Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MIROSHNIK v. UKRAINE

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 34, 35, 6, 29, P1-1

NUMERO: 75804/01/2008
STATO: Ucraina
DATA: 27/11/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; Violations of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Non-pecuniary damage - award
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF MIROSHNIK v. UKRAINE
(Application no. 75804/01)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
27 November 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Miroshnik v. Ukraine,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Rait Maruste, President,
Karel Jungwiert,
Volodymyr Butkevych,
Renate Jaeger,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 November 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 75804/01) against Ukraine lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Ukrainian national, Mr A. V. M. (“the applicant”), on 10 May 2001.
2. The Ukrainian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr Y. Zaytsev, their Agent.
3. The applicant complained about the non-enforcement of a court decision in his favour. He further alleged that the military courts dealing with his cases had not met the requirement of constituting an “independent tribunal” as requested by the Convention.
4. On 13 September 2005 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1955 and resides in the village of Akimovka, the Zaporizhzhya region, Ukraine.
6. In December 1998 the applicant was dismissed from the military forces.
A. First set of proceedings
7. On 8 June 1999 the Zaporizhzhya Garrison Military Court (“the Zaporizhzhya Court”) ordered the Zaporizhzhya Regional Military Enlistment Office to pay the applicant 1,260.91 Ukrainian hryvnyas (UAH) for his uniform expenses for the period up to 31 December 1998.
8. On 11 February 2000 the enforcement proceedings were discontinued because of the debtor's lack of funds and because, according to Article 5 of the Economic Activities of the Armed Forces Act, the property of the Armed Forces could not be used to enforce a court decision.
9. According to the applicant, on 16 October 2001 the decision was enforced in part by the debtor. At 21 August 2007 the decision had not been enforced in full.
B. Second set of proceedings
10. In June 1999 the applicant instituted proceedings in the Zaporizhzhya Court against his former employer, the Akimovskiy District Military Enlistment Office, claiming an allowance due to him for the period of January-February 1999. The applicant stated that though he was officially dismissed on 31 December 1998, he had actually left the forces on 16 February 1999.
11. On 23 June 1999 the court found for the applicant and awarded him UAH 442.03 for the unpaid allowance to be paid by the Enlistment Office.
12. On 17 August 1999 the South Regional Military Court quashed that decision and remitted the case for a fresh consideration.
13. On 3 November 1999 the Zaporizhzhya Court found against the applicant.
14. On 7 December 1999 the South Regional Military Court upheld that decision.
15. On 11 July 2000 the Supreme Court quashed the decisions of 3 November 1999 and 7 December 1999 upon a protest, lodged by the President of the Supreme Court (at the applicant's request), and remitted the case for a fresh consideration.
16. The applicant lodged an additional claim asking to change the date of his dismissal and requesting the payment of an insurance premium, compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage, and the enforcement of the decision of 8 June 1999.
17. On 3 November 2000 the Zaporizhzhya Court, considering the case in the applicant's presence, changed the date of his dismissal and ordered the Enlistment Office to pay him UAH 791.78 for the unpaid allowance and other payments.
18. The applicant did not appeal against the decision.
19. In a letter of 30 January 2004, the applicant informed the Court that the decision of 3 November 2000 had been enforced in full, without specifying the date of enforcement.
C. Third set of proceedings
20. In August 2000 the applicant instituted proceedings in the Zaporizhzhya Court against the Enlistment Office and the Ministry of Defence with claims similar to those in the second set of proceedings.
21. On 31 August 2000 the court returned the applicant's claim, stating that he had failed to pay the court fee and to enclose any evidence in support of his claim as required by the legislation.
22. The applicant neither appealed against that decision nor submitted his claim anew.
D. Fourth set of proceedings
23. In November 2000 the applicant instituted proceedings in the Central Regional Military Court against the Ministry of Defence contesting the lawfulness of his dismissal from the military service and seeking compensation for damage. The applicant also clamed that the defendant had been unlawfully ignoring the court decisions in his favour.
