Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BULVES AD v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, P1-1

NUMERO: 3991/03/2009
STATO: Bulgaria
DATA: 22/01/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1; Pecuniary damage - award; Non-pecuniary damage - finding of a violation sufficient
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF “BULVES” AD v. BULGARIA
(Application no. 3991/03)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
22 January 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of “Bulves” AD v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Rait Maruste,
Karel Jungwiert,
Renate Jaeger,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 16 December 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 3991/03) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court on 23 January 2003 under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by “B.” AD, a Bulgarian joint-stock company set up in 1996 with its registered office in Plovdiv (“the applicant company”).
2. The applicant company was represented by Mr M. E. and Mrs S. S., lawyers practising in Plovdiv.
3. The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agents, Ms M. Karadjova and Ms M. Kotzeva, of the Ministry of Justice.
4. The applicant company alleged, in particular, that in spite of its full compliance with its statutory VAT reporting obligations, the domestic authorities had deprived it of the right to deduct the input VAT it had paid on a supply of goods received by it, because its supplier had been late in complying with its own VAT reporting obligations. It also argued that this difference in treatment was discriminatory.
5. On 24 November 2005 the Court decided to give notice to the Government of the above-mentioned complaints by the applicant company. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. The taxable transaction
6. On 16 August 2000 the applicant company purchased goods from another company (“the supplier”).
7. Both companies were registered under the Value Added Tax Act 1999 (“the VAT Act”) and the transaction constituted a taxable supply under the said Act.
8. The total cost of the received supply was 21,660 Bulgarian levs (BGN) (11,107 euros (EUR)), of which BGN 18,050 (EUR 9,256) was the value of the goods and BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) was value-added tax (“VAT”).
9. The supplier issued invoice no. 12/16.08.2000 to the applicant company, which the latter paid in full, including the VAT of BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851).
10. The applicant company recorded the purchase in its accounting records for the month of August 2000 and filed its VAT return for that period by 15 September 2000.
11. The supplier, on the other hand, did not record the sale in its accounting records for the month of August 2000, but for October 2000, and reported it in its VAT return for the latter period, which it filed on 14 November 2000.
B. The VAT audit
12. On an unspecified date the tax authorities conducted a VAT audit of the applicant company covering the period from 10 February to 31 December 2000. In the course of the inspection a cross-check of the supplier was conducted in order to ascertain whether it had properly reported and recorded the supply in its accounting records. As a result, the above reporting discrepancy was discovered (see paragraphs 10 and 11 above).
13. On 31 January 2001 the “Yug” Tax Office of the Plovdiv Territorial Tax Directorate issued the applicant company with a tax assessment. It refused the applicant company the right to deduct the VAT it had paid to its supplier (“the input VAT”), amounting to BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851), because the supplier had entered the supply in its accounting records for the month of October 2000 and had reported it for that period rather than for August 2000. The Territorial Tax Directorate therefore considered that no VAT had been “charged” on the supply in the August 2000 tax period, that the applicant company could not therefore deduct the amount it had paid to its supplier as VAT and, furthermore, that it was liable to pay the VAT on the received supply a second time. Accordingly, it ordered the applicant company to pay the VAT in the amount of BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) into the State budget, together with interest of BGN 200.24 (EUR 102) for the period from 15 September 2000 to 31 January 2001.
14. The applicant company appealed against the tax assessment on 20 February 2001.
15. In a decision of 26 February 2001 the Plovdiv Regional Tax Directorate dismissed the applicant company's appeal and upheld the tax assessment in its entirety. It recognised that the applicant company had fully complied with its VAT reporting obligations in respect of the received supply, but found that the supplier had failed to enter its invoice in its own accounting records on the date it had been issued, 16 August 2000, and had not reported its VAT-taxable supply for the month of August 2000 as it should have done. It therefore concluded that no VAT had been “charged” on the supply in question and that the applicant company was accordingly not entitled to deduct the input VAT, in spite of the fact that the supplier had subsequently reported the supply for the month of October 2000.
16. The applicant company appealed against the decision of the Regional Tax Directorate on 19 March 2001, arguing that it could not be denied the right to deduct the input VAT solely because of its supplier's belated compliance with its VAT reporting obligations. The applicant company also claimed that the supplier's right to deduct the VAT it had paid to its own supplier had been recognised by its tax office, while the applicant company was being denied that right. In its submissions the applicant company relied, inter alia, on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
17. In a judgment of 21 September 2001 the Plovdiv Regional Court dismissed the applicant company's appeal and upheld the decisions of the tax directorates. It stated as follows:
“The Court finds that the ... objection of the [applicant company] is ... unsubstantiated. In particular, [the applicant company objected that] it had been the compliant party, while the supplier had not complied with its obligations. The right to ... [deduct the input VAT] arises for the recipient of a [taxable] supply only if the supplier has fulfilled the conditions under section 64 in conjunction with section 55 of the VAT Act. The Act does not differentiate between the parties to a supply transaction as regards compliance; the court cannot therefore introduce such an element into this judgment. ”
18. On 26 October 2001 the applicant company appealed to the Supreme Administrative Court.
19. In a final judgment of 24 October 2002 the Supreme Administrative Court concurred with the findings and conclusions of the tax authorities and stated the following:
“... In this case the non-compliance of the supplier impacts unfavourably on the recipient ..., because the right to recover the [input VAT] does not arise for [the latter] and it does not matter that the recipient of the [taxable] supply [acted] in good faith and [was] compliant..., as this is irrelevant for the [purposes of] taxation. ... There [is] also [no] ... violation of ... Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, because the refusal to recognise the claimant's right to [deduct the input VAT] under section 64 (2) of the VAT Act did not violate its property rights, due [to the fact that] the recognition of its substantive right [to deduct] under section 64 of the VAT Act is conditional on the actions of its supplier and [the latter's] discharge [of its obligations] vis-à-vis [the State] budget. ...”
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
The VAT Act
(a) General information
20. The VAT Act came into force on 1 January 1999. Although at the time Bulgaria was not a member of the European Union (EU), domestic VAT legislation in many respects followed the provisions of Council Directive 77/388/EEC of 17 May 1977 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to turnover taxes, known as the Sixth VAT Directive, which at the time was the principal basis for the system of value-added tax in the EU.
21. In general, VAT was charged on the price due for a supply of goods or services plus certain costs, taxes and charges not including the VAT itself. Most domestic supplies of goods and services, as well as imports, were subject to the standard rate of twenty percent VAT.
22. VAT was generally reported and paid monthly. Monthly VAT returns had to be filed and monthly VAT payments made by the fourteenth day of the following month.
23. At the relevant time, any person (legal or natural, resident or non-resident) who had a taxable turnover exceeding BGN 75,000 (EUR 38,461) during any preceding twelve-month period was obliged to register for VAT purposes (section 108). Voluntary and optional registration was also possible in certain cases.
24. On 1 January 2007, when Bulgaria became a member of the EU, the VAT Act was replaced by a new act of the same name.
(b) The right to deduct the input VAT
25. At the relevant time the input VAT – the so-called “tax credit” under domestic legislation – was the amount of tax which a VAT-registered person had been charged under the VAT Act for receipt of a taxable supply of goods or services, or for imported goods, in a given tax period, which the person in question had the right to deduct (section 63).
26. During the relevant period and in the context of the present case, where the VAT incurred on supplies exceeded the VAT charged on sales in a given tax period, the excess VAT was first carried forward for a period of six months to offset any VAT debt due in those six months, as well as other liabilities to the State (sections 63 and 77). If at the end of the six-month period the excess VAT, or part thereof, had still not been recovered, the balance was refunded within a further forty-five days (section 77). This period could be extended if the tax authorities initiated a tax audit (section 78 § 7).
27. At the relevant time, section 64 of the VAT Act provided that the recipient of a supply could deduct the input VAT when the following conditions were fulfilled:
(a) the recipient of the supply on which VAT had been charged was a VAT-registered person;
(b) the VAT had been charged by the supplier, who was a VAT-registered person, at the latest on the date of issuance of the VAT invoice;
(c) VAT was chargeable on the supply in question;
(d) the goods or services received were used, were being used or would be used for VAT-taxable supplies; and,
(e) the recipient was in possession of a VAT invoice which met the statutory requirements.
28. Further to the above, in respect of item (b), VAT was considered during the relevant period to have been charged when the supplier:
(1) issued an invoice which indicated the VAT;
(2) recorded the issuance of the invoice in its sales register;
(2) entered the VAT charged in its accounting records as a liability to the State budget; and
(3) declared the VAT charged in its VAT return filed with the tax authorities (section 55 § 6).
III. COMMUNITY LAW
29. At the relevant time, Bulgaria was not a member of the European Union. Accordingly, the acquis communautaire was not directly applicable or transposed into domestic legislation. However, as noted above, its domestic VAT legislation in many respects followed the provisions of the Sixth VAT Directive (see paragraph 20 above).
30. Consequently, it is worth mentioning in the context of the present case the following two judgments of the Court of Justice of the European Communities (CJEC), which examine the entitlement of the recipient of a supply to reimbursement of the VAT charged on such a supply in cases of suspected “carousel fraud”. This type of fraud, a kind of VAT missing trader intra-Community fraud, occurs when goods are imported VAT-free from other Member States, are then re-sold through a series of companies at VAT-inclusive prices and subsequently re-exported to another Member State with the original importer disappearing without paying over to the tax authorities the VAT paid by its customers.
31. In its judgment of 12 January 2006 in joined cases C-354/03, C-355/03 and C-484/03, Optigen Ltd (C-354/03), Fulcrum Electronics Ltd (C-355/03) and Bond House Systems Ltd (C-484/03) v Commissioners of Customs & Excise: reference for a preliminary ruling from the High Court of Justice (England & Wales), Chancery Division – United Kingdom, European Court Reports (ECR) 2006, page I-00483, the CJEC concluded as follows:
“Transactions such as those at issue in the main proceedings, which are not themselves vitiated by value added tax fraud, constitute supplies of goods or services effected by a taxable person acting as such and an economic activity within the meaning of Articles 2 (1), 4 and 5 (1) of Sixth Council Directive 77/388/EEC of 17 May 1977 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to turnover taxes – Common system of value added tax: uniform basis of assessment, as amended by Council Directive 95/7/EC of 10 April 1995, where they fulfil the objective criteria on which the definitions of those terms are based, regardless of the intention of a trader other than the taxable person concerned involved in the same chain of supply and/or the possible fraudulent nature of another transaction in the chain, prior or subsequent to the transaction carried out by that taxable person, of which that taxable person had no knowledge and no means of knowledge. The right to deduct input value added tax of a taxable person who carries out such transactions cannot be affected by the fact that in the chain of supply of which those transactions form part another prior or subsequent transaction is vitiated by value added tax fraud, without that taxable person knowing or having any means of knowing.”
32. In a similar judgment of 6 July 2006 in joined Cases C-439/04 and C-440/04, Axel Kittel v Belgian State (C-439/04) and Belgian State v Recolta Recycling SPRL (C-440/04) (ECR 2006, page I-06161), the CJEC went on to state the following.
