Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF KUDIC v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI:

NUMERO: 28971/05/2008
STATO: Bosnia Herzegovina
DATA: 09/12/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF KUDIĆ v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
(Application no. 28971/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
9 December 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Kudić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
Päivi Hirvelä,
Ledi Bianku,
Nebojša Vučinić, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 18 November 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 28971/05) against Bosnia and Herzegovina lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mr E. K.and Ms M. K. (“the applicants”), on 26 July 2005.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr M. S., a lawyer practising in Sarajevo. The Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Mijić.
3. On 29 May 2007 the President of the Fourth Section decided to give notice of the application to the Government. It was also decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility (Article 29 § 3).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
4. The applicants were born in 1928 and 1933 respectively and live in Bihać.
5. Prior to the dissolution of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (“the SFRY”) the applicants deposited foreign currency in their bank accounts at the Privredna banka Sarajevo Glavna filijala Bihać. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as in other successor States of the former SFRY, such savings are commonly referred to as “old” foreign-currency savings (for the relevant background information see Jeličić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 41183/02, ECHR 2005-...).
6. Following several unsuccessful attempts to withdraw their funds, the applicants initiated court proceedings seeking the recovery of their entire “old” foreign-currency savings and accrued interest.
7. By a decision of the Bihać Municipal Court of 3 December 1993, the Privredna banka Sarajevo Glavna filijala Bihać was ordered to pay the applicants 54,469.42 German marks (DEM), 19,257.25 Swiss francs, 81.12 French francs, 60,120.49 Austrian shillings, 185.61 Canadian dollars, 231.86 US dollars, 163.39 Dutch guilders and 22,217.60 Italian liras, default interest on the above amounts at the rate applicable to overnight deposits from private individuals from 1 January 1992 and legal costs in the amount of DEM 1,940. The judgment entered into force on 12 June 1994.
8. On 9 April 1997 the Bihać Municipal Court issued a writ of execution (rješenje o izvršenju). The execution proceedings were effectively stayed between 12 January 1998 and 12 September 2001.
9. Meanwhile, on 28 November 1997, the judgment debt became a public debt pursuant to the Settlement of Claims Against the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina Act 1997.
10. On 6 April 2005 the Human Rights Commission within the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Human Rights Commission”) found a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention arising from a failure to enforce the judgment of 3 December 1993. It ordered the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina to ensure full enforcement of the judgment in issue within two months, to pay the equivalent of 255 euros in respect of non-pecuniary damage within three months and to pay default interest after the expiry of the above time-limits at the annual rate of 10%.
11. On 28 October 2005 the applicants received the compensation awarded by the Human Rights Commission.
12. The judgment of 3 December 1993 was fully enforced on 5 June 2007 (the applicants were paid the principal debt, default interest and legal costs in the amounts specified in the judgment).
II. RELEVANT LAW AND PRACTICE
13. For relevant law and practice see the admissibility decision in Jeličić, cited above; Suljagić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 27912/02, 20 June 2006; the judgment in Jeličić v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, no. 41183/02, ECHR 2006-...; and Pejaković and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, nos. 337/04, 36022/04 and 45219/04, 18 December 2007.
THE LAW
14. The applicants complained of the protracted non-enforcement of a final and enforceable judgment in their favour. They relied on Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Article 6, in so far as relevant, provides:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
I. ADMISSIBILITY
15. The Government submitted that the applicants could no longer claim to be victims within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention since the judgment in issue had been enforced and the Human Rights Commission had acknowledged the alleged breach and awarded compensation.
16. The applicants disagreed that the compensation awarded by the Human Rights Commission constituted appropriate and sufficient redress.
17. According to the Court's settled case-law, a decision or measure favourable to the applicant is not in principle sufficient to deprive him of his status as a “victim” unless the national authorities have acknowledged the breach (at least in substance) and afforded redress for it (see the admissibility decision in Jeličić, cited above). It is further recalled that redress afforded by the national authorities must be appropriate and sufficient (see Višnjevac v. Bosnia and Herzegovina (dec.), no. 2333/04, 24 October 2006).