24. On 12 December 2000 the court returned the applicant's claim for res judicata reasons, stating, in particular, that such a claim had already been considered by the courts.
25. On 23 January 2001 the Supreme Court quashed that decision and remitted the case for a fresh consideration, finding that the applicant's claim had not been considered by the courts before.
26. On 5 March 2001 the Central Regional Military Court returned the applicant's claim for failure to indicate all the requisites of the claim, and to enclose any evidence in its support, as required by the legislation.
27. The applicant states that this decision was sent to him too late to enable him to appeal against it within the fixed time-limit. The applicant did not submit any request for an extension of the time-limit for appeal.
28. On 12 April 2001 the Supreme Court rejected an appeal by the applicant against the decision of 5 March 2001 under the extraordinary review procedure.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Domestic law regarding enforcement of court decisions
29. The relevant domestic law regarding enforcement of court decisions is summarised in the judgment of Voytenko v. Ukraine (no. 18966/02, §§ 20-25, 29 June 2004)
B. Domestic law and practice regarding independence of the judiciary
1. The Constitution of Ukraine of 1996
30. The relevant provisions of the Constitution read as follows:
Article 126
“The independence and immunity of judges are guaranteed by the Constitution and the laws of Ukraine.
Influencing judges in any manner is prohibited ...”
Article 129
“In the administration of justice, judges are independent and subject only to the law ...”
2. Code of Civil Procedure of 1963 (in force at the material time)
31. Section 123 of the Code provided that garrison military courts, as first-instance courts, had jurisdiction over civil cases where military servicemen challenged the lawfulness of acts or decisions taken by military officials or military bodies as well as over other civil cases where military servicemen's rights and freedoms were claimed to be violated, except for cases falling within the jurisdiction of the regional military courts. The regional military courts, as first-instance courts, had jurisdiction over civil cases where the lawfulness of acts or decisions taken by military officials or military bodies having the level of a military association or higher, were challenged.
32. In accordance with Sections 289 and 325 of the Code, appeals against decisions of military garrison courts were to be submitted to the military regional courts. Appeals against decisions of the military regional courts were to be submitted to the Supreme Court.
3. The Judicial System Act of 5 June 1981 (in force at the material time)
33. Sections 20, 38-1, 38-3 of the Act provided that the military courts were incorporated into the system of the general courts of Ukraine. They exercised judicial power in the Armed Forces of Ukraine and other military formations allowed by Ukrainian legislation. The judges of the military courts were elected by the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine for ten years. The candidates, on passing a competitive examination the first time, were elected for five years. Only an acting officer in the army could become a judge of the military court.
34. Section 38-10 of the Act envisaged that the financing, logistics, maintenance and archiving of the military courts and the Military Chamber of the Supreme Court were performed by entities of the Ministry of Defence at the expense of the Ministry of Justice and the Supreme Court, using part of the State Budget allocated specifically for those purposes.
35. According to Section 38-11 of the Act the servicemen of the military courts were considered to be in military service and constituted a part of the staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine. The judges of the military courts were awarded military ranks by the President of Ukraine upon the joint submission of the Minster of Justice and the Chairman of the Supreme Court (as regards the judges of the military garrison courts, military regional courts, and naval courts) or upon the sole submission of the Chairman of the Supreme Court (as regards the judges of the military chamber of the Supreme Court).
36. Section 43 of the Act provided that a military chamber was incorporated into the structure of the Supreme Court. According to Section 49 of the Act the chambers of the Supreme Court could consider cases as, inter alia, the court of appeal instance.
The Act was repealed on 7 February 2002.
4. The Status of Judges Act of 15 December 1992 (in force at the material time)
37. According to Section 11 of the Act the independence of judges was guaranteed by the manner of their appointment, termination and suspension of their office; by the special procedure of awarding military ranks to the military judges; by the special procedure of administration of justice; by the secrecy of the decision-making process; by prohibition of interference with the administration of justice; by the establishment of the legal responsibility for contempt of court; by the judges' right to resign; by the judges' inviolability; by the provision of the technical and informational conditions necessary for the operation of the courts; by the material support and social welfare programs provided for the judges; by the special procedure of the courts' financing; and by the system of judicial self-government.
