anche dell'insuccesso delle autorità nel pagamento del pieno importo della soddisfazione equa assegnata dalla sentenza della Corte del 7 maggio 2002. Secondo il suo calcolo, la somma di EUR 3,000 assegnata era equivalente nella data di pagamento a RUB 94,981.50, mentre lui ricevette solamente RUB 92,724.60. Rivendicava di conseguenza un ammanco di RUB 2,256.90.
121. La Corte reitera che sotto Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione, la soprintendenza dell'esecuzione delle sue sentenze è affidata al Comitato dei Ministri (vedere paragrafi 10-11 sopra). La Corte non ha nessuna competenza per esaminare questa azione di reclamo che avrebbe dovuta essere presentata al Comitato dei Ministri (vedere Haase ed altri c. Germania (il dec.), n. 34499/04, 7 febbraio 2008).
C. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
122. La Corte nota all'inizio che la non-esecuzione o l’esecuzione ritardata di sentenze nazionali costituisce un problema ricorrente in Russia che ha condotto a numerose violazioni della Convenzione. La Corte ha già trovato simili violazioni in più di 200 sentenze fin dalla prima sentenza simile nella causa Burdov nel 2002. La Corte trova perciò opportuno ed appropriato considerare questa seconda causa portata dallo stesso richiedente sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione che si legge come segue:
“L'Articolo 46 forza vincolante ed esecuzione di sentenze
1. Le Alti Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in qualsiasi causa in cui loro sono parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte sarà trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri che soprintenderà alla sua esecuzione.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
123. Il richiedente presentò che il ricorrente insuccesso delle autorità russe nell’esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali nazionali consegnate contro loro costituiva un problema sistematico come dimostrato dalla non-esecuzione ripetuta di simili decisioni nel suo caso.
124. Il Governo dibatté che nessun problema di questo tipo esisteva riguardo sia all’esecuzione di sentenze che vie di ricorso nazionali. Dibatté che la Corte Costituzionale non aveva contestato l'esistenza di una procedura speciale per l'esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali contro lo Stato (sentenza del 14 luglio 2005). C'erano ulteriori specifiche regolamentazioni che disciplinavano il pagamento di benefit alle vittime di Chernobyl. Nel 2007 considerevoli allocazioni budgetarie furono fatte inoltre per pagare pendenze debitorie sotto le sentenze nazionali e le necessità effettive in simili finanziamenti erano riflesse nel bilancio del 2007. Il Governo concluse che c'erano meccanismi chiari per l’esecuzione di simili decisioni, in particolare riguardo alle vittime di Chernobyl. La complessità di questi meccanismi era attribuibile alla struttura a vari livelli del sistema budgetario ed al bisogno di coordinazione fra le autorità federali e locali. Il Governo presentò, inoltre, delle informazioni statistiche sull’ esecuzione di sentenze fornite dai ministeri federali e dagli ufficiali giudiziari.
B. la valutazione della Corte
1. Principi Generali
125. La Corte richiama che Articolo 46 della Convenzione, come interpretato alla luce dell’ Articolo 1, impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo legale di implementare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato dei Ministri misure individuali e/o generali appropriate per assicurare il diritto del richiedente che la Corte ha trovato essere stato violato. Simili misure devono essere prese anche riguardo ad altre persone nella posizione del richiedente, in particolare risolvendo i problemi che hanno condotto alle sentenze della Corte (vedere Scozzari e Giunta c. Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249 ECHR 2000 VIII; Christine Goodwin c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 28957/95, § 120 ECHR 2002 VI; Lukenda c. Slovenia, n. 23032/02, § 94 ECHR 2005-X; e S. e Marper c. Regno Unito [GC], N. 30562/04 e 30566/04, § 134 ECHR 2008...). Questo obbligo è stato enfatizzato costantemente dal Comitato dei Ministri nella soprintendenza dell'esecuzione delle sentenze della Corte (vedere, fra molte autorità, Decisioni Provvisorie DH(97)336 in cause riguardo alla lunghezza di procedimenti in Italia; DH(99)434 in cause riguardo all'azione delle forze di sicurezza in Turchia; ResDH(2001)65 nella causa Scozzari e Giunta c. Italia; ResDH(2006)1 nelle cause Ryabykh e Volkova).