As the Court has already held in length-of-proceedings cases, one of the characteristics of sufficient redress which may remove an applicant's victim status relates to the amount awarded as a result of using the domestic remedy (see Cocchiarella v. Italy [GC], no. 64886/01, § 93, ECHR 2006-..., or Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 202, ECHR 2006 - ...). Since enforcement proceedings are regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 of the Convention (see, as a recent authority, Wasserman v. Russia (no. 2), no. 21071/05, § 51, 10 April 2008), the principles developed in the context of length-of-proceedings cases are also applicable in the situation where an applicant complains of the protracted non-enforcement of a final and enforceable judgment in his favour (as in the present case).
18. Turning to the instant case, the Court observes that at the time when the Human Rights Commission's decision was given the enforcement proceedings had already been pending for more than two years and eight months after the date of ratification of the Convention by Bosnia and Herzegovina. The just satisfaction awarded by the Human Rights Commission is not in reasonable proportion with what the Court would have been likely to award under Article 41 of the Convention in respect of the same period (as illustrated in the judgment in Jeličić, cited above). It therefore cannot be regarded as adequate in the circumstances of the case (see, by analogy, the principles established in Cocchiarella, cited above, §§ 65-107, or Scordino, cited above, §§ 173-216). Furthermore, the enforcement proceedings continued for more than two years after the Human Rights Commission's decision.
The Government's objection must thus be dismissed.
19. The Court notes that the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible. In accordance with its decision to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention (see paragraph 3 above), the Court will immediately consider the merits of the case.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION AND OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
20. The Court notes that the present case is practically identical to Jeličić (cited above) and Pejaković and Others (cited above) in which the Court found a violation of Article 6 of the Convention as well as a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Considering the length of the period of non-enforcement of the judgment in issue in the present case (almost five years after the date of ratification of the Convention by Bosnia and Herzegovina), and having examined all relevant circumstances, the Court does not see any reason to depart from its previous case-law.
There has accordingly been a breach of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
21. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
22. The applicants claimed 5,000 euros (EUR) each in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
23. The Government considered the amount claimed to be excessive.
24. The Court considers it clear that the applicants sustained some non-pecuniary loss arising from the violations of the Convention found in the present case, for which they should be compensated. Having regard to the amounts awarded in comparable cases (see Jeličić, cited above, and Pejaković and Others, cited above) and to the amount of compensation already awarded to the applicants (see paragraph 8 above) and making its assessment on an equitable basis, as required by Article 41 of the Convention, the Court awards the applicants a total of EUR 1,300 plus any tax that may be chargeable under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
25. The applicants did not claim costs and expenses.
C. Default interest
26. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 1,300 (one thousand three hundred euros) in total, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into convertible marks at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants' claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 9 December 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA KUDIĆ C. BOSNIA E HERZEGOVINA
(Richiesta n. 28971/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
9 dicembre 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Kudić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, Päivi Hirvelä, Ledi Bianku, Nebojša Vučinić, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 18 novembre 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in questa data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 28971/05) contro la Bosnia e Herzegovina depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da due cittadini della Bosnia e Herzegovina, il Sig. E. K. e la Sig.ra M. K. (“i richiedenti”), il 26 luglio 2005.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. M. S., un avvocato che pratica a Sarajevo. Il Governo della Bosnia e Herzegovina (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra M. Mijić.
3. Il 29 maggio 2007 il Presidente della quarta Sezione decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Fu deciso anche di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità (Articolo 29 § 3).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
4. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1928 e 1933 e vivono a Bihać.
5. Prima dello scioglimento della precedente Repubblica Federale Socialista di Iugoslavia (“la SFRY”) i richiedenti depositarono della valuta estera sui loro conti bancari presso la Privredna banka Sarajevo filijala di Glavna Bihać. Nella Bosnia e Herzegovina, così come negli altri Stati successori della precedente SFRY, ci si riferisce comunemente a simili risparmi come a “vecchi” risparmi di in valuta estera (per le informazioni di fondo ed attinenti vedere Jeličić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina ( dec.), n. 41183/02, ECHR 2005 -...).
