Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BORZHONOV v. RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 13, 35, 6, P1-1

NUMERO: 18274/04/2009
STATO: Russia
DATA: 22/01/2009
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objections joined to merits and dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of Art. 13+6-1 ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of Art. 13+P1-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF BORZHONOV v. RUSSIA
(Application no. 18274/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
22 January 2009
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Borzhonov v. Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens, judges,
and André Wampach, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 16 December 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 18274/04) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian national, Mr Y. D. B. (“the applicant”), on 20 April 2004.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr A. B., a lawyer practising in Ulan-Ude. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr P. Laptev, former Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. On 9 May 2006 the President of the First Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicant was born in 1954 and lives in the town of Ulan-Ude in the Buryatiya Republic.
A. Criminal proceedings against the applicant
5. The Russian authorities initiated criminal proceedings against the applicant:
- on 13 June 1999 under Article 198 § 2 of the Criminal Code (tax evasion by a private person); the applicant was charged on 10 August 1999;
- on 24 June 1999 under Article 201 § 1 of the Code (abuse of power);
- on 29 August 1999 under Article 199 of the Code (tax evasion by a legal entity);
- on 13 October 1999 under Article 160 § 3 (b) (misappropriation of private property);
- on 21 January 2000 under Article 165 (causing pecuniary damage).
6. The above cases were joined on a number of occasions, most recently on 4 June 2001. According to the Government, the charges under Articles 165 and 199 of the Code were abandoned on 5 January 2000 and 4 June 2001 respectively (see, however, paragraph 9 below).
7. According to the Government, the proceedings were suspended on 6 January, 4 February and 17 August 2000, 13 June and 21 September 2001, and 20 January 2003, owing to the applicant's illness. According to the Government, the applicant and his counsel were advised that the proceedings had been suspended on a number of occasions and subsequently resumed.
8. On 18 August 2004 the applicant sought access to the case file and, in particular, to the above-mentioned decisions to suspend the proceedings. On 27 August 2004 the Prosecutor's Office of the Buryatiya Republic sent him a letter stating that the case file might be available at the archives of the Tax Authority in Ulan-Ude. On 5 October 2004 the Investigations Department of the Regional Ministry of the Interior informed the applicant that the criminal case against him had been suspended owing to his illness. Upon his renewed request, on 22 December 2004 the applicant received another reply from the Regional Office of the Drugs Control Service stating that the Investigations Department might be able to provide the requested documents. On 8 September 2005 the Drugs Control Service informed the applicant that on 10 July 2003 the criminal case against him had been forwarded to the Prosecutor's Office of the Buryatiya Republic.
9. On 20 January 2006 the Investigations Department discontinued the proceedings as regards charges under Articles 160, 165, 198, 199 and 201 of the Criminal Code.
B. Seizure and retention of the applicant's bus
10. In August 1997 the applicant bought a PAZ-320500 bus. On 5 November 1999 the investigator in the criminal case against the applicant (see above) authorised seizure of the bus as security for eventual civil claims against him or eventual confiscation as a penalty under Article 160 § 3 (b) of the Criminal Code (see paragraph 16 below). On 9 November 1999 the applicant's bus was seized. It appears that no civil claims were lodged in the criminal case against the applicant.
11. On an unspecified date the bus was transferred for safekeeping to a Mr Y.
12. In September 2003 the applicant brought proceedings in which he challenged the investigator's seizure order as unlawful and requested the court to release the bus.
13. On 15 September 2003 the Sovetskiy District Court of Ulan-Ude examined the applicant's claims with reference to Article 125 of the 2002 Code of Criminal Procedure (see paragraph 19 below) and rejected them as unfounded. The court held as follows:
“...under Article 175 § 1 of the RSFSR Code of Criminal Procedure in order to secure civil claims or eventual confiscation of property the investigator shall issue an order of attachment in respect of the accused's property which had been unlawfully obtained. Article 160 § 3 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation provides for confiscation as a penalty. Besides, the case discloses pecuniary loss [sustained by the victim], and the victim has the right to file a civil claim for damages against the applicant...
The court finds no reasons for leaving the bus with [the applicant] for safekeeping...
The [first instance] court rejected the applicant's arguments to the effect that his property rights over the bus had been breached by the continuing attachment of property and the criminal case is still pending. The case is being suspended owing to the applicant's illness...”
14. On 11 November 2003 the Supreme Court of the Buryatiya Republic upheld the judgment on appeal. The court stated:
“Under Article 115 § 9 the Code of Criminal Procedure, which is now applicable to issues pertaining to attachment of property, the authority dealing with the criminal case has the power to release the property under the order of attachment, if attachment is no longer needed. As shown by the case file, at present the criminal case against the applicant is being dealt with by the investigating authority, the investigation being suspended. Taking into account the earlier submissions and the requirement of the procedure under Article 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, the court is not empowered to decide on the issue of lifting the order of attachment...”
15. On 18 July 2006 the deputy prosecutor of the Buryatiya Republic lifted the order of attachment in respect of the applicant's bus. The applicant was served with a copy of that decision on 21 March 2007. It appears that the authorities were unable to determine where the bus was kept and thus could not return it to the applicant.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Criminal Code
16. Under Article 160 § 3 (b) of the Code, in force at the material time, misappropriation of another's property committed on a large scale or in view of the person's hierarchical status was punishable by a sentence of imprisonment of up to ten years with or without confiscation of property. Under the Federal Law of 8 December 2003 (no. 162-ФЗ), confiscation as a penalty was removed from the Criminal Code, including its Article 160 § 3 (b). On 27 July 2006 a new Chapter 15.1 reintroducing the notion of confiscation was inserted into the Code in relation to a number of offences. The offences under Articles 160, 165, 198, 199 and 201 were not concerned.
B. Criminal proceedings
1. The 1960 RSFSR Code of Criminal Procedure (RSFSR CCrP)
17. A preliminary investigation in a criminal case had to be completed within two months starting from the date when the proceedings were initiated until the date when a bill of indictment was sent to the prosecutor or when the proceedings were terminated or suspended (Article 133). The preliminary investigation could be suspended if the accused had absconded or if his whereabouts had not been determined or if he was suffering from a mental or other serious disease. The investigator had to issue a reasoned decision (Article 195). Pursuant to Article 218 of the Code, a prosecutor was competent to examine complaints against decisions taken by an inquirer or an investigator. By a ruling of 23 March 1999, the Constitutional Court invalidated this provision in so far as it excluded a possibility of judicial supervision over such decisions, including those relating to suspension of proceedings and imposition of charging orders.
2. The 2002 Code of Criminal Procedure (CCrP)
18. Under Article 208 § 1 of the Code, the preliminary investigation can be suspended, inter alia, if the suspect or accused is temporarily suffering from a serious disease which prevents him from participating in the investigation. A victim, civil claimant or respondent and their representatives should be notified accordingly and apprised of their right to appeal against the decision suspending the proceedings (Article 209 § 1). A suspect or accused and counsel should also be informed, if the suspension was caused by his or her illness.
19. Articles 123 and 125 of the Code concern judicial supervision over any (in)action on the part of an inquirer, investigator or prosecutor in so far as such (in)action affects a complainant's rights or impedes his or her access to a court. The judge either (i) invalidates the impugned (in)action as unlawful or lacking justification and requires the respondent authority to remedy the violation, or (ii) rejects the complaint.
20. A decision terminating the criminal proceedings should be handed over or dispatched to the person concerned (Article 214 § 4).
21. Article 133 § 1 of the Code safeguards a so-called “right to rehabilitation”, including a right to full compensation in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage caused by criminal prosecution of a person who has been acquitted or in respect of whom the criminal proceedings have been terminated, inter alia, owing to a lack of corpus delicti or because the person had not been involved in the criminal act. The investigator issues a decision in which he or she recognises the person's right to rehabilitation and also sends notification explaining the procedure for obtaining compensation (Article 134 § 1).
C. Attachment of property in criminal proceedings
1. The 1960 RSFSR CCrP
22. A person who has sustained pecuniary damage or loss from a criminal offence has a right to lodge a civil claim against the accused. He or she can exercise this right from the commencement of the criminal proceedings until the opening of the trial (Article 29).
23. If sufficient reasons obtain as to the existence of pecuniary damage caused by a criminal offence, the investigating authority or a court should take measures for securing the existing or eventual civil claim and/or for impeding the accused from hiding his property, if the charges against him carry confiscation as a possible penalty (Article 30).
24. According to Article 175 of the Code, in order to secure civil claims or eventual confiscation of property, the investigator should issue a charging order in respect of an accused's property; that of persons who are liable by law for the accused or suspect's actions; that of other persons who are in possession of the property acquired through unlawful actions. Property attached may be impounded or transferred at the attaching official's discretion for safekeeping to a competent authority or left with the owner or other person who shall be warned about responsibility for keeping the property safe, and the fact shall be mentioned in the relevant record. The investigator lifts the charging order if it is no longer needed.
2. The 2002 CCrP
25. Under Article 115 § 1 of the Code, in order to ensure execution of a judgment in a part pertaining to a civil claim, to satisfy other pecuniary penalties or an eventual confiscation of property, an inquirer or investigator, subject to the prosecutor's consent, or a prosecutor should apply to a court for a charging order in respect of the suspect's or accused's property. The court should examine such request under the procedure set out in Article 165 of the Code. A charge or attachment of property prohibits the proprietor or owner from disposing of, and, if appropriate, using the property; it may require impounding of that property and its transfer for safekeeping to its proprietor or owner or a third person (§§ 2 and 6). A charging order is lifted by the authority dealing with the criminal case when the charge is no longer needed (§ 9).