“Where a recipient of a supply of goods is a taxable person who did not and could not know that the transaction concerned was connected with a fraud committed by the seller, Article 17 of Sixth Council Directive 77/388/EEC of 17 May 1977 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to turnover taxes – Common system of value added tax: uniform basis of assessment, as amended by Council Directive 95/7/EC of 10 April 1995, must be interpreted as meaning that it precludes a rule of national law under which the fact that the contract of sale is void – by reason of a civil law provision which renders that contract incurably void as contrary to public policy for unlawful basis of the contract attributable to the seller – causes that taxable person to lose the right to deduct the value added tax he has paid. It is irrelevant in this respect whether the fact that the contract is void is due to fraudulent evasion of value added tax or to other fraud.
By contrast, where it is ascertained, having regard to objective factors, that the supply is to a taxable person who knew or should have known that, by his purchase, he was participating in a transaction connected with fraudulent evasion of value added tax, it is for the national court to refuse that taxable person entitlement to the right to deduct.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
33. The applicant company complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that, in spite of its full compliance with its own VAT reporting obligations, the domestic authorities had deprived it of its right to deduct the input VAT it had paid on the received supply of goods, because its supplier had been late in complying with its own VAT reporting obligations. Moreover, as a result of the refusal to allow the aforesaid deduction, the applicant company had unjustifiably had to pay the input VAT a second time, this time directly into the State budget under the tax assessment, together with interest.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties' submissions
1. The Government
34. The Government stated that the applicant company could have initiated an action against its supplier under the general rules of tort in order to seek compensation for the input VAT it had not been allowed to deduct because of the supplier's failure to comply with its VAT reporting obligations.
35. On the merits, the Government noted that in principle the collection of taxes fell within the ambit of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as it related to measures to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest.
36. They further noted that such measures were legitimate when they were provided for in a statute or other normative act, and considered that a State enjoyed considerable freedom in determining the “laws ... it deems necessary to control the use of property” as provided in the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (the Government referred to AGOSI v. the United Kingdom 24 October 1986, § 52, Series A no. 108). They also considered that, in so far as most measures for control of the use of property did not involve confiscation, the Convention gave the domestic authorities considerable freedom of action in regulating, based on their own social and economic criteria, the use of private property. Following this line of thought, according to the Government, the Court had stated in its judgment in the case of Handyside v. the United Kingdom (7 December 1976, Series A no. 24) that the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 “sets the Contracting States up as sole judges of the 'necessity' for an interference” (ibid., § 62).
37. The Government stated that a further requirement in order for a measure to be legitimate was for it to be in accordance with the “general interest”; in this respect States enjoyed a “wide margin of appreciation” (they referred to Tre Traktörer AB v. Sweden, 7 July 1989, § 62, Series A no. 159).
38. As to the case at hand, the Government noted that it related to a “tax credit”, the input VAT which according to section 63 of the VAT Act could be deducted only if the tax had been charged. Accordingly, it related to the right of the applicant company to deduct an amount due in respect of VAT only if specific statutorily defined conditions had been met: (a) an invoice had been issued with VAT included, (b) the invoice had been recorded in the VAT sales register, (c) the supplier had entered the invoice in its accounting records and (d) the supplier had entered it in the VAT return it had duly filed (section 55 § 6). Only when these four conditions were cumulatively met did the right to deduct the input VAT arise, constituting thenceforth a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Hence, only from that moment on could the applicant company claim that there had been interference with its right to deduct the input VAT. In view of the above, the Government considered that the applicant company did not have a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention which could have been the subject of interference.
39. They further argued that the right to deduct the input VAT was the result of a complex tax relationship between the supplier and the applicant company and that the latter had implicitly consented to a situation whereby the right to such a deduction depended on the actions of the supplier. This situation, the Government claimed, was widely known, was predictable and applied to all VAT-taxable supplies.
40. The Government also submitted that the domestic authorities had acted in the general interest in order to ensure the collection of taxes and enforce discipline in the tax reporting of transactions. They considered this to have been in conformity with the discretion granted to States under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
41. The Government also considered that, in the event that the Court should find that there had been interference with a conditional possession of the applicant company, this should not be considered to have represented an excessive burden for it, as the amount of VAT had been known and had been fixed at twenty percent. Accordingly, the Government considered that the present case did not amount to an excessive burden imposed on the applicant company but simply to a refusal to allow the input VAT to be deducted.
2. The applicant company
42. The applicant company stated that it could not seek compensation from its supplier under the general rules of tort as they were in a contractual relationship and domestic legislation precluded it from initiating such an action in those circumstances. In addition, it claimed that the supplier's failure to comply with its VAT reporting obligations in timely fashion could not be said to have directly caused it damage, and that the supplier had not enriched himself in any way as a result. The applicant company considered that it was the tax authorities' actions, and their conclusions in the tax assessment as to the repercussions of the supplier's belated compliance, which had caused it damage. Accordingly, it claimed that an action under the general rules of tort against its supplier could not afford it appropriate redress in respect of its complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
43. On the merits, the applicant company claimed that the right to deduct the input VAT constituted a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which should be considered to have arisen at the moment it had fully complied with its own VAT reporting obligations. It argued that the fact that recognition of the right to deduct the input VAT was conditional on the compliance of the supplier – a factor which was beyond the control of the recipient of a supply – made the relevant provisions of the VAT Act unpredictable and arbitrary in their application. Accordingly, the applicant company considered that the refusal of the authorities to allow it to deduct the input VAT amounted to a deprivation of its possession, resulting from the fact that the price it had paid to its supplier included BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) in VAT. Hence, it had not only lost the amount it had paid to its supplier in respect of VAT but had also had to pay the same amount a second time to the State budget under the tax assessment, together with interest in the amount of BGN 200.24 (EUR 102). In addition, the applicant company claimed that, as a result of the refusal to allow it to deduct the VAT, the amount it had paid to its supplier as VAT had not been tax-deductible as an expense and had been subject to corporate income tax, which amounted to a further deprivation of its “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
44. Alternatively, the applicant company argued that it had had a legitimate interest in the deduction of the input VAT which also fell within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (the applicant company referred to Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, 20 November 1995, Series A no. 332). In particular, in so far as it had acted in good faith towards its supplier and the tax authorities, had paid the VAT charged by the supplier and had recorded the transaction in its accounting records in timely fashion, it had legitimately acquired a legal expectation that the right to deduct the input VAT would be recognised. The applicant company further claimed that the right to deduct the input VAT constituted an asset in respect of which it had a “legitimate expectation” that it would obtain effective enjoyment of a property right.
45. In view of the above, the applicant company considered that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was applicable and that there had undoubtedly been interference with its “possessions” within the meaning of that Article.
46. As to whether the interference had been necessary, the applicant company recognised that it had sought to protect the community's interest in the effective collection of taxes. However, even assuming that the interference with its property rights had served a legitimate aim, the applicant company considered that the interference had not been in the general interest, as the VAT on the supply in question had been paid into the State budget by the supplier with only a slight delay.
47. The applicant company further argued that the interference in question had not been proportionate, as it had failed to strike a fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the community and its own right to protection of its property rights. In particular, although it agreed with the Government that States enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in implementing fiscal legislation, their discretion in that respect could not be considered to be limitless. In that connection it argued that it had had to bear an individual and excessive burden which upset the fair balance that had to be maintained between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the right of property. In particular, although the applicant company had complied with its VAT reporting obligations fully and in time, because of its supplier's failure to discharge its VAT reporting obligations in the same manner (a) it had still been denied the right to deduct the input VAT of BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851); (b) it had then been ordered to pay the VAT of BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) a second time, but this time to the State budget; (c) it had additionally been ordered to pay interest of BGN 200.24 (EUR 102) on that amount; (d) the VAT it had paid to its supplier had not been recognised as a tax-deductible expense and corporate income tax had then been charged on it; (e) it had incurred additional court fees and expenses in challenging the tax assessment; (f) it had thus been unduly and severely sanctioned for an infringement by the supplier, which had in fact discharged its VAT reporting obligations, but with a slight delay; and (g) general uncertainty had arisen in the fiscal affairs of the applicant company because all its VAT supplies could similarly be compromised by the failure of a supplier to discharge its VAT reporting obligations. Moreover, the applicant company would have no knowledge of this until such time as the tax authorities refused to recognise the right to deduct the input VAT relating to a particular transaction.
48. Hence, the applicant company considered that the severe pecuniary and non-pecuniary consequences it had suffered, despite having acted in complete conformity with the law, were evidence of the inadequacy and disproportionate nature of the State interference.
B. Admissibility
49. The Government claimed that the applicant company could have initiated an action against its supplier under the general rules of tort in order to seek compensation for the input VAT it had not been allowed to deduct because of the supplier's failure to comply with its VAT reporting obligations (see paragraph 34 above). They did not submit any domestic case-law to support their assertion that this was a viable alternative which could have afforded redress to the applicant company. The Court observes in this regard the position of the applicant company and its claim that such an action was not available to it under domestic legislation (see paragraph 42 above).
50. The Court recognises that where the Government claim non-exhaustion, they bear the burden of proving that the applicant has not used a remedy that was both effective and available at the relevant time. The availability of any such remedy must be sufficiently certain in law as well as in practice (see Vernillo v. France, 20 February 1991, § 27, Series A no. 198). In so far as the Government failed to show that the suggested remedy was both effective and available at the relevant time by providing examples of domestic judgments, the Court finds that it cannot be considered that the applicant company failed to exhaust the available domestic remedies by not having initiated an action against its supplier under the general rules of tort.
51. In any event, the Court notes that the applicant company appealed against the tax assessment issued against it, presented its arguments before the domestic courts and afforded them the opportunity to prevent or put right the alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Hence, it exhausted the available domestic remedies in respect of the complaint submitted to the Court.
52. Accordingly, the Court finds that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
C. Merits
1. Existence of a possession within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
53. The Court reiterates its established case-law whereby an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions related to his “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right. By way of contrast, the hope of recognition of a property right which it has been impossible to exercise effectively cannot be considered a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, nor can a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfilment of the condition (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004-IX; Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, §§ 82 and 83, ECHR 2001-VIII; and Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, § 69, ECHR 2002-VII).
54. The Court observes that in the present case the right to claim a deduction of input VAT arose for the applicant company when the VAT it had incurred on purchases exceeded the VAT it had charged on sales. In order to take advantage of its right to deduct, the applicant company fully complied with its own obligations under the VAT Act: (a) it paid the VAT on the supply on the basis of the VAT invoice issued by its supplier; (b) it entered the supply in its accounting records for the month of August 2000; and (c) it reported it in its VAT return for that period. Thus, the applicant company did everything that was within its power, under the applicable legislation, in order to attain the right to deduct the input VAT.