38. Section 44 of the Act foresaw that judges of the military courts who needed to improve their living conditions were provided with an appropriate flat or house by the Ministry of Defence within the term of six months from the date of their appointment.
5. The Armed Forces of Ukraine Act of 6 December 1991 (in force at the material time)
39. Section 3 of the Act provided that the Armed Forces of Ukraine were subordinate to the Ministry of Defence.
THE LAW
I. NON-ENFORCEMENT OF THE COURT DECISION OF 8 JUNE 1999
A. Admissibility
40. The applicant complained about the non-enforcement of the decision of the Zaporizhzhya Court of 8 June 1999 in his favour. He also complained of a violation of his property rights on that account. The applicant invoked Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
41. The Court finds it appropriate to examine these complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which read, in so far as relevant, as follows:
Article 6
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal ...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest ...”
42. The Government raised objections regarding exhaustion of domestic remedies similar to those which the Court has already dismissed in a number of similar cases concerning the non-enforcement of court judgments (see Sokur v. Ukraine (dec.), no. 29439/02, 16 December 2003, and Voytenko, cited above, §§ 27-31). The Court considers that these objections must be rejected for the same reasons.
43. The Court finds that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
44. The Government contended that the State Bailiffs had taken every action necessary to enforce the decision of 8 June 1999 in the applicant's favour and that there had been no violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
45. The applicant disagreed.
46. The Court notes that as of 21 August 2007 the decision of the Zaporizhzhya Court of 8 June 1999 in the applicant's favour has not been fully enforced. Thus, the period of non-enforcement constituted eight years and two months.
47. The Court has already found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in cases like the present one (see, among other authorities, Voytenko v. Ukraine, no. 18966/02, §§ 43 and 55, 29 June 2004 and Dubenko v. Ukraine, no. 74221/01, §§ 47 and 51, 11 January 2005). The Court finds no ground to depart from its case-law in this case.
48. Having examined all the material in its possession, the Court considers that the Government have not put forward any fact or argument capable of persuading it to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
49. There has, accordingly, been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED LACK OF INDEPENDENCE OF MILITARY COURTS
50. The applicant complained about the lack of independence of military courts, stating that at the material time they were administratively dependant upon the Ministry of Defence. He relied on Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads, in so far as relevant, as follows:
Article 6
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties' submissions
51. The Government submitted that as regards the third and fourth sets of proceedings the applicant had failed to appeal against the decisions of 31 August 2000 and 5 March 2001, and thus had not exhausted domestic remedies. They further contended that as regards the first and third sets of proceedings the applicant had introduced this complaint out of the six-month time-limit. They lastly asserted that the applicant had failed to prove that he had been affected by the alleged violation of the Convention and therefore could not claim to be a victim on that account.
52. The applicant disagreed with those submissions, arguing that he had introduced his compliant to the Court in time and exhausted all the remedies he considered relevant. He further insisted that his right to an independent tribunal had been violated and he was therefore a victim within the meaning of the Convention.
2. The Court's assessment
a. Exhaustion of domestic remedies (third and fourth sets of proceedings)
53. The Court recalls that the purpose of Article 35 § 1 of the Convention is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity to prevent or put right the violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court. However, the only remedies to be exhausted are those which are effective. It is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one, available in theory and in practice at the relevant time (see Khokhlich v. Ukraine, no. 41707/98, § 149, judgment of 29 April 2003). The domestic remedy should be capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant's complaints and offer reasonable prospects of success (see Selmouni v. France [GC], no. 25803/94, § 76, ECHR 1999-V).