126. Per facilitare l’attuazione efficace delle sue sentenze lungo queste linee la Corte può adottare una procedura di sentenza pilota che le conceda chiaramente di identificare in una sentenza l'esistenza di problemi strutturali sottostanti le violazioni ed indicare le specifiche misure o azioni che debbono essere prese dallo stato rispondente per rimediarli (vedere Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], 31443/96, §§ 189-194 e la parte operativa, ECHR 2004-V, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC] n. 35014/97, ECHR 2006 -... §§ 231-239 e la parte operativa). Questo approccio aggiudicativo viene intrapreso con dovuto riguardo comunque alle rispettive funzioni degli organi della Convenzione: spetta al Comitato dei Ministri valutare l'attuazione di misure generali e individuali sotto l’Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski c. Polonia (regolamento amichevole) [GC], n. 31443/96, § 42, ECHR 2005-IX, e Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia ( regolamento amichevole) [GC], n. 35014/97, § 42 del 28 aprile 2008).
127. Un altro importante scopo della procedura della sentenza pilota è incitare lo Stato rispondente a chiarire i grandi numeri di cause individuali che sorgono dallo stesso problema strutturale a livello nazionale, perfezionando così il principio di sussidiarietà che sostiene il sistema della Convenzione. Effettivamente, il compito della Corte, come definito dall’ Articolo 19, che è “assicurare l'osservanza degli impegni sottoscritti dalle Alte Parti Contraenti nella Convenzione ed inoltre nei Protocolli”, non è realizzato necessariamente meglio ripetendo le stesse sentenze in una grande serie di cause (vedere, mutatis mutandis, E.G. c. Polonia (dec.), n. 50425/99, § 27, 23 settembre 2008 § 27). L'oggetto della procedura della sentenza pilota è facilitare la soluzione più veloce ed efficace di una disfunzione che colpisce la protezione dei diritti della Convenzione in questione di ordine legale e nazionale (vedere Wolkenberg ed Altri c. Polonia (dec.), n. 50003/99, § 34 ECHR 2007 -... (gli estratti)). Mentre l'azione dello Stato rispondente dovrebbe mirare primariamente alla decisione di tale disfunzione ed all'introduzione, dove appropriato, di vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci riguardo alle violazioni in questione, può includere anche soluzioni ad hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatrici ed unilaterali in linea coi requisiti della Convenzione. La Corte può decidere di aggiornare l’esame di tutte le cause simili, dando così allo Stato rispondente un'opportunità di sistemarle in modi così vari (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Broniowski citata sopra, § 198, e Xenides-Arestis c. Turchia, n. 46347/99, § 50 22 dicembre 2005).
128. Comunque, se gli Stati rispondenti falliscono nell’adozione di simile misuri a seguito di una sentenza pilota e continua a violare la Convenzione, la Corte non avrà nessuna alternativa se non quella di riprendere l’esame di tutte le richieste simili pendenti di fronte a sé e portarle a giudizio così da assicurare l’osservanza effettiva della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, E.G., citata sopra, § 28).
2. La richiesta dei principi alla causa presente
(a) l’applicazione della procedura della sentenza pilota
129. La Corte nota che la presente causa può essere distinta per certi aspetti dalle precedenti “cause pilota”, come Broniowski e Hutten-Czapska, per esempio. Infatti, persone nella stessa posizione del richiedente non appartengono necessariamente “ad una classe identificabile di cittadini” (confronta Broniowski, citata sopra, § 189, e Hutten-Czapska, citata sopra, § 229). Inoltre, le due sentenze summenzionate erano le prime ad identificare nuovi problemi strutturali alla radice di numerose cause consecutive e simili, mentre la presente causa viene considerata dopo che circa 200 sentenze hanno accentuato ampiamente il problema di non-esecuzione in Russia.
130. Ciononostante queste differenze, la Corte lo considera appropriato applicare la procedura della sentenza pilota in questa causa, dato la natura ricorrente e persistente dei problemi fondamentali, un gran numero di persone colpite da questi in Russia ed il bisogno urgente di accordare loro compensazione veloce ed appropriata a livello nazionale.