55. The Court notes, however, the Government's argument that this was not sufficient to create an entitlement for the applicant company to deduct the input VAT on the supply in question, because not all the conditions of section 63 of the VAT Act had been met (see paragraph 38 above). In particular, after the tax authorities conducted a cross-check of the supplier they established a reporting discrepancy which led them to conclude that no VAT had been charged on the supply in the August 2000 tax period, and they refused to recognise the applicant company's right to deduct the input VAT (see paragraphs 12 and 13 above). Accordingly, the right to deduct the input VAT did not constitute an “existing possession” of the applicant company.
56. The Court further notes the Government's argument that by entering into a contractual relationship with the supplier, which inevitably had tax consequences for both parties, the applicant company had implicitly consented to a situation whereby the right to deduct the input VAT depended on the actions of the said supplier (see paragraph 39 above). The Court observes, however, that the rules governing the VAT system of taxation – including the conditions for registration, charges, recharges, exemptions, deductions and reimbursements – are exclusively set and regulated by the State. Hence, as a result of the rules imposed by the State the applicant company had limited or no choice as to whether and how it would participate in the VAT system of taxation. Likewise, in respect of the supply in question, the applicant company, as a VAT-registered person, did not have a choice in respect of the applicable VAT rules. It therefore cannot be considered that by entering into a contractual relationship with its supplier it had consented to any particular VAT rules that might subsequently have had a negative effect on its tax position.
57. In the light of the foregoing, the Court considers that, in so far as the applicant company had complied fully and in time with the VAT rules set by the State, had no means of enforcing compliance by its supplier and had no knowledge of the latter's failure to do so, it could justifiably expect to be allowed to benefit from one of the principal rules of the VAT system of taxation by being allowed to deduct the input VAT it had paid to its supplier. Moreover, only once a claim for such a deduction had been made and a cross-check of the supplier had been conducted by the tax authorities could it be ascertained whether the latter had fully complied with its own VAT reporting obligations. Thus, the Court considers that the applicant company's right to claim a deduction of the input VAT amounted to at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right amounting to a “possession” within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Pine Valley Developments Ltd and Others v. Ireland, 29 November 1991, § 51, Series A no. 222; S.A. Dangeville v. France, no. 36677/97, § 48, ECHR 2002-III; Cabinet Diot and S.A. Gras Savoye v. France, nos. 49217/99 and 49218/99, § 26, 22 July 2003; and Aon Conseil and Courtage S.A. and Christian de Clarens S.A. v. France, no. 70160/01, § 45, ECHR 2007-...).
58. Separately, as a result of the authorities' conclusion that no VAT had been “charged” on the supply in the August 2000 tax period and of their refusal to recognise the applicant company's right to deduct the input VAT, the latter was ordered to pay the VAT on the supply a second time, together with interest, to the State budget (see paragraph 14 above). In addition, the applicant company's first payment of VAT on the supply, which it had made to its supplier, was purportedly no longer recognised as an expense for corporate income tax purposes. This in turn increased the applicant's taxable base for the tax year in question, with the result that it had to pay higher corporate income tax than it would allegedly have paid otherwise. These amounts, which the applicant company incurred as a result of the authorities' refusal to allow it to deduct the input VAT, unquestionably constituted possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
2. Whether there was interference and the applicable rule
59. The Court reiterates that the authorities denied the applicant company the right to deduct the VAT it had been charged by and had paid to its supplier, because the latter had been late in complying with its VAT reporting obligations. This was in spite of the authorities' recognition of the fact that the applicant company had fully complied with its own VAT reporting obligations (see paragraphs 15 and 19 above). Moreover, as a result of the foregoing, the authorities ordered the applicant company to pay all the VAT due on the supply, together with interest, which in turn apparently led to the applicant company having a higher liability for corporate income tax for the tax year in question.
60. The Court notes that the applicant company complained that it had been deprived of its possessions, a situation which fell to be examined under the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It is true that interference with the exercise of claims against the State may constitute such a deprivation of possessions (see Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others, cited above, § 34). However, as regards the payment of a tax, a more natural approach is to examine the complaint from the angle of control of the use of property in the general interest “to secure the payment of taxes”, which falls within the rule in the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see S.A. Dangeville, cited above, § 51, and National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society v. the United Kingdom, 23 October 1997, § 79, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-VII). The Government argued in favour of this characterization (see paragraph 35 above).
61. The Court, however, considers that it may not be necessary to decide this issue, since the two rules are not “distinct” in the sense of being unconnected, are only concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and must, accordingly, be construed in the light of the principle enunciated in the first sentence of the first paragraph. The Court therefore takes the view that it should examine the interference in the light of the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see S.A. Dangeville, cited above, § 51).
3. Whether the interference was justified
62. The Court reiterates that according to its well-established case-law, an instance of interference, including one resulting from a measure to secure payment of taxes, must strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights. The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a whole, including the second paragraph: there must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aims pursued.
63. However, in determining whether this requirement has been met, it is recognised that a Contracting State, not least when framing and implementing policies in the area of taxation, enjoys a wide margin of appreciation, and the Court will respect the legislature's assessment in such matters unless it is devoid of reasonable foundation (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, § 69, Series A no. 52; National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society and Yorkshire Building Society, cited above, § 80; and M.A. and 34 Others v. Finland (dec.), no. 27793/95, 10 June 2003).
64. Accordingly, the Court cannot fail to exercise its power of review and must determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the applicant company's right to “the peaceful enjoyment of [its] possessions”, within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, § 69; Lithgow and Others v. the United Kingdom, 8 July 1986, §§ 121-22, Series A no. 102; and Intersplav v. Ukraine, no. 803/02, § 38, 9 January 2007).
(a) The general interest
65. The Court considers that in the present case the general interest of the community was in preserving the financial stability of the VAT system of taxation with its complex rules regarding charges, recharges, exemptions, deductions and reimbursements. Essential elements of the preservation of that stability were the attainment of full and timely discharge by all VAT-registered persons of their VAT reporting and payment obligations and, ultimately, the prevention of any fraudulent abuse of the said system. In this respect, the Court accepts that attempts to abuse the VAT system of taxation need to be curbed and that it may be reasonable for domestic legislation to require special diligence by VAT-registered persons in order to prevent such abuse.
(b) Whether a fair balance was struck between the competing interests
66. Following from the above, it is necessary to assess whether the means employed by the State to preserve the financial stability of the VAT system of taxation and to curb any fraudulent abuse of the system amounted to proportionate interference with the applicant company's right to peaceful enjoyment of its “possessions”.
67. The Court notes once again that the applicant company fully complied with its VAT reporting obligations. In addition, the Court notes that the applicant company's supplier also eventually complied with its VAT reporting obligations, but with a two-month delay. As a result, the supplier either paid the VAT into the State budget or deducted the amount of input VAT it had paid to its own supplier and paid the balance of the VAT to the State budget. Thus, the VAT due on the chain of supplies in question was eventually paid to the State.
68. In view of the above, by 31 January 2001, when the tax authorities refused the applicant company's right to deduct the input VAT on the supply in question, it should have been apparent that there had been no negative effect on the State budget. On the contrary, in the end the State budget in fact received two payments of VAT for the same supply – one from the supplier who had received payment from the applicant company and one from the applicant company itself when it was ordered to pay the VAT together with interest. Accordingly, the refusal to allow the applicant company to deduct the input VAT does not seem, in itself, to be justified by the need to secure payment of the taxes, all of which had been paid, or at least reported, by the supplier by that time, albeit belatedly. The Court notes in this respect the rigid interpretation of the provision on which the authorities relied in refusing the applicant company's right to deduct the input VAT and the absence of any assessment of the overall effect on the State budget of the supplier's belated compliance with its obligations.
69. Separately, the Court notes that the applicant company had absolutely no power to monitor, control or secure compliance by its supplier with its VAT reporting, filing and payment obligations. Accordingly, the Court finds that the applicant company was placed in a disadvantaged position by having no certainty as to whether, in spite of its own full compliance, it would be able to deduct the input VAT it had paid to its supplier, since the recognition or otherwise of the right to deduct was also dependent on the tax authorities' assessment as to whether the latter had discharged its VAT reporting obligations in timely fashion.
70. Lastly, as regards efforts to curb fraudulent abuse of the VAT system of taxation, the Court accepts that when Contracting States possess information of such abuse by a specific individual or entity, they may take appropriate measures to prevent, stop or punish it. However, it considers that if the national authorities, in the absence of any indication of direct involvement by an individual or entity in fraudulent abuse of a VAT chain of supply, or knowledge thereof, nevertheless penalise the fully compliant recipient of a VAT-taxable supply for the actions or inactions of a supplier over which it has no control and in relation to which it has no means of monitoring or securing compliance, they are going beyond what is reasonable and are upsetting the fair balance that must be maintained between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the right of property (see, mutatis mutandis, Intersplav, cited above, § 38).
4. Conclusion
71. Considering the timely and full discharge by the applicant company of its VAT reporting obligations, its inability to secure compliance by its supplier with its VAT reporting obligations and the fact that there was no fraud in relation to the VAT system of which the applicant company had knowledge or the means to obtain such knowledge, the Court finds that the latter should not have been required to bear the full consequences of its supplier's failure to discharge its VAT reporting obligations in timely fashion, by being refused the right to deduct the input VAT and, as a result, being ordered to pay the VAT a second time, plus interest. The Court considers that this amounted to an excessive individual burden on the applicant company which upset the fair balance that must be maintained between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the right of property.
There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
72. The applicant company alleged a violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It argued that the domestic VAT legislation was discriminatory because it had deprived the applicant company of its possession with the sole aim of securing payment of the VAT due by another company. It also considered this to be discriminatory because it provided for different degrees of protection for State and private property. The applicant company further alleged that its supplier had been treated differently, since the tax authorities had recognised its right to deduct the VAT it had paid in respect of the supply, while denying that right to the applicant company.
Article 14 provides:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
73. The Government contested the arguments of the applicant company and claimed that the relevant VAT regulations were clear, concise and applied in the same manner to all recipients of VAT-taxable supplies. The Government also noted that the applicant company and its supplier had different roles and occupied different levels in the VAT chain of supply. Accordingly, any difference in their treatment was justified on that basis and could not be construed as discriminatory.
74. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
75. However, having regard to its finding relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 71 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine whether, in this case, there has also been a violation of Article 14 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, S.A. Dangeville, cited above, § 66).
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
76. The applicant company complained under Article 13, taken in conjunction with Article 14 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, that it lacked effective domestic remedies for its Convention complaints and that the domestic courts had not addressed its arguments concerning alleged violations of the Convention.
Article 13 provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
77. The Court notes that the applicant company had the right of appeal against the tax assessment, of which it made use. In the course of these proceedings it submitted and argued its Convention complaints before the domestic courts, which examined them, albeit finding against the applicant company. Accordingly, no issue arises under this provision.
It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
78. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
79. The applicant company claimed 3,810.24 Bulgarian levs (BGN) (1,953 euros (EUR)) in respect of pecuniary damage. The amount claimed comprised the value of the input VAT, in the amount of BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851), and the interest charged to the applicant company by the tax authorities (BGN 200.24 (EUR 102), see paragraph 13 above).