On 4 July 2003 Article 115 § 1 of the Code was amended to exclude an eventual confiscation of property as a reason for requesting a charging order. A charging order could only concern property acquired by the suspect, accused or another person as a result of criminal activity or by criminal means.
On 8 December 2003 Article 115 § 1 of the Code was amended to reintroduce an eventual confiscation of property as a reason for requesting a charging order; in such circumstances it became incumbent on the court to indicate the relevant circumstances in its decision.
3. Other relevant legislation/jurisprudence
26. By decision no. 97-O of 10 March 2005 the Constitutional Court held, in the context of proceedings concerning Article 82 of the CCrP on real evidence, that provisional measures such as imposition of a charge on one's property may be required in criminal proceedings and should not be considered as a violation of constitutional rights and freedoms, including property rights. Judicial scrutiny of such measures as to their lawfulness should also encompass an assessment of whether other measures would be inappropriate, with due regard to the gravity of the charges in relation to which provisional measures have been taken, as well as to the nature of the property under the charge, its importance for its owner or holder and other eventual negative effects that the charge might have. Thus, it is incumbent on the investigator and, subsequently, on the reviewing court to be satisfied that the property under the charge should or should not be returned to its owner for safekeeping until the closure of the criminal proceedings.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLES 6 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION
27. The applicant complained that the length of the criminal proceedings against him had been in breach of the “reasonable time” requirement under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. It reads as follows:
“In the determination of ... any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal ...”
He also complained about the lack of effective remedies in respect of his above complaint. Article 13 reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
28. In relation to both complaints, the Government argued that the applicant had not complained before the national authorities about any delays in the criminal proceedings or appealed against decisions by which they had been suspended. Neither had he ascertained his right to rehabilitation following the discontinuation of the criminal case against him. They also submitted that the preliminary investigation in the applicant's case had taken only eleven months, certain unspecified periods of delay being attributable to the authorities. With reference to an information note from the Prosecutor General's Office, the Government alleged that the criminal case file contained copies of notifications sent to the applicant about suspension of the proceedings and their resumption; the applicant and his counsel had not requested copies of the relevant procedural orders. In any event, Articles 208 and 209 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (CCrP) did not require their provision to the defence (see paragraph 18 above). The proceedings had been suspended owing to the applicant's repeated periods of illness.
29. The applicant submitted that the preliminary investigation in his case had spanned from June 1999 to January 2006. He had not been served with copies of the decisions suspending the proceedings which, in any event, could not have been justified by the state of his mental health. He had learnt about the discontinuation of the proceedings from the Government's observations dated 6 September 2006. Having not been provided with copies of the relevant decisions, the applicant could not challenge them in the courts and had not been informed of his right to rehabilitation.
A. Admissibility
30. The Court considers that the Government's argument relating to exhaustion of domestic remedies is closely linked to the merits of the applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention. Thus, the Court finds it necessary to join it to the merits of the applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention.
31. The Court further notes that the applicant's complaints under Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Article 13 of the Convention
32. Article 13 of the Convention guarantees the availability at national level of a remedy to enforce the substance of the Convention rights and freedoms in whatever form they may happen to be secured in the domestic legal order. The effect of Article 13 is thus to require the provision of a domestic remedy to deal with the substance of an “arguable complaint” under the Convention and to grant appropriate relief. The Court considers that the applicant's complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention is an arguable one.
33. The scope of the Contracting States' obligations under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant's complaint; however, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law (see, among other authorities, Kudła v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 157, ECHR 2000-XI). Moreover, there is a close affinity between the requirements of Article 13 of the Convention and the rule on exhaustion of domestic remedies in Article 35 § 1 of the Convention. The latter's purpose is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court (see, among other authorities, Selmouni v. France [GC], no. 25803/94, § 74, ECHR 1999-V). The rule in Article 35 § 1 is based on the assumption, reflected in Article 13, that there is an effective domestic remedy available in respect of the alleged breach of an individual's Convention rights (see Kudła, cited above, § 152). Nevertheless, the only remedies which Article 35 of the Convention requires to be exhausted are those that relate to the breaches alleged and at the same time are available and sufficient. The existence of such remedies must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but also in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 142, ECHR 2006-...).
34. As to a remedy concerning a complaint about the length of proceedings, the decisive element in assessing its effectiveness is whether the applicant can raise this complaint before the domestic courts by claiming a specific redress; in other words, whether a remedy exists that could answer his complaints by providing direct and speedy redress, and not merely indirect protection of the rights guaranteed in Article 6 of the Convention (see Hajibeyli v. Azerbaijan, no. 16528/05, § 39, 10 July 2008). In particular, a remedy of this sort shall be “effective” if it can be used either to expedite a decision by the courts dealing with the case or to provide the litigant with adequate redress for delays which have already occurred (see Krasuski v. Poland, no. 61444/00, § 66, ECHR 2005-V (extracts)).
35. Regarding the possibility of challenging procedural orders suspending the proceedings (see paragraphs 17 - 19 above), the Court observes that, as the Government have agreed, the applicant and his counsel were not served with copies of those orders. Despite their assertion to the contrary, the Government failed to adduce any evidence showing that the applicant had at least been put on notice that the proceedings had been suspended or resumed. In such circumstances, the Court does not see how the applicant could appeal against those procedural measures taken in the course of the preliminary investigation. In the Court's view, in the absence of a copy of the procedural orders, the applicant would not have a realistic opportunity effectively to challenge them (see Chitayev and Chitayev v. Russia, no. 59334/00, §§ 139 and 140, 18 January 2007, and Khamila Isayeva v. Russia, no. 6846/02, §§ 101 and 133, 15 November 2007).
36. The Government also argued, in general terms, that the applicant could have exercised his so-called “right to rehabilitation” (see paragraph 21 above). The Court need not decide whether the procedure referred to by the Government constituted on the facts a remedy within the meaning of Article 13 of the Convention or for purposes of exhaustion within the meaning of its Article 35 § 1, since it does not transpire from the case file that the applicant was given a copy of the decision of 20 January 2006. Neither is there any evidence showing that he was apprised of his right to apply for compensation in respect of damage caused by criminal prosecution (compare Sidorenko v. Russia, no. 4459/03, § 39, 8 March 2007). Furthermore, the Government did not indicate how that would have remedied the complaint currently before the Court in respect of the alleged excessive length of the criminal proceedings (see Karamitrov and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 53321/99, §§ 59-60, 10 January 2008). The Government produced no copies of domestic court judgments where awards had been made in the proceedings under Articles 133 and 134 of the CCrP providing redress for excessive length of criminal proceedings. Having regard to this, the Court considers that the Government's argument as to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in respect of the applicant's complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention must be dismissed.
37. Furthermore, the foregoing considerations are sufficient for the Court to conclude that the applicant was not afforded an effective and accessible remedy in respect of his complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention regarding the allegedly excessive length of the criminal proceedings against him. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention.
2. Article 6 § 1 of the Convention
38. The parties made no submissions as to the exact period to be taken into consideration. The Court considers that the relevant period started at the latest on 10 August 1999, when the applicant was first charged. As to the end of that period, the Court reiterates that proceedings which do not lead to a proper trial before a domestic court normally end with an official notification to the accused that he or she is no longer to be prosecuted on the charges which would allow a conclusion that the situation of that person could no longer be considered to be substantially affected (see Kalpachka v. Bulgaria, no. 49163/99, §§ 65 and 66, 2 November 2006, with further references). The Court notes that the criminal proceedings against the applicant were discontinued on 20 January 2006 but that he contended that he had first learnt about the discontinuation of the proceedings from the Government's observations submitted in September 2006. It is also observed that under Russian law (see paragraph 20 above) he was entitled to be served ex officio with a copy of the decision to discontinue the criminal proceedings against him (see also Nakhmanovich v. Russia, no. 55669/00, §§ 88-94, 2 March 2006). The Court has already noted that it does not transpire from the materials in the case file that the applicant was given a copy of that decision. Thus, the Court considers that the proceedings under review did not end until September 2006 and thus lasted for approximately seven years.
39. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of the proceedings is to be assessed in the light of the particular circumstances of the case, regard being had to the criteria laid down in the Court's case-law, in particular the complexity of the case, the applicant's conduct and the conduct of the competent authorities (see, among other authorities, Rokhlina v. Russia, no. 54071/00, § 86, 7 April 2005). One of the purposes of the right to trial within a reasonable period of time is to protect individuals from remaining too long in a state of uncertainty about their fate (see Stögmüller v. Austria, § 5, 10 November 1969, Series A no. 9).
40. The Court is not convinced by the Government's argument that the length of the proceedings was caused by the applicant's state of health. The Government did not submit copies of the suspension or resumption orders. They neither adduced any medical evidence nor specified in what way the applicant's medical condition had impeded the proceedings. The applicant was not brought to trial and no plausible explanation was given as to why it took seven years to conduct the preliminary investigation. Furthermore, the facts of the case do not reveal that the applicant in any way delayed the investigation. The Court considers, rather, that the conduct of the domestic authorities led to substantial delays in the proceedings.