(b) Esistenza di una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione
131. La Corte trova, all'inizio, che le violazioni trovate nella presente sentenza non furono provocate né da un incidente isolato, né erano attribuibili ad una particolare svolta di eventi in questa causa, ma erano piuttosto la conseguenza dei difetti regolatori e/o della condotta amministrativa delle autorità nell'esecuzione di sentenze esecutive e vincolanti che ordinano pagamenti monetari da parte di autorità Statali (confronta Broniowski, citata sopra, § 189, e Hutten-Czapska, citata sopra, § 229).
132. Benché il Governo negasse tale situazione nelle sue osservazioni supplementari, le sue osservazioni nella presente causa sembrano andare verso un riconoscimento quasi incontrastato sia a livello nazionale che internazionale dell'esistenza di problemi strutturali in questo campo (vedere paragrafi 25 e 38-45 sopra). I problemi sembrano, inoltre, essere stati ammessi dalle autorità competenti russe (vedere CM/Inf/DH(2006)45 in particolare, citata sopra) e è stata enfatizzata ripetutamente dal Comitato dei Ministri. Le recenti decisioni del Comitato notarono, in particolare, che i problemi strutturali in oggetto nell'ordinamento giuridico russo hanno severamente colpito, per loro natura e scala, la sua efficacia e provocato numerosissime violazioni della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra).
133. Le importanti preoccupazioni espresse e le sentenze rese dalle varie autorità ed istituzioni sono concordi con le 200 sentenze della Corte che hanno accentuato gli aspetti multipli dei problemi strutturali fondamentali che non colpiscono solamente le vittime di Chernobyl come nella presente causa, ma anche altri grandi gruppi della popolazione russa, incluso particolarmente alcuni gruppi vulnerabili. E’ stato scoperto che lo Stato molto frequentemente ha rimandato notevolmente l'esecuzione di decisioni giudiziali che ordinavano il pagamento di benefit sociali come pensioni o assegni famigliari per i figli, del risarcimento per danno subito durante il servizio militare o del risarcimento per accusa sbagliata. La Corte non può ignorare il fatto che approssimativamente 700 cause concernenti fatti simili sono attualmente pendenti di fronte a sé contro la Russia e che alcune delle cause, come la presente conducono la Corte a trovare un secondo set di violazioni della Convenzione riguardo gli stessi richiedenti (vedere Wasserman (n. 2), citata sopra, e Kukalo c. Russia (n. 2), n. 11319/04, 24 luglio 2008). Inoltre, le vittime della non-esecuzione o dell’esecuzione ritardata non dispongono di nessuna via di ricorso efficace, preventiva o compensativa che lasci spazio ad una compensazione adeguata sufficiente a livello nazionale (vedere paragrafi 101-117 sopra).
134. Le sentenze della Corte, prese in concomitanza con l'altro materiale in sua proprietà così chiaramente indicano che simili violazioni riflettono una persistente disfunzione strutturale. La Corte nota con grave preoccupazione che le violazioni trovate nella presente sentenza si sono verificate molti anni dopo la sua prima sentenza del 7 maggio 2002, nonostante l'obbligo della Russia sotto l’Articolo 46 di adottare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato dei Ministri le necessarie misure preventive riparatrici , sia a livello individuale che generale. La Corte nota in particolare che l’ inadempienza con una delle sentenze a favore del richiedente è durata sino all’ agosto 2007, non da ultimo a causa dell'insuccesso delle autorità competenti nell’adozione di procedure necessarie (vedere paragrafi 80-81 sopra).
135. In prospettiva di ciò che, la Corte conclude, che la presente situazione deve essere qualificata come una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione (vedere Bottazzi c.'Italia [GC], n. 34884/97, § 22 ECHR 1999-V ).