80. The applicant company also claimed EUR 3,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage stemming, in particular, from the frustration, insecurity and uncertainty endured by its executive director.
81. The Government did not comment.
82. In view of the violation it has found of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that, as regards pecuniary damage, the most suitable form of reparation would be to award the value of the input VAT (EUR 1,851) that the applicant company was ordered to pay a second time, plus the interest that was charged on the aforesaid amount (EUR 102) (see S.A. Dangeville, cited above, § 70). Thus, the Court awards the sum of EUR 1,953 to the applicant company for pecuniary damage.
83. The Court further considers that while the applicant company may have sustained non-pecuniary damage, the present judgment provides sufficient compensation for it (ibid.).
B. Costs and expenses
84. The applicant company claimed BGN 546.61 (EUR 280) in respect of the costs and expenses incurred in the proceedings before the domestic courts. The amount claimed comprised the court fee paid for challenging the decision of the Regional Tax Directorate (BGN 50 (EUR 26)), the court fee paid for appealing against the judgment of the Plovdiv Regional Court (BGN 28 (EUR 14)), its lawyer's fees before the domestic courts (BGN 200 (EUR 102)), and the costs and expenses awarded to the tax authorities (BGN 268.61 (EUR 138)). In support of its claim, the applicant company furnished a decision of 16 January 2001 of the Plovdiv Regional Court awarding BGN 268.61 (EUR 137) in costs and expenses to the tax authorities, a legal-fees agreement with its lawyer and receipts for payment of court fees.
85. The applicant company claimed a further EUR 2,097.80 in respect of the costs and expenses incurred in the proceedings before the Court for fifty-two hours' legal work by its lawyer at an hourly rate of EUR 70 and for postal, photocopying and office supply expenses (EUR 27). The applicant company furnished a legal-fees agreement, an approved time sheet and postal receipts in support of its claim. It requested that the costs and expenses incurred for the proceedings before the Court be paid directly to its lawyer, Mr M. E., with the exception of the first BGN 500 (EUR 256.41), which it had paid as advance payment.
86. The Government did not comment.
87. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the information in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award in full the sums incurred for costs and expenses, which total EUR 2,377.80, of which EUR 1,841.39 is to be paid directly to the applicant company's lawyer, Mr M. E..
C. Default interest
88. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that no separate examination of the complaint of a breach of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is necessary;
4. Holds that the finding of a violation constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction for any non-pecuniary damage sustained by the applicant company;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay to the applicant company, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final according to Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Bulgarian levs at the rate applicable on the date of settlement:
(i) in respect of pecuniary damage – EUR 1,953 (one thousand nine hundred and fifty-three euros);
(ii) in respect of costs and expenses incurred in the proceedings before the domestic courts – EUR 280 (two hundred and eighty euros);
(iii) in respect of costs and expenses incurred in the proceedings before the Court – EUR 256.41 (two hundred and fifty-six euros and forty-one cents), payable to the applicant company, and EUR 1,841.39 (one thousand eight hundred and forty-one euros and thirty-nine cents), payable into the bank account of the applicant company's lawyer, Mr M. E.;
(iv) any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant company on the above amounts;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant company's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 January 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Peer Lorenzen
Deputy Registrar President



TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; danno Materiale - assegnazione; danno morale - costatazionedi una violazione sufficiente
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA “BULVES” AD C. BULGARIA
(Richiesta n. 3991/03)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
22 gennaio 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa “Bulves” Ad c. Bulgaria,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Peer Lorenzen, Presidente, Rait Maruste, Karel Jungwiert, Renate Jaeger, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e Stefano Phillips, Cancelliere di Sezione Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 16 dicembre 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 3991/03) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata con la Corte il 23 gennaio 2003 sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da “B.” Ad, una società per azioni bulgara costituita nel 1996 con la sua sede legale a Plovdiv (“ società richiedente”).
2. La società richiedente era rappresentata dal Sig. M. E. e dalla Sig.ra S. S., avvocati che praticano a Plovdiv.
3. Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) era rappresentato dai suoi Agenti, la Sig.ra M. Karadjova e la Sig.ra M. Kotzeva, del Ministero di Giustizia.
4. La società richiedente addusse, in particolare, che nonostante la sua piena ottemperanza i suoi obblighi legali dei rapporti dell’ IVA, le autorità nazionali l'avevano spogliato del diritto di dedurre il contributo dell’IVA che aveva pagato su una fornitura di beni ricevuti , perché il suo fornitore era in ritardo nell'attenersi con i suoi propri obblighi di rapporti dell’ IVA. Dibatté anche che questa differenza nel trattamento fosse discriminatoria.
5. Il 24 novembre 2005 la Corte decise di dare avviso al Governo delle azioni di reclamo summenzionate da parte della società richiedente. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. L'operazione tassabile
6. Il 16 agosto 2000 la società richiedente acquistò beni da un'altra società (“il fornitore”).
7. Ambo le società furono registrate sotto l’ Atto dell’Imposta sul Valore Aggiunto del 1999 (“the VAT Act”) e l'operazione costituiva una fornitura tassabile sotto detto Atto.
8. Il costo totale della fornitura ricevute era di 21,660 levs bulgari (BGN) (11,107 euro (EUR)) di cui BGN 18,050 (EUR 9,256) era il valore dei beni e BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) era l’imposta sul valore aggiunto (“IVA”).
9. Il fornitore emise la fattura n. 12/16.08.2000 alla società richiedente che la pagò in pieno, incluso l'IVA di BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851).
10. La società richiedente registrò l'acquisto nelle sue scritture contabili per il mese di agosto 2000 e registrò la sua dichiarazione dell’ IVA per quel periodo il 15 settembre 2000.
11. Il fornitore, d'altra parte non registrò la vendita nelle sue scritture contabili per il mese di agosto 2000, ma per ottobre 2000, e la riportò nella sua dichiarazione dell’ IVA per il secondo periodo che registrò il 14 novembre 2000.
B. La revisione dell’ IVA
12. In una data non specificata le autorità fiscali condussero una revisione dell’ IVA della società richiedente che copriva il periodo dal 10 febbraio al 31 dicembre 2000. Nel corso dell'ispezione un controllo incrociato del fornitore fu condotto per accertare se aveva riportato ed aveva registrato la fornitura in modo appropriato nelle sue scritture contabili. Di conseguenza, la discrepanza nel rapporto qui sopra fu scoperta (vedere paragrafi 10 e 11 sopra).
13. Il 31 gennaio 2001 la Direzione Fiscale Territoriale dell’ Ufficio Fiscale “Yug” di Plovdiv fece un accertamento tributario nei confronti della società richiedente . Rifiutò alla società richiedente il diritto di dedurre l'IVA che aveva pagato al suo fornitore (“ contributo IVA”), corrispondente a BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851), perché il fornitore aveva inserito la fornitura nelle sue scritture contabili per il mese di ottobre 2000 e l'aveva riportato per quel periodo piuttosto che per l’agosto 2000. La Direzione Fiscale Territoriale considerò perciò che nessuna IVA fosse stata “addebitata” sulla fornitura nel periodo fiscale di agosto 2000, che la società richiedente non potesse dedurre perciò l'importo che aveva pagato al suo fornitore come IVA e, inoltre, che fosse responsabile per il pagamento dell'IVA sulla fornitura ricevuta una seconda volta. Di conseguenza, ordinò alla società richiedente di pagare l'IVA nell'importo di BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) nel bilancio Statale, insieme con interesse di BGN 200.24 (EUR 102) per il periodo dal15 settembre 2000 al 31 gennaio 2001 .
14. La società richiedente fece ricorso contro l'accertamento tributario del 20 febbraio 2001.
15. In una decisione del 26 febbraio 2001 la Direzione Fiscale Regionale di Plovdiv respinse il ricorso della società richiedente e sostenne l'accertamento tributario nella sua interezza. Riconobbe che la società richiedente si era attenuta in pieno con i suoi obblighi di rapporti dell’ IVA riguardo la fornitura ricevuta, ma trovò che il fornitore non era riuscito ad inserire la sua fattura nelle sue proprie scritture contabili nella data in cui era stata emessa, il 16 agosto 2000, e non ha riportato la sua fornitura tassabile dell’ IVA dal mese di agosto 2000 come avrebbe dovuto fare. Concluse perciò che nessuna IVA era stata “addebitata” sulla fornitura in oggetto e che alla società richiedente non era concesso di conseguenza di dedurre il contributo IVA, nonostante il fatto che il fornitore avesse riportato successivamente la fornitura dal mese di ottobre 2000.
16. La società richiedente fece ricorso contro la decisione della Direzione Fiscale Regionale il 19 marzo 2001, dibattendo che non poteva esserle negato il diritto di dedurre il contributo IVA solamente a causa della tarda ottemperanza del suo fornitore con i suoi obblighi di rapporti dell’ IVA. La società richiedente chiese anche che il diritto del fornitore di dedurre l'IVA che aveva pagato al suo proprio fornitore era stato riconosciuto dal suo ufficio delle tasse, mentre alla società richiedente fu negato questo diritto. Nelle sue osservazioni la società richiedente si appellò, inter alia, all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
17. In una sentenza del 21 settembre 2001 la Corte Regionale di Plovdiv respinse il ricorso della società richiedente e sostenne le decisioni della Direzione fiscale. Affermò ciò che segue:
“La Corte costata che l’... obiezione [della società richiedente] non è... comprovato. In particolare, [la società richiedente obiettò che] era stata la parte che si era conformata, mentre il fornitore non si era attenuto ai suoi obblighi. Il diritto a... [dedurre il contributo IVA] nasce per il destinatario di una fornitura [tassabile] solamente se il fornitore ha adempiuto alle condizioni sotto la sezione 64 in concomitanza con la sezione 55 del VAT Act. L'Atto non fa differenze fra le parti di un'operazione di fornitura riguardo all’ottemperanza; la corte non può introdurre perciò tale elemento in questa sentenza. ”
18. Il 26 ottobre 2001 la società richiedente fece appello presso la Corte amministrativa Suprema.
19. In una sentenza definitiva del 24 ottobre 2002 la Corte amministrativa Suprema concordò con i ritrovamenti e le conclusioni delle autorità fiscali e dichiarò ciò che segue:
“... In questa causa l'inadempienza del fornitore ha un impatto sfavorevole sul destinatario..., perché il diritto a recuperare [il contributo IVA] non sorge per [il secondo] e non si importa che il destinatario della fornitura [tassabile] [agì] in buon fede e [fosse] in conformità..., siccome questo è irrilevante per [i fini ] della tassazione. ... Là [non vi è] neanche [nessuna]... violazione dell’... Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, perché il rifiuto di riconoscere il diritto del rivendicatore a [dedurre il contributo IVA] sotto la sezione 64 (2) del VAT Act non violò i suoi diritti di proprietà, dovuto [al fatto che] il riconoscimento del suo diritto effettivo [dedurre] sotto la sezione 64 del VAT Act è subordinato alle azioni del suo fornitore e al fatto che [il secondo] assolva [i suoi obblighi] vis-à-vis del bilancio [dello Stato] . ...”