41. Having regard to the foregoing, the Court considers that the length of the proceedings did not satisfy the “reasonable-time” requirement. Accordingly, there has been a breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
42. With reference to Article 6 §§ 1 and 2, Article 13 and Article 18 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the applicant contended that the imposition of the charging order in respect of his bus, its transfer to Mr Y. and its continued retention by the authorities amounted to disproportionate limitations on the “peaceful enjoyment of his possessions”. The Court considers that this complaint should be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
The Court also decides to examine under Article 13 of the Convention (cited above) whether the applicant had an effective remedy in relation to his complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
A. Submissions by the parties
43. The Government argued that the applicant could have applied to a court for the lifting of the charging order in respect of his bus and sought compensation in respect of the loss allegedly sustained because of the impounding of the vehicle. The Government submitted that the seizure of the applicant's bus had been lawful and that its aim had been to constitute security for the eventual penalty of confiscation of his property in relation to charges under Article 160 of the Criminal Code, if he were subsequently convicted by a court. The Government acknowledged that the investigator's failure to order the release of the bus after the decision of 20 January 2006 had been unlawful. However, it had been remedied by the decision of 18 July 2006 taken by the deputy prosecutor of the Buryatiya Republic. In any event, the applicant had not made any effort between January and July 2006 in order to obtain release of his bus. As regards Article 13 of the Convention, the Government submitted that the applicant had had an effective remedy, namely the possibility of challenging the investigator's decision to seize the bus. The applicant had used that remedy, albeit without success.
44. The applicant maintained his complaint.
A. The Court's assessment
1. Scope of the complaints
45. The Court observes at the outset that the applicant's complaint is threefold. First, he contested as unlawful the charging order issued in respect of his bus. Second, he was unsatisfied with its transfer for safekeeping to a Mr Y. Third, he contended that the prolonged retention of the bus constituted a disproportionate limitation on the “peaceful enjoyment of his possessions”.
46. The parties made no specific arguments relating to the lawfulness of the initial act of seizure or that of the safekeeping of the bus by Mr Y. The Court considers that both acts were lawful and otherwise compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. It will make no further findings in that respect. It is further noted that although the charging order was lifted in July 2006, the bus has not been returned to the applicant to date. The total period, during which the applicant was denied use of the vehicle has already exceeded nine years. In that connection, the Court observes that there are two uninterrupted periods under consideration:
(i) from November 1999 to 18 July 2006, the date on which the charging order was lifted; and
(ii) from 18 July 2006 onwards.
The Court will confine its analysis to the compatibility of the prolonged retention of the bus with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
47. The Court also observes that the applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention relates to the period when the charging order was in force, that is from November 1999 to 18 July 2006.
2. Admissibility
48. The Court considers that the Government's argument relating to exhaustion of domestic remedies is closely linked to the merits of the applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention. Thus, the Court finds it necessary to join it to the merits of the applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention.
49. The Court further notes that the applicant's complaints under Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention and that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.
3. Merits
(a) Compliance with Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
50. The Court notes at the outset that although the complaints under Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 arise out of the same facts, there is a difference in the nature of the interests protected by those provisions: the former affords a procedural safeguard, namely the “right to an effective remedy”, whereas the procedural requirement inherent in the latter is ancillary to the wider purpose of ensuring respect for the right to the peaceful enjoyment of one's possessions. Thus, the Court judges it appropriate in the instant case to examine the same set of facts under both Articles (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 65, ECHR 1999-II).
51. The Court has consistently interpreted Article 13 as requiring a remedy in domestic law in respect of grievances which can be regarded as “arguable” in terms of the Convention (see, for example, Boyle and Rice v. the United Kingdom, 27 April 1988, § 54, Series A no. 131). The Court considers that the applicant's grievance under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is an “arguable” one. The Court has to determine whether the Russian legal system afforded the applicant an “effective” remedy, allowing the competent “national authority” both to deal with the complaint and to grant appropriate relief (see Camenzind v. Switzerland, 16 December 1997, § 53, Reports 1997-VIII).
52. The Court accepts that at the relevant time Russian law in principle allowed recourse to courts in order to challenge a decision by the investigating authority to seize chattels in pending criminal proceedings (see paragraphs 17 and 19 above). However, the Court is unable to reach the same conclusion in respect of the possibility of opposing the continuing retention of such chattels. Indeed, by a judgment of 15 September 2003 the Sovetskiy District Court of Ulan-Ude rejected the applicant's arguments to the effect that his property rights over the bus had been breached by the continuing application of the charging order. On appeal, the Supreme Court of the Buryatiya Republic, referring to the 2002 CCrP, held, however, that the authority dealing with the criminal case had the power to release the property under the charging order, if the charge was no longer needed. The appeal court concluded that “[t]aking into account...the requirement of the procedure under Article 125 of the Code, the court [was] not empowered to decide on the issue of lifting the charging order”.
53. The Court observes that the redress in the procedure under Article 125 of the CCrP consists of invalidating the impugned action or inaction as unlawful or lacking justification and requiring the respondent authority to remedy the violation. The power to lift the charging order and to release the property remains with the “authority dealing with the case”, that is the investigator in the present case. In a recent case against Russia, the Court found a violation of Article 13 with reference to the fact that the domestic courts had examined a complaint concerning a search and seizure in the applicant's flat, while declaring inadmissible a complaint about a failure to return his computer on the ground that the retention decision was not amenable to judicial review (see Smirnov v. Russia, no. 71362/01, § 64, 7 June 2007, ECHR 2007-...). In other words, the Russian courts declined jurisdiction to deal with the substance of the applicant's complaint and to grant appropriate relief. In view of the above findings, the Court dismisses the Government's argument that the applicant did not apply for the lifting of a charging order. It was not submitted, and the Court does not consider, that any subsequent applications would have had better prospects of success (see, mutatis mutandis, Granger v. the United Kingdom, 28 March 1990, §§ 37 and 40, Series A no. 174).
54. As to an eventual claim for compensation, the Court reiterates that an individual is not required to try more than one avenue of redress when there are several available. It is for the applicant to choose the legal remedy that is most appropriate in the circumstances of the case (see, among other authorities, Airey v. Ireland, 9 October 1979, § 23, Series A no. 32, and Boicenco v. Moldova, no. 41088/05, § 80, 11 July 2006). The Court considers that, having exhausted all the possibilities of appeal available to him in the framework of the 2003 proceedings (see paragraphs 13 and 14 above), the applicant should not be required to embark on another attempt to obtain redress by bringing a civil action for damages (see, mutatis mutandis, Assenov and Others v. Bulgaria, 28 October 1998, § 86, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-VIII). In any event, the Court finds it unproven that at the relevant time Russian law provided the applicant with the possibility of seeking compensation for the damage caused as a result of the prolonged interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. In particular, the Government failed to provide sufficient details as to what type of legal action could be considered to have been an effective remedy that should have been exhausted.
55. As regards the second period, in the absence of any submissions from the Government regarding availability of a remedy relating to the applicant's regaining possession of his bus after the charging order had been lifted and once the applicant had become aware of that fact, the Court is not prepared to dismiss the complaint for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies.
56. In view of the foregoing considerations, the Court concludes that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in that, at the relevant time, the applicant had no effective domestic remedy in respect of his complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
(b) Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
57. It is common ground between the parties that the applicant was the lawful owner of the bus; in other words, it was his “possession”. Neither is it disputed that the charging order and its continued application amounted to an interference with the applicant's right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions and that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is therefore applicable. The Court reiterates that the seizure of property for legal proceedings normally relates to the control of the use of property, which falls within the ambit of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, among others, Raimondo v. Italy, 22 February 1994, § 27, Series A no. 281-A; Andrews v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 49584/99, 26 September 2002; Adamczyk v. Poland (dec.), no. 28551/04, 7 November 2006; and Simonjan-Heikinheino v. Finland (dec.), no. 6321/03, 2 September 2008). Indeed, the seizure of the vehicle did not deprive the applicant of his possession, but only provisionally prevented him from using it and from disposing of it. The Court cannot but note certain indications that the applicant's bus is no longer available, which may be why it has not been returned to him to date. However, having regard to the established facts and verifiable information in its possession, it will examine the applicant's complaint with reference to the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
58. As regards the period when the charging order was in force, nothing in the parties' submissions discloses that the interference was not lawful. The Court also accepts that the interference was in the “general interest” of the community because the charge aimed at anticipating an eventual confiscation of property and securing civil claims of the injured party (see Kokavecz v. Hungary (dec.), no. 27312/95, 20 April 1999, and Földes and Földesné Hajlik v. Hungary, no. 41463/02, § 26, ECHR 2006-...).
59. The Court observes, however, that there must also be a reasonable relation of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised by any measures applied by the State, including measures designed to control the use of the individual's property. That requirement is expressed by the notion of a “fair balance” that must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual's fundamental rights (see Edwards v. Malta, no. 17647/04, § 69, 24 October 2006, with further references).
60. The Court considers that, in principle, imposition of a charge on an accused's property is not in itself open to criticism, having regard in particular to the margin of appreciation permitted under the second paragraph of Article 1 of the Protocol. However, it carries with it the risk of imposing on him or her an excessive burden in terms of ability to dispose of his or her property and must accordingly provide certain procedural safeguards so as to ensure that the operation of the system and its impact on an applicant's property rights are neither arbitrary nor unforeseeable (see, mutatis mutandis, Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 54, ECHR 1999-V, and the ruling from the Russian Constitutional Court cited in paragraph 26 above).
