Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SACCOCCIA v. AUSTRIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 6, P1-1

NUMERO: 69917/01/2008
STATO: Austria
DATA: 18/12/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion No violation of Art. 6-1 ; No violation of P1-1
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF SACCOCCIA v. AUSTRIA
(Application no. 69917/01)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
18 December 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Saccoccia v. Austria,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajić,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Khanlar Hajiyev,
Dean Spielmann,
Sverre Erik Jebens, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 27 November 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 69917/01) against the Republic of Austria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a national of the United States of America, Mr S. A. S. (“the applicant”), on 27 April 2001.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr J. H., a lawyer practising in Vienna. The Austrian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ambasssador F. Trauttmansdorff, Head of the Law Department at the Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that in proceedings before the Austrian courts concerning the execution of a forfeiture order issued by the United States courts he had not had a hearing and that the Austrian courts' decisions had violated his right to property.
4. By a decision of 5 July 2007 the Court declared the application partly admissible.
5. The Government filed observations on the merits (Rule 59 § 1). The applicant requested the Court to instruct the respondent Government to disclose a complete list of the values of all his Austrian assets at the time of their seizure and at the time when they were forfeited following the judgment by the Vienna Court of Appeal of 7 October 2000 in order to enable him to calculate his just satisfaction claims. Having regard to its decision under Article 41 of the Convention (see paragraphs 98-100 below), the Court dismisses this request.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant was born in 1958. He is currently serving a prison term in the United States.
A. Background
7. In 1992, in the context of criminal proceedings for large-scale money laundering conducted against the applicant before the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island (“the Rhode Island District Court”), the Austrian courts were requested under letters rogatory to seize assets which had been found in two safes in Vienna rented by the applicant. On 10 February 1992 the Vienna District Criminal Court ordered the seizure and put the assets, mostly cash and bearer bonds, at the disposal of the Rhode Island District Court as evidence in the criminal proceedings against the applicant, on the condition that the assets were to be returned upon termination of the proceedings.
8. The parties disagree as to whether or not the applicant was the owner of the assets at issue. The applicant claims that the assets stemmed from lawful business activities carried out until 1988, while the Government claim that they stemmed from the money laundering in 1990 and 1991 of which he was convicted (see below) and that he was holding them as a trustee for the drug cartel for which he had worked.
9. In February 1993 the Rhode Island District Court convicted the applicant of money laundering and related charges, finding that he had headed an organisation which had laundered more than a hundred million United States dollars (USD) in 1990 and 1991, and sentenced him to 660 years' imprisonment. Subsequently, on 30 August 1993, the court issued a preliminary forfeiture order.
10. On 28 June 1995 the United States Court of Appeals, First Circuit, dismissed an appeal by the applicant against his conviction and against the forfeiture order. The reasons, in so far as relevant in the context of the present case, were as follows. As to the applicant's claim that he was represented at his trial by counsel (H.) who had a conflict of interest, the court noted that the applicant had been informed of his rights but had insisted on being represented by counsel H. Finally, he had executed a written waiver retaining H. as counsel and confirming that he had been fully advised and had considered the possible adverse consequences for his defence. Since counsel H. had only informed the court in vague terms that he feared being charged or called as a witness in the applicant's case, the District Court was justified in accepting the waiver. In any event, the applicant was represented by a second, conflict-free counsel, D. As to the applicant's complaint that he had had no hearing in the forfeiture proceedings, the appellate court noted that the applicant, represented by counsel, had waived his right to a jury hearing in the separate forfeiture proceedings on the ground that they purely concerned matters of legal argument. The case had been heard on 26 March 1993 in the presence of the applicant's counsel. The applicant had not been present since he had to appear before another court. Counsel had requested that the applicant be heard but had refused the court's offer to have a further hearing in the presence of the applicant before the delivery of the judgment.
11. On 25 March 1996 the United States Supreme Court rejected an appeal on points of law by the applicant.
12. On 7 November 1997 the Rhode Island District Court issued a final forfeiture order relating to a total amount of USD 136 million, including some USD 9 million in respect of the applicant, “being the proceeds of narcotics money laundering for which the following property has been partially substituted”. There followed an enumeration of cash amounts in Swiss francs, United States dollars and Austrian schillings seized in Vienna in 1992 and a list of bearer bonds issued by Austrian banks and, finally a bank account in Vienna.
13. On 9 December 1997 the Rhode Island District Court issued letters rogatory which, so far as relevant, read as follows:
“... the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island requests enforcement in Austria of the enclosed Final Forfeiture Order against said cash, bonds and other financial instruments. To the extent possible under Austrian law and consistent with any sharing agreement between the United States and Austria, please convert the cash and the proceeds of the bonds and other instruments into United States dollars and transfer those funds by wire into the above referenced United States Customs Service Account. ...”
14. The United States Department of Justice transmitted this request to the Austrian authorities on 18 December 1997. On 23 January 1998 the Austrian Ministry of Justice requested the Vienna Senior Public Prosecutor's Office to open “exequatur” proceedings to enforce the foreign court's decision.
B. The proceedings before the Austrian courts
1. Preliminary confiscation in order to secure the enforcement of the final forfeiture order of 7 November 1997
15. On 12 March 1998 the Vienna Regional Criminal Court (Landesgericht für Strafsachen), as an interim measure, ordered the confiscation of the applicant's assets, of a total value of about 80,000,000 Austrian schillings (ATS – approximately 5,800,000 euros), in cash, bearer bonds and a bank account, for the purpose of securing the enforcement of the final forfeiture order of 7 November 1997. It referred to the above request and noted that enforcement proceedings under the Extradition and Legal Assistance Act (Auslieferungs- und Rechtshilfegesetz – “the ELAA”) were pending.
16. The applicant appealed on 26 March 1998, submitting in particular that the Regional Court's decision amounted to an unlawful interference with his right to property, as it lacked a legal basis. Moreover, an enforcement of the forfeiture order for the benefit of the United States was not admissible in Austria as section 64(7) of the ELAA provided that any fines or forfeited assets obtained by executing a foreign decision fell to the Republic of Austria.
17. Further, the applicant claimed that the final forfeiture order also included “substitute assets”, i.e. assets not connected to or derived from criminal activity. Thus the measure requested did not correspond in any way to forfeiture (Verfall) or withdrawal of enrichment (Abschöpfung der Bereicherung) within the meaning of the Austrian Criminal Code (Strafgesetzbuch). In any event these penalties could not be applied in his case, as the relevant provisions had not been in force at the time he committed the offences. Furthermore, he had been convicted of money laundering in the United States, an offence which had not been punishable under Austrian law at the time of its commission.
18. Relying on section 64(1) of the ELAA, the applicant also argued that the forfeiture proceedings had failed to comply with the requirements of Article 6 of the Convention, since the proceedings had not been public and he had not been heard. Moreover, his defence rights had been violated in the underlying criminal proceedings, his defence lawyer having been caught in a conflict of interests.
19. Lastly, the applicant claimed that there was a lack of reciprocity as decisions of Austrian courts were not enforceable in the United States.
20. Meanwhile, on 12 March 1998, the Vienna Regional Criminal Court had made a formal request to the United States authorities to hear the applicant in connection with the request for execution of the final forfeiture order. On 16 April 1998 the United States Department of Justice transmitted the applicant's submissions to the Austrian Ministry of Justice.
21. On 22 May 1998 the United States Department of Justice addressed a note to the Austrian Ministry of Justice concerning reciprocity in providing legal assistance in forfeiture proceedings. The applicant denies that this note contains assurances of reciprocity.
22. On 1 August 1998 the Treaty between the Government of the Republic of Austria and the Government of the United States of America on Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters (“the 1998 Treaty”) entered into force.
23. On 12 October 1998 the Vienna Court of Appeal (Oberlandesgericht) dismissed the applicant's appeal against the Regional Court's decision of 12 March 1998.
24. The Court of Appeal found that the Regional Court's decision was based on Article 144a of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Strafprozeßordnung). In this connection, the court noted that pursuant to section 9(1) of the ELAA, the provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure had to be applied mutatis mutandis unless explicitly provided otherwise.
25. As to the applicant's assertion that a forfeiture for the benefit of the United States would be contrary to section 64(7) of the ELAA, the court observed that the letters rogatory requested first and foremost that any measures required under Austrian law for the execution of the final forfeiture order be taken. Only as an additional point did they ask for the transfer of the assets, provided that this was admissible under Austrian law or any bilateral treaty. In this connection it referred to Article 17(3) of the 1998 Treaty.
26. As regards the applicant's assertion that the final forfeiture order covered substitute assets which could not be subject to forfeiture under Austrian law, the court observed that it followed from the judgment concerning the applicant's conviction that he had led an organisation which had laundered large sums of money derived from drug dealing and had usually received a 10% commission for each amount laundered. Between 1 January 1990 and 2 April 1991 he had transferred more than USD 136 million of drug-related money from the account of a sham company to various foreign bank accounts. Thus, there were good reasons to assume that the applicant's Austrian assets were monies received for or derived from the commission of a crime and subject to withdrawal of enrichment under Article 20 of the Criminal Code, or monies directly obtained through drug dealing, subject to forfeiture under Article 20b of the Criminal Code, in the version in force since its 1996 amendment. The final forfeiture order made a clear link between the offence of money laundering of which the applicant had been convicted and the forfeiture of all monies obtained thereby.
27. Articles 20 and 20b in the version in force since the 1996 amendment of the Criminal Code were not regarded as penalties under Austrian law, but as measures sui generis. The fact that they had not been in force at the time of the commission of the offences was therefore not material.
28. Even if one applied the law in force at the time of the commission of the offences, the requirements for withdrawal of enrichment were met. Article 20a(1) of the Criminal Code, in the version in force at that time, provided that an offender who had unjustly enriched himself could be ordered to pay an amount equivalent to the enrichment if the latter exceeded ATS 1 million. Although there had been no offence of money laundering under Austrian law at the time, the facts constituted the offence of receiving stolen property (Hehlerei) under Article 164(1)(4) of the Criminal Code, which made it an offence to assist the perpetrator of an offence (here, the drug dealers) in concealing assets derived from or received for the commission of the offence or to acquire such assets.