6. A seguito di molti tentativi senza successo di ritirare i loro fondi, i richiedenti iniziarono atti chiedendo il ricupero di tutti i loro “vecchi” risparmi in valuta estera e dell’ interesse maturato.
7. Con una decisione della Corte Municipale di Bihać del 3 dicembre 1993, alla Privredna banka Sarajevo filijala di Glavna Bihać fu ordinato di pagare ai richiedenti 54,469.42 di marchi tedeschi (DEM), 19,257.25 franchi svizzeri, 81.12 franchi francesi, 60,120.49 scellini austriaci, 185.61 dollari canadesi, 231.86 dollari Stati Uniti, 163.39 fiorini olandesi e 22,217.60 lire italiane, interesse di mora sugli importi sopra al tasso applicabile ai depositi a brevissimo termine da parte di individui privati dal 1 gennaio 1992 e spese processuali per l'importo di DEM 1,940. La sentenza entrò in vigore il 12 giugno 1994.
8. Il 9 aprile 1997 la Corte Municipale di Bihać emise un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza (rješenje o izvršenju). I procedimenti di esecuzione furono sospesi effettivamente fra il 12 gennaio 1998 e il 12 settembre 2001 .
9. Il 28 novembre 1997, il debito della sentenza divenne nel frattempo, un debito pubblico facendo seguito all'Atto dell’Accordo delle Rivendicazioni Contro la Federazione della Bosnia e Herzegovina del 1997.
10. Il 6 aprile 2005 la Commissione dei Diritti umani all'interno della Corte Costituzionale della Bosnia e Herzegovina (“la Commissione dei Diritti umani”) ha trovato una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che nasce da un insuccesso nell’esecuzione della sentenza del 3 dicembre 1993. Ordinò alla Federazione della Bosnia e Herzegovina di assicurare la piena esecuzione della sentenza in questione entro due mesi, di pagare l'equivalente di 255 euro a riguardo del danno morale entro tre mesi e di pagare un interesse di mora dopo la scadenza del suddetto tempo limite al tasso annuale del 10%.
11. Il 28 ottobre 2005 i richiedenti ricevettero il risarcimento assegnato dalla Commissione dei Diritti umani.
12. La sentenza del 3 dicembre 1993 fu completamente eseguita il 5 giugno 2007 (ai richiedenti fu pagato il debito principale, l’interesse di mora e le spese processuali negli importi specificati nella sentenza).
II. LEGGE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
13. Per la legge attinente e la pratica vedere la decisione di ammissibilità in Jeličić, citata sopra; Suljagić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina ( dec.), n. 27912/02, 20 giugno 2006; la sentenza Jeličić c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, n. 41183/02, ECHR 2006 -...; e Pejaković ed Altri c. Bosnia e Herzegovina, N. 337/04, 36022/04 e 45219/04, 18 dicembre 2007.
LA LEGGE
14. I richiedenti si lamentarono della non-esecuzione prolungata di una sentenza definitiva ed esecutiva a loro favore. Si appellarono all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
L’Articolo 6, nella parte attinente, prevede:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ad ognuno è concesso un’equa udienza pubblica all'interno di un termine ragionevole da parteun tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito dalla legge.”
L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
I. AMMISSIBILITÀ
15. Il Governo presentò che i richiedenti non potevano più pretendere di essere vittime all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 34 della Convenzione poiché la sentenza in questione era stata eseguita e la Commissione dei Diritti umani aveva riconosciuto la violazione addotta e il risarcimento assegnato.
16. I richiedenti non erano d'accordo sul farro che il risarcimento assegnato dalla Commissione dei Diritti umani costituisse una compensazione appropriata e sufficiente.