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
Il VAT Act
() informazioni Generali
20. Il VAT Act entrò in vigore il 1 gennaio 1999. Benché al tempo la Bulgaria non fosse un membro dell'Unione europea (EU), la legislazione nazionale sull’ IVA per molti aspetti seguì le disposizioni della Direttiva del Consiglio 77/388/EEC del 17 maggio 1977 sull’armonizzazione delle leggi degli Stati Membri relative al fatturato fiscale, noto come la sesta Direttiva sull’ IVA che al tempo era la base principale per il sistema d’imposta sul valore aggiunto nell'EU.
21. In generale, l’ IVA era addebitata sul prezzo dovuto per una fornitura di beni o servizi più certi costi, tasse e oneri che non includevano l'IVA stessa. La maggior parte delle forniture nazionali di beni e servizi, così come le importazioni, erano soggetti al tasso standard dell’IVA del venti percento.
22.L’ IVA generalmente veniva riportata e pagata ogni mese. La dichiarazione dell’ IVA mensile doveva essere registrata e i pagamenti dell’ IVA mensili essere fatti entro il quattordici del mese seguente.
23. Al tempo attinente qualsiasi persona (giuridica o fisica, residente o non residente) che aveva un fatturato tassabile che superava i BGN 75,000 (EUR 38,461) durante qualsiasi periodo dei dodici mesi precedente era obbligato a fare la registrazione ai fini dell’ IVA (sezione 108). Registrazione volontaria ed opzionale era anche possibile in certi casi.
24. Il 1 gennaio 2007, quando la Bulgaria divenne un membro dell'EU, il VAT Act fu sostituito con un nuovo atto dallo stesso nome.
(b) Il diritto a dedurre il contributo IVA
25. Al tempo attinente il contributo IVA -il così definito “credito di tassa” sotto la legislazione nazionale -era l'importo della tassa che una persona con partita IVA era stato addebitato sotto il VAT Act per il ricevimento di una fornitura tassabile di beni o servizi, o per beni importati, in un determinato periodo fiscale che la persona in oggetto aveva diritto di detrarre (sezione 63).
26. Durante il periodo attinente e nel contesto della presente causa, in cui è incorsa l'IVA su forniture che eccedevano l'IVA addebitata su vendite in un determinato periodo fiscale, l'eccesso d’IVA da prima fu portato avanti per un periodo di sei mesi per compensare qualsiasi debito d’ IVA dovuto in quei sei mesi, così come delle altre passività nei confronti dello Stato (sezioni 63 e 77). Se alla fine del periodo di sei mesi l'eccesso d’IVA, o parte a riguardo, ancora non era stato recuperato, il saldo veniva risarcito entro ulteriori quaranta cinque giorni (sezione 77). Questo periodo si sarebbe potuto prolungare se le autorità fiscali avessero iniziato un esame fiscale ( sezione 78 § 7).
27. Al tempo attinente, la sezione 64 del VAT Act prevedeva che il destinatario di una fornitura potesse dedurre il contributo IVA quando le seguenti condizioni venivano adempiute:
(a) il destinatario della fornitura sulla quale era stata addebitata l’IVA era una persona con partita IVA;
(b) l'IVA era stata addebitata dal fornitore che era una persona con partita IVA almeno in data dell’emissione della fattura IVA;
(c) l’IVA era addebitabile sulla fornitura in oggetto;
(d) i beni o servizi ricevuti sono stati usati, si stavano usando o sarebbero stati usati per forniture tassabili d’ IVA; e,
(e) il destinatario era in possesso di una fattura d’ IVA che soddisfaceva i requisiti legali.
28. Oltre quello riportato qui sopra, riguardo all’articolo (b), si considerava che l’IVA dovesse essere addebitata durante il periodo attinente quando il fornitore:
(1) emetteva una fattura che indicava l'IVA;
(2) registrava l'emissione della fattura nel suo registro di vendite;
(2) registrava l'IVA addebitata nelle sue scritture contabili come passività nei confronti del bilancio Statale; e
(3) dichiarava l'IVA addebitata nella sua dichiarazione d’IVA registrata con le autorità fiscali (sezione 55 § 6).
III. LEGGE COMUNITARIA
29. Al tempo attinente, la Bulgaria non era un membro dell'Unione europea. L’acquisizione comunitaria non era di conseguenza direttamente, applicabile o trasposta nella legislazione nazionale. Comunque, come notato sopra, la sua legislazione nazionale sull’ IVA per molti aspetti seguiva le disposizioni della sesta Direttiva sull’ IVA (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra).
30. Di conseguenza, vale la pena menzionare nel contesto della presente causa le seguenti due sentenze della Corte di Giustizia delle Comunità Europee (CJEC) che esaminano il diritto del destinatario di una fornitura a un rimborso dell'IVA addebitata su tale fornitura in casi di sospetta “giostra di frode .” Questo tipo di frode, un tipo di frode tra comunità di mancante scambio dell’IVA, accade quando i beni vengono importati senza IVA da altri Stati Membro, sono ri-venduti poi tramite una serie di società a prezzi inclusivi d’ IVA e successivamente sono ri-esportati ad un altro Stato membro dall'importatore originale che scompare senza pagare alle autorità fiscali l'IVA pagata dai suoi clienti.
31. Nella sua sentenza del 12 gennaio 2006 nelle cause congiunte C-354/03, C-355/03 e C-484/03 Optigen Ltd (C-354/03), Fulcrum Electronics Ltd (C-355/03) e Bond House Systems Ltd (C-484/03) Commissari v Customs & Excise: riferimento per una normativa preliminare dall’ Alta Corte di giustizia (England & Wales), Divisione Chancery- Regno Unito, Relazioni della Corte Europea (ECR) 2006, pagina I-00483, la CJEC concluse ciò che segue:
“Operazioni come quelle in questione nei procedimenti principali che non sono viziati di frode dell’imposta sul valore aggiunto, costituiscono forniture di beni o servizi effettuati da una persona tassabile che agisce così ed un'attività economica all'interno del significato degli Articoli 2 (1), 4 e 5 (1) della sesta Direttiva del Consiglio 77/388/EEC del 17 maggio 1977 sull’armonizzazione delle leggi degli Stati Membro relative alle imposte sul reddito . Sistema comune del’imposta sul valore aggiunto: base uniforme di valutazione, come corretto dalla Direttiva del Consiglio 95/7/EC del 10 aprile 1995, in cui adempiono criteri obiettivi su cui sono basate le definizioni di quei termini, nonostante l'intenzione di un commerciante diverso dalla persona tassabile riguardata coinvolta nella stessa catena di forniture e/o la possibile natura fraudolenta di un'altra operazione nella catena, antecedente o susseguente all'operazione portata avanti da quella persona tassabile di cui questa persona tassabile non aveva nessuna conoscenza e nessun mezzo di conoscenza. Il diritto di dedurre il contributo dell’imposta sul valore aggiunto di una persona tassabile che esegue simili operazioni non può essere colpito dal fatto che nella catena di fornitura di cui quelle operazioni formavano parte di un'altra operazione precedente o susseguente viene viziato dalla frode fiscale dell’imposta sul valore aggiunto, senza che persona tassabile sapesse o avesse qualsiasi mezzo di esserne a conoscenza.”
32. In una sentenza simile del 6 luglio 2006 in Cause congiunte C-439/04 e C-440/04, Axel Kittel v Stato belga (C-439/04) e Stato belga v Recolta Recycling SPRL (C-440/04) (ECR 2006, pagina I-06161), la CJEC continuò ad affermare ciò che segue.
“Dove il destinatario di una fornitura di ben è una persona tassabile che non sapeva e non poteva sapere che l'operazione riguardata era connessa ad una frode commessa dal venditore, l’Articolo 17 della sesta Direttiva del Consiglio 77/388/EEC del 17 maggio 1977 sull’ armonizzazione delle leggi degli Stati Membro relative alle imposte sul reddito - sistema fiscale Comune dell’imposta sul valore aggiunse : base uniforme di valutazione, come corretta dalla Direttiva del Consiglio 95/7/EC del 10 aprile 1995, deve essere interpretato nel senso che preclude una regola della legge nazionale sotto cui il fatto che il contratto di vendita è nullo- in ragione di una disposizione di diritto civile che rende quel contratto insanabilmente nullo come contrario alla politica pubblica per base illegale del contratto attribuibile al venditore-causa chela persona tassabile perda il diritto a dedurre l’imposta sul valore aggiunto che lui ha pagato. È irrilevante a questo riguardo se il fatto che il contratto sia nullo a causa dell’ evasione fraudolenta dell’imposta sul valore aggiunto o di un’altra frode.
Per contrasto, dove è accertato, avendo riguardo a fattori obiettivi, che la fornitura è per una persona tassabile che sapeva o avrebbe dovuto sapere che, col suo acquisto, stava partecipando in un'operazione connessa con l’evasione fraudolenta dell’imposta sul valore aggiunto, la corte nazionale deve rifiutare il diritto di quella persona tassabile alla detrazione.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
33. La società richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che, nonostante la sua piena ottemperanza con i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA, le autorità nazionali l'avevano spogliato del suo diritto di detrarre il contributo IVA che aveva pagato sulla fornitura ricevuta di beni, perché il suo fornitore aveva ritardato nell'attenersi con i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA. Inoltre come risultato del rifiuto di concedere la suddetta deduzione, la società richiedente aveva dovuto ingiustificabilmente, pagare il contributo IVA una seconda volta, questa volta direttamente nel bilancio Statale sotto l'accertamento tributario, insieme con interesse.
L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. le osservazioni delle parti
1. Il Governo
34. Il Governo affermò che la società richiedente avrebbe potuto iniziare un'azione contro il suo fornitore sotto gli articoli generali di illecito civile per chiedere il risarcimento del contributo IVA che non gli era stato concesso di dedurre a causa dell'inosservanza del fornitore dei suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA.
35. Sui meriti, il Governo notò, che in principio la riscossione delle imposte ricadeva all'interno dell'ambito del secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in quanto faceva rifermento alle misure per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale.
36. Notò inoltre che simili misure erano legittime quando venivano previste da una legge o un altro atto normativo, e considerò che uno Stato godeva della libertà considerevole di determinare l “le leggi... che ritiene necessarie a controllare l'uso della proprietà” come previsto nel secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (il Governo fece riferimento ad AGOSI c. Regno Unito 24 ottobre 1986, § 52 Serie A n. 108). Considerò anche che, dal momento che la maggior parte delle misure per il controllo dell'uso della proprietà non comporta il sequestro, la Convenzione diede le autorità nazionali una considerevole libertà di azione nel regolare, basandosi sul loro proprio criterio sociale ed economico, l'uso della proprietà privata. Seguendo questa linea di pensiero, secondo il Governo la Corte aveva affermato nella sua sentenza nella causa Handyside c. Regno Unito (7 dicembre 1976, Serie A n. 24) che il secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 “stabilisce che gli Stati Contraenti siano i soli giudici 'della necessità' di un'interferenza” (ibid., § 62).