29. As to the applicant's allegation that both the criminal proceedings against him and the proceedings resulting in the final forfeiture order had failed to comply with Article 6 of the Convention, the court referred to the documents of those proceedings contained in its file and noted the following. In the criminal proceedings, the applicant had been present and had been represented by two counsel. It noted that it was the applicant who had insisted on being represented by counsel H. although the latter had voiced concerns, albeit without substantiating them, that he might himself be charged. In any case, the applicant had been represented by a second counsel, who was free from any potential conflict of interests. In the forfeiture proceedings he waived his right to a public hearing before a jury since they only concerned questions of law. On 26 March 1993 the judge had heard the case in the presence of the applicant's counsel but without the applicant being present. The applicant's lawyer had requested that the applicant be heard but had refused the court's offer to hold a further hearing in the presence of the applicant before the delivery of the judgment. In sum, the Vienna Court of Appeal found no indication that the proceedings before the United States courts had failed to comply with Article 6 of the Convention.
30. As regards the alleged lack of reciprocity, the court noted that when the request for enforcement of the final forfeiture order had been made, there had been no bilateral treaty between the United States and the Republic of Austria. Thus, only the provisions of the ELAA had to be applied, section 3(1) of which required reciprocity. The Regional Court had duly investigated the issue in that it had required the United States Department of Justice to submit information as to the possibilities of enforcing an Austrian forfeiture order in the United States. Meanwhile, however, the 1998 Treaty had entered into force. Under Article 20(3) of that Treaty, it applied irrespective of whether the underlying offences were committed before or after its entry into force. Article 17 provided for mutual legal assistance in forfeiture proceedings.
2. The enforcement of the final forfeiture order of 7 November 1997
31. On 25 August 1999 the United States central authority, relying on the 1998 Treaty, made a new request for enforcement of the final forfeiture order of 7 November 1997. According to the applicant, this second request for legal assistance was not served on him.
32. The applicant made submissions on 22 December 1998, on 11 March 1999 and on 11 May 2000.
33. On 14 June 2000 the Vienna Regional Criminal Court, without holding a hearing, decided to take over the enforcement of the final forfeiture order of 7 November 1997 and ordered the forfeiture of the applicant's Austrian assets for the benefit of the United States.
34. Having regard to the 1998 Treaty, the requirement of reciprocity was fulfilled. The submissions by the applicant which disputed this were no longer relevant as they referred to the legal position before the entry into force of the 1998 Treaty. As to the question of the beneficiary of the forfeiture, it noted that Article 17(3) of the 1998 Treaty provided optionally that each State party could hand over forfeited assets to the other party.
35. Referring to the Court of Appeal's decision of 12 October 1998, it noted that the applicant's conduct had been punishable under Austrian law. Thus, the forfeiture was not contrary to Article 7 of the Convention. Finally, the court noted that the applicant had been given an opportunity to comment on the request for legal assistance.
36. The applicant appealed on 7 July 2000. He asserted that the 1998 Treaty provided for legal assistance in pending criminal proceedings, but did not contain a legal basis for mutual execution of final decisions. Even assuming that the 1998 Treaty applied in the present case, the enforcement of the final forfeiture order would violate Article 7 of the Convention as the said Treaty had not been in force in 1997 when the forfeiture order was issued. Moreover, money laundering had not been punishable under Austrian law at the time of the commission of the offences. Consequently, his assets could not be subject to forfeiture or withdrawal of enrichment under Austrian law.
37. Furthermore, the applicant repeated his argument that his Austrian assets were substitute assets and claimed that, at the time of the commission of the offences, such assets had not been subject to forfeiture or withdrawal of enrichment under Austrian law.
38. Relying on expert opinions submitted by him, the applicant maintained that the condition of reciprocity required by section 3(1) of the ELAA was not fulfilled, as United States constitutional law did not permit the enforcement of decisions given by foreign criminal courts. He further submitted that the five-year limitation period for enforcement had started running on 30 August 1993, when the preliminary forfeiture order was issued (as it was, despite its name, a final and enforceable decision), and not only on 7 November 1997, when the final forfeiture order was issued.
39. In addition the applicant alleged that the criminal proceedings and the forfeiture proceedings before the United States courts had not complied with the requirements of Article 6 of the Convention. He submitted the same arguments as in the proceedings relating to the preliminary confiscation of his assets. Moreover, he referred in general terms to the fact that the United States still applied the death penalty.
40. The applicant also complained about a number of procedural shortcomings as regards the proceedings in Austria. He alleged in particular that the Regional Court had refused to take into account the aforesaid expert opinions submitted by him, which showed that United States constitutional law excluded any enforcement of decisions of foreign criminal courts. Moreover, he had not been given sufficient opportunity to advance his arguments as, in his view, that would have required his personal presence in court. Finally, he complained that the Regional Court had failed to hold a public oral hearing and requested that such a hearing be held by the appellate court.
41. The Public Prosecutor's Office also appealed. Its appeal was served on the applicant for comments, which he submitted on 21 September 2000.
42. On 7 October 2000 the Vienna Court of Appeal, sitting in camera, dismissed the applicant's appeal. Upon the public prosecutor's appeal, it amended the Regional Court's decision and ordered the forfeiture to the benefit of the Republic of Austria.
43. The court noted at the outset that, pursuant to its Article 20(3), the 1998 Treaty applied irrespective of whether the underlying offences were committed before or after its entry into force. It dismissed the applicant's argument that the said Treaty did not provide a basis for the mutual enforcement of decisions. Article 1, paragraphs (1) and (2)(h) of the Treaty, in conjunction with Article 17, governed legal assistance in forfeiture proceedings. As to the alleged lack of reciprocity, it was sufficient to refer to those provisions. It was therefore not necessary to examine questions of United States constitutional law.
44. Moreover, referring to its decision of 12 October 1998, the court reiterated that the facts underlying the applicant's conviction for money laundering would have been punishable as receiving stolen property under Article 164(1)(4) of the Criminal Code at the time of the commission of the offences. Further, it reiterated that withdrawal of enrichment pursuant to Article 20 of the Criminal Code and forfeiture pursuant to Article 20b, both in the version in force since 1996, were not regarded as penalties, but served the purpose of neutralising proceeds of criminal activities. These measures covered any proceeds of an offence, irrespective of whether they were directly derived from the offence or given for its commission or whether they had already been converted into other assets.
45. With regard to the applicant's complaint that the proceedings in the United States had not complied with the requirements of Article 6 of the Convention, the court referred to the reasons given in its previous decision of 12 October 1998.
46. The court dismissed the applicant's plea that the enforcement of the final forfeiture order was time-barred, noting that the United States Supreme Court, on 25 March 1996, had refused leave to appeal against the provisional forfeiture order, whereupon the final forfeiture order had been issued on 7 November 1997. Consequently, the five-year limitation period pursuant to section 59 of the Criminal Code had not expired.
47. As to the applicant's procedural rights, the court noted that he had been represented by counsel throughout the proceedings and had had the opportunity to submit extensive written pleadings.
48. Finally, the court considered that the public prosecutor's appeal was well-founded in that section 64(7) of the ELAA provided that forfeited assets fell to the Republic of Austria. Thus, forfeiture to the benefit of the United States under Article 17(3) of the 1998 Treaty was not admissible.
49. The decision was served on the applicant on 30 October 2000.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. The Extradition and Legal Assistance Act
50. Section 1 of the Extradition and Legal Assistance Act (Auslieferungs- und Rechtshilfegesetz, Federal Law Gazette no. 529/1979) provides that the Act applies where international or bilateral agreements do not provide otherwise.
51. Section 3 carries the heading “reciprocity” and, so far as relevant, provides as follows:
“(1) Foreign requests may be granted only if it is ensured that the requesting State would also grant an equivalent Austrian request.
...
(3) If there are doubts regarding compliance with reciprocity, information shall be obtained from the Federal Minister of Justice.”
52. Section 64 is situated in the chapter on the enforcement of decisions by foreign criminal courts. It regulates the conditions for taking over the enforcement of such decisions.
“(1) Enforcement or further enforcement of a decision by a foreign court with final and legal effect, in the form of a monetary fine or prison sentence, a preventive measure or a pecuniary measure (vermögensrechtliche Anordnung), is admissible at the request of another State if:
1. the decision of the foreign court was taken in the course of proceedings in compliance with the principles of Article 6 of the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (the Convention) (Federal Law Gazette no. 210/1958);
2. the decision was taken in relation to an act that is punished by a court sentence under Austrian law;
3. the decision was not taken in relation to one of the offences listed in sections 14 and 15;
4. no time-limit has expired under Austrian law regarding enforceability;
5. the person concerned by the decision of the foreign court regarding this offence is not being prosecuted in Austria, has been finally and effectively convicted or acquitted in this matter or has otherwise been released from prosecution.
...
(4) Enforcement of a decision by a foreign court which results in pecuniary measures is admissible only to the extent that the requirements under Austrian law for a monetary fine, a withdrawal of enrichment or forfeiture apply, and that no corresponding Austrian measure has yet been taken.
...
(7) Fines, forfeited assets or enrichment withdrawn shall fall to the Republic of Austria.”
53. The procedure to be followed in cases concerning the enforcement of foreign decisions is laid down in section 67 of the ELAA. It does not make any provision for the holding of hearings.
B. Treaty between the Government of the Republic of Austria and the Government of the United States of America on Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters
54. The Treaty was signed on 23 February 1995 and, following ratification, entered into force on 1 August 1998 (Federal Law Gazette Part III, no. 107/1998).
Article 1
“(1) The Contracting Parties shall provide mutual assistance, in accordance with the provisions of this Treaty, in connection with the investigation and prosecution of offences, the punishment of which at the time of the request for assistance would fall within the jurisdiction of the judicial authorities of the Requesting State, and in related forfeiture proceedings.
(2) Assistance shall include:
...
(h) assisting in proceedings related to forfeiture and restitution; ...”
Article 17
“(1) If the Central Authority of one Contracting Party becomes aware of fruits or instrumentalities of offences which are located in the territory of the other Party and may be forfeitable or otherwise subject to seizure under the laws of that Party, it may so inform the Central Authority of the other Party. If the other Party has jurisdiction in this regard, it may present this information to its authorities for a determination as to whether any action is appropriate. These authorities shall issue their decision and shall, through their Central Authority, report to the other Party on the action taken.
(2) The Contracting Parties shall assist each other to the extent permitted by their respective laws in proceedings relating to the forfeiture of the fruits and instrumentalities of offences, restitution to the victims of crime, and the collection of fines imposed as sentences in criminal prosecutions.
(3) A Requested State in control of forfeited proceeds or instrumentalities shall dispose of them in accordance with its law. To the extent permitted by its laws and upon such terms as it deems appropriate, either Party may transfer forfeited assets or the proceeds of their sale to the other Party.”