(c) misure generali
136. La Corte nota che i problemi alla base delle violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 trovate in questa causa sono di grande potenza e di natura complessa . Effettivamente, non sono scaturiti da una specifica disposizione legale o regolatrice o una particolare lacuna nella legge russa. Loro richiedono di conseguenza l'attuazione di misure comprensive e complesse, possibilmente di un carattere legislativo ed amministrativo che coinvolga le varie autorità a livello sia federale che locale. Soggetto all’esame del Comitato dei Ministri, lo Stato rispondente è libero di scegliere i mezzi con cui assolverà il suo obbligo legale sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, purché simili mezzi siano compatibili con le conclusioni stabilite sentenza della Corte (vedere Scozzari e Giunta, citata sopra, § 249).
137. La Corte nota che l'adozione di simili misure è stata considerata completamente dal Comitato dei Ministri in cooperazione con le autorità competenti russe (vedere decisioni e documenti citati nei paragrafi 39-40 sopra). Le decisioni e i documenti del Comitato mostrano che benché l'attuazione delle misure necessarie sia lontano dall'essere completata, ulteriori azioni vengono considerate o prese a questo riguardo (vedere le principali vie delineate nel paragrafo 40 sopra). La Corte nota che questa elaborazione solleva un numero di complessi problemi legali e pratici che vanno, in principio, oltre la funzione giudiziale della Corte. Si asterrà così in queste circostanze dall'indicare qualsiasi specifica misura generale da prendere. Il Comitato dei Ministri è messo meglio ed attrezzato per esaminare le riforme necessarie che devono essere adottate dalla Russia a questo riguardo. La Corte lascia perciò al Comitato di Ministri di garantire che la Federazione russa, in conformità coi suoi obblighi sotto la Convenzione, adotti le misure necessarie coerenti con le conclusioni della Corte nella presente sentenza.
138. Comunque, la Corte osserva che la situazione è diversa riguardo la violazione dell’ Articolo 13 a causa della mancanza di vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci. In conformità con l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione, i ritrovamenti della Corte nei paragrafi 101-117 sopra chiaramente richiedono la predisposizione di una via di ricorso nazionale efficace o una combinazione di vie di ricorso che permettono che una compensazione adeguata sufficiente venga accordata ai grandi numeri di persone colpite dalle violazioni in oggetto. Sembra estremamente improbabile alla luce delle conclusioni della Corte che tale via di ricorso efficace può essere stabilita senza cambiare la legislazione nazionale su certi specifici punti.
139. A questo riguardo, la Corte dà importanza considerevole alle sentenze della Corte Costituzionale russa che hanno invitato il Parlamento dal gennaio 2001 a preparare una procedura per il risarcimento di danno che nasce, inter alia, da procedimenti smodatamente lunghi. Di particolare importanza è la sentenza resa in particolare con riferimento all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione per cui simile risarcimento non dovrebbe essere condizionale alla costituzione di colpa (vedere paragrafo 32-33 sopra). La Corte dà il benvenuto anche recentemente l'iniziativa legislativa presa con la Corte Suprema in questa area e nota i conti proposero in Parlamento 30 settembre 2008 con una prospettiva ad introducendo via di ricorso in riguardo sulle violazioni in oggetto (veda divide in paragrafi 34-36 sopra). La Corte nota con interesse il riferimento agli standard della Convenzione come base per determinare il risarcimento per danno, e che gli importi medi del risarcimento per l’ esecuzione ritardata sono stati calcolati con riferimento alla giurisprudenza della Corte (vedere paragrafi 35 e 36 sopra).
140. Comunque, non spetta alla Corte valutare l'adeguatezza complessiva della riforma in corso, né specificare quale sarebbe il modo più appropriato di preparare le vie di ricorso nazionali necessarie (vedere Hutten-Czapska, citata sopra, § 239). Lo Stato può sia correggere la serie esistente di vie di ricorso legali sia può aggiungere nuove vie di ricorso per assicurare una compensazione sinceramente efficace per la violazione dei diritti della Convenzione riguardati (vedere Lukenda, citata sopra, § 98; Xenides-Arestis, citata sopra, § 40). Spetta anche allo Stato assicurare, sotto la soprintendenza del Comitato dei Ministri che una nuova via di ricorso o una combinazione di vie di ricorso rispetti sia in teoria che in pratica i requisiti della Convenzione come esposti nella presente sentenza (vedere in particolare §§ 96-100). Nel fare così, le autorità possono avere anche il dovuto riguardo alla Raccomandazione del Comitato dei Ministri Rec(2004)6 agli stati membri sul miglioramento delle vie di ricorso nazionali.