54. The Court notes that it is not disputed between the parties that the applicant did not appeal against the decisions of the military courts of 31 August 2000 and 5 March 2001. However, claiming that the applicant had not availed himself of the impugned appeal procedures, the Government have not shown how the superior military courts, considering such appeals, could effectively deal with the essence of the applicant's complaint. It is unclear to the Court how the superior military courts would address the issue of judicial dependence arising, in the applicant's opinion, from the legislative provisions and affecting therefore the whole system of the military courts. It is also well to mention that the applicant could not avail himself of the possibility of lodging his claims with the other domestic courts since those claims fell within the jurisdiction of the military courts only (see paragraph 31 above). It follows that the Government's objection as to the non-exhaustion of domestic remedies should be dismissed.
b. Observance of the six-month period (first, second, and third sets of proceedings)
55. The Court reiterates that Article 35 § 1 of the Convention provides that the Court may only deal with a matter where it has been introduced within six months from date of the final decision in the process of exhaustion of domestic remedies. Where no effective remedy is available to the applicant, the time-limit expires six months after the date of the acts or measures complained of, or after the date of knowledge of that act or its effect or prejudice on the applicant (see Younger v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 57420/00, ECHR 2003-I). It is not open to the Court to set aside the application of the six-month rule in the absence of the relevant objection from the Government (see Belaousof and Others v. Greece, no. 66296/01, judgment of 27 May 2004, § 38).
56. In the present case the applicant complained of a lack of independence on the part of the tribunal with respect to four sets of his proceedings before the military courts. The Court observes that the first, second and third sets of proceedings terminated on 8 June 1999, 3 November 2000, and 31 August 2000, respectively, that is, more than six months before the date when the application was submitted to the Court (10 May 2001). The Court therefore holds that the first, second and third sets of proceedings fall outside the six-month period and rejects this part of the application pursuant to Article 35 §§ 1 and 4 of the Convention.
c. Victim status (fourth set of proceedings)
57. The Court considers that the Government's objection concerning the applicant's victim status with respect to the fourth set of proceedings is closely linked to the merits of the complaint. Accordingly, it joins the preliminary objection of the Government to the merits (see Bączkowski and Others v. Poland, no. 1543/06, §§ 45-48, judgment of 3 May 2007).
58. The Court further notes that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties' submissions
59. The Government maintained that the judges of the military courts possessed strong guarantees regarding their appointment and dismissal, as well as the duration of their term of office. They further stated that the safeguards and immunities provided to judges by the domestic law had effectively prevented them from any outer influence. The Government finally submitted that the Ministry of Defence had no influence on the military courts and that there accordingly had been no breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
60. The applicant disagreed, arguing that the military courts were dependent on the Ministry of Defence, referring in particular to the way they were financed and to the vulnerable status of military judges, who were military servicemen and therefore subordinate to the Ministry of Defence.
2. The Court's assessment
61. The Court recalls at the outset that the right to a fair trial, of which the right to a hearing before an independent tribunal is an essential component, holds a prominent place in a democratic society (see, mutatis mutandis, the De Cubber v. Belgium judgment of 26 October 1984, Series A no. 86, p. 16, § 30 in fine). The Court reiterates that, in order to establish whether a tribunal can be considered “independent”, regard must be had, inter alia, to the manner of appointment of its members and their term of office, the existence of guarantees against outside pressures and to the question whether the body presents an appearance of independence. In this latter respect, what is at stake is the confidence which such tribunals in a democratic society must inspire in the public and, above all, the parties to the proceedings. In deciding whether there is a legitimate reason to fear that a particular court lacked independence or impartiality, the standpoint of the party to the proceedings is important without being decisive. What is decisive is whether the party's doubts can be held to be objectively justified (see, mutatis mutandis, Incal v. Turkey, judgment of 9 June 1998, Reports 1998-IV, pp. 1572-73, § 71; and Cooper v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 48843/99, § 104, ECHR 2003-XII).
62. Turning to the instant case, the Court agrees with the Government that there were guarantees of the independence of judges of the military courts, provided, inter alia, by the manner of their appointment, the term of their office, their inviolability, and the prohibition of interference with the administration of justice (see paragraphs 30 and 37 above).