61. The Court has already found that the criminal proceedings in relation to which the charging order had been issued in the present case did not comply with the “reasonable-time” requirement of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (see paragraph 41 above). It has also found that the applicant was not afforded an effective remedy for his complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 56 above). Furthermore, the Court reiterates that while any seizure or confiscation entails damage, the actual damage sustained should not be more extensive than that which is inevitable, if it is to be compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Raimondo, cited above, § 33, and Jucys v. Lithuania, no. 5457/03, § 36, 8 January 2008). It was not in dispute between the parties that the bus had a considerable commercial value for the applicant. However, following amendment of the Criminal Code in December 2003, removing confiscation as a penalty for criminal offences, and in the absence of any civil claims against the applicant, it was incumbent on the national authorities to re-assess the lawfulness and necessity of the continued application of the order. Indeed, it was the investigator's duty under the CCrP to lift the charging order if it was no longer necessary (see paragraph 25 above). Nevertheless, the case remained dormant and no investigative measures were taken between 2000 and early 2006. The domestic authorities did not consider whether it would be possible to leave the bus with the applicant, while restraining him from disposing of it. Although the availability of alternative solutions does not in itself render the interference with the applicant's right unjustified, it constitutes a relevant factor when determining whether the means chosen may be regarded as reasonable and suited to achieving the legitimate aim being pursued (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 51, Series A no. 98; and Wiesinger v. Austria, 30 October 1991, § 77, Series A no. 213). The Court concludes that the Russian authorities failed to strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest and the requirement of the protection of the applicant's right to peaceful enjoinment of his possessions by maintaining the charging order for more than six years.
62. As regards the retention of the bus after the decision of 20 January 2006 (see paragraph 9 above), the Government have acknowledged that maintaining the charging order after that date and until its discharge on 18 July 2006 was unlawful. The Court has no reason to disagree with this assessment. In addition to that, the Court observes that the Government cited no legal basis for not returning the bus to the applicant after that annulment. Thus, the Court considers that the continued retention of the bus even after the annulment of the charging order is equally unlawful (cf. Vendittelli v. Italy, 18 July 1994, §§ 39 and 40, Series A no. 293-A; and Raimondo, cited above, § 36).
63. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
64. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
65. The applicant claimed 170,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage caused in relation to the seizure and retention of his bus and restitution of his bus or payment of EUR 700,000, as well as lost earnings in the amount of 1,533,000 Russian roubles (RUB).
66. The Government made no comments within the prescribed time-limit.
67. The Court considers that the applicant has suffered non-pecuniary damage on account of the prolonged retention of his bus and, making its assessment on an equitable basis, awards him EUR 3,000 under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable.
68. As to the pecuniary claims, the Court considers that the applicant did not substantiate his claims in respect of the lost earnings. Neither did he submit any details as to his alternative claim regarding the value of the bus. Thus, the Court dismisses those claims as unfounded.
69. However, the Court reiterates that a judgment in which the Court finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences (see Papamichalopoulos and Others v. Greece (Article 50), 31 October 1995, Series A no. 330-B, and Brumărescu v. Romania (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 28342/95, ECHR 2001-I). Therefore, in so far as the claim for restitution of the bus is concerned, the Court finds it appropriate in the circumstances of the case to grant the applicant's claim by requiring the respondent State to ensure, by appropriate means, that the bus in question is returned to the applicant.
B. Costs and expenses
70. The applicant claimed RUB 21,000 for unspecified legal costs.
71. The Court reiterates that costs and expenses will not be awarded under Article 41 unless it is established that they were actually and necessarily incurred, and were also reasonable as to quantum (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000-XI). The Court considers that the applicant's claim is unsubstantiated; it therefore rejects it.
C. Default interest
72. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Decides to join to the merits the Government's objections as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies in respect of the applicant's complaints about the excessive length of the criminal proceedings against him and the prolonged retention of the bus and rejects them;
2. Declares the application admissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in relation to the applicant's complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in relation to the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
6. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
7. Holds
(a) that the respondent State shall ensure, by appropriate means, that the bus in question be returned to the applicant;
(b) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into Russian roubles at the rate applicable at the date of settlement, plus any tax that may be chargeable;
(c) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
8. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 22 January 2009, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Obiezioni preliminari congiunte ai meriti e respinte (non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione dell’ Art. 13+6-1; violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione dell’ Art. 13+P1-1; Violazione di P1-1; danno Materiale e morale - assegnazione
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA BORZHONOV C. RUSSIA
(Richiesta n. 18274/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
22 gennaio 2009
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Borzhonov c. Russia,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, giudici,
ed André Wampach, Cancelliere d Sezione i Aggiunto,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 16 dicembre 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 18274/04) contro la Federazione russa depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo, il Sig. Y. D. B. (“il richiedente”), il 20 aprile 2004.
2. Il richiedente è stato rappresentato dal Sig. A. B., un avvocato che pratica a Ulan-Ude. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal Sig. P. Laptev, Rappresentante precedente della Federazione russa alla Corte europea dei Diritti umani.
3. Il 9 maggio 2006 il Presidente della prima Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. Il richiedente nacque nel 1954 e vive nella città di Ulan-Ude nella Repubblica di Buryatiya.
A. procedimenti Penali contro il richiedente
5. Le autorità russe iniziarono procedimenti penali contro il richiedente:
- il 13 giugno 1999 sotto l’Articolo 198 § 2 del Codice Penale (evasione fiscale da parte di persona privata); il richiedente fu accusato di colpevolezza il 10 agosto 1999;
- il 24 giugno 1999 sotto l’Articolo 201 § 1 del Codice (abuso di potere);
- il 29 agosto 1999 sotto l’Articolo 199 del Codice (evasione fiscale da parte di persona giuridica);
- il 13 ottobre 1999 sotto l’Articolo 160 § 3 (b) (appropriazione indebita di proprietà privata);
- il 21 gennaio 2000 sotto l’Articolo 165 (per aver provocato danno materiale).
6. Le cause sopra furono congiunte in numerose occasioni, la più recentemente il 4 giugno 2001. Secondo il Governo, le accuse sotto gli Articoli 165 e 199 del Codice furono sospesi rispettivamente il 5 gennaio 2000 e il 4 giugno 2001 (vedere, comunque, paragrafo 9 sotto).
7. Secondo il Governo, i procedimenti furono sospesi il 6 gennaio, il 4 febbraio e il 17 agosto 2000, il 13 giugno e il 21 settembre 2001, e il 20 gennaio 2003, a causa della malattia del richiedente. Secondo il Governo, il richiedente ed il suo consigliere furono messi al corrente, che i procedimenti erano stati sospesi in numerose occasioni e successivamente erano stati ripresi.
8. Il 18 agosto 2004 il richiedente chiese accesso al file della causa e, in particolare, alle decisioni summenzionate per sospendere i procedimenti. Il 27 agosto 2004 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore della Repubblica di Buryatiya gli spedì una lettera affermando che era probabile che il file della causa fosse disponibile all'archivio dell’ Autorità Fiscale a Ulan-Ude. Il 5 ottobre 2004 il Dipartimento delle Indagini del Ministero Regionale dell'Interno ha informato il richiedente che la causa penale contro lui a causa della sua malattia era stata sospesa. Su sua nuova richiesta, il 22 dicembre 2004 il richiedente ricevette un'altra replica dall'Ufficio Regionale del Servizio di Controllo delle Droghe che affermava che , era probabile che il Dipartimento delle Indagini fosse in grado offrire i documenti richiesti. L’8 settembre 2005 il Servizio del Controllo delle Droghe informò il richiedente che il 10 luglio 2003 la causa penale contro lui era stata spedita all'Ufficio dell'Accusatore della Repubblica di Buryatiya.
9. Il 20 gennaio 2006 il Dipartimento delle Indagini cessò i procedimenti riguardo ad accuse sotto gli Articoli 160, 165, 198, 199 e 201 del Codice Penale.
B. La Confisca e il trattenimento dell'autobus del richiedente
10. Nell’ agosto 1997 il richiedente comprò un autobus PAZ-320500. Il 5 novembre 1999 l'investigatore nella causa penale contro il richiedente (vedere sopra) autorizzò la confisca dell'autobus come garanzia per le eventuali rivendicazioni civili contro lui o l’ eventuale sequestro come sanzione penale sotto l’Articolo 160 § 3 (b) del Codice Penale (vedere paragrafo 16 sotto). Il 9 novembre 1999 l'autobus del richiedente fu sequestrato. Sembra che nessuna rivendicazione civile venne depositata nella causa penale contro il richiedente.
11. In una data non specificata l'autobus fu trasferito per custodia al Sig. Y.
12. Nel settembre 2003 il richiedente portò procedimenti nei quali impugnò l'ordine di confisca dell'investigatore come illegale e richiese al tribunale di rilasciare l'autobus.
13. Il 15 settembre 2003 la Corte distrettuale Sovetskiy di Ulan-Ude esaminò le rivendicazioni del richiedente con riferimento all’ Articolo 125 del Codice del 2002 di Diritto di procedura penale (vedere paragrafo 19 sotto) e le respinse come infondate. La corte sostenne ciò che segue:
“... sotto l’Articolo 175 § 1 del RSFSR Codice di Diritto di procedura penale per garantire le rivendicazioni civili o la confisca di eventuali beni l'investigatore emetterà un ordine di sequestro riguardo la proprietà dell'accusato che era stata ottenuta illegalmente. L’Articolo 160 § 3 del Codice Penale della Federazione russa prevede il sequestro come sanzione penale. Inoltre, il caso rivela perdita materiale [subito dalla vittima], e la vittima ha diritto di intentare una rivendicazione civile per danni contro il richiedente...
La corte non trova ragioni per lasciare l'autobus con [il richiedente] per custodia...
La corte [prima l'istanza] respinti gli argomenti del richiedente per il fatto che i suoi diritti di proprietà sull'autobus erano stati violati dal sequestro continuo di proprietà e la causa penale era ancora pendente. La causa è sospesa a causa della malattia del richiedente...”