Article 20
“(3) This Treaty shall apply to requests whether or not the relevant offences occurred prior to the entry into force of this Treaty.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
55. The applicant complained about the lack of a public hearing in the proceedings concerning the execution of the Rhode Island District Court's forfeiture order in Austria. He relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which, in so far as material, reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. Applicability of Article 6 § 1
56. In its decision on admissibility (see paragraph 4 above) the Court held that while the criminal head of Article 6 § 1 did not apply to the proceedings relating to the enforcement of the forfeiture order, they fell under the civil head of Article 6 § 1.
57. In their observations following the admissibility decision, the Government maintained that Article 6 did not apply. In particular they asserted that exequatur proceedings did not involve a determination of the applicant's civil rights. The decision on his civil rights regarding the forfeited assets had already been taken in the proceedings before the Rhode Island District Court which had resulted in a final and enforceable forfeiture order. In contrast the exequatur proceedings were international enforcement proceedings. They were a prerequisite for enforcing a foreign decision in Austria and could not entail reopening the question whether the applicant's assets had been legitimately forfeited.
58. The Court does not see a reason to deviate from the view expressed in the admissibility decision but would add the following considerations.
59. The Court refers to its finding in the admissibility decision that the Rhode Island District Court's final forfeiture order involved a determination of the applicant's civil rights and obligations.
60. As far as civil proceedings before domestic courts are concerned, the applicability of Article 6 extends to the execution phase of the proceedings, the reason being that the “right to a court” embodied in Article 6 would be illusory if a Contracting State's domestic legal system allowed a final, binding judicial decision to remain inoperative to the detriment of one party (see Hornsby v. Greece, 19 March 1997, § 40, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-II).
61. The Court has, again with regard to domestic proceedings, also found Article 6 to apply in respect of execution proceedings on the ground that it is the moment when the right asserted actually becomes effective which constitutes the determination of a civil right (see, in particular, Pérez de Rada Cavanilles v. Spain, 28 October 1998, § 39, Reports 1998-VIII, relating to the execution of a settlement agreement, and Estima Jorge v. Portugal, 21 April 1998, § 37, Reports 1998-II, relating to the enforcement of a notarial deed).
62. The Court sees no need to come to a different conclusion for exequatur proceedings, that is, proceedings relating to the execution of a foreign court's decision, provided that the decision in question concerned a civil right or obligation (see Sylvester v. Austria (dec.), no. 54640/00, 9 October 2003, and McDonald v. France (dec.), no. 18648/04, 29 April 2008, both relating to exequatur proceedings for a foreign divorce decree).
63. However, as the Government rightly pointed out, in exequatur proceedings the domestic courts are not called upon to decide anew on the merits of the foreign court's decision. All they have to do is to examine whether the conditions for granting execution have been met.
64. In the present case the courts had to examine in particular whether the requirements of the 1998 Treaty and the ELAA were met, including the question whether the proceedings conducted before the Rhode Island District Court had been in conformity with Article 6 of the Convention (see the admissibility decision, paragraph 4 above). However, they were clearly not called upon to examine in substance whether the applicant's assets had been legitimately forfeited.
65. In conclusion, the Court confirms that Article 6 § 1 under its civil head applies to the proceedings at issue.
B. Compliance with Article 6 § 1
1. The parties' submissions
66. The applicant complained that neither the Vienna Regional Criminal Court nor the Vienna Court of Appeal had held a public hearing although there were no special circumstances that justified forgoing a hearing. Moreover, he submitted that he should have been heard in person in order to show that the assets stemmed from lawful business activities.
67. The Government contended that the right to a public hearing or any hearing at all was not absolute. In the present case, the courts had been justified in dispensing with a hearing, since the exequatur proceedings had exclusively concerned questions of law.
68. Moreover, a personal appearance by the applicant had neither been necessary, as the issues to be resolved had not required the court to gain a personal impression of him, nor had it been feasible, as he was serving his prison term in the United States. A requirement of personal attendance would severely hamper international cooperation in cases such as the present one.
69. Lastly, the Government argued that the applicant had been sufficiently involved in the proceedings in that he had been informed of all steps taken and had submitted comprehensive statements through counsel.
2. The Court's assessment
70. The Court reiterates that the holding of court hearings in public constitutes a fundamental principle enshrined in paragraph 1 of Article 6. This public character protects litigants against the administration of justice in secret with no public scrutiny; it is also one of the means whereby confidence in the courts can be maintained. By rendering the administration of justice transparent, publicity contributes to the achievement of the aim of Article 6 § 1, namely a fair trial, the guarantee of which is one of the fundamental principles of any democratic society, within the meaning of the Convention (see, for example, Diennet v. France, 26 September 1995, § 33, Series A no. 325-A, and Werner v. Austria, 24 November 1997, § 45, Reports 1997-VII).
71. According to the Court's case-law, the right to a “public hearing” under Article 6 § 1 entails the right to an “oral hearing” unless there are circumstances which justify dispensing with such a hearing (see Allan Jacobsson v. Sweden (no. 2), 19 February 1998, § 46, Reports 1998-I, with reference to Fredin v. Sweden (no. 2), 23 February 1994, §§ 21-22, Series A no. 283-A, and Stallinger and Kuso v. Austria, 23 April 1997, § 51, Reports 1997-II).
72. In the present case neither the Vienna Regional Court nor the Vienna Court of Appeal held a hearing before taking over the execution of the Rhode Island District Court's forfeiture order (see paragraphs 33 and 42 above). The Court notes that section 67 of the ELAA does not envisage the holding of a hearing in proceedings concerning the execution of a foreign decision. The fact that the applicant did not request a hearing before the Vienna Regional Criminal Court cannot therefore be interpreted as a waiver of his right to a hearing (see Werner, cited above, § 48). Moreover, in his appeal against the Regional Court's decision he complained about the lack of a hearing and requested the appellate court to hold one (see paragraph 40 above).
73. The Court must therefore examine whether there where circumstances of such a nature as to dispense the courts from holding a hearing. The Court has accepted that a hearing may not be required where there are no issues of credibility or contested facts which necessitate a hearing and the courts may fairly and reasonably decide the case on the basis of the parties' submissions and other written materials (see, as a recent authority, mutatis mutandis, Jussila v. Finland [GC], no. 73053/01, § 41, ECHR 2006-XIV, with further references).
74. It follows from the Court's case-law that the character of the circumstances that may justify dispensing with an oral hearing essentially comes down to the nature of the issues to be decided by the competent national court, not to the frequency of such situations. It does not mean that refusing to hold an oral hearing may be justified only in rare cases (ibid., §42). The overarching principle of fairness embodied in Article 6 is, as always, the key consideration.
75. In particular the Court has had regard to the technical nature of disputes over social-security benefits, which are better dealt with in writing than by means of oral argument. It has repeatedly held that in this sphere the national authorities, having regard to the demands of efficiency and economy, could abstain from holding a hearing since systematically holding hearings could be an obstacle to the particular diligence required in social-security proceedings (see, for instance, Schuler-Zgraggen v. Switzerland, 24 June 1993, § 58, Series A no. 263; Döry v. Sweden, no. 28394/95, § 41, 12 November 2002; and Pitkänen v. Sweden (dec.), no. 52793/99, 26 August 2003). In addition the Court has sometimes noted that the dispute at hand did not raise issues of public importance such as to make a hearing necessary (see Schuler-Zgraggen, ibid.).
76. Furthermore, the Court has accepted that forgoing a hearing may be justified in cases raising merely legal issues of a limited nature (see Allan Jacobsson (no.2), cited above, §§ 48-49, and Valová and Others v. Slovakia, no. 44925/99, § 68, 1 June 2004) or of no particular complexity (Varela Assalino v. Portugal (dec.), no. 64336/01, 25 April 2002, and Speil v. Austria (dec.), no. 42057/98, 5 September 2002).
77. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court observes that the courts had to examine whether the conditions laid down in the relevant provisions of the ELAA and the 1998 Treaty for execution of the forfeiture order were met. The issues to be examined included questions of reciprocity, the question whether the acts committed by the applicant were punishable under Austrian law at the time of their commission, compliance with statutory time-limits and whether the proceedings before the Rhode Island District Court, which had issued the confiscation order, had been in conformity with the standards of Article 6 of the Convention.
78. In the Court's view, the present proceedings concerned rather technical issues of inter-State cooperation in combating money-laundering through the enforcement of a foreign forfeiture order. They raised exclusively legal issues of a limited nature. All the Austrian courts had to establish was whether the conditions set out in the ELAA and the 1998 Treaty for granting the execution of the confiscation order were met. As has already been established (see paragraphs 63-64 above), the proceedings did not involve any review of the merits of the forfeiture order issued by the Rhode Island District Court.
79. The present proceedings did not require the hearing of witnesses or the taking of other oral evidence. Furthermore, the Court agrees with the Government that the courts were not called upon to hear the applicant in person. The proceedings did not raise any issue of his credibility, nor did they concern any circumstances which would have required the courts to gain a personal impression of the applicant. In these circumstances, the courts could fairly and reasonably decide the case on the basis of the parties' written submissions and other written materials. They were therefore dispensed from holding a hearing.
80. Consequently, there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 OF THE CONVENTION
81. The applicant complained that the Austrian courts' decisions violated Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties' submissions
82. The applicant asserted that he was the owner of the assets at issue. He maintained that the Austrian courts' decisions lacked a legal basis, firstly in that the condition of reciprocity was not fulfilled, secondly in that the final forfeiture order was time-barred, and thirdly in that Article 17 of the 1998 Treaty only permitted the forfeiture of “fruits and instrumentalities” of an offence, but not the forfeiture of “substitute assets”. Lastly, he argued that the procedure had not given him a reasonable opportunity to present his arguments, in particular as no hearing had been held and as the courts had disregarded the expert opinion submitted by him.
83. The Government argued that the execution of the forfeiture order did not interfere with the applicant's right to peaceful enjoyment of his property. He had failed to show that he was the owner of the assets at issue. It had only been established that the key to the safe in Vienna in which the assets were stored had been discovered in the applicant's flat in London. In the Government's view the applicant had only held the assets as a trustee for the drugs cartel for which he had been laundering money. Even assuming that the applicant was the owner of the assets at issue, there was nothing to indicate that they stemmed from any legal activities.