37. Il Governo affermò che un ulteriore requisito perché una misura sia legittima era che fosse in conformità con l’ “interesse generale”; a questo riguardo gli Stati godono di un “ampio margine di valutazione” (ha fatto riferimento a Tre Traktörer Ab c. Svezia, 7 luglio 1989, § 62 Serie A n. 159).
38. Riguardo alla presente causa, il Governo notò, che era in relazione ad un “credito d’imposta”, il contributo IVA che secondo la sezione 63 del VAT Act può essere dedotto solamente se la tassa è stata addebitata. Di conseguenza, fece riferimento al diritto della società richiedente di dedurre un importo dovuto a riguardo dell’ IVA solamente se specifiche condizioni statutariamente definite fossero state soddisfatte: (a) una fattura era stata emessa con IVA inclusa, (b) la fattura era stata registrata nei registri delle vendite dell’ IVA, (c) il fornitore aveva registrato la fattura nelle sue scritture contabili e (d) il fornitore l'aveva registrata della dichiarazione dell’ IVA che aveva debitamente registrato (sezione 55 § 6). Solamente quando queste quattro condizioni venivano soddisfatte cumulativamente sorgeva il diritto di detrarre il contributo IVA, costituendo da allora una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Quindi, solamente da quel momento società richiedente poteva rivendicare che c'era stata interferenza col suo diritto alla deduzione del contributo IVA. In prospettiva di quanto sopra, il Governo considerò, che la società richiedente non avesse una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che avrebbe potuto essere la materia dell’interferenza.
39. Dibatté inoltre che il diritto alla detrazione del contributo IVA era il risultato di una relazione fiscale complessa fra il fornitore e la società richiedente e che la seconda aveva acconsentito implicitamente ad una situazione per cui il diritto a tale deduzione dipendeva dalle azioni del fornitore. Questa situazione, il Governo affermò, era ampiamente conosciuta, era prevedibile e si applicava a tutte le forniture tassabili d’IVA.
40. Il Governo presentò anche che le autorità nazionali avevano agito nell'interesse generale per assicurare la riscossione delle imposte e disciplinare le operazioni dei rapporti fiscali. Considerò che questo fosse stato in conformità alla discrezione accordata agli Stati sotto il secondo paragrafo dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
41. Il Governo considerò anche che, nel caso in cui la Corte dovesse trovare che c'era stata un’interferenza con una proprietà condizionale della società richiedente, non si dovrebbe considerare che questo abbia rappresentato un carico eccessivo per questa, siccome l'importo del’ IVA era noto ed era fissato al venti percento. Di conseguenza, il Governo considerò che la presente causa non corrispondesse ad un carico eccessivo imposto sulla società richiedente ma semplicemente ad un rifiuto di permettere la detrazione del contributo dell’IVA.
2. La società richiedente
42. La società richiedente affermò di non poter chiedere il risarcimento dal suo fornitore sotto gli articoli generali di illecito civile siccome loro erano in un vincolo contrattuale e la legislazione nazionale gli precludeva l’inizio di tale azione in quelle circostanze. Inoltre, affermò che non si poteva dire che l'inosservanza del fornitore dei suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA in modo opportuno gli avesse provocato direttamente un danno, e che il fornitore non si fosse arricchito in qualsiasi modo di conseguenza. La società richiedente considerò che era state le azioni delle autorità fiscali, e le loro conclusioni nell'accertamento tributario riguardo alle ripercussioni della tarda ottemperanza del fornitore che gli aveva provocato un danno. Di conseguenza, affermò che un'azione sotto gli articoli generali di illecito civile contro il suo fornitore non avrebbe potuto riconoscergli una compensazione appropriata riguardo la sua azione di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
43. Sui meriti, la società richiedente rivendicò, che il diritto alla detrazione del contributo d’IVA costituiva una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si dovrebbe considerare sia sorto nel momento in cui si era attenuto pienamente ai suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA. Dibatté che il fatto che il riconoscimento del diritto alla detrazione del contributo dell’IVA fosse condizionale all'ottemperanza del fornitore -un fattore che andava oltre il controllo del destinatario di una fornitura-rese le disposizioni attinenti del VAT Act imprevedibili ed arbitrarie nella loro applicazione. Di conseguenza, la società richiedente considerò che il rifiuto delle autorità di concedergli la detrazione del contributo IVA corrispose ad una privazione della sua proprietà, essendo il risultato del fatto che il prezzo che aveva pagato al suo fornitore includeva BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) come IVA. Non solo aveva perso da quel momento, l'importo che aveva pagato al suo fornitore riguardo all’IVA ma aveva dovuto pagare anche lo stesso importo una seconda volta al bilancio Statale sotto l'accertamento tributario, insieme con interesse nell'importo di BGN 200.24 (EUR 102). Inoltre, la società richiedente rivendicò che, come risultato del rifiuto l'importo che aveva pagato al suo fornitore come IVA non era stato fiscalmente deducibile come spesa, ed era stato soggetto ad imposta sul reddito che corrispose ad un'ulteriore privazione della sua “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
44. Alternativamente, la società richiedente dibatté che aveva avuto un interesse legittimo nella deduzione del contributo IVA che rientrava anche all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (la società richiedente fece riferimento a Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri c. Belgio, 20 novembre 1995 Serie A n. 332). In particolare, dal momento che aveva agito in buon fede verso il suo fornitore e verso le autorità fiscali, aveva pagato l'IVA addebitata dal fornitore ed aveva registrato l'operazione nelle sue scritture contabili in modo opportuna, legittimamente aveva acquisito un'aspettativa legale che gli sarebbe stato riconosciuto il diritto a detrarre il contributo dell’IVA. La società richiedente rivendicò inoltre che il diritto a detrarre il contributo IVA costituì un bene a riguardo del quale aveva una “legittima aspettativa” di ottenere un godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà.
45. In prospettiva di quanto sopra, la società richiedente considerò, che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 fosse applicabile e che c'era stata indubbiamente interferenza con la sua “ proprietà” all'interno del significato di quell'Articolo.
46. Riguardo a se l'interferenza fosse stata necessaria, la società richiedente riconobbe che aveva cercato di proteggere l'interesse della comunità nella riscossione effettiva delle imposte. Comunque, presumendo anche che l'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà aveva perseguito uno scopo legittimo, la società richiedente considerò che l'interferenza non era stata nell'interesse generale, siccome l'IVA sulla fornitura in oggetto era stato pagato nel bilancio Statale dal fornitore con solamente con un lieve ritardo.
47. La società richiedente dibatté inoltre che l'interferenza in oggetto non era stata proporzionato, siccome non era riuscita a prevedere un giusto equilibrio fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed il suo proprio diritto alla protezione dei suoi diritti di proprietà. In particolare, benché convenisse col Governo che gli Stati godevano di un ampio margine della valutazione sotto il secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nell’implementare la legislazione fiscale, la loro discrezione a questo proposito non poteva essere considerata illimitata. In questo collegamento ha dibattuto che aveva dovuto sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo che sconvolse il giusto equilibrio che si doveva prevedere fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione del diritto di proprietà. In particolare, benché la società richiedente si fosse attenuta pienamente ai suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’IVA in tempo, a causa dell'insuccesso del suo fornitore di assolvere i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA allo stesso modo (a) era stato negato ancora il diritto a detrarre il contributo IVA di BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851); (b) era stato ordinato poi di pagare l'IVA di BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851) una seconda volta, ma questa volta al bilancio Statale; (c) era stato ordinato inoltre di pagare l’ interesse di BGN 200.24 (EUR 102) su quell’ importo; (d) l'IVA che aveva pagato al suo fornitore non era stata riconosciuta come una spesa deducibile fiscalmente ed era stata addebitata l’imposta sul reddito su questa; (e) era incorso in parcelle di tribunale supplementari e spese nell'impugnare l'accertamento tributario; (f) era stato così impropriamente e severamente sanzionato per una violazione da parte del fornitore che aveva infatti assolto i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA, ma con lieve ritardo; e (g) l'incertezza generale era sorta negli affari fiscali della società richiedente perché tutte le sue forniture con IVA avrebbero potuto essere compromesse similmente per l'insuccesso di un fornitore ad assolvere i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA. Inoltre, la società richiedente non avrebbe avuto nessuna conoscenza di questo sino al momento in cui le autorità fiscali si fossero rifiutate di riconoscere il diritto a detrarre il contributo dell’ IVA relativo ad una particolare operazione.
48. Perciò, la società richiedente considerò che le severe conseguenze materiali e morali di cui aveva sofferto, nonostante avendo agito in completo conformità con la legge erano la prova dell'inadeguatezza e della natura sproporzionata dell'intromissione dello stato.
B. Ammissibilità
49. Il Governo rivendicò che la società richiedente avrebbe potuto iniziare un'azione contro il suo fornitore sotto gli articoli generali di illecito civile per chiedere il risarcimento per il contributo d’ IVA a cui non era stata concessa la detrazione a causa dell'inosservanza del fornitore dei suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra). Non presentò alcuna giurisprudenza nazionale per sostenere la sua asserzione per cui questa fosse un'alternativa vitale che avrebbe potuto riconoscere compensazione alla società richiedente. La Corte osserva a questo riguardo la posizione della società richiedente e la sua rivendicazione che tale azione non le fosse disponibile sotto la legislazione nazionale (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra).
50. La Corte riconosce che dove il Governo rivendica il non-esaurimento, deve sopportare il carico di provare che il richiedente non ha usato una via di ricorso che fosse sia efficace e disponibile al tempo attinente. La disponibilità di qualsiasi simile via di ricorso deve essere sufficientemente sicura in legge così come in pratica (vedere Vernillo c. Francia, 20 febbraio 1991, § 27 Serie A n. 198). Dal momento che il Governo non riuscì a mostrare che la via di ricorso suggerita fosse sia efficace e disponibile al tempo attinente offrendo esempi di sentenze nazionali, la Corte costata che non può essere considerato che la società richiedente non esaurì le vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili non avendo iniziato un'azione contro il suo fornitore sotto gli articoli generali di illecito civile.
51. In qualsiasi caso, la Corte nota che la società richiedente fece ricorso contro l'accertamento tributario emesso contro lei , presentò i suoi argomenti di fronte ai tribunali nazionali e riconobbe loro l'opportunità di prevenire o correggere la violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Quindi , esaurì le vie di ricorso nazionali e disponibili riguardo dl'azione di reclamo presentata alla Corte.
52. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
C. Meriti
1. Esistenza di una proprietà all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
53. La Corte reitera la sua giurisprudenza stabilita da cui un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente dal momento che le decisioni contestate si riferiscono alla sua “ proprietà” all'interno del significato di quella disposizione. “La proprietà” può essere una “proprietà esistente” o dei beni, incluso le rivendicazioni a riguardo delle quali il richiedente può dibattere di avere almeno un’ “aspettativa legittima” di ottenere il godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà. Per contrasto, la speranza di riconoscimento di un diritto di proprietà che è stato impossibile esercitare non può essere considerata effettivamente, una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, né può esserlo una rivendicazione condizionale che passa come risultato del non-adempimento della condizione (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35 ECHR 2004-IX; Principe Hans-Adamo II del Liechtenstein c. Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, §§ 82 e 83, ECHR 2001-VIII; e Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. Repubblica ceca (dec.) [GC], n. 39794/98, § 69 ECHR 2002-VII).