14. L’ 11 novembre 2003 la Corte Suprema della Repubblica di Buryatiya sostenne il giudizio su ricorso. La corte affermò:
“Sotto l’Articolo 115 § 9 il Codice di Diritto di procedura penale che ora è applicabile a questioni concernenti un sequestro di proprietà l'autorità che tratta con la causa penale ha il potere di rilasciare la proprietà sotto l'ordine di sequestro, se non c’è più bisogno di sequestro. Come mostrato dal file della causa, la causa penale contro il richiedente è trattata attualmente dall'autorità inquirente, essendo l'indagine. Prendendo in considerazione le osservazioni precedenti ed il requisito della procedura sotto l’Articolo 125 del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale, alla corte non sono conferiti poteri per decidere sul problema di togliere l'ordine di sequestro...”
15. Il 18 luglio 2006 l'accusatore aggiunto della Repubblica di Buryatiya tolse l'ordine di sequestro a riguardo dell'autobus del richiedente. Al richiedente fu notificata una copia di quella decisione il 21 marzo 2007. Sembra che le autorità fossero incapaci di determinare dove l'autobus era tenuto e così non potevano restituirlo al richiedente.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Codice Penale
16. Sotto l'Articolo 160 § 3 (b) del Codice, in vigore al tempo attinente, l’appropriazione indebita di una proprietà altrui commessa su grande scala o in prospettiva dello status gerarchico della persona era punibile con una sentenza di reclusione da dieci anni in su con o senza la confisca dei beni. Sotto la Legge Federale dell’ 8 dicembre 2003 (n. 162-ÔÇ), il sequestro come sanzione penale fu rimosso dal Codice Penale, incluso il suo Articolo 160 § 3 (b). Il 27 luglio 2006 un nuovo Capitolo 15.1 che reintroduceva la nozione del sequestro è stato inserito nel Codice in relazione ad un numero di reati. I reati sotto gli Articoli 160, 165, 198 che 199 e 201 non sono riguardati.
B. procedimenti Penali
1. Il Codice 1960 RSFSR di Diritto di procedura penale (RSFSR CCrP)
17. Un'indagine preliminare in una causa penale doveva essere completata entro due mesi a partire dalla data in cui i procedimenti furono iniziati sino alla data in cui un conto di custodia è stato spedito all'accusatore o quando i procedimenti sono stati terminati o sospesi (Articolo 133). L'indagine preliminare si potrebbe sospendere se l'accusato fosse scappato o se non si fosse determinato il suo domicilio o se lui stesse patendo una malattia seria mentale o altro. L'investigatore doveva emettere una decisione ragionata (Articolo 195). Facendo seguito all’ Articolo 218 del Codice, un accusatore era competente per l’esame azioni di reclamo contro decisioni prese da un indagatore o un investigatore. Con una direttiva del 23 marzo 1999, la Corte Costituzionale invalidò questa disposizione in quanto escludeva una possibilità di soprintendenza giudiziale su simile decisioni, incluso quelle relative alla sospensione di procedimenti e all'imposizione di ordini di custodia.
2. Il Codice del 2002 del Diritto di procedura penale (CCrP)
18. Sotto l'Articolo 208 § 1 del Codice, l'indagine preliminare può essere sospesa, inter alia, se la persona sospetta o accusata sta patendo temporaneamente una malattia seria che gli impedisce di partecipare all'indagine. Alla vittima, rivendicatore civile o convenuto ed ai loro rappresentanti dovrebbero essere notificati e conseguenza dovrebbero essere informati del loro diritto a fare appello contro la decisione che sospende i procedimenti (Articolo 209 § 1). Una persona sospetta o accusato e il consigliere dovrebbero essere anche informati, nel caso in cui la sospensione fosse causata dalla sua malattia.
19.Gli Articoli 123 e 125 del Codice riguardano la soprintendenza giudiziale su qualsiasi azione (non azione) da parte di un indagatore, investigatore o accusatore dal momento che simile azione (non azione) colpisce i diritti di un reclamante o impedisce il suo accesso ad una tribunale. Il giudice o (i) invalida l’azione (non azione) contestata come illegale o mancante di giustificazione e costringe l'autorità rispondente a rimediare alla violazione, o (ii) respinge l'azione di reclamo.
20. Una decisione che termina i procedimenti penali dovrebbe essere data o dovrebbe essere inviata alla persona riguardata (Articolo 214 § 4).
21. L’Articolo 133 § 1 del Codice salvaguardia un così definito “diritto di riabilitazione”, incluso un diritto al pieno risarcimento riguardo al danno materiale e morale causato dall’ azione penale di una persona che è stata assolta o riguardo a cui i procedimenti penali sono stati terminati, inter alia, a causa di una mancanza di corpus delicti o perché la persona non era stata coinvolta nell'atto penale. L'investigatore emette una decisione in cui riconosce il diritto della persona a riabilitazione ed anche spedisce una notificazione che spiega la procedura per ottenere il risarcimento (Articolo 134 § 1).
C. Sequestro di proprietà in procedimenti penali
1. Il 1960 RSFSR CCrP
22. Una persona che ha subito danno materiale o perdita da un reato penale ha diritto a depositare una rivendicazione civile contro l'accusato. Può esercitare questo diritto dal principio dei procedimenti penali sino all'apertura della prova (Articolo 29).
23. Se ragioni sufficienti dimostrano l'esistenza di danno materiale causato da un reato penale, l'autorità inquirente o un tribunale dovrebbero prendere misure per assicurare l'esistente o eventuale rivendicazione civile e/o per impedire l'accusato di nascondere la sua proprietà, se le accuse contro lui portano al sequestro come una possibile sanzione penale (Articolo 30).
24. Secondo l’Articolo 175 del Codice per assicurare rivendicazioni civili o l’ eventuale confisca dei beni, l'investigatore dovrebbe emettere un ordine di custodia riguardo la proprietà di un accusato; che di persone che sono responsabili per legge per l'accusato o le azioni di persona sospetta; che delle altre persone che sono in possesso della proprietà acquisite tramite azioni illegali. La proprietà addotta può essere confiscata o può essere trasferita a discrezione dell'ufficiale annesso per custodia ad un'autorità competente o può essere lasciata col proprietario o altra persona che saranno avvertite della responsabilità di mantenere la proprietà al sicuro, ed il fatto sarà menzionato nel documento attinente. L'investigatore toglie l'ordine di custodia se non ce n’è più bisogno.
2. Il 2002 CCrP
25. Sotto l'Articolo 115 § 1 del Codice per assicurare l’esecuzione di una sentenza in una parte che concerne una rivendicazione civile, soddisfare le altre multe o una eventuale confisca di beni, un indagatore o investigatore, soggetto al beneplacito dell'accusatore o un accusatore dovrebbero fare domanda ad un tribunale per un ordine di custodia riguardo la proprietà della persona sospetta o accusata. Il tribunale dovrebbe esaminare simile richiesta sotto la procedura esposta nell’ Articolo 165 del Codice. Un'accusa o sequestro di proprietà proibisce al proprietario di disporre, e, se appropriato, di utilizzare la proprietà; si può richiedere la confisca di quella proprietà ed il suo trasferimento per la custodia al suo proprietario o una terza persona (§§ 2 e 6). Un ordine di custodia è tolto dall'autorità che tratta la causa penale quando non c’è più bisogno della custodia (§ 9).
Il 4 luglio 2003 l’Articolo 115 § 1 del Codice fu corretto per escludere un’ eventuale confisca dei beni come ragione per richiedere un ordine di custodia. Un ordine di custodia potrebbe concernere solamente la proprietà acquisita dalla persona sospetta, accusata o un'altra persona come risultato dell'attività criminale o tramite mezzi illeciti.
L’8 dicembre 2003 l’Articolo 115 § 1 del Codice fu corretto per reintrodurre un’ eventuale confisca dei beni come ragione per richiedere un ordine di custodia; in simili circostanze divenne a carico del tribunale indicare le circostanze attinenti nella sua decisione.
3. Altra legislazione/giurisprudenza attinente
26. Con la decisione n. 97-O del 10 marzo 2005 che la Corte Costituzionale ha sostenuto, nel contesto di procedimenti riguardo all’ Articolo 82 del CCrP su prova materiale quelle misure provvisorie come l'imposizione di un'accusa sulla proprietà di uno possono essere richieste in procedimenti penali e non dovrebbero essere considerate come una violazione di diritti costituzionali e delle libertà, incluso i diritti di proprietà. Lo scrutinio giudiziale di simili misure riguardo alla loro legalità dovrebbe includere anche una valutazione del fatto se altre misure sarebbero improprie, con dovuto riguardo alla gravità delle accuse in relazione alla quale delle misure provvisorie sono state prese, così come alla natura della proprietà sotto accusa, la sua importanza per il suo proprietario o possessore e gli altri eventuali effetti negativi che è probabile che l'accusa abbia. Così, è spetta all'investigatore e, successivamente, al tribunale do revisione verificare che la proprietà sotto accusa debba o meno essere ritornata al suo proprietario per custodia sino alla chiusura dei procedimenti penali.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTE DEGLI ARTICOLI 6 E 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
27. Il richiedente si lamentò che la lunghezza dei procedimenti penali contro lui era stata in violazione del “termine ragionevole” richiesto sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Si legge come segue:
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
Lui si lamentò anche sulla mancanza di vie di ricorso efficaci riguardo la sua azione di reclamo qui sopra. L’Articolo 13 si legge come segue:
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
28. In relazione ad ambo le azioni di reclamo, il Governo dibatté, che il richiedente non si era lamentato di fronte alle autorità nazionali circa qualsiasi ritardo nei procedimenti penali o ha fatto ricorso contro decisioni con le quali erano stati sospesi. Né lui aveva accertato il suo diritto alla riabilitazione a seguito dell'interruzione della causa penale contro lui. Presentò anche che l'indagine preliminare nella causa del richiedente aveva impiegato solamente undici mesi, certi periodi non specificati di ritardo essendo attribuibili alle autorità. Con riferimento ad una nota informativa dall'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, il Governo addusse che il file della causa penale conteneva copie di notificazioni spedite al richiedente sulla sospensione dei procedimenti e la loro riapertura; in richiedente ed il suo consiglio non aveva richiesto copie degli ordini procedurali ed attinenti. In qualsiasi caso, gli Articoli 208 e 209 del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale (CCrP) non richiedono di essere forniti alla difesa (vedere paragrafo 18 sopra). I procedimenti sono stati sospesi a causa di ripetuti periodi di malattia del richiedente .