84. In the alternative the Government argued that an interference with the applicant's “possessions” was in any case justified. The execution of the forfeiture order had a legal basis in Article 17 of the 1998 Treaty and section 64 of the ELAA. Moreover, the Austrian courts had given detailed reasons when finding that the conditions enumerated in these provisions were met. The forfeiture served the legitimate aim of combating international drug-trafficking; the measure was also proportionate, given that the applicant had been found guilty of money laundering for a drugs cartel.
B. The Court's assessment
85. As regards the Government's argument that the applicant was not the owner of the assets, the Court observes that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 refers to “possessions”, a term which has an autonomous meaning. It is not disputed that the applicant had rented the safe in which the assets were found. Nor is it disputed that the Rhode Island District Court's final forfeiture order was directed against him. Without the confiscation and the execution of the final forfeiture order by the Austrian courts, he would have been able to dispose of the cash amounts, the bank account and the bearer bonds deposited in the safe (see, as a comparable case, Riela and Others v. Italy (dec.), no. 52439/99, 4 September 2001). Therefore, the measures complained of amounted to an interference with his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.
86. The Court refers to its established case-law on the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the manner in which the three rules contained in that provision are to be applied (see AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, 24 October 1986, § 48, Series A no. 108, and Air Canada v. the United Kingdom, 5 May 1995, §§ 29 and 30, Series A no. 316-A). In line with that case-law, the Court considers that the execution of the forfeiture order, though depriving the applicant permanently of the assets at issue, falls to be considered under the so-called third rule, relating to the State's right “to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control of the use of property in accordance with the general interest” set out in the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Butler v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 41661/98, ECHR 2002-VI, and AGOSI, cited above, § 51).
87. The Court notes that the execution of the forfeiture order had a basis in Austrian law, namely section 64 of the ELAA and Article 17 of the 1998 Treaty. As to the applicant's claim that the requirements laid down in these provisions were not complied with, it has to be borne in mind that the Court's power to review compliance with domestic law is limited (see, among many other authorities, Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 51, ECHR 2002-IV, and Fredin v. Sweden (no. 1), 18 February 1991, § 50, Series A no. 192). In the present case, the Austrian courts dealt in detail with the applicant's arguments and gave extensive reasons for their finding that the above-mentioned provisions provided a legal basis for executing the final forfeiture order. There is nothing to show that their application of the law went beyond the reasonable limits of interpretation.
88. Furthermore, the Court observes that the execution of the forfeiture order had a legitimate aim, namely enhancing international co-operation to ensure that monies derived from drug dealing were actually forfeited. The Court is fully aware of the difficulties encountered by States in the fight against drug-trafficking. It has already held that measures, which are designed to block movements of suspect capital, are an effective and necessary weapon in that fight (see Raimondo v. Italy, 22 February 1994, § 30, Series A no. 281-A). Thus the execution of the forfeiture order served the general interest of combating drug trafficking. However, a fair balance has to be struck between these demands of the general interest and the applicant's interest in the protection of his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. In making this assessment due regard is to be had to the wide margin of appreciation the respondent State enjoys in such matters (see AGOSI, cited above, § 52, and Butler, cited above).
89. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements. It follows that they are not necessarily the same as under Article 6. However, the Court has held that the proceedings at issue must afford the individual a reasonable opportunity of putting his or her case to the relevant authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision. In ascertaining whether this condition has been satisfied, the Court takes a comprehensive view (see, for instance, Jokela, cited above, § 45, and AGOSI, cited above, § 55).
90. In the present case, two sets of proceedings were conducted before the Austrian courts. The first related to the preliminary confiscation of the assets in order to secure the execution of the forfeiture, the second concerned the decision to take over the execution of the Rhode Island District Court's final forfeiture order. The applicant was represented by a lawyer throughout the proceedings and had the opportunity, of which he made ample use, to submit his arguments. He was therefore in a position to effectively challenge the measures interfering with his rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Moreover, bearing in mind the respondent State's wide margin of appreciation in this area, the Court finds that the execution of the forfeiture order does not disclose a failure to strike a fair balance between respect for the applicant's rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the general interest of the community.
91. Having regard to these considerations, the Court considers that the execution of the forfeiture order did not amount to a disproportionate interference with the applicant's property rights.
92. Consequently, there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
2. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 18 December 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; nessuna violazione di P1-1
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA SACCOCCIA C. AUSTRIA
(Richiesta n. 69917/01)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
18 dicembre 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Saccoccia c. Austria,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajić, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Khanlar Hajiyev, Dean Spielmann, Sverre Erik Jebens, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 27 novembre 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa ha origine da una richiesta (n. 69917/01) contro la Repubblica dell'Austria depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino degli Stati Uniti d'America, il Sig. S. A. S. (“il richiedente”), il 27 aprile 2001.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. J. H., un avvocato che pratica a Vienna. Il Governo austriaco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, Ambasciatore F. Trauttmansdorff Capo del Settore Legale al Ministero Federale per gli Affari Internazionali ed europei .
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che in procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali austriaci riguardo all'esecuzione di un ordine di confisca emesso dai tribunali degli Stati Uniti non aveva avuto un'udienza e che le decisioni dei tribunali austriaci avevano violato il suo diritto alla proprietà.
4. Con una decisione del 5 luglio 2007 la Corte dichiarò la richiesta parzialmente ammissibile.
5. Il Governo registrò osservazioni sui meriti (Articolo 59 § 1). Il richiedente richiese alla Corte di istruire il Governo rispondente a rivelare una lista completa dei valori di tutti i suoi beni austriaci al tempo della loro confisca ed al tempo in cui furono confiscati a seguito della sentenza da parte della Corte d'appello di Vienna del 7 ottobre 2000 per permettergli di calcolare le sue rivendicazioni di soddisfazione equa. Avendo riguardo alla sua decisione sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafi 98-100 sotto), la Corte respinge questa richiesta.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente nacque nel 1958. Sta scontando attualmente un periodo di detenzioni negli Stati Uniti.
A. Background
7. Nel 1992, nel contesto di procedimenti penali per riciclaggio di soldi su grande scala condotti contro il richiedente di fronte alla Corte distrettuale degli Stati Uniti per il Distretto di Rhode Island(“la Corte distrettuale Rhode Island”), ai tribunali austriaci furono richieste sotto rogatorie di sequestrare beni che erano stati trovati in due casseforti a Vienna affittate dal richiedente. Il 10 febbraio 1992 il Tribunale penale del Distretto di Vienna ordinò la confisca e mise i beni, soprattutto soldi e obbligazioni al portatore, a disposizione della Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island come prova nei procedimenti penali contro il richiedente, a condizione che i beni sarebbero stati restituiti alla conclusione dei procedimenti.
8. Le parti non sono d'accordo in merito al fatto se il richiedente fosse o meno il proprietario dei beni in questione. Il richiedente afferma che i beni provenivano da esercizi d'impresa legali eseguiti fino al 1988, mentre lo Stato rivendica che provenivano da soldi riciclati nel 1990 e 1991 , che di ciò fu dichiarato colpevole (vedere sotto) e che stava trattenendoli come amministratore per il cartello di droga per il quale lui aveva lavorato.
9. Nel febbraio 1993 la Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island dichiarò colpevole il richiedente per riciclaggio di denaro e riferì accuse, trovando che lui aveva capeggiato un'organizzazione che aveva riciclato più di cento milioni di dollari degli Stati Uniti (USD) nel 1990 e 1991, e lo condannò alla reclusione di 660 anni. Il 30 agosto 1993, la corte emise successivamente, un ordine di confisca preliminare.
10. Il 28 giugno 1995 le Corti d'appello degli Stati Uniti, Primo Circuito respinsero un ricorso da parte del richiedente contro la sua condanna e contro l'ordine di confisca. Le ragioni, nella parte attinente al contesto della presente causa, erano le seguenti. Riguardo alla rivendicazione del richiedente per la quale è stato rappresentato alla sua prova da un avvocato (H.) che aveva un conflitto di interessi, la corte notò che il richiedente era stato informato dei suoi diritti ma aveva insistito per essere rappresentato da l’avvocato H. Infine, aveva eseguito una rinuncia scritta trattenendo H. come consigliere e confermando che era stato pienamente informato ed aveva considerato le possibili conseguenze avverse per la sua difesa. Poiché l’avvocato H. aveva informato la corte solamente in termini vaghi di temere di essere accusato o chiamato come testimone nella causa del richiedente, la Corte distrettuale era giustificata nell'accettare la rinuncia. In qualsiasi caso, il richiedente fu rappresentato da un secondo, consigliere libero da conflitto, D. Riguardo all'azione di reclamo del richiedente per cui non aveva avuto udienza nei procedimenti di confisca, la corte di appello notò che il richiedente, rappresentato da un consigliere aveva rinunciato al suo diritto ad un’udienza di giuria nei procedimenti separati di confisca per il fatto che concernevano puramente questioni di argomento giuridico. La causa era stata ascoltata il 26 marzo 1993 in presenza del consigliere del richiedente. Il richiedente non era presente poiché doveva comparire di fronte ad un'altra corte. Il consulente legale aveva richiesto che il richiedente venisse ascoltato ma aveva rifiutato l'offerta del tribunale di avere un’ulteriore udienza in presenza del richiedente prima della consegna della sentenza.
11. Il 25 marzo 1996 la Corte Suprema degli Stati Uniti respinse un ricorso su questioni di diritto da parte del richiedente.
12. Il 7 novembre 1997 la Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island emise un ordine definitivo di confisca relativo ad un importo totale di USD 136 milioni, incluso USD 9 milioni nei confronti del richiedente “essendo il riciclaggio degli incassi di soldi derivati dalla droga per cui la seguente proprietà è stata sostituita parzialmente.” Seguì poi un'enumerazione di importi in contanti in franchi svizzeri, dollari degli Stati Uniti e scellini austriaci sequestrati a Vienna nel 1992 ed una lista di obbligazioni al portatore emesse da banche austriache e, infine un conto bancario a Vienna.
13. Il 9 dicembre 1997 la Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island emise delle rogatorie che, nella parte attinente, si leggono come segue:
“... la Corte distrettuale degli Stati Uniti per il Distretto di Rhode Island richiede l’esecuzione in Austria dell'accluso Ordine di Confisca Definitivo contro detti soldi, obbligazioni e altri strumenti finanziari. Nella misura possibile sotto la legge austriaca e coerente con qualsiasi accordo condiviso fra gli Stati Uniti e l'Austria, per favore converta i soldi e gli incassi delle obbligazioni e gli altri strumenti in dollari degli Stati Uniti e trasferisca per telegrafo quei finanziamenti sul Conto del Servizio Doganale degli Stati Uniti citato sopra . ...”