54. La Corte osserva che nella presente causa il diritto a chiedere una deduzione del contributo IVA sorse per la società richiedente quando l'IVA che era incorsa sugli acquisti ha ecceduto l'IVA che addebitata sulle vendite. Per approfittare del suo diritto a dedurre la società richiedente si attenne pienamente ai suoi propri obblighi sotto il VAT Act: (a) pagò l'IVA sulla fornitura sulla base della fattura dell’ IVA emessa dal suo fornitore; (b) registrò la fornitura nelle sue scritture contabili per il mese di agosto 2000; e (c) lo riportò nella sua dichiarazione dell’ IVA per quel periodo. Così, la società richiedente ha fatto tutto ciò che era in suo potere, sotto la legislazione applicabile per raggiungere il diritto a dedurre il contributo dell’IVA.
55. Comunque, la Corte nota l'argomento del Governo per cui questo non era sufficiente per creare un diritto per la società richiedente a dedurre il contributo IVA sulla fornitura in oggetto, perché non tutte le condizioni della sezione 63 del VAT Act erano state soddisfatte (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra). In particolare, dopo che le autorità fiscali condussero un controllo incrociato del fornitore loro stabilirono una discrepanza nel rapporto che li condusse a concludere che nessuna IVA era stata addebitata sulla fornitura nel periodo fiscale dell’ agosto 2000, e loro rifiutarono di riconoscere il diritto della società richiedente di dedurre il contributo IVA (vedere paragrafi 12 e 13 sopra). Di conseguenza, il diritto a dedurre il contributo IVA non costituiva una “proprietà esistente” della società richiedente.
56. La Corte nota inoltre l'argomento del Governo per cui entrando in un vincolo contrattuale col fornitore che aveva inevitabilmente conseguenze fiscali su ambo le parti, la società richiedente aveva acconsentito implicitamente ad una situazione da cui il diritto alla detrazione del contributo IVA dipendeva dalle azioni del detto fornitore (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra). Comunque, la Corte osserva che le norme che governano il sistema fiscale dell’ IVA -incluso le condizioni per la registrazione, l’addebito, i ricarichi,le esenzioni, le deduzioni e i rimborsi-venga stabilito e regolato esclusivamente dallo Stato. Quindi, come risultato delle norme imposte dallo Stato la società richiedente aveva un’alternativa limitata o nessuna alternativa riguardo a come avrebbe partecipato nel sistema fiscale dell’IVA. Similmente, riguardo alla fornitura in oggetto, la società richiedente, come una persona con partita IVA non aveva una scelta riguardo le norme dell’ articoli IVA applicabili. Non può essere considerato perciò che entrando in un vincolo contrattuale col suo fornitore avesse acconsentito a qualsiasi particolare norma dell’ IVA che avrebbe avuto successivamente un effetto negativo sulla sua posizione fiscale.
57. Alla luce di ciò che precede, la Corte considera, che, dal momento che la società richiedente si era attenuto pienamente ed in tempo alle norme dell’IVA stabilite dallo Stato, non aveva nessuno mezzo di eseguire l’ottemperanza del suo fornitore e non aveva nessuna conoscenza dell'insuccesso del secondo nell’agire così, poteva aspettarsi in modo giustificato di vedersi concedere di trarre profitto da uno degli articoli principali del sistema fiscale dell’ IVA venendole concesso di dedurre il contributo IVA che aveva pagato al suo fornitore. Inoltre una rivendicazione per tale deduzione era stata fatta solamente una volta, ed un controllo incrociato del fornitore era stato condotto dalle autorità fiscali per poter accertare se il secondo si erano attenuto pienamente ai suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA. Così, la Corte considera che il diritto della società richiedente di chiedere una deduzione del contributo IVA corrispose almeno ad un’“aspettativa legittima” di ottenere un effettivo godimento di un diritto di proprietà che corrispondesse ad una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato della prima frase dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Pine Valley Developments Ltd ed Altri c. Irlanda, 29 novembre 1991, § 51 Serie A n. 222; S.A. Dangeville c. Francia, n. 36677/97, § 48 ECHR 2002-III; Cabinet Diot Diot e S.A. Gras Savoye c. Francia, N. 49217/99 e 49218/99, § 26 del 22 luglio 2003; ed Aon Conseil e Courtage S.A. e Christian de Clarens S.A. c. Francia, n. 70160/01, § 45 ECHR 2007 -...).
58. Separatamente, come risultato della conclusione delle autorità per cui nessuna IVA era stata “addebitato” sulla fornitura del periodo fiscale dell’ agosto 2000 e il loro rifiuto di riconoscere il diritto della società richiedente a dedurre il contributo IVA, al secondo fu ordinato di pagare l'IVA sulla fornitura una seconda volta, insieme con l’ interesse al bilancio Statale (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). Inoltre, il primo pagamento della società richiedente dell’ IVA sulla fornitura che aveva fatto al suo fornitore, non veniva più senza senso riconosciuto come una spesa ai fini dell’ imposta sul reddito. Questo a sua volta aumentò la base tassabile del richiedente per l'anno fiscale in oggetto, col risultato che doveva pagare imposta sul reddito più alta di quella che presumibilmente avrebbe pagato altrimenti. Questi importi in cui la società richiedente incorse come un risultato del rifiuto delle autorità di concederle la deduzione del contributo dell’IVA, costituivano indiscutibilmente una proprietà costituita all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
2. Se c'era interferenza e l'articolo applicabile
59. La Corte reitera che le autorità negarono alla società richiedente il diritto di dedurre l'IVA che le era stata addebitata e che aveva pagato al suo fornitore, perché il secondo era in ritardo nell'attenersi con i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA. Questo nonostante il riconoscimento delle autorità del fatto che la società richiedente si fosse pienamente attenuta ai suoi propri obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA (vedere paragrafi 15 e 19 sopra). Come risultato di ciò che precede, le autorità ordinarono inoltre, alla società richiedente di pagare tutta l'IVA dovuta sulla fornitura, insieme con l’interesse che a in cambio condusse apparentemente alla società richiedente ad avere una responsabilità per un’ imposta più alta sul reddito per l'anno fiscale in oggetto.
60. La Corte nota che la società richiedente si lamentò di essere stata privata delle sue proprietà, una situazione che doveva essere esaminata sotto la seconda frase del primo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. È vero che interferenza con l'esercizio di rivendicazioni contro lo Stato può costituire tale privazione di proprietà (vedere Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. ed Altri, citata sopra, § 34). Comunque, riguardo al pagamento di una tassa, un approccio più naturale è esaminare l'azione di reclamo sotto l'angolo del controllo dell'uso di proprietà nell'interesse generale “assicurare il pagamento di tasse” che rientra nell’'articolo del secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere S.A. Dangeville, citata sopra, § 51, e National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society e Yorkshire Building Society c. Regno Unito, 23 ottobre 1997, § 79 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-VII). Il Governo dibatté a favore di questa caratterizzazione (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra).
61. Comunque, la Corte considera che non può essere necessario decidere questo problema, poiché i due articoli non sono “distinti” nel senso di essere distaccati, si occupano solamente di esempi particolari di interferenza col diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà e deve, di conseguenza, essere costruito alla luce del principio enunciato nella prima frase del primo paragrafo. La Corte prende perciò la prospettiva che dovrebbe esaminare l'interferenza alla luce della prima frase del primo paragrafo dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere S.A. Dangeville, citata sopra, § 51).
3. Se l'interferenza era giustificata
62. La Corte reitera che secondo la sua giurisprudenza ben stabilita, un esempio di interferenza, incluso quello che è il risultato di una misura per garantire il pagamento di tasse, deve prevedere un “giusto equilibrio” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo. La preoccupazione di realizzare questo equilibrio è riflessa nella struttura dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nell'insieme, incluso il secondo paragrafo: ci deve essere una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e gli scopi perseguiti.
63. Comunque, nel determinare se questo requisito è stato soddisfatto, viene riconosciuto che un Stato Contraente, non da meno quando si stanno inquadrando e implementando le politiche nell'area della tassazione, gode di un ampio margine di valutazione, e che la Corte rispetterà la valutazione della legislatura in simili questioni a meno che sia priva di fondamento ragionevole (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, § 69 Serie A n. 52; National & Provincial Building Society, Leeds Permanent Building Society e Yorkshire Building Society, citata sopra, § 80; e M.A. e 34 Altri c. Finlandia (dec.), n. 27793/95, 10 giugno 2003).
64. Di conseguenza, la Corte non mancare nell’ esercitare il suo potere di revisione e deve determinare se l'equilibrio richiesto è stato sostenuto in modo conforme al diritto della società richiedente al pacifico godimento della [sua] proprietà”, all'interno del significato della prima frase dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth, citata sopra, § 69; Lithgow ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 8 luglio 1986, §§ 121-22 Serie A n. 102; ed Intersplav c. Ucraina, n. 803/02, § 38 9 gennaio 2007).
(a) L'interesse generale
65. La Corte considera che nella presente causa che l'interesse generale della comunità era preservare la stabilità finanziaria del sistema di tassazione dell’ IVA con le sue complesse norme riguardo ad addebiti, ricarichi, esenzioni, deduzioni e rimborsi. Elementi essenziali della conservazione di questa stabilità erano il conseguimento del pieno e puntuale pagamento da parte di tutte le persone con partita IVA del lori rapporto d’ IVA e obblighi di pagamento e, ultimamente, la prevenzione di qualsiasi abuso fraudolento del detto sistema. A questo riguardo, la Corte accetta, che i tentativi di abuso del sistema di tassazione dell’IVA devono essere tenuti a freno e che può essere ragionevole per la legislazione nazionale per sottoporre ad una speciale diligenza le persone con partita IVA per prevenire simile abuso.
(b) Se un equilibrio equo è stato previsto fra gli interessi che competono
66. A seguito di ciò che precede, è necessario valutare se i mezzi usati dallo Stato per preservare la stabilità finanziaria del sistema di tassazione dell’ IVA e tenere a freno qualsiasi abuso fraudolento del sistema corrispondeva ad un’ interferenza proporzionata col diritto della società richiedente al pacifico godimento della sua “ proprietà.”
67. La Corte ancora una volta nota che la società richiedente si attenne pienamente ai suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA. Inoltre, la Corte nota che il fornitore della società richiedente si attenne anche infine ai suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA, ma con un ritardo di due mesi. Di conseguenza, il fornitore pagò l'IVA sia nel bilancio Statale o dedusse l'importo del contributo IVA che aveva pagato al suo proprio fornitore sia pagato il saldo dell'IVA al bilancio Statale. Così, l'IVA dovuto sulla catena di fornitura in oggetto fu pagata infine allo Stato.