63. The Court, however, notes that it was foreseen by the domestic law that the judges of the military courts were military servicemen, and in that capacity they constituted a part of the staff of the Armed Forces subordinate to the Ministry of Defence (see paragraphs 33, 35, and 39 above). The Court further observes that it was up to the Ministry of Defence to provide the judges of the military courts with appropriate flats or houses if they needed to improve their living conditions (see paragraph 38 above). Finally, the Court notes that the entities of the Ministry of Defence carried out the financing, logistics and maintenance of the military courts on a practical level. While it was not the competence of the Ministry of Defence to decide on the annual scope of the financing and maintenance of the military courts, it did however administer that financing and maintenance on a daily basis (see paragraph 34 above). It is noteworthy that this procedure of financing the military courts was repealed in 2002 by the subsequent law.
64. In the Court's opinion the above aspects of the status of the military courts and their judges, taken cumulatively, gave objective grounds for the applicant to doubt whether the military courts complied with the requirement of independence when dealing with his claim against the Ministry of Defence. The Court therefore holds that the applicant had not had an opportunity to present his case before an independent tribunal, as required by the Convention, and in this regard he clearly possessed victim status. It therefore dismisses the Government's preliminary objection as to the applicant's victim status and finds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of the lack of an independent tribunal in the applicant's fourth set of proceedings.
III. THE REMAINDER OF THE APPLICANTION
65. The applicant complained under Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention about the outcome and length of the proceedings in his cases. He also invoked Articles 1 and 14 of the Convention, complaining that the State had failed to secure his rights guaranteed by the Convention and that he had suffered discrimination, providing no further details.
66. The Court has examined the remainder of the applicant's complaints and considers that, in the light of all the material in its possession and in so far as the matters complained of were within its competence, they did not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention or its Protocols. Accordingly, the Court rejects them as manifestly ill-founded, pursuant to Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
67. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
68. The applicant claimed 60,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non-pecuniary damage. The applicant also claimed pecuniary damage without any further specification.
69. The Government submitted that the applicant's claims for non-pecuniary damage were exorbitant and unsubstantiated. In the Government's opinion, the finding of a violation, if any, would constitute sufficient just satisfaction.
70. As regards the applicant's claims for non-pecuniary damage, the Court, ruling on the equitable basis, awards the applicant EUR 2,000.
B. Costs and expenses
71. The applicant did not submit any claim under this head; the Court therefore makes no award for costs and expenses.
C. Default interest
72. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerning the non-enforcement of the court decision of 8 June 1999 and the complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention about the lack of the military courts' independence in the applicant's fourth set of proceedings admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the non-enforcement of the court decision of 8 June 1999;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention on account of the lack of the military courts' independence in the applicant's fourth set of proceedings;
4. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to be converted into the currency of Ukraine at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
5. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 27 November 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Rait Maruste
Deputy Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; danno morale - assegnazione
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA MIROSHNIK C. UCRAINA
(Richiesta n. 75804/01)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
27 novembre 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Miroshnik c. Ucraina,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Rait Maruste, Presidente, Karel Jungwiert, Volodymyr Butkevych, Renate Jaeger, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Mirjana Lazarova Trajkovska, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e Stefano Phillips, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 4 novembre 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa ha origine da una richiesta (n. 75804/01) contro l'Ucraina depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino ucraino, il Sig. A. V. M. (“il richiedente”), il 10 maggio 2001.
2. Il Governo ucraino (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal Sig. Y. Zaytsev, il suo Agente.
3. Il richiedente si lamentò della non-esecuzione di una decisione del tribunale a suo favore. Lui addusse inoltre che il trattamento delle sue cause da parte di tribunali militari non aveva soddisfatto il requisito della costituzione di un “tribunale indipendente” come richiesto dalla Convenzione.
4. Il 13 settembre 2005 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1955 e risiede nel villaggio di Akimovka, la regione di Zaporizhzhya, Ucraina.