14. Il Dipartimento di Giustizia degli Stati Uniti trasmise questa richiesta alle autorità austriache il 18 dicembre 1997. Il 23 gennaio 1998 il Ministero austriaco di Giustizia richiese all'Ufficio diell’ Accusatore Pubblico Senior Vienna di aprire procedimenti “exequatur” per eseguire la decisione del giudice estero.
B. I procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali austriaci
1. Il sequestro preliminare per assicurare l'esecuzione dell’ ordine definitivo di confisca del 7 novembre 1997
15. Il 12 marzo 1998 il Tribunale penale Regionale di Vienna (Landesgericht für Strafsachen), come misura provvisoria, ordinò il sequestro dei beni del richiedente, di un valore totale di approssimativamente 80,000,000 di scellini austriaci (ATS- approssimativamente 5,800,000 euro), in contanti, obbligazioni al portatore ed un conto bancario, al fine di assicurare l'esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca del 7 novembre 1997. Fece riferimento alla richiesta sopra e notò che i procedimenti esecutivi sotto l' Atto Legale di Estradizione ed Assistenza (Auslieferungs- und Rechtshilfegesetz -“l'ELAA”) erano pendente.
16. Il richiedente fece ricorso il 26 marzo 1998, presentando in particolare che la decisione della Corte Regionale corrispondeva ad un'interferenza illegale col suo diritto alla proprietà, siccome mancava di una base legale. Inoltre, un'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca a beneficio degli Stati Uniti non era ammissibile in Austria siccome la sezione 64(7) dell'ELAA prevedeva che qualsiasi multa o beni confiscati ottenuti eseguendo una decisione estera ricadevano sotto la Repubblica dell'Austria.
17. Inoltre, il richiedente affermò che l’ ordine definitivo di confisca includeva anche “i beni surrogati ”, cioè beni non collegati ad o derivati dall'attività criminale. Così la misura richiesta non corrispondeva in alcuni modo alla confisca (Verfall) o ritiro dell'arricchimento (Abschöpfung der Bereicherung) all'interno del significato del Codice Penale austriaco (Strafgesetzbuch). In ogni caso queste sanzioni penali non potevano essere applicate ala sua causa, siccome le disposizioni attinenti non erano in vigore al tempo in cui commise i reati. Inoltre, era stato dichiarato colpevole di riciclaggio di soldi negli Stati Uniti, un reato che non era punibile sotto la legge austriaca al tempo della sua perpetrazione .
18. Appellandosi alla sezione 64(1) dell'ELAA, il richiedente dibatté anche, che i procedimenti di confisca erano andati a vuoto nell’ attenersi coi requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, poiché i procedimenti non erano stati pubblici e lui non era stato ascoltato. Inoltre, i suoi diritti di difesa erano stati violati nei fondamentali procedimenti penali e, il suo avvocato di difesa stato preso in un conflitto di interessi.
19. Infine, il richiedente rivendicò che c'era stata una mancanza di reciprocità siccome le decisioni dei tribunali austriaci non erano esecutivi negli Stati Uniti.
20. Nel frattempo, il 12 marzo 1998, il Tribunale penale Regionale di Vienna che aveva formulato una richiesta formale alle autorità degli Stati Uniti di ascoltare il richiedente in collegamento con la richiesta per l’ esecuzione dell’ ordine definitivo di confisca. Il 16 aprile 1998 il Dipartimento di Giustizia degli Stati Uniti trasmise le osservazioni del richiedente al Ministero austriaco di Giustizia.
21. Il 22 maggio 1998 il Dipartimento di Giustizia degli Stati Uniti indirizzò una nota al Ministero austriaco di Giustizia riguardo alla reciprocità nell'offrire assistenza legale in procedimenti di confisca. Il richiedente nega che questo nota contenga assicurazioni di reciprocità.
22. Il 1 agosto 1998 il Trattato fra il Governo della Repubblica dell’ Austria ed il Governo degli Stati Uniti d'America sull’ Assistenza Giuridica Reciproca in Questioni Penali (“il Trattato del 1998”) entrò in vigore.
23. Il 12 ottobre 1998 la Corte d'appello di Vienna (Oberlandesgericht) respinse il ricorso del richiedente contro la decisione della Corte Regionale del 12 marzo 1998.
24. La Corte d'appello trovò che la decisione della Corte Regionale era basata sull’ Articolo 144a del Codice di procedura penale (Strafprozeßordnung). In questo collegamento, la corte notò, che facendo seguito alla sezione 9(1) dell'ELAA, le disposizioni del Codice di Diritto di procedura penale dovevano essere applicate mutatis mutandis a meno che non prevedesse esplicitamente altrimenti.
25. Riguardo all'asserzione del richiedente che una confisca a beneficio degli Stati Uniti sarebbe contraria alla sezione 64(7) dell'ELAA, la corte osservò, che le rogatorie fecero la richiesta prima che qualsiasi misura richiesta sotto la legge austriaca per l'esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca venisse presa. Solamente come punto supplementare chiesero il trasferimento dei beni, purché che questo fosse stato ammissibile sotto la legge austriaca o qualsiasi trattato bilaterale. In questo collegamento fece riferimento all’ Articolo 17(3) del Trattato del 1998.
26. Riguardo all'asserzione del richiedente per cui l’ ordine definitivo di confisca coprì beni surrogati che non potevano essere soggetti alla confisca sotto la legge austriaca, la corte osservò che seguì la sentenza riguardo alla condanna del richiedente secondo la quale aveva condotto un'organizzazione che aveva riciclato grandi somme di soldi derivate dalla distribuzione di droga ed di solito riceveva una commissione del 10% per ogni importo riciclato. Fra il1 gennaio 1990 e il 2 aprile 1991 aveva trasferito più di USD 136 milioni di denaro relativo a droga dal conto di una società fittizia ai vari conti bancari esteri. C'erano così, buone ragioni di presumere che i beni austriaci del richiedente fossero proventi ricevuti per o derivanti dalla perpetrazione di un crimine e soggetti a ritiro dell'arricchimento sotto l’Articolo 20 del Codice Penale, o proventi ottenuti direttamente dallo spaccio di droga, soggetti a confisca sotto l’Articolo 20b del Codice Penale nella versione in vigore fin dal suo emendamento del 1996. L’ ordine definitivo di confisca fece un chiaro collegamento fra il reato di riciclaggio di denaro per il quale era stato condannato il richiedente e la confisca di ogni avere ottennuto con ciò.
27. Gli Articoli 20 e 20b nella versione in vigore fin dall'emendamento del 1996 del Codice Penale non furono considerati sanzioni penali sotto la legge austriaca, ma come misura sui generis. Il fatto che non fossero in vigore al tempo della perpetrazione dei reati non era perciò rilevante.
28. Anche se si applicò il diritto vigente al tempo della perpetrazione dei reati, i requisiti per ritiro dell'arricchimento furono soddisfatti. L’Articolo 20a(1) del Codice Penale, nella versione in vigore a quel tempo, prevedeva che si potesse ordinare ad un offensore che ingiustamente si era arricchito di pagare un importo equivalente all'arricchimento se quest’ultimo avesse ecceduto ATS 1 milione. Benché non c'era stato nessun reato di riciclaggio di denaro sotto la legge austriaca al tempo, i fatti costituirono il reato di ricettazione di refurtiva (Hehlerei) sotto l’Articolo 164(1)(4) del Codice Penale che gli creò un reato per assistere il perpetratore di un reato (qui, i rivenditori di droga) nel celare beni derivati da o ricevuti per la perpetrazione del reato o acquisire simili beni.
29. Riguardo alla dichiarazione del richiedente che sia i procedimenti penali contro lui sia i procedimenti che hanno dato luogo all’ ordine definitivo di confisca non erano riusciti ad attenersi all’Articolo 6 della Convenzione, la corte si riferì ai documenti di quei procedimenti contenuti nel suo archivio e notò ciò che segue . Nei procedimenti penali, il richiedente era stato presente ed era stato rappresentato con due consiglieri. Notò che era stato il richiedente ad insistere per essere rappresentato dall’ avvocato H. benché i secondo avesse espresso preoccupazioni, benché senza provarle, di poter venir accusato. In qualsiasi caso, il richiedente era stato rappresentato da un secondo consigliere che era libero da qualsiasi potenziale conflitto di interessi. Nei procedimenti di confisca lui rinunciò al suo diritto ad un'udienza pubblica di fronte ad una giuria poiché riguardavano solamente questioni giuridiche. Il 26 marzo 1993 il giudice aveva ascoltato la causa in presenza del consigliere del richiedente ma senza che il richiedente fosse presente. L'avvocato del richiedente aveva richiesto che il richiedente venisse ascoltato ma aveva rifiutato l'offerta della corte di sostenere un’ulteriore udienza in presenza del richiedente prima della consegna della sentenza. Insomma, la Corte d'appello di Vienna non ha trovato nessuna indicazione che i procedimenti di fronte ai tribunali degli Stati Uniti non fossero riusciti ad attenersi all’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
30. riguardo alla mancanza addotta di reciprocità, la corte notò che quando la richiesta per l’esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca fu resa, non c'era trattato bilaterale fra gli Stati Uniti e la Repubblica d'Austria. Solamente le disposizioni dell'ELAA dovevano così, essere applicate, la cui sezione 3(1) di questo richiedeva la reciprocità. La Corte Regionale aveva investigato debitamente il problema in cui aveva costretto il Dipartimento di Giustizia degli Stati Uniti a presentare informazioni riguardo alle possibilità di eseguire un ordine di confisca austriaco negli Stati Uniti. Il Trattato del 1998 era entrato nel frattempo comunque, in vigore. Sotto l’Articolo 20(3) di quel Trattato, si applicava a prescindere che dei reati fondamentali fossero stati commessi prima o dopo la sua entrata in vigore. L’Articolo 17 prevedeva la reciproca assistenza legale in procedimenti di confisca.
2. L'esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca del 7 novembre 1997
31. Il 25 agosto 1999 l’ autorità centrale degli Stati Uniti, appellandosi al Trattato del 1998, fece una nuova richiesta per l’ esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca del 7 novembre 1997. Secondo il richiedente, questa seconda richiesta per assistenza legale non fu mai notificata a lui.