29. Il richiedente presentò che l'indagine preliminare nella sua causa andava dal giugno 1999 al gennaio 2006. Non gli erano state notificate le copie delle decisioni di sospensione dei procedimenti che in qualsiasi caso, non potevano essere giustificati dallo stato della sua salute mentale. Aveva appreso dell'interruzione dei procedimenti dalle osservazioni del Governo datate 6 settembre 2006. Non essendogli state fornite copie delle decisioni attinenti, il richiedente non poteva impugnarle nei tribunali e non era stato informato del suo diritto alla riabilitazione.
A. Ammissibilità
30. La Corte considera che l'argomento del Governo relativo all'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sia collegato da vicino ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione. Così, la Corte trova necessario congiungerlo ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
31. La Corte nota inoltre che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione non sono manifestamente mal-fondati all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e che loro non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo. Devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
B. Meriti
1. Articolo 13 della Convenzione
32. L’Articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce la disponibilità a livello di cittadino di una via di ricorso per eseguire la sostanza dei diritti della Convenzione e delle libertà in qualsiasi potrebbe accadere di essere fissati nell'ordine legale nazionale. L'effetto dell’ Articolo 13 deve richiedere così la disposizione di una via di ricorso nazionale per trattare con la sostanza di un “azione di reclamo difendibile” sotto la Convenzione ed accordare il sollievo appropriato. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione sia difendibile.
33. La sfera degli obblighi degli Stati Contraenti sotto l’Articolo 13 varia a seconda dalla natura dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente; comunque, la via di ricorso richiesta dall’Articolo 13 deve essere “efficace” in pratica così come in legge (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Kudła c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 157 ECHR 2000-XI). C'è inoltre, un'affinità vicina fra i requisiti dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione e l'articolo sull'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali nell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione. Il fine del secondo è riconoscere agli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di prevenire o correggere le violazioni addotte contro loro prima che quelle dichiarazioni vengano presentate alla Corte (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Selmouni c. Francia [GC], n. 25803/94, § 74 il 1999-V di ECHR). La norma nell’ Articolo 35 § 1 è basata sull'assunzione, riflessa nell’ Articolo 13 che ci sia una via di ricorso nazionale efficace disponibile riguardo la violazione addotta dei diritti della Convenzione di un individuo (vedere Kudła, citata sopra, § 152). Ciononostante, le sole vie di ricorso che l’Articolo 35 della Convenzione costringe ad esaurire sono quelle che si riferiscono alle violazioni addotte ed allo stesso tempo che sono disponibili e sufficienti. L'esistenza di simili vie di ricorso non solo deve essere sufficientemente sicura in teoria ma anche in pratica, fallendo in questo mancherà loro il requisito di accessibilità d’'efficacia (vedere Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 142 ECHR 2006 -...).
34. Riguardo ad una via di ricorso concernente un'azione di reclamo sulla lunghezza di procedimenti, l'elemento decisivo nel valutare la sua efficacia è, se il richiedente può sollevare questa azione di reclamo di fronte ai tribunali nazionali chiedendo una specifica compensazione; in altre parole, se una via di ricorso esiste che potrebbe rispondere alle sue azioni di reclamo offrendo compensazione diretta e veloce, e non protezione soltanto indiretta dei diritti garantiti nell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere Hajibeyli c. Azerbaijan, n. 16528/05, § 39 10 luglio 2008). In particolare, una via di ricorso di questo genere sarà “efficace” se si può usare sia per accelerare una decisione da parte dei tribunali che trattano la causa sia per fornire al contendente una compensazione adeguata per i ritardi che già si sono verificati, (vedere Krasuski c. Polonia, n. 61444/00, § 66 il 2005-V di ECHR (gli estratti)).
35. Riguardo alla possibilità di impugnare ordini procedurali che sospendono i procedimenti (vedere paragrafi 17 - 19 sopra), la Corte osserva che, come il Governo ha concordato, al richiedente ed al suo consigliere non furono notificate le copie di quegli ordini. Nonostante asserisca il contrario, il Governo mancò nell’ addurre qualsiasi prova che mostrasse che al richiedente era stato almeno notificato un avviso che i procedimenti erano stati sospesi o erano stati riaperti. In simili circostanze, la Corte non vede, come il richiedente avrebbe potuto fare ricorso contro quelle misure procedurali prese nel corso dell'indagine preliminare. Nella prospettiva della Corte, in assenza di una copia degli ordini procedurali il richiedente non avrebbe avuto effettivamente un'opportunità realistica di impugnarli (vedere Chitayev e Chitayev c. Russia, n. 59334/00, §§ 139 e 140, 18 gennaio 2007, e Khamila Isayeva c. Russia, n. 6846/02, §§ 101 e 133, 15 novembre 2007).
36. Il Governo dibatté anche, in termini generali che il richiedente avrebbe potuto esercitare il suo così definito “diritto a riabilitazione” (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra). La Corte non ha bisogno di decidere se la procedura a cui fa riferimento il Governo costituisca di fatto fatti una via di ricorso all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione o ai fini dell'esaurimento all'interno del significato del suo Articolo 35 § 1, poiché non traspare dal file della causa che al richiedente fu data una copia della decisione del 20 gennaio 2006. Nemmeno vi è una qualsiasi prova che mostri che lui fu informato del suo diritto a richiedere il risarcimento riguardo al danno causato dall’ azione penale (confrontare Sidorenko c. Russia, n. 4459/03, § 39 dell’8 marzo 2007). Inoltre, il Governo non indicò come ciò avrebbe rimediato l'azione di reclamo attualmente di fronte alla Corte riguardo all’addotta lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali (vedere Karamitrov ed Altri c. Bulgaria, n. 53321/99, §§ 59-60 del10 gennaio 2008). Il Governo non produsse nessuna copia di sentenze di tribunali nazionali in cui assegnazioni erano state rese nei procedimenti sotto gli Articoli 133 e 134 del CCrP che offrissero compensazione per la lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti penali. Avendo riguardo a questo, la Corte considera, che l'argomento del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali a proposito dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione debba essere respinta.
37. Inoltre, le considerazioni precedenti sono sufficienti per la Corte a concludere che al richiedente non fu riconosciuto una via di ricorso efficace ed accessibile riguardo alla sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a proposito della lunghezza presumibilmente eccessiva dei procedimenti penali contro lui. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
2. Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione
38. Le parti non hanno fatto osservazioni riguardo al periodo che doveva essere preso in esame. La Corte considera che il periodo attinente cominciò al massimo il 10 agosto 1999, quando il richiedente fu accusato. Riguardo alla fine di quel periodo, la Corte reitera che i procedimenti che non conducono ad una prova corretta di fronte ad un tribunale nazionale normalmente terminano con una notificazione ufficiale all'accusato per cui non sarà più perseguito sulla base delle accuse che permetterebbero una conclusione che la situazione di quella persona non si potrebbe considerare più come sostanzialmente colpita, (vedere Kalpachka c. Bulgaria, n. 49163/99, §§ 65 e 66, 2 novembre 2006 con gli ulteriori riferimenti). La Corte nota che i procedimenti penali contro il richiedente furono cessati il 20 gennaio 2006 ma che lui contese d aver appreso per la prima volta dell'interruzione dei procedimenti dalle osservazioni del Governo presentate il settembre 2006 . È osservato anche che sotto legge russa (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra) fu concesso di notificargli ex officio una copia della decisione di cessare i procedimenti penali contro lui (vedere anche Nakhmanovich c. Russia, n. 55669/00, §§ 88-94 del 2 marzo 2006). La Corte già ha notato che non traspare dai materiali nel file della causa che al richiedente fu data una copia di quella decisione. Così, la Corte considera che i procedimenti sotto revisione non terminarono sino al settembre 2006 e così durarono per approssimativamente sette anni.
39. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti sarà valutata alla luce delle particolari circostanze della causa, con avuto riguardo al criterio stabilito nella giurisprudenza della Corte, in particolare la complessità della causa, della condotta del richiedente e della condotta delle autorità competenti (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Rokhlina c. Russia, n. 54071/00, § 86 del 7 aprile 2005). Uno dei fini del diritto alla prova entro un periodo ragionevole di tempo è proteggere gli individui dal rimanere troppo lungo in uno stato d'incertezza sul loro destino (vedere Stögmüller c. Austria, § 5, 10 novembre 1969 Serie A n. 9).
40. La Corte non è convinta dell'argomento del Governo per l quale la lunghezza dei procedimenti è stata causata dallo stato di salute del richiedente. Il Governo non presentò copie della sospensione o ordini di riapertura. Non addusse né alcuna prova medica né specificò in quale modo la condizione medica del richiedente aveva impedito i procedimenti. Il richiedente non fu portato alla prova e nessun chiarimento plausibile fu dato riguardo al perché ci vollero sette anni per condurre l'indagine preliminare. Inoltre, i fatti della causa non rivelano che il richiedente in qualsiasi modo rimandò l'indagine. La Corte considera, piuttosto, che la condotta delle autorità nazionali abbia condotto a ritardi sostanziali nei procedimenti.