141. La Corte conclude di conseguenza che lo Stato rispondente deve introdurre una via di ricorso che assicuri compensazione sinceramente efficace per le violazioni della Convenzione a causa della prolungata inosservanza delle autorità Statali di decisioni giudiziali consegnate contro lo Stato o i suoi enti. Tale via di ricorso deve adattarsi ai principi della Convenzione come stabilito in particolare nella presente sentenza e essere disponibile entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diviene definitiva (confrontare Xenides-Arestis, citata sopra, § 40 e punto5 della parte operativa).
(d) Compensi essere accordato in cause simili
142. La Corte richiama che uno degli scopi della procedura della sentenza pilota è concedere la compensazione più veloce possibile da accordare a livello nazionale a numerose persone che subiscono il problema strutturale identificato nella sentenza pilota (vedere paragrafo 127 sopra). Può essere deciso così nella sentenza pilota che i procedimenti in tutte le cause che scaturiscono dallo stesso problema strutturale siano aggiornati essendo pendente l'attuazione delle misure attinenti allo Stato rispondente. La Corte considera appropriato adottare un simile approccio seguendo la presente sentenza, differenziando le cause già pendenti di fronte alla Corte e quelle che potrebbero essere portate nel futuro.
(i) le Richieste depositata dopo la consegna della presente sentenza
143. La Corte aggiornerà i procedimenti su tutte le nuove richieste depositate con la Corte dopo la consegna della presente sentenza in cui i richiedenti si lamentano solamente della non-esecuzione e/ del ritardo dell’ esecuzione di sentenze nazionali che ordinano pagamenti monetari da parte di autorità Statali. L'aggiornamento sarà efficace per un periodo di un anno dopo che la presente sentenza diverrà definitivo. I richiedenti in queste cause sarebbero informati di conseguenza.
(ii) le Richieste depositate prima della consegna della presente sentenza
144. Comunque, la Corte decide di seguire un corso diverso di azione riguardo le richieste depositate prima della consegna della sentenza. Nella prospettiva della Corte, sarebbe ingiusto se i richiedenti in simili cause che subiscono presumibilmente da anni continue violazioni del loro diritto ad un tribunale hanno chiesto il sollievo in questa Corte, sono ancora obbligati a presentare di nuovo le loro offese alle autorità nazionali, anche se fosse sulla base di una nuova via di ricorso.
145. La Corte considera perciò che lo Stato rispondente deve accordare una compensazione adeguata sufficiente, entro un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva a tutte le vittime di non-pagamento o pagamento irragionevolmente ritardato da parte di autorità Statali di un debito di una sentenza nazionale a loro favore che hanno depositato le loro richieste con la Corte prima della consegna della presente sentenza e le cui richieste furono comunicate al Governo sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2(b) degli Articoli della Corte. Si ricorda che ritardi nell'esecuzione di sentenze dovrebbero essere calcolati e dovrebbero essere valutati con riferimento ai requisiti della Convenzione e, in particolare, in conformità col criterio come definito nella presente sentenza (vedere in particolare paragrafi 66-67 e 73 sopra). Nella prospettiva della Corte, simile compensazione può essere implementata proprio motu tramite attuazione da parte delle autorità di una via di ricorso nazionale efficace in queste cause o tramite soluzioni ad hoc come regolamenti amichevoli coi richiedenti od offerte riparatrici ed unilaterali in linea coi requisiti della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 127 sopra).
146. Essendo pendente l'adozione di misure riparatrici nazionali da parte delle autorità russe, la Corte decide di aggiornare i procedimenti di confronto in tutte queste cause per un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva. Questa decisione non pregiudica il potere della Corte in qualsiasi momento di dichiarare inammissibile qualsiasi causa simile o cancellarla dal suo ruolo a seguito di un regolamento amichevole fra le parti o alla decisione della questione con altri mezzi in conformità con gli Articoli 37 o 39 della Convenzione.