6. Nel dicembre 1998 il richiedente fu dimesso dalle forze militari.
A. Prima serie di procedimenti
7. L’8 giugno 1999 la Corte Militare di Zaporizhzhya Garrison (“Zaporizhzhya Court”) ordinò all’Ufficio Militare Regionale di Arruolamento di Zaporizhzhya di pagare al richiedente 1,260.91 hryvnyas ucraini (UAH) per le sue spese di uniforme per il periodo dal 31 dicembre 1998.
8. L’11 febbraio 2000 i procedimenti di esecuzione furono cessati a causa della mancanza di fondi da parte del debitore e perché, secondo l’Articolo 5 dell’Atto delle Attività Economiche delle Forze armate la proprietà delle Forze armate non poteva essere usata per eseguire una decisione del tribunale.
9. Secondo il richiedente, il 16 ottobre 2001 la decisione è stata eseguita in parte dal debitore. Il 21 agosto 2007 la decisione non era stata eseguita in pieno.
B. Seconda serie di procedimenti
10. Nel giugno 1999 il richiedente avviò procedimenti presso il Tribunale di Zaporizhzhya contro il suo precedente datore di lavoro, l’Ufficio del Distretto di Akimovskiy di Arruolamento Militare, chiedendo un indennità dovutagli per il periodo gennaio-febbraio 1999. Il richiedente affermò che sebbene si fosse ufficialmente dimesso il 31 dicembre 1998, in realtà aveva lasciato le forze il 16 febbraio 1999.
11. Il 23 giugno 1999 il tribunale si espresse a favore del richiedente e gli assegnò UAH 442.03 per l’indennità non retribuita che doveva essere pagata dall’Ufficio dell'Arruolamento.
12. Il 17 agosto 1999 la Corte Militare Regionale del Sud ha annullato questa decisione e ha rinviato la causa per una nuova considerazione.
13. Il 3 novembre 1999 il Tribunale di Zaporizhzhya si espresse a favore del richiedente.
14. Il 7 dicembre 1999 la Corte Militare Regionale del Sud sostenne quella decisione.
15. Il 11 luglio 2000 la Corte Suprema annullò le decisioni del 3 novembre 1999 e del 7 dicembre 1999 su una protesta, depositata dal Presidente della Corte Suprema (su richiesta del richiedente), e rinviò la causa per una nuova considerazione.
16. Il richiedente depositò una rivendicazione supplementare chiedendo di cambiare la data del suo licenziamento e richiedendo il pagamento di un premio di assicurazione, un risarcimento per danno materiale e morale e l'esecuzione della decisione dell’ 8 giugno 1999.
17. Il 3 novembre 2000 il Tribunale di Zaporizhzhya, considerando la causa in presenza del richiedente cambiò la data del suo licenziamento ed ordinò l'Ufficio di Arruolamento di pagargli UAH 791.78 per l'indennità non retribuita e gli altri pagamenti.
18. Il richiedente non fece appello contro la decisione.
19. In una lettera del 30 gennaio 2004, il richiedente informò la Corte che la decisione del 3 novembre 2000 era stata eseguita in pieno, senza specificare la data di esecuzione.
C. terza serie di procedimenti
20. Nell’ agosto 2000 il richiedente avviò procedimenti presso il Tribunale di Zaporizhzhya contro l' Ufficio di Arruolamento ed il Ministero della Difesa con rivendicazioni simili a quelli nella seconda serie di procedimenti.
21. Il 31 agosto 2000 la corte respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente, affermando che lui non era riuscito a pagare la parcella del tribunale ed includere una qualsiasi prova in appoggio della sua rivendicazione come richiesto dalla legislazione.
22. Il richiedente non fece né appello contro questa decisione né presentò nuovamente la sua rivendicazione.
D. quarta serie di procedimenti
23. Nel novembre 2000 il richiedente avviò procedimenti presso la Corte Militare Regionale Centrale contro il Ministero della Difesa contestando la legalità del suo licenziamento dal servizio militare ed il risarcimento richiesto per danno. Il richiedente rivendicava anche che l'imputato stava ignorando illegalmente le decisioni del tribunale a suo favore.