41. Avendo riguardo a ciò che precede, la Corte considera, che la lunghezza dei procedimenti non abbia soddisfatto il requisito del “ termine ragionevole”. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
II. VIOLAZIONI ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
42. Con riferimento all’ Articolo 6 §§ 1 e 2, l’Articolo 13 e l’Articolo 18 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 dl Protocollo N.ro 1, il richiedente contese che l'imposizione dell'ordine di custodia riguardo del suo autobus, il suo trasferimento al Sig. Y. e il suo trattenimento continuato da parte delle autorità corrispose a limitazioni sproporzionate al “pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà.” La Corte considera che questa azione di reclamo dovrebbe essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
La Corte decide anche di esaminare sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione (citato sopra) se il richiedente aveva una via di ricorso efficace in relazione alla sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
A. Osservazioni delle parti
43. Il Governo dibatté che il richiedente avrebbe potuto fare domanda ad un tribunale per far togliere l'ordine di custodia n riguardo il suo autobus ed avrebbe potuto chiedere il risarcimento riguardo la perdita subita presumibilmente a causa della confisca del veicolo. Il Governo presentò che la confisca dell'autobus del richiedente era stata legale e che il suo scopo era stato costituire la sicurezza per l’ eventuale sanzione penale del sequestro della sua proprietà in relazione ad accuse sotto l’Articolo 160 del Codice Penale, nel caso fosse stato successivamente dichiarato colpevole da un tribunale. Il Governo ammise che l'insuccesso dell'investigatore nell’ ordinare il dissequestro dell'autobus dopo la decisione del 20 gennaio 2006 era stata illegale. Comunque, era stato rimediato con la decisione del 18 luglio 2006 presa dall'accusatore aggiunto della Repubblica di Buryatiya. In qualsiasi caso, il richiedente non aveva fatto alcuno sforzo fra il gennaio e il luglio 2006 per ottenere il dissequestro del suo autobus. Riguardo all’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione, il Governo presentò che il richiedente aveva avuto una via di ricorso efficace, vale a dire la possibilità di impugnare la decisione dell'investigatore di sequestrare l'autobus. Il richiedente aveva usato quella via di ricorso, benché senza successo.
44. Il richiedente sostenne la sua azione di reclamo.
A. la valutazione della Corte
1. Sfera delle azioni di reclamo
45. La Corte osserva all'inizio che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente è divisa in tre parti. In primo luogo, contestò come illegale l'ordine di custodia emesso a riguardo del suo autobus. In secondo luogo, era insoddisfatto del suo trasferimento per custodia ad un terzo Sig. Y., e in terzo luogo contese che il trattenimento prolungato dell'autobus costituì una limitazione sproporzionata al “pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà.”
46. Le parti non hanno fatto nessun argomento specifico relativo alla legalità dell'atto iniziale di confisca o a quello della custodia dell'autobus da parte del Sig. Y. La Corte considera che entrambi gli atti fossero legali ed quindi compatibili con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Non farà ulteriori giudizi a questo riguardo. È noto inoltre che benché l'ordine di custodia fosse stato tolto nel luglio 2006, l'autobus non è ad oggi stato ritornato al richiedente. Il periodo totale durante il quale al richiedente fu negato uso del veicolo ha già superato i nove anni. In questo contesto, la Corte osserva che ci sono due periodi ininterrotti da prender in considerazione:
(i) dal novembre 1999 al 18 luglio 2006, data in cui fu tolto l'ordine di custodia; e
(ii) dal 18 luglio 2006 in avanti .
La Corte limiterà la sua analisi alla compatibilità del trattenimento prolungato dell'autobus coi requisiti dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
47. La Corte osserva anche che l'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione si riferisce al periodo in cui l'ordine di custodia era in vigore che va dal novembre 1999 al 18 luglio 2006.
2. Ammissibilità
48. La Corte considera che l'argomento del Governo relativo all'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sia collegato da vicino ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione. Così, la Corte trova necessario congiungerlo ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
49. La Corte nota inoltre che le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non siano manifestamente mal-fondate all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione e che loro non sono inammissibili per qualsiasi altro motivo. Loro devono essere dichiarati perciò ammissibili.
3. Meriti
(a) Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 13 in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1
50. La Corte nota all'inizio che benché le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 scaturiscano dagli stessi fatti, c'è una differenza nella natura degli interessi protetti da queste disposizioni: il primo riconosce una salvaguardia procedurale, vale a dire il “diritto ad una via di ricorso efficace”, mentre il requisito procedurale inerente al secondo è subordinato al fine più ampio di assicurare il rispetto del diritto al pacifico godimento delle proprie proprietà . Così, la Corte giudica appropriato nella presente causa esaminare la stessa serie di fatti sotto ambo gli Articoli (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 65 ECHR 1999-II).
51. La Corte ha interpretato costantemente l’Articolo 13 nel senso che richiede una via di ricorso nel diritto nazionale riguardo i danni che possono essere considerati “difendibili” ai termini della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Boyle e Rice c. Regno Unito, 27 aprile 1988, § 54 Serie A n. 131). La Corte considera che il danno del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 sia “difendibile”. La Corte deve determinare se l'ordinamento giuridico russo ha riconosciuto al richiedente una via di ricorso “efficace”, che abbia concesso alla competente “autorità nazionale” sia di trattare l'azione di reclamo che di accordare il sollievo appropriato (vedere Camenzind c. Svizzera, 16 dicembre 1997, § 53 Relazioni 1997-VIII).
52. La Corte accetta che al tempo attinente la legge russa in principio abbia permesso il ricorso a tribunali per impugnare una decisione dell'autorità inquirente di sequestrare beni principali nei procedimenti penali pendenti (vedere paragrafi 17 e 19 sopra). Comunque, la Corte non è in grado di giungere alla stessa conclusione riguardo la possibilità di opporsi al trattenimento continuo di simile beni principali. Effettivamente con una sentenza del 15 settembre 2003 la Corte distrettuale Sovetskiy di Ulan-Ude respinse gli argomenti del richiedente per il fatto che i suoi diritti di proprietà sull'autobus erano stati infranti dalla richiesta continuativa dell'ordine di custodia. Su ricorso, la Corte Suprema della Repubblica di Buryatiya, riferendosi al 2002 CCrP, sostenne, comunque, che l'autorità che trattava la causa penale aveva il potere di dissequestrare la proprietà sotto l'ordine di custodia, se non ci fosse più stato bisogno dell'accusa. La corte d’appello concluse che “tenendo in conto... il requisito della procedura sotto l’Articolo 125 del Codice, alla corte non si [dovevano] conferire poteri decisionali sul problema di togliere l'ordine di custodia.”
53. La Corte osserva che la compensazione nella procedura sotto l’Articolo 125 del CCrP consiste nell’invalidare l'azione contestata o inazione come illegale o mancante di giustificazione e costringere l'autorità rispondente a rimediare alla violazione. Il potere di togliere l'ordine di custodia e rilasciare i la proprietà resta all’ “autorità che tratta la causa”, cioè l'investigatore nella presente causa . In una recente causa contro la Russia, la Corte trovò una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 con riferimento al fatto che i tribunali nazionali avevano esaminato un'azione di reclamo riguardo ad una perquisizione e sequestro nell'appartamento del richiedente, dichiarando inammissibile un'azione di reclamo per l’ insuccesso nella restituzione del suo computer per il fatto che la decisione di trattenimento non fosse assoggettabile al controllo giurisdizionale (vedere Smirnov c. Russia, n. 71362/01, § 64, 7 giugno 2007 ECHR 2007 -...). In altre parole, i tribunali russi declinarono la giurisdizione per trattare la sostanza dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente ed accordare il sollievo appropriato. Nella prospettiva delle sentenze sopra, la Corte respinge l'argomento del Governo per cui il richiedente non ha fatto domanda per togliere l’ ordine di custodia. Non fu presentato, e la Corte non considera, che qualsiasi richiesta susseguente avrebbe avuto migliori prospettive di successo (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Granger c. Regno Unito, 28 marzo 1990 §§ 37 e 40, Serie A n. 174).
54. Riguardo ad un’ eventuale rivendicazione per il risarcimento, la Corte reitera, che un individuo non è costretto a provare più di una via di compensazione quando ce ne sono molte disponibile. Spetta al richiedente scegliere la via di ricorso legale che sia molto appropriata nelle circostanze della causa (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Airey c. Irlanda, 9 ottobre 1979, § 23 Serie A n. 32, e Boicenco c. Moldavia, n. 41088/05, § 80 dell’11 luglio 2006). La Corte considera che, avendo esaurito tutte le possibilità di ricorso a lui disponibili nella struttura dei procedimenti del 2003 (vedere paragrafi 13 e 14 sopra), il richiedente non dovrebbe essere costretto ad intraprendere un altro tentativo di ottenere compensazione intentando un'azione civile per danni (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Assenov ed Altri c. Bulgaria, 28 ottobre 1998, § 86 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-VIII). In qualsiasi caso, la Corte trova non provato che al tempo attinente la legge russa fornisse al richiedente la possibilità di chiedere il risarcimento per il danno causato come risultato dell'interferenza prolungata col suo diritto a pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà. In particolare, si potrebbe considerare che il Governo non sia riuscito ad offrire dettagli sufficienti riguardo quale tipo di azione legale fosse una via di ricorso efficace che avrebbe dovuto essere esaurita.