32. Il richiedente fece osservazioni il 22 dicembre 1998, l’11 marzo 1999 ed l’ 11 maggio 2000.
33. Il 14 giugno 2000 il Tribunale penale Regionale di Vienna, senza sostenere un'udienza decise di accogliere l'esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca del 7 novembre 1997 ed ordinò la confisca dei beni austriaci del richiedente a beneficio degli Stati Uniti.
34. Avendo riguardo al Trattato del 1998 il requisito di reciprocità fu adempiuto. Le osservazioni da parte del richiedente che contestavano questo non erano più attinenti siccome loro si riferivano alla posizione giuridica prima dell'entrata in vigore del Trattato del 1998. Riguardo alla questione del beneficiario della confisca, notò, che l’Articolo 17(3) del Trattato del 1998 prevedeva opzionalmente che ogni parte Statale potesse dare i beni confiscati all'altra parte.
35. Riferendosi alla decisione della Corte d'appello del 12 ottobre 1998, notò che la condotta del richiedente era stata punibile sotto la legge austriaca. Così, la confisca non era contraria all’Articolo 7 della Convenzione. Infine, la corte notò che al richiedente era stata data un'opportunità di fare commenti sulla richiesta per assistenza legale.
36. Il richiedente fece ricorso il 7 luglio 2000. Lui asserì che il Trattato del 1998 prevedeva l’assistenza legale in procedimenti penali pendenti, ma non conteneva una base legale per l’esecuzione reciproca di decisioni definitive. Presumendo anche che il Trattato del 1998 si applicasse nella presente causa, l'esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca violerebbe l’Articolo 7 della Convenzione siccome il detto Trattato non era in vigore nel 1997 quando l'ordine di confisca fu emesso. Inoltre, il riciclaggio di denaro non era punibile sotto la legge austriaca al tempo della perpetrazione dei reati. Di conseguenza, i suoi beni non potevano essere soggetti alla confisca o al ritiro dell'arricchimento sotto la legge austriaca.
37. Inoltre, il richiedente ripeté il suo argomento per cui i suoi beni austriaci erano i beni surrogati e sostenne che, al tempo della perpetrazione dei reati, simili beni non erano soggetti alla confisca o al ritiro dell'arricchimento sotto la legge austriaca.
38. Appellandosi ad opinioni competenti presentate da lui, il richiedente sostenne che la condizione di reciprocità richiesta dalla sezione 3(1) dell'ELAA non fu adempiuta, siccome la legge costituzionale degli Stati Uniti non permetteva l'esecuzione di decisioni rese da tribunali penale esteri. Lui presentò inoltre che il termine di prescrizione quinquennale per l’esecuzione era cominciato a decorrere il 30 agosto 1993, quando l'ordine di confisca preliminare fu emesso (siccome era, nonostante il suo nome, una decisione definitiva ed esecutiva), e non solamente il 7 novembre 1997, quando l’ ordine definitivo di confisca fu emesso.
39. Inoltre il richiedente addusse che i procedimenti penali ed i procedimenti di confisca di fronte ai tribunali degli Stati Uniti non si erano attenuti ai requisiti dell’Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Lui presentò gli stessi argomenti riguardo ai procedimenti relativi al sequestro preliminare dei suoi beni. Inoltre, lui si riferì in termini generali al fatto che gli Stati Uniti ancora applicassero la pena di morte.
40. Il richiedente si lamentò anche di un numero di difetti procedurali riguardo ai procedimenti in Austria. Lui addusse in particolare che la Corte Regionale aveva rifiutato di prendere in considerazione le suddette opinioni competenti presentate da lui che mostravano che la legge costituzionale degli Stati Uniti escludeva qualsiasi esecuzione di decisioni di tribunali penali esteri. Inoltre, non gli era stata data un’opportunità sufficiente di avanzare i suoi argomenti che, nella sua prospettiva avrebbe richiesto la sua presenza personale in tribunale. Infine, lui si lamentò che la Corte Regionale non era riuscita a sostenere un'udienza orale pubblica e richiese che tale udienza venisse sostenuta dalla di appello.
41. Anche l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Pubblico fece riscorso . Il suo ricorso fu notificato al richiedente per commenti che lui presentò il 21 settembre 2000.
42. Il 7 ottobre 2000 la Corte d'appello di Vienna, riunendosi in camera, respinse il ricorso del richiedente. Sul ricorso dell'accusatore pubblico, corresse la decisione della Corte Regionale ed ordinò la confisca a beneficio della Repubblica d'Austria.
43. La corte notò all'inizio che, facendo seguito al suo Articolo 20(3), il Trattato del 1998 si applicava a prescindere se dei reati fondamentali furono commessi prima o dopo la sua entrata in vigore. Respinse l'argomento del richiedente che il Trattato detto non offriva una base per l'esecuzione reciproca di decisioni. L’Articolo 1, paragrafi (1) e (2)(h) del Trattato, in concomitanza con l’Articolo 17 regolano l’assistenza giuridica nei procedimenti di confisca. Riguardo alla mancanza addotta della reciprocità, era sufficiente far riferimento a quelle disposizioni. Non era perciò necessario esaminare questioni della legge costituzionale degli Stati Uniti.
44. Inoltre, riferendosi alla sua decisione del 12 ottobre 1998, la corte reiterò che i fatti sottostanti la condanna del richiedente per riciclaggio di denaro sarebbero stati punibili come ricettazione di refurtiva sotto l’Articolo 164(1)(4) del Codice Penale al tempo della perpetrazione dei reati. Inoltre, reiterò che il ritiro dell'arricchimento che faceva seguito all’ Articolo 20 del Codice Penale e la confisca che faceva seguito all’ Articolo 20b, sia nella versione in vigore fin dal 1996, non erano considerati come sanzioni penali, ma servivano il fine di neutralizzare gli incassi delle attività penali. Queste misure coprivano ogni incasso da reato, a prescindere se derivava direttamente dal reato o dati per la sua commissione o se già era stato convertito in altri beni.
45. Con riguardo all'azione di reclamo del richiedente per cui i procedimenti negli Stati Uniti non si erano attenuti coi requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, la corte si riferì alle ragioni date nella sua decisione precedente del 12 ottobre 1998.
46. La corte respinse la dichiarazione del richiedente per cui l'esecuzione dell’ ordine definitivo di confisca sia stato bloccato dal tempo,, notando che la Corte Suprema degli Stati Uniti, il 25 marzo 1996, aveva rifiutato di lasciare il ricorso contro l'ordine di confisca provvisorio, ed allora l’ordine definitivo di confisca era stato emesso il 7 novembre 1997. Di conseguenza, il termine di prescrizione quinquennale facendo seguito alla sezione 59 del Codice Penale non era scaduto.
47. Riguardo ai diritti procedurali del richiedente, la corte notò, che lui era stato rappresentato da un consigliere in tutti i procedimenti ed aveva avuto l'opportunità di presentare note scritte ed estese.
48. Infine, la corte considerò che il ricorso dell'accusatore pubblico era ben fondato in quanto la sezione 64(7) dell'ELAA prevedeva che la confisca dei beni ricadeva sotto la Repubblica dell'Austria. Così, la confisca a beneficio degli Stati Uniti sotto l’Articolo 17(3) del Trattato del 1998 non era ammissibile.
49. La decisione fu notificata al richiedente il 30 ottobre 2000.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
A. L’ Atto Giuridico di Estradizione e di Assistenza
50. La Sezione 1 dell' Atto Giuridico di Estradizione ed Assistenza (Auslieferungs- und Rechtshilfegesetz, Gazzetta della Legge Federale n. 529/1979) prevede che l'Atto si applica dove accordi bilaterali o internazionale non prevedono altrimenti.
51. La Sezione 3 porta l'intestazione “la reciprocità” e, nella parte attinente, prevede come segue:
“(1) richieste estere si possono garantite solamente se è garantito che anche lo Stato richiedente potrebbe garantire una richiesta austriaca equivalente.
...
(3) se ci sono dubbi riguardo all’ ottemperanza con la reciprocità, informazioni saranno ottenute dal Ministro Federale di Giustizia.”
52. la Sezione 64 è situata nel capitolo sull'esecuzione delle decisioni da parte dei tribunali penali esteri. Regola le condizioni per applicare l'esecuzione di simili decisioni.
“(1) l’esecuzione o l'ulteriore esecuzione di una decisione da parte di un giudice straniero con effetto definitivo e legale, nella forma di una multa valutaria o pena detentiva, una misura preventiva o una misura pecuniaria (vermögensrechtliche Anordnung), è ammissibile alla richiesta di un altro Statale se:
1. la decisione del giudice straniero fu presa nel corso di procedimenti in ottemperanza coi principi dell’Articolo 6 della Convenzione europea per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (la Convenzione) (Gazzetta della Legge Federale n. 210/1958);
2. la decisione fu portata in relazione ad un atto che è punito da una sentenza del tribunale sotto la legge austriaca;
3. la decisione non fu portata in relazione ad uno dei reati elencati nelle sezioni 14 e 15;
4. nessun tempo-limite è scaduto sotto la legge austriaca riguardo all’ esecutorietà;
5. la persona riguardata dalla decisione del giudice straniero riguardo a questo reato non è perseguita in Austria, ed è stata dichiarata colpevole in modo effettivo e definitivo o assolta in questa questione o è stata altrimenti prosciolta dall’ accusa.
...
(4) l’esecuzione di una decisione da parte di un giudice straniero che dà luogo a misure materiali è solamente ammissibile nella misura in cui i requisiti sotto la legge austriaca per una multa valutaria, un ritiro dell'arricchimento o la confisca si applica, e che nessuna misura austriaca corrispondente sia stata ancora presa.
...
(7) multe, i beni confiscati o l'arricchimento ritirati spetteranno alla Repubblica dell'Austria.”
53. La procedura da seguire in cause riguardo all'esecuzione di decisioni estere è esposta nella sezione 67 dell'ELAA. Non rende qualsiasi provvedimento per il tenere udienze.
B. Trattato fra il Governo della Repubblica d’Austria ed il Governo degli Stati Uniti d'America sull’ Assistenza Giuridica e Reciproca in Questioni Penali
54. Il Trattato fu firmato il 23 febbraio 1995 e, a seguito della ratificazione, entrò in vigore il 1 agosto 1998 (Gazzetta della Legge Federale Parte III, n. 107/1998).
Articolo 1
“(1) le Parti Contraenti offriranno assistenza reciproca, in conformità con le disposizioni di questo Trattato, in collegamento con l'indagine e il perseguimento di reati ,la punizione di cui al tempo della richiesta per assistenza incorrerebbe all'interno della giurisdizione delle autorità giudiziali dello Stato richiedente, ed in relativi procedimenti di confisca.