24. Il 12 dicembre 2000 il tribunale ha respinto la rivendicazione del richiedente per ragioni res judicata, affermando, in particolare, che tale rivendicazione era già stata considerata dai tribunali.
25. Il 23 gennaio 2001 la Corte Suprema annullò questa decisione e rinviò la causa per una nuova considerazione, trovando che la rivendicazione del richiedente non era stata considerata prima dai tribunali.
26. Il 5 marzo 2001 la Corte Militare Regionale Centrale respinse la rivendicazione del richiedente per insuccesso nell’indicare tutti i requisiti della rivendicazione, ed includere qualsiasi prova in suo appoggio, come richiesto dalla legislazione.
27. Il richiedente ha affermato che questa decisione gli è stata spedita troppo tardi per permettergli di fare appello contro questa all'interno del tempo-limite fissato. Il richiedente non presentò alcuna richiesta per una proroga del tempo-limite per ricorso.
28. Il 12 aprile 2001 la Corte Suprema respinse un ricorso del richiedente contro la decisione del 5 marzo 2001 sotto la procedura di revisione straordinaria.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Diritto nazionale riguardo all’ esecuzione di decisioni della corte
29. Il diritto nazionale attinente riguardo ad esecuzione di decisioni della corte è riassunto nella sentenza di Voytenko c. Ucraina (n. 18966/02, §§ 20-25 29 giugno 2004)
B. Diritto nazionale e pratica riguardo all'indipendenza dell'ordinamento giudiziario
1. La Costituzione dell’ Ucraina di 1996
30. Le disposizioni attinenti della Costituzione si leggono come segue:
Articolo 126
“L'indipendenza e l'immunità dei giudici sono garantite dalla Costituzione e dalle leggi dell'Ucraina.
Influenzare i Giudici in qualsiasi maniera è proibito...”
Articolo 129
“Nell'amministrazione della giustizia, i giudici sono indipendenti e soggetti solamente alla legge...”
2. Codice di Procedura Civile del 1963 (in vigore al tempo attinente)
31. La Sezione 123 del Codice prevede che corti di guarnigione militare, come corti di prima istanza avevano giurisdizione su giudizi civili in cui i membri delle Forze Armate militari impugnavano la legalità di atti o decisioni presi da ufficiali militari o corpi militari così come su altri giudizi civili in cui si rivendicava che i diritti e le libertà dei membri delle Forze Armate militari venivano violate, a parte cause che rientrano all'interno della giurisdizione delle corti militari regionali. Le corti militari e regionali, come le corti di prima istanza avevano giurisdizione su giudizi civili in cui la legalità di atti o decisioni presi da ufficiali militari o corpi militari aventi livello di un'associazione militare o più alto, venivano impugnati.
32. In conformità con le Sezioni 289 e 325 del Codice, i ricorsi contro le decisioni delle corti di guarnigione militari dovrebbero essere presentati alle corti regionali militari. I ricorsi contro le decisioni delle corti regionali militari dovrebbero essere presentati alla Corte Suprema.
3. L’Atto del Sistema Giudiziale del 5 giugno 1981 (in vigore al tempo attinente)
33. Le Sezioni 20, 38-1 38-3 dell'Atto prevedono che le corti militari siano incorporate nel sistema delle corti generali dell'Ucraina. Esercitarono il potere giudiziale nelle Forze armate dell’ Ucraina e le altre formazioni militari permesse dalla legislazione ucraina. I giudici delle corti militari sono stati eletti dal Verkhovna Rada dell'Ucraina per dieci anni. I candidati, passando un esame competitivo la prima volta, sono stati eletti per cinque anni. Solamente un ufficiale in carica nell'esercito potrebbe divenire un giudice della corte militare.