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
147. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
148. Il richiedente chiese una somma globale di EUR 40,000 riguardo il danno materiale e morale. Lui fece riferimento a sofferenze causate del ripetuto e persistente fallimento dello Stato nell’attenersi alle sentenze nazionali nonostante la sua prima richiesta di successo alla Corte. Lui sostenne la sua rivendicazione per danno materiale con l’ insuccesso addotto delle autorità di pagarlo interesse di mora sotto l'Atto di Assicurazione Sociale Obbligatoria del 998 (vedere paragrafo 118 sopra).
149. Il Governo presentò che il richiedente non aveva sofferto di nessun danno materiale e che una sentenza di una violazione avrebbe offerto una soddisfazione equa adeguata per qualsiasi danno subito. Fece riferimento a certe cause di non-esecuzione in cui la Corte o aveva assegnato importi modesti (Plotnikovy c. Russia, n. 43883/02, § 34 del 24 febbraio 2005) riguardo il danno morale o aveva deciso che la costatazione di una violazione era sufficiente (Poznakhirina c. Russia, n. 25964/02, 24 febbraio 2005; Shapovalova c. Russia, n. 2047/03, 5 ottobre 2006; Shestopalova ed Altri c. Russia, n. 39866/02, 17 novembre 2005; e Bobrova c. Russia, n. 24654/03, 17 novembre 2005).
150. La Corte richiama che ha respinto l'azione di reclamo del richiedente per il non-pagamento dell’ interesse di mora sotto l' Atto di Assicurazione Sociale Obbligatoria del1998 (vedere paragrafo 119 sopra); respinge perciò anche la rivendicazione del richiedente per danno materiale a questo riguardo .
151. Riguardo al danno morale, la Corte accetta che il richiedente soffrì di angoscia mentale e di frustrazione a causa delle violazioni trovate. La Corte considera inoltre che la questione è pronta per una decisione e può essere considerata nella presente sentenza senza aspettare l'adozione di misure generali come deciso sopra (vedere paragrafo 141 sopra).
152. La Corte non può confarsi col Governo che una sentenza di una violazione offrirebbe la soddisfazione equa adeguata. La Corte si riferisce a questo riguardo una presunzione molto forte che le l'inadempienza delle autorità o l’ ottemperanza ritardata con una sentenza esecutiva e vincolante causerà un danno morale (vedere paragrafi 100 e 111 sopra). Chiaramente traspare dalla grande maggioranza delle sue sentenze che simili violazioni della Convenzione danno origine, in principio, alla frustrazione e all'angoscia che non possono essere compensate con la mera costatazione di una violazione.
153. Contro questo background, le cause a cui ha fatto riferimento il Governo sembrano piuttosto eccezionali. Effettivamente, la posizione della Corte in queste cause può essere spiegata dalle loro circostanze molto specifiche, non meno dalla piccola entità delle assegnazioni dei tribunali nazionali (meno di EUR 100 nella maggior parte delle cause) ed il significato marginale delle assegnazioni in relazione ai redditi dei richiedenti (vedere Poznakhirina, citata sopra, § 35).
154. La Corte richiama che determina l’entità delle assegnazioni per danno morale prendendo in conto fattori come l'età del richiedente, reddito personale, la natura delle assegnazioni dei tribunali nazionali la lunghezza dei procedimenti di esecuzione e gli altri aspetti attinenti (vedere Plotnikovy, citata sopra, §34). La salute del richiedente è presa anche in considerazione, così come il numero delle sentenze che non sono state eseguite in modo appropriato e/o puntualmente . Tutti questi fattori possono colpire a vari gradi l'assegnazione della Corte riguardo il danno morale e possono anche condurre, insolitamente, a nessuna assegnazione del tutto. Allo stesso tempo, è stato dimostrato piuttosto chiaramente dalla giurisprudenza della Corte che simili assegnazioni sono, in principio direttamente proporzionali al periodo durante cui una sentenza esecutiva e vincolante è rimasta non eseguita.
155. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte richiama che con la sentenza del 7 maggio 2002 assegnò EUR 3,000 allo stesso richiedente riguardo al danno morale subito a causa di ritardi dell’ esecuzione che variano fra circa uno e tre anni all'interno della giurisdizione della Corte e concernenti tre sentenze nazionali (vedere Burdov, citata sopra, §§36 e 47).