17. Secondo la giurisprudenza stabilita della Corte, una decisione o una misura favorevole al richiedente non è in principio sufficiente per spogliarlo del suo status come “ vittima” a meno che le autorità nazionali abbiano riconosciuto la violazione (almeno in sostanza) e stabilito una compensazione per questa (vedere la decisione di ammissibilità in Jeličić, citata sopra). Si ricorda inoltre che la compensazione riconosciuta dalle autorità nazionali deve essere appropriata e sufficiente (vedere Višnjevac c. Bosnia e Herzegovina ( dec.), n. 2333/04, 24 ottobre 2006).
Come la Corte ha già sostenuto in cause inerenti alla lunghezza del procedimento, una delle caratteristiche di compensazione sufficiente in grado di rimuovere lo status di vittima di un richiedente fa riferimento all'importo assegnato come risultato dell’utilizzo della via di ricorso nazionale (vedere Cocchiarella c. Italia [GC], n. 64886/01, § 93 ECHR 2006 -..., o Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 202 ECHR 2006 -...). Poiché i procedimenti di esecuzione vengono considerati una parte integrante della “ prova” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere, come recente autorità, Wasserman c. Russia (n. 2), n. 21071/05, § 51 10 aprile 2008), i principi sviluppati nel contesto di cause inerenti alla lunghezza del procedimento sono anche applicabili nella situazione in cui un richiedente si lamenta della non-esecuzione prolungata di una sentenza definitiva ed esecutiva a suo favore (come nella presente causa).
18. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa , la Corte osserva che nel momento in cui la decisione della Commissione dei Diritti umani fu data i procedimenti di esecuzione erano già pendenti da più di due anni ed otto mesi dopo la data di ratificazione della Convenzione da parte della Bosnia e Herzegovina. La soddisfazione equa assegnata dalla Commissione dei Diritti umani non è in proporzione ragionevole con quella che sarebbe stata probabilmente assegnata dalla Corte sotto l’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione riguardo lo stesso periodo (come illustrato nella sentenza Jeličić, citata sopra). Non può essere considerata perciò come adeguata nelle circostanze della causa (vedere, per analogia, i principi stabiliti in Cocchiarella, citata sopra, §§ 65-107, o Scordino, citata sopra, §§ 173-216). Inoltre, i procedimenti di esecuzione sono continuati per più di due anni dopo la decisione della Commissione dei Diritti umani.
L'obiezione del Governo deve essere così respinta.
19. La Corte nota che la richiesta non è manifestamente mal fondata all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile. In conformità con la sua decisione di applicare l’Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 3 sopra), la Corte immediatamente considererà i meriti della causa.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
20. La Corte nota che la presente causa è praticamente identica a Jeličić (citata sopra) e Pejaković ed Altri (citatata sopra) nelle quali la Corte trovò una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione così come una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. In considerazione della lunghezza del periodo di non-esecuzione della sentenza in questione nella presente causa (circa cinque anni dopo la data di ratificazione della Convenzione della Bosnia e Herzegovina), ed avendo esaminato tutte le circostanze attinenti, la Corte non vede alcuna ragione di scostarsi dalla sua giurisprudenza precedente.
C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
21. L’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
22. I richiedenti hanno chiesto 5,000 euro (EUR) ciascuno riguardo al danno morale.
23. Il Governo ha considerato l'importo chiesto eccessivo.
24. La Corte considera chiaramente che i richiedenti hanno subito una perdita morale che nasce dalle violazioni della Convenzione trovate nella presente causa per la quala loro dovrebbero essere compensati. Avendo riguardo agli importi assegnati in cause comparabili (vedere Jeličić, citata sopra, e Pejaković ed Altri, citata sopra) ed all'importo del risarcimento già assegnato ai richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra) e facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, come richiesto dall’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte assegna un totale di 1,300 EUR ai richiedenti più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile sotto questo capo.
B. Costi e spese
25. I richiedenti non hanno chiesto rimborso di costi e spese.
C. Interesse di mora
26. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora debba essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea al quale dovrebbe essere aggiunto tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare i richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 1,300 (mille trecento euro) in totale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, riguardo al danno morale da convertire in marchi convertibili al tasso applicabile in data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
5. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 9 dicembre 2008, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.