55. Riguardi al secondo periodo, in assenza di qualsiasi osservazione dal Governo riguardo alla disponibilità di una via di ricorso relativa al richiedente per riguadagnare la proprietà del suo autobus dopo che l'ordine di custodia era stato tolto ed una volta il richiedente era divenuto consapevole di questo fatto, la Corte non è preparata a respingere l'azione di reclamo per non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali.
56. In prospettiva delle considerazioni precedenti, la Corte conclude, che c'è stata una violazione dell’Articolo 13 della Convenzione per il fatto che, al tempo attinente, il richiedente non aveva una via di ricorso nazionale efficace riguardo la sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
(b) Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
57. È fatto comune fra le parti che il richiedente fosse il proprietario legale dell'autobus; in altre parole, era sua “la proprietà.” Non viene neanche discusso che l'ordine di custodia e la sua applicazione continuata corrisposero ad un'interferenza col diritto del richiedente al pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà e che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è perciò applicabile. La Corte reitera che la confisca di proprietà per procedimenti legali fa riferimento al controllo dell'uso di proprietà che rientra di norma all'interno dell'ambito del secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo e N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere, fra altri, Raimondo c. Italia, 22 febbraio 1994, § 27 Serie A n. 281-a; Andrews c. Regno Unito (dec.), n. 49584/99, 26 settembre 2002; Adamczyk c. Polonia ( dec.), n. 28551/04, 7 novembre 2006; e Simonjan-Heikinheino c. Finlandia (dec.), n. 6321/03, 2 settembre 2008). Effettivamente, la confisca del veicolo non spogliò il richiedente della sua proprietà, ma solamente gli impedì provvisoriamente di usarla e di disporne . La Corte può solo notare certe indicazioni per cui l'autobus del richiedente non è più disponibile il che può essere perché non gli è stato reso ad oggi. Comunque, avendo riguardo ai fatti stabiliti ed alle informazioni verificabili riguardanti la sua proprietà, esaminerà l'azione di reclamo del richiedente con riferimento al secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
58. Riguardo al periodo in cui l'ordine di custodia era in vigore, nulla nelle osservazioni delle parti rivela che l'interferenza non fosse legale. La Corte accetta anche che l'interferenza era nell “interesse generale” della comunità perché l'accusa mirava ad anticipare un’eventuale confisca dei beni e ad assicurare le rivendicazioni civili della vittima (vedere Kokavecz c. Ungheria (dec.), n. 27312/95, 20 aprile 1999, e Földes e Földesné Hajlik c. Ungheria, n. 41463/02, § 26 ECHR 2006 -...).
59. Comunque, la Corte osserva che ci deve essere anche una relazione ragionevole della proporzionalità fra i mezzi assunti e lo scopo perseguito da realizzare con qualsiasi misura applicata dallo Stato, incluso misure progettate per il controllo dell'uso della proprietà dell'individuo. Questo requisito è espresso dalla nozione di “giusto equilibrio” che si deve prevedere fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere Edwards c. Malta, n. 17647/04, § 69, 24 ottobre 2006 con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
60. La Corte considera che, in principio, l'imposizione di un'accusa sulla proprietà di un accusato non è di per sé aperta alla critica, avendo riguardo in particolare al margine di valutazione permesso sotto il secondo paragrafo dell’i Articolo 1 del Protocollo. Comunque, porta con sé il rischio di imporre un carico eccessivo in termini di capacità di disporre della sua proprietà e deve offrire di conseguenza certe salvaguardie procedurali così come assicurare che l'operazione del sistema ed il suo impatto sui diritti di proprietà di un richiedente non sia né arbitraria né imprevedibile (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Immobiliare Saffi c. Italia [GC], n. 22774/93, § 54, il 1999-V di ECHR, e la direttiva dalla Corte Costituzionale russa citata nel paragrafo 26 sopra).
61. La Corte già ha trovato che i procedimenti penali in relazione ai quali l'ordine di custodia era stato emesso nella presente causa non si sono attenuti al requisito del “termine ragionevole” dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra). Ha trovato anche che al richiedente non fu riconosciuta una via di ricorso efficace per la sua azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere paragrafo 56 sopra). Inoltre, la Corte reitera che mentre qualsiasi confisca o sequestro comportano un danno, il danno effettivo subito non dovrebbe essere più grande di quello che sarebbe inevitabile, se dovesse essere compatibile con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Raimondo, citata sopra, § 33, e Jucys c. Lituania, n. 5457/03, § 36 dell’8 gennaio 2008). Non era in controversia fra le parti che l'autobus avesse un valore commerciale considerevole per il richiedente. Comunque, il successivo emendamento del Codice Penale nel dicembre 2003, che toglieva il sequestro come sanzione penale per reati penali e in assenza di qualsiasi rivendicazione civili contro il richiedente, spettava alle autorità nazionali valutare di nuovo la legalità e la necessità dell’applicazione continuata dell'ordine. Effettivamente, era dovere dell'investigatore sotto il CCrP togliere l'ordine di custodia se non fosse stato più necessario (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra). Ciononostante, la causa rimase inattiva e nessuna misura investigativa fu presa fra il 2000 e il primo 2006. Le autorità nazionali non considerarono se sarebbe stato possibile lasciare l'autobus al richiedente, limitandolo nel disporre di questo. Benché la disponibilità di soluzioni alternative non renda di per sé l'interferenza col diritto del richiedente ingiustificata, costituisce un fattore attinente quando si determina se i mezzi scelti possano essere considerati ragionevoli e adatti a realizzare lo scopo legittimo perseguito (vedere James ed Altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 51 Serie A n. 98; e Wiesinger c. Austria, 30 ottobre 1991, § 77 Serie A n. 213). La Corte conclude che le autorità russe mancarono nel prevedere un “giusto equilibrio” fra le richieste dell'interesse generale ed il requisito della protezione del diritto del richiedente al pacifico godimento della sua proprietà mantenendo l'ordine di custodia per più di sei anni.
62. Riguardo al trattenimento dell'autobus dopo la decisione del 20 gennaio 2006 (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra), il Governo ha ammesso che mantenendo l'ordine di custodia dopo quella data e sino al suo pagamento il 18 luglio 2006 era illegale. La Corte non ha nessuna ragione di non essere d'accordo con questa valutazione. Oltre a questo, la Corte osserva che il Governo non citò base legale per non restituire l'autobus al richiedente dopo quell'annullamento. Così, la Corte considera che il trattenimento continuato dell'autobus anche dopo quell'annullamento dell'ordine di custodia sia ugualmente illegale ( cf. Vendittelli c. Italia, 18 luglio 1994 §§ 39 e 40, Serie A n. 293-un; e Raimondo, citata sopra, § 36).
63. C'è stata perciò una violazione di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
64. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
65. Il richiedente chiese 170,000 euro (EUR) riguardo il danno non-materiale causato in relazione alla confisca e il trattenimenti del suo autobus e la restituzione del suo autobus o pagamento di EUR 700,000, così come i guadagni perduti nell'importo di 1,533,000 rubli russi (RUB).
66. Il Governo non ha fatto commenti all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto.
67. La Corte considera che il richiedente ha sofferto un danno materiale per il trattenimento prolungato del suo autobus e, facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, gli assegna EUR 3,000 sotto questo capo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile.
68. Riguardo alle rivendicazioni materiali, la Corte considera, che il richiedente non ha provato le sue rivendicazioni riguardo i guadagni perduti. Neanche a sottoposto alcun dettaglio riguardo alla sua alternativa rivendicazione riguardo al valore dell'autobus. Così, la Corte respinge quelle rivendicazioni come infondate.
69. Comunque, la Corte reitera che una sentenza in cui la Corte trova una violazione impone allo Stato rispondente un obbligo giuridico di porre fine alla violazione e fare una riparazione delle sue conseguenze (vedere Papamichalopoulos ed Altri c. Grecia (Articolo 50), 31 ottobre 1995, Serie A n. 330-B, e Brumărescu c. Romania (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 28342/95, ECHR 2001-io). Perciò, per quel che riguarda la rivendicazione per la restituzione dell'autobus , la Corte trova appropriato nelle circostanze della causa ammettere il ricorso del richiedente costringendo lo Stato rispondente ad assicurare, con appropriati mezzi, che l'autobus in oggetto venga ridato al richiedente.
B. Costi e spese
70. Il richiedente ha chiesto RUB 21,000 per spese processuali non specificate.
71. La Corte reitera che costi e spese non saranno assegnate sotto l’Articolo 41 a meno che venga stabilito che loro siano davvero e necessariamente incorsi, e saranno stati anche ragionevole riguardo al quantum (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia (soddisfazione equa) [GC], n. 31107/96, § 54 ECHR 2000-XI). La Corte considera che la rivendicazione del richiedente non sia comprovata; la respinge perciò.
C. Interesse di mora
72. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea a cui dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Decide di congiungere ai meriti le obiezioni del Governo riguardo all'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali riguardo le azioni di reclamo del richiedente sulla lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali contro di lui e il trattenimento prolungato dell'autobus e le respinge;
2. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione di Articolo 13 della Convenzione in relazione all'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione in relazione all'azione di reclamo del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
6. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
7. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente assicurerà, con appropriati mezzi, che l'autobus in oggetto venga ridato al richiedente;
(b) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare al richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 3,000 (tre mila euro) riguardo il danno morale, da convertire in rubli russi al tasso applicabile in data dell’accordo, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile;
(c) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo sarà pagabile l’ interesse semplice sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
8. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 22 gennaio 2009, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
André Wampach Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.