(2)l’ assistenza includerà:
...
(h) l’assistenza nei procedimenti si riferisce alla confisca e alla restituzione;...”
Articolo 17
“(1) se l'Autorità Centrale di una Parte Contraente diviene consapevole di frutti o strumenti di reati che sono localizzati nel territorio dell'altra Parte e possono essere confiscabili o altrimenti soggetti alla confisca sotto le leggi di quella Parte, può informare così l'Autorità Centrale dell'altra Parte. Se l'altra Parte ha giurisdizione a questo riguardo, può presentare queste informazioni alle sue autorità per una determinazione riguardo a quale azione sia appropriata. Queste autorità emetteranno la loro decisione e potranno, tramite la loro Autorità Centrale, fare rapporto all'altra Parte sull'azione presa.
(2) le Parti Contraenti si assisteranno l'un l'altra nella misura permessa dalle loro rispettive leggi nei procedimenti relativi alla confisca di frutti ed strumenti di reati, restituzione alle vittime di crimine e la raccolta di multe imposte come sentenze in azioni penali.
(3) uno Stato a cui viene richiesto il controllo di incassi confiscati o di strumenti disporrà di questi in conformità con la sua legge. Nella misura permessa dalle sue leggi e in simili termini come ritiene appropriato, entrambi le Parti possono trasferire i beni confiscati o gli incassi della loro vendita all'altra Parte.”
Articolo 20
“(3) questo Trattato si applicherà a richieste se o meno i reati attinenti accaddero prima dell'entrata in vigore di questo Trattato.”
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
55. Il richiedente si lamentò della mancanza di un'udienza pubblica nei procedimenti riguardo all'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca della Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island in Austria. Lui si appellò all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, nella parte attinente, si legge come segue:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ad ognuno viene concessa un’equa udienza pubblica... da parte di [un]... tribunale...”
A, L'Applicabilità dell’ Articolo 6 § 1
56. Nella sua decisione sull’ ammissibilità (vedere paragrafo 4 sopra) la Corte sostenne che mentre il capo penale dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 non si applicava ai procedimenti relativi all'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca, ricadevano sotto il capo civile dell’Articolo 6 § 1.
57. Nelle sue osservazioni seguenti la decisione di ammissibilità, il Governo sostenne, che l’Articolo 6 non si applicava. In particolare asserì che procedimenti exequatur non comportarono una determinazione dei diritti civili del richiedente. La decisione sui suoi diritti civili riguardo ai beni confiscati era già stata presa nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island che aveva dato luogo ad un ordine di confisca definitivo ed esecutivo. In contrasto i procedimenti exequatur erano procedimenti di esecuzione internazionali. Loro erano un requisito indispensabile per eseguire una decisione estera in Austria e non potevano comportare la riapertura della questione se i beni del richiedente fossero stati legittimamente confiscati.
58. La Corte non vede alcuna ragione di deviare dalla prospettiva espressa nella decisione di ammissibilità ma aggiungerebbe le seguenti considerazioni.
59. La Corte si riferisce alla sua sentenza nella decisione di ammissibilità per cui l’ordine di confisca definitivo Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island coinvolgeva una determinazione dei diritti civili ed obblighi del richiedente.
60. Dal momento che sono coinvolti i procedimenti civili di fronte ai tribunali nazionali, l'applicabilità dell’ Articolo 6 si estende alla fase di esecuzione dei procedimenti, e la ragione è che il “diritto ad un tribunale” consacrato nell’ Articolo 6 sarebbe illusorio se l'ordinamento giuridico nazionale di un Stato Contraente concedesse ad una decisione giudiziale definitiva vincolante di rimanere non operativa a danno di una parte (vedere Hornsby c. Grecia, 19 marzo 1997, § 40 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-II).
61. La Corte ha, di nuovo con riguardo a procedimenti nazionali, anche trovato che l’Articolo 6 si applica riguardo a procedimenti di esecuzione per il fatto che è il momento in cui davvero il diritto asserito diviene efficace il che costituisce la determinazione di un diritto civile (vedere, in particolare, Pérez de Rada Cavanilles c. Spagna, 28 ottobre 1998, § 39 Relazioni 1998-VIII, relativa all'esecuzione di un accordo stabilito ed Estima Jorge c. Portogallo, 21 aprile 1998 § 37, Relazioni 1998-II relativa all'esecuzione di un atto notarile).
62. La Corte non vede nessun bisogno di pervenire ad una conclusione diversa per procedimenti exequatur che sono procedimenti relativi all'esecuzione della decisione di un giudice straniero, purché la decisione in oggetto interessi un diritto civile od obbligo (vedere Sylvester c. Austria ( dec.), n. 54640/00, 9 ottobre 2003, e McDonald c. Francia ( dec.), n. 18648/04, 29 aprile 2008 entrambe relative a procedimenti exequatur per una sentenza di divorzio estera).
63. In procedimenti exequatur i tribunali nazionali non sono chiamati comunque, per decidere di nuovo sui meriti della decisione del giudice straniero come il Governo ha indicato esattamente. Tutti ciò che devono fare è esaminare se le condizioni per accordare l’esecuzione siano state soddisfatte.
64. Nella presente causa i tribunali dovevano esaminare in particolare se i requisiti del Trattato del 1998 e l'ELAA furono soddisfatti, incluso la questione se i procedimenti condotti di fronte alla Corte distrettuale Rhode Island erano stati in conformità con l’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere la decisione di ammissibilità, paragrafi 4 sopra). Comunque, chiaramente non furono chiamati, ad esaminare in sostanza se i beni del richiedente erano stati legittimamente confiscati.
65. In conclusione, la Corte conferma, che l’Articolo 6 § 1 sotto il suo capo civile si applica ai procedimenti in questione.
B. Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 6 § 1
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
66. Il richiedente si lamentò che né il Tribunale penale Regionale di Vienna né la Corte d'appello di Vienna avevano sostenuto un'udienza pubblica benché non ci fosse nessuna circostanza speciale che giustificasse l’assenza di un'udienza. Inoltre, lui presentò che avrebbe dovuto essere ascoltato in persona per mostrare che i beni derivavano da esercizi d'impresa legali.
67. Il Governo contese che il diritto ad un'udienza pubblica o qualsiasi udienza non era del tutto assoluto. Nella presente causa, i tribunali sono stati giustificate nel dispensarsi da un'udienza, poiché i procedimenti exequatur avevano riguardato esclusivamente questioni di legge.
68. Una comparizione personale da parte del richiedente non era stata inoltre, necessaria, siccome i problemi da risolvere non avevano costretto il tribunale a procurarsi una sua impressione personale , né era stato fattibile, siccome stava scontando il suo periodo di detenzione negli Stati Uniti. Un requisito di presenza personale impedirebbe severamente la cooperazione internazionale in cause come la presente.
69. Infine, il Governo dibatté che il richiedente fosse stato sufficientemente coinvolto nei procedimenti in quanto era stato informato di tutti i passi presi ed aveva presentato ampie dichiarazioni tramite consigliere.
2. La valutazione della Corte
70. La Corte reitera che la partecipazione ad udienze in tribunale in pubblico costituisce un principio fondamentale custodito nel paragrafo 1 dell’ Articolo 6. Questo carattere pubblico protegge i contendenti contro l'amministrazione della giustizia in segreto senza scrutinio pubblico; è anche uno dei mezzi tramite cui si può sostenere la fiducia nei tribunali . Rendendo l'amministrazione della giustizia trasparente, la pubblicità contribuisce al conseguimento dello scopo dell’ Articolo 6 § 1, vale a dire un processo equo la cui garanzia è uno dei principi fondamentali di qualsiasi società democratica, all'interno del significato della Convenzione (vedere, per esempio, Diennet c. Francia, 26 settembre 1995, § 33 la Serie A n. 325-un, e Werner c. Austria, 24 novembre 1997, § 45 Relazioni 1997-VII).
71. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, il diritto ad un “udienza pubblica” sotto l’ Articolo 6 § 1 comporta il diritto ad un “udienza orale” a meno che non ci sono circostanze che giustificano la mancanza di tale udienza (vedere Allan Jacobsson c. Svezia (n. 2), 19 febbraio 1998, § 46 le Relazioni 1998-I, con riferimento a Fredin c. Svezia (n. 2), 23 febbraio 1994, §§ 21-22 Serie A n. 283-a, e Stallinger e Kuso c. Austria, 23 aprile 1997, § 51 Relazioni 1997-II).
72. Nella presente causa né la Corte Regionale di Vienna né la Corte d'appello di Vienna sostennero un'udienza prima di procedere all'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca della Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island (vedere paragrafi 33 e 42 sopra). La Corte nota che la sezione 67 dell'ELAA non prevede la partecipazione ad un'udienza nei procedimenti riguardo all'esecuzione di una decisione estera. Il fatto che il richiedente non richiese un'udienza di fronte al Tribunale penale Regionale di Vienna non può essere interpretato perciò come una rinuncia del suo diritto ad un'udienza (vedere Werner, citatata sopra, § 48). Nel suo ricorso contro la decisione della Corte Regionale si lamentò inoltre, della mancanza di un'udienza e richiese alla corte di appello di tenerne una (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra).
73. La Corte deve esaminare perciò se ci sono state in questo caso circostanze di natura tale dal dispensare i tribunali dal tenere un'udienza. La Corte ha accettato che un'udienza può essere non richiesta nel caso in cui non ci sia nessun problema di credibilità o fatti contestati che rendono necessario un'udienza e i tribunali possono equamente e ragionevolmente decidere la causa sulla base delle osservazioni delle parti e gli altri materiali scritti (vedere, come recente autorità, mutatis mutandis, Jussila c. Finlandia [GC], n. 73053/01, § 41 ECHR 2006-XIV, con gli ulteriori riferimenti).
74. Segue dalla giurisprudenza della Corte che il carattere delle circostanze che possono giustificare essenzialmente il non tenere un'udienza orale deriva dalla natura dei problemi che devono essere decisi dai tribunali nazionali e competenti, non dalla frequenza di simili situazioni. Non vuole dire che il rifiuto di tenere un'udienza orale può essere giustificato solamente in rare cause (l'ibid., §42). Il sovrastante principio ed’equità incarnato nell’ Articolo 6 è, come sempre, la considerazione chiave.