156. Nella presente causa richiedente subì comparabili ritardi di esecuzione riguardo a simili assegnazioni giudiziali sotto altre tre sentenze nazionali. Di conseguenza, le violazioni trovate dalla Corte possono, in principio, richiamare un'assegnazione di soddisfazione equa uguale o molto vicino alla decisione della sentenza del 7 maggio 2002. La Corte, inoltre, terrà presente che lo stress e la frustatine derivanti dalla non esecuzione di sentenze nazionali può seriamente minare , come questione di principio, la fiducia dei cittadini nel sistema giudiziale. Questo fattore doveva essere bilanciato comunque attentamente contro l'atteggiamento e gli sforzi dello Stato rispondente per combattere tale pratica nella prospettiva di soddisfare i suoi obblighi sotto la Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 137 sopra). La Corte deve prendere anche in conto delle circostanze speciali supplementari nella presente causa. Effettivamente, si deve accettare che l'angoscia del richiedente e la frustrazione furono esacerbate dall’ insuccesso persistente delle autorità nell’ onorare i loro debiti sotto le sentenze nazionali nonostante la prima costatazione di violazioni da parte della Corte nella sua causa. Di conseguenza, il richiedente non aveva nessuna alternativa se non chiedere di nuovo il sollievo tramite la lunga causa internazionale di fronte alla Corte. In prospettiva di questo importante elemento, la Corte considera, che un'assegnazione aumentata sarebbe appropriata riguardo il danno non-materiale nella presente causa.
157. Avendo riguardo a ciò che precede e facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna EUR 6,000 al richiedente riguardo al danno morale.
B. Costi e spese
158. Il richiedente non chiese alcun risarcimento per costi e spese. La Corte non fa perciò assegnazione sotto questo capo.
C. Interesse di mora
159. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara ammissibile l'azione di reclamo riguardo alla prolungata inosservanza delle autorità delle sentenze esecutive e vincolanti a favore del richiedente ed il resto delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente inammissibili;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa dell'insuccesso prolungato dello Stato nell’esecuzione di tre sentenze nazionali che ordinavano pagamenti monetari da parte delle autorità al richiedente;
3. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa dell'esecuzione delle sentenze del 22 maggio 2007 e del 21 agosto 2007;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione a causa della mancanza di vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci riguardo alla non-esecuzione o esecuzione ritardata di sentenze a favore del richiedente;
5. Sostiene che le violazioni sopra nacquero da una pratica incompatibile con la Convenzione che consisteva nell'insuccesso ricorrente dello Stato nell’ onorare debiti di sentenza ed riguardo dei quali le parti offese non hanno vie di ricorso nazionali ed efficaci;
6. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente deve predisporre , entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, una via di ricorso nazionale efficace o una combinazione di simili vie di ricorso che assicurano compensazione adeguata e sufficiente per la non-esecuzione o l’esecuzione ritardata di sentenze nazionali in linea coi principi della Convenzione come stabilito nella giurisprudenza della Corte;
7. Sostiene che lo Stato rispondente deve accordare simile compensazione, entro un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva a tutte le vittime del non-pagamento o del pagamento irragionevolmente ritardato da parte delle autorità Statali di un debito di sentenza a loro favore che hanno depositato le loro richieste con la Corte prima della consegna della presente sentenza e le cui richieste furono comunicate al Governo sotto l’Articolo 54 § 2(b) degli Articoli della Corte;
8. Sostiene che essendo pendente l'adozione delle misure sopra, la Corte aggiornerà, per un anno dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva, i procedimenti in tutte le cause concernenti solamente la non-esecuzione e/o l’ esecuzione ritardata di sentenze nazionali che ordinano pagamenti monetari da parte delle autorità Statali, senza pregiudicare il potere della Corte di dichiarare inammissibile a qualsiasi momento ogni causa simile o di cancellarla dal ruolo a seguito di un regolamento amichevole fra le parti o della decisione della questione tramite altri mezzi in conformità con gli Articoli 37 o 39 della Convenzione;
9. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare al richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva EUR 6,000 (sei mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, riguardo il danno morale da convertire in Rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
10. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 15 gennaio 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.