68. In prospettiva di quanto sopra, il 31 gennaio 2001, quando le autorità fiscali rifiutarono il diritto della società richiedente di dedurre il contributo IVA sulla fornitura in oggetto, avrebbe dovuto essere evidente che non c'era stato effetto negativo sul bilancio Statale. Al contrario, alla fine il bilancio Statale infatti ricevette due pagamenti d’ IVA per la stessa fornitura uno dal fornitore che ha ricevuto pagamento dalla società richiedente ed uno dalla società richiedente stessa quando le fu ordinato di pagare l'IVA insieme con l’ interesse. Di conseguenza, il rifiuto di permettere alla società richiedente di dedurre il contributo IVA non sembra, di per se stesso, essere giustificato dal bisogno di assicurare il pagamento delle tasse , che furono tutte pagate o almeno erano state riportate, dal fornitore in tempo, benché tardamente. La Corte nota a questo riguardo l'interpretazione rigida della disposizione alla quale le autorità si appellarono nel rifiutare il diritto della società richiedente dir dedurre il contributo IVA e l'assenza di qualsiasi valutazione dell'effetto complessivo sul bilancio Statale della tarda ottemperanza del fornitore dei suoi obblighi.
69. Separatamente, la Corte nota che la società richiedente non aveva completamente potere di monitorare, controllare o garantire l’ ottemperanza sicura da parte del suo fornitore per ciò che riguarda il suo rapporto d’ IVA, la registrazione e gli obblighi di pagamento. Di conseguenza, la Corte costata che la società richiedente è stata messa in una posizione svantaggiata non avendo certezza riguardo a se, nonostante la sua propria piena ottemperanza, fosse stato in grado di dedurre il contributo IVA che aveva pagato al suo fornitore, poiché il riconoscimento o meno del diritto di dedurre era anche dipendente dalla valutazione delle autorità fiscali riguardo a se i secondi avevano assolto i loro obblighi di rapporto d’ IVA in maniera opportuna.
70. Infine, riguardo agli sforzi di tenere a freno l’abuso fraudolento del sistema di tassazione dell’ IVA , la Corte accetta che quando gli Stati Contraenti possiedono informazioni di simile abuso da parte di un specifico individuo o ente, loro possono prendere misure appropriate per prevenirlo, possono fermarlo o possono penalizzarlo. Comunque, considera che se le autorità nazionali, in assenza di qualsiasi indicazione di coinvolgimento diretto da parte di un individuo o dell'ente nell'abuso fraudolento dell’ IVA di una catena di fornitura , o di conoscenza al riguardo, ciononostante penalizzino il destinatario completamente conforme ad una fornitura tassabile d’ IVA- per le azioni o inazioni di un fornitore su cui non ha controllo ed in relazione a cui non ha nessun mezzo di monitorare o assicurare l’ottemperanza, loro stanno andando, oltre ciò che è ragionevole e stanno sconvolgendo il giusto equilibrio che deve essere sostenuto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione del diritto di proprietà (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Intersplav citata sopra, § 38).
4. Conclusione
71. In considerazione del puntuale e completo pagamento da parte della società richiedente dei suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’sua IVA, la sua incapacità di garantire l’ottemperanza del suo fornitore con i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’IVA ed il fatto che non c'era frode in relazione al sistema dell’ IVA del quale la società richiedente aveva conoscenza o dei mezzi di ottenere simile conoscenza, la Corte costata che il secondo non avrebbe dovuto essere costretto a sopportare le piene conseguenze dell'insuccesso del suo fornitore nell’ assolvere i suoi obblighi di rapporto dell’ IVA in maniera opportuna vedendosi rifiutare il diritto didedurre il contributo IVA e, di conseguenza, venendogli ordinato di pagare l'IVA una seconda volta, più interesse. La Corte considera che questo corrispose ad un carico individuale eccessivo sulla società richiedente che sconvolse il giusto equilibrio che deve essere sostenuto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione del diritto di proprietà.
C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
72. La società richiedente addusse una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Dibatté che la legislazione nazionale sull’ IVA fosse discriminatoria perché aveva spogliato la società richiedente della sua proprietà al solo scopo di assicurare il pagamento dell'IVA dovuto da un'altra società. Considerò anche che questo fosse discriminatorio perché prevedeva gradi diversi di protezione per lo Stato e per la proprietà privata. La società richiedente addusse inoltre che il suo fornitore era stato trattato differentemente, poiché le autorità fiscali avevano riconosciuto il suo diritto a dedurre l'IVA che aveva pagato a riguardo della fornitura, negando questo diritto alla società richiedente.
L’Articolo 14 prevede:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabiliti [nella] Convenzione sarà assicurato senza discriminazione sulla base qualsiasi fatto come il sesso, la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione, l’opinione politica o altro, la cittadinanza o l’origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, la proprietà, la nascita o altro status.”
73. Il Governo contestò gli argomenti della società richiedente ed affermò che le regolamentazioni attinenti all’ IVA erano chiare, concise e si applicavano allo stesso modo a tutti i destinatari delle forniture tassabili d’ IVA. Il Governo notò anche che la società richiedente ed il suo fornitore avevano ruoli diversi ed occupavano livelli nella catena dell’ IVA delle forniture. Di conseguenza qualsiasi differenza nel loro trattamento si giustificava sulla questa base e non poteva essere ritenuta come discriminatoria.
74. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo è collegata a quanto esaminato sopra e deve essere dichiarata perciò similmente ammissibile.
75. Comunque, avendo riguardo alla sua sentenza relativa all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 71 sopra), la Corte considera che non è necessario esaminare se, in questa caso, vi è stata anche una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, S.A. Dangeville citata sopra, § 66).
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
76. La società richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 13, preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, che gli mancarono vie di ricorso nazionali efficaci per le sue azioni di reclamo della Convenzione e che i tribunali nazionali non si erano rivolti ai suoi argomenti concernenti le violazioni addotte della Convenzione.
L’Articolo 13 prevede:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
77. La Corte nota che la società richiedente aveva il diritto di appello contro l'accertamento tributario del quale si avvalse. Nel corso di questi procedimenti presentò e dibatté le sue azioni di reclamo della Convenzione di fronte ai tribunali nazionali che li esaminarono benché esprimendosi contro la società richiedente. Nessun problema deriva di conseguenza sotto questa disposizione.
Ne segue che questa azione di reclamo è manifestamente mal-fondata e deve essere respinta in conformità con l’Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
78. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
79. La società richiedente chiese 3,810.24 levs bulgari (BGN) (1,953 euro (EUR)) riguardo il danno materiale. L'importo chiesto comprendeva il valore del contributo IVA, nell'importo di BGN 3,610 (EUR 1,851), e l'interesse addebitato alla società richiedente dalle autorità fiscali BGN 200.24 (EUR 102) ( vedere paragrafo 13 sopra).
80. La società richiedente chiese anche EUR 3,000 riguardo del danno morale insorto , in particolare, dalla frustrazione, dall'insicurezza e dall'incertezza sopportate dal suo direttore esecutivo.
81. Il Governo non fece commenti.
82. In prospettiva della violazione trovata dell’ Articolo 1 de Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte considera che, riguardo al danno materiale, la forma più appropriata di riparazione sarebbe assegnare il valore del contributo IVA (EUR 1,851) che fu ordinato alla società richiedente di pagare una seconda volta, più l'interesse che è stato addebitato sul suddetto importo (EUR 102) (vedere S.A. Dangeville, citata sopra, § 70). Così, la Corte assegna la somma di EUR 1,953 alla società richiedente per danno materiale.
83. La Corte considera inoltre che anche se la società richiedente avesse potuto subire un danno morale, la presente sentenza offrirebbe un risarcimento sufficiente di per sé (ibid.).
B. Costi e spese
84. La società richiedente chiese BGN 546.61 (EUR 280) riguardo i costi e spese incorsi nei procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali nazionali. L'importo chiesto comprendeva la parcella di corte pagata per impugnare la decisione della Direzione Regionale delle Tasse (BGN 50 (EUR 26)), la parcella di corte pagata per fare appello contro la sentenza della Corte Regionale di Plovdiv (BGN 28 (EUR 14)), le parcelle del suo avvocato di fronte ai tribunali nazionali (BGN 200 (EUR 102)), ed i costi e spese assegnati alle autorità fiscali (BGN 268.61 (EUR 138)). In appoggio alla sua rivendicazione, la società richiedente fornì una decisione del 16 gennaio 2001 della Corte Regionale di Plovdiv che concedeva BGN 268.61 (EUR 137) per costi e spese alle autorità fiscali, un accordo di parcelle legali col suo avvocato e ricevute per il pagamento di parcelle di corte.
85. La società richiedente chiese ulteriori EUR 2,097.80 riguardo i costi e spese incorsi nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte per il lavoro legale di cinquanta-due ore del suo avvocato ad una tariffa oraria di EUR 70 e per spese postali, di fotocopie e spese di fornitura d’ ufficio (EUR 27). La società richiedente fornì un accordo parcelle legali, un foglio di tempi approvato e ricevute postali in appoggio alla sua rivendicazione. Richiese che i costi e le spese incorsi ne i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte venissero pagati direttamente al suo avvocato, il Sig. M. E, con l'eccezione dei primi BGN 500 (EUR 256.41) che aveva pagato come pagamento anticipato.
86. Il Governo non fece commenti.
87. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, a un richiedente viene concesso un rimborso di costi e spese solamente dal momento che viene stato mostrato che questi davvero e necessariamente siano incorsi in e siano ragionevoli riguardo al quantum. Nella presente causa, avuto dovuto riguardo alle informazioni in sua proprietà ed al criterio sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare in pieno le somme incorse per costi e spese che equivale a EUR 2,377.80 del quale EUR 1,841.39 saranno pagati direttamente all'avvocato della società richiedente, il Sig. M. E..
C. Interesse di mora
88. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e l’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibili ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che nessun esame separato dell'azione di reclamo di una violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 sia necessario;
4. Sostiene che la sentenza di una violazione costituisce di per sé soddisfazione equa sufficiente per qualsiasi danno morale subiti dalla società richiedente;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare alla società richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva secondo l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi , da convertire in levs bulgari al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo:
(i) riguardo al danno materiale -EUR 1,953 (mille novecento e cinquanta-tre euro);
(ii) riguardo a costi e spese incorsi in nei procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali nazionali -EUR 280 (duecento ed ottanta euro);
(iii) riguardo costi e spese incorsi nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte -EUR 256.41 (duecento e cinquanta-sei euro e quarantun centesimi), pagabili alla società richiedente, ed EUR 1,841.39 (mille ottocento e quarantuno euro e trenta-nove centesimi), pagabili sul conto bancario dell'avvocato della società richiedente, il Sig. M. E.;
(iv) qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico della società richiedente sugli importi sopra;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il tasso d’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione della società richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 22 gennaio 2009, facendo seguito agli Articoli 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stefano Phillips Peer Lorenzen
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente





DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.