75. In particolare la Corte ha avuto riguardo alla natura tecnica di controversie su benefici di sicurezza sociale che sono tratti meglio per iscritto che tramite argomento orale. Ha sostenuto ripetutamente che in questa sfera le autorità nazionali, avendo riguardo alle richieste di efficienza ed economia, potrebbero astenersi dal sostenere un'udienza poiché sostenere sistematicamente udienze potrebbe essere un ostacolo alla particolare diligenza richiesta in procedimenti di sicurezza sociale (vedere, per esempio, Schuler-Zgraggen c. Svizzera, 24 giugno 1993, § 58 Serie A n. 263; Döry c. Svezia, n. 28394/95, § 41 12 novembre 2002; e Pitkänen c. Svezia ( dec.), n. 52793/99, 26 agosto 2003). Inoltre la Corte qualche volta ha notato che la controversia in questione non sollevava problemi d'importanza pubblica da rendere necessaria un'udienza (vedere Schuler-Zgraggen, ibid.).
76. Inoltre, la Corte ha accettato che il fare a meno di un'udienza può essere giustificato in cause che sollevano soltanto problemi giuridici di natura limitata (vedere Allan Jacobsson (no.2), citata sopra, §§ 48-49, e Valová ed Altri c. Slovacchia, n. 44925/99, § 68 1 giugno 2004) o di nessuna particolare complessità (Varela Assalino c. Portogallo (il dec.), n. 64336/01, 25 aprile 2002, e Speil c. Austria (dec.), n. 42057/98, 5 settembre 2002).
77. Rivolgendosi alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte osserva che i tribunali dovevano esaminare se le condizioni poste nelle disposizioni attinenti dell'ELAA ed nel Trattato del 1998 per l’esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca furono rispettate. Le questioni da esaminare includevano questioni di reciprocità, la questione se gli atti commessi dal richiedente fossero punibili sotto la legge austriaca al tempo della loro perpetrazione, ottemperanza coi tempo limiti legali e se i procedimenti di fronte alla Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island che aveva emesso l'ordine di sequestro erano stati in conformità agli standard dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
78. Nella prospettiva della Corte, i presenti procedimenti concernevano piuttosto problemi tecnici di cooperazione inter-stato nella lotta al riciclaggio di denaro tramite l'esecuzione di un ordine di confisca estero. Loro sollevavano esclusivamente problemi giuridici di natura limitata. Tutto ciò che i tribunali austriaci dovevano stabilire era se le condizioni esposte nell'ELAA ed nel Trattato del 1998 per accordare l'esecuzione dell'ordine di sequestro erano state rispettate. Come è già stato stabilito (vedere paragrafi 63-64 sopra), i procedimenti non coinvolsero nessuna revisione dei meriti dell'ordine di confisca emesso dalla Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island.
79. I presenti procedimenti non richiesero l'udienza di testimoni o la presa di altre prove orali. Inoltre, la Corte si confà col Governo per il fatto che i tribunali non erano tenuti ad ascoltare il richiedente in persona. I procedimenti non sollevarono alcuna questione sulla sua credibilità, né riguardarono alcuna circostanza che avrebbe costretto i tribunali a ottenere un'impressione personale del richiedente. In queste circostanze, i tribunali potevano equamente e ragionevolmente, decidere la causa sulla base delle osservazioni scritte delle parti e gli altri materiali scritti. Loro furono dispensati perciò dal sostenere un'udienza.
80. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
81. Il richiedente si lamentò che le decisioni dei tribunali austriaci violarono l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento pacifico delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
82. Il richiedente asserì che lui era il proprietario dei beni in questione. Lui sostenne che alle decisioni delle corti austriache mancò una base legale, in primo luogo per il fatto che la condizione di reciprocità non fu adempiuta, in secondo luogo per il fatto che l’ ordine definitivo di confisca fu bloccato dal tempo, ed in terzo luogo per il fatto che l’ Articolo 17 del Trattato del 1998 permetteva solamente la confisca di “frutti ed strumenti” di un reato, ma non la confisca di “i beni surrogati.” Infine, lui dibatté che la procedura non gli aveva dato un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare i suoi argomenti, in particolare siccome nessuna udienza era stata sostenuta e siccome i tribunali avevano trascurato l'opinione competente presentata da lui.
83. Il Governo dibatté che l'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca non interferì col diritto del richiedente al pacifico godimento della sua proprietà. Lui non era riuscito a mostrare che fosse il proprietario dei beni in questione. E’ stato stabilito solamente che la chiave della cassaforte a Vienna nella quale i beni furono immagazzinati era stata scoperta nell'appartamento del richiedente a Londra. Nella prospettiva del Governo il richiedente aveva solamente tenuto i beni come amministratore per il cartello di narcotici per il quale lui stava riciclando denaro. Presumendo anche che il richiedente era il proprietario dei beni in questione, non c'era niente che indicasse che provenivano da attività legali.
84. In alternativa il Governo dibatté che un'interferenza con le “ proprietà” del richiedente era in qualsiasi causa giustificata. L'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca aveva una base giuridica nell’ Articolo 17 del Trattato del 1998 e nella sezione 64 dell'ELAA. Inoltre, i tribunali austriaci avevano dato ragioni particolareggiate nel trovare che le condizioni enumerate in queste disposizioni erano rispettate. La confisca serviva lo scopo legittimo di combattere il traffico di droga internazionale; la misura era anche proporzionata, dato che il richiedente era stato riconosciuto colpevole di riciclaggio di denaro per un cartello di droghe.
B. La valutazione della Corte
85. Riguardo all'argomento del Governo per cui il richiedente non era il proprietario dei beni, la Corte osserva che l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 fa riferimento alla “ proprietà”, un termine che ha un significato autonomo. Non si contesta che il richiedente aveva affittato la cassaforte nella quale furono trovati i beni. Né è contestato che l’ordine di confisca definitivo della Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island fu diretto contro lui. Senza il sequestro e l'esecuzione dell’ ordine definitivo di confisca da parte dei tribunali austriaci, lui sarebbe stato in grado disporre degli importi in contanti, del conto bancario e delle obbligazioni al portatore depositati nella cassaforte (vedere, come causa comparabile, Riela ed Altri c. Italia ( dec.), n. 52439/99, 4 settembre 2001). Perciò, le misure di cui si è lamentato corrisposero ad un'interferenza col suo diritto al pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà.
86. La Corte si riferisce alla sua giurisprudenza stabilita sulla struttura dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e al modo in cui i tre articoli contenuti in quella disposizione verranno applicati (vedere AGOSI c. Regno Unito, 24 ottobre 1986, § 48 Serie A n. 108, ed Air Canada c. Regno Unito, 5 maggio 1995 §§ 29 e 30, Serie A n. 316-a). In linea con questa giurisprudenza, la Corte considera che l'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca, spogliando permanentemente tuttavia il richiedente dei beni in questione, debba essere considerato sotto il così definito terzo articolo, relativo al diritto dello Stato di “eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale” esposto nel secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Butler c. Regno Unito ( dec.), n. 41661/98, ECHR 2002-VI, ed AGOSI citata sopra, § 51).
87. La Corte nota che l'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca aveva una base nella legge austriaca, vale a dire la sezione 64 dell'ELAA e l’ Articolo 17 del Trattato del 1998. Riguardo alla rivendicazione del richiedente per cui non si sono attenuti ai requisiti stabiliti in queste disposizioni, bisogno tenere in mente che il potere della Corte di fare una revisione dell’ottemperanza con il diritto nazionale è limitato (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Jokela c. Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 51, ECHR 2002-IV, e Fredin c. Svezia (n. 1), 18 febbraio 1991, § 50 la Serie A n. 192). Nella presente causa, le corti austriache trattarono in dettaglio gli argomenti del richiedente e diedero ragioni ampie per la loro costatazione che le disposizioni summenzionate offrirono una base giuridica per l’esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca. Non c'è niente che mostri che la applicazione della legge andò oltre i limiti ragionevoli dell’ interpretazione.
88. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che l'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca aveva un scopo legittimo, migliorando vale a dire la co-operazione internazionale per assicurare che i proventi derivanti dallo spacco di droga davvero venissero confiscato. La Corte è completamente consapevole delle difficoltà incontrate dagli Stati nella lotta contro il traffico di droga. Già ha sostenuto che le misure che sono progettate per rendere impraticabile movimenti di capitale di persona sospetta sono un'arma efficace e necessaria in questa lotta (vedere Raimondo c. Italia, 22 febbraio 1994, § 30 la Serie A n. 281-a). Così l'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca servì l'interesse generale di combattere il traffico di droga. Un giusto equilibrio doveva comunque, essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale e l'interesse del richiedente nella protezione del suo diritto al pacifico godimento delle sue proprietà. Nel fare questa valutazione occorre dare il dovuto riguardo all’ampio margine di valutazione di cui lo Stato rispondente gode in simili questioni (vedere AGOSI, citata sopra, § 52, e Butler, citata sopra).
89. L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non contiene requisiti procedurali espliciti. Ne segue che non sono necessariamente gli stessi di quelli sotto l’ Articolo 6. Comunque, la Corte ha sostenuto che i procedimenti in questione devono riconoscere all'individuo un'opportunità ragionevole di rimettere la sua causa alle autorità attinenti al fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantiti da questa disposizione. Nell'accertare se questa condizione è stata soddisfatta, la Corte prende una prospettiva ampia (vedere, per esempio, Jokela, citata sopra, § 45, ed AGOSI, citata sopra, § 55).
90. Nella presente causa, due set di procedimenti furono condotti di fronte alle corti austriache. Il primo relativo al sequestro preliminare dei beni per assicurare l'esecuzione della confisca, il secondo riguardava la decisione di procedere all'esecuzione dell’ordine definitivo di confisca della Corte distrettuale di Rhode Island. Il richiedente fu rappresentato da un avvocato in tutti i procedimenti ed aveva l'opportunità di cui si avvalse ampiamente, di presentare i suoi argomenti. Lui era perciò nella posizione di poter impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferivano coi suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Inoltre, tenendo presente l ‘ampio margine dello Stato rispondente nella valutazione in questa area, la Corte costata che l'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca non rivela un insuccesso nel prevedere un giusto equilibrio fra il rispetto dei diritti del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 deli Protocollo N.ro 1 e l'interesse generale della comunità.
91. Avendo riguardo a queste considerazioni, la Corte considera, che l'esecuzione dell'ordine di confisca non corrispose ad un'interferenza sproporzionata coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente.
92. Non c'è stata di conseguenza, nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
2. Sostiene che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 18 dicembre 2008, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.