34. La Sezione 38-10 dell'Atto prevede che il finanziamento, la logistica il mantenimento e l’archivio delle corti militari e della Corte Suprema della Camera Militare è stato compiuto da entità del Ministero della Difesa a spese del Ministero della Giustizia e della Corte Suprema, usando parte del Bilancio Statale specificamente assegnato a quei fini.
35. Secondo la Sezione 38-11 dell'Atto i membri delle Forze Armate delle corti militari venivano considerati in servizio militare e costituivano una parte del personale delle Forze armate dell'Ucraina. Ai giudici delle corti militari furono assegnati ranghi militari dal Presidente dell'Ucraina sulla base dell’osservazione congiunta del Ministro della Giustizia e del Presidente della Corte Suprema (riguardo ai giudici delle corti di guarnigione militari, delle corti regionali e militari, e delle corti della marina) o sulla sola osservazione del Presidente della Corte Suprema (riguardo ai giudici della camera militare della Corte Suprema).
36. La Sezione 43 dell'Atto prevede che una camera militare venga incorporata nella struttura della Corte Suprema. Secondo la Sezione 49 dell'Atto le camere della Corte Suprema potrebbero considerare cause come, inter alia, della corte d'appello d’istanza.
L'Atto fu abrogato il 7 febbraio 2002.
4. L’Atto dello Status dei Giudici del 15 dicembre 1992 (in vigore al tempo attinente)
37. Secondo la Sezione 11 dell'Atto l'indipendenza dei giudici viene garantita dal metodo della loro designazione , conclusione e sospensione del loro ufficio; tramite la procedura speciale di assegnare ranghi militari ai giudici militari; tramite la procedura speciale di amministrazione della giustizia; tramite la segretezza dell'elaborazione decisionale; tramite la proibizione dell’ interferenza con l'amministrazione della giustizia; tramite la costituzione della responsabilità giuridica per vilipendio alla corte; tramite diritto dei giudici di dimettersi; tramite l'inviolabilità dei giudici; tramite la disposizione dei tecnici e le condizioni d’informazione necessarie per l'operato dei tribunali; tramite l'appoggio di materiale e programmi di benessere sociale previsti per i giudici; tramite la procedura speciale del finanziamento dei tribunali; e tramite il sistema di autogoverno giudiziale.
38. La Sezione 44 dell'Atto prevede che a giudici delle corti militari bisognosi di migliorare le loro condizioni abitative venisse fornito un appartamento appropriato o un alloggio dal Ministero della Difesa all'interno del termine di sei mesi dalla data della loro designazione.
5. L’Atto delle Forze armate dell’ Ucraina del 6 dicembre 1991 (in vigore al tempo attinente)
39. La Sezione 3 dell'Atto prevede che le Forze armate dell'Ucraina siano subordinate al Ministero della Difesa.
LA LEGGE
I. NON-ESECUZIONE DELLA DECISIONE DELLA CORTE DLL’ 8 GIUGNO 1999
A. Ammissibilità
40. Il richiedente si è lamentato della non-esecuzione della decisione della Corte di Zaporizhzhya dell’8 giugno 1999 a suo favore. Si è lamentato anche di una violazione del suo diritti alla proprietà a tal proposito. Il richiedente ha invocato l’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
41. La Corte trova appropriato esaminare queste azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge, nella parte attinente, come segue:
Articolo 6
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
42. Il Governo ha sollevato obiezioni riguardo all'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali simile a quelle che la Corte ha già respinto in un numero di cause simili riguardo alla non-esecuzione di sentenze dei tribunali (vedere Sokur c. Ucraina ( dec.), n. 29439/02, 16 dicembre 2003, e Voytenko citata sopra, §§ 27-31). La Corte considera che queste obiezioni devono essere respinte per le stesse ragioni.
43. La Corte costata che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
44. Il Governo contese che gli Ufficiali giudiziari Statali avevano intentato ogni azione necessaria all’esecuzione della decisione di 8 giugno 1999 a favore del richiedente e che non c'era stata nessuna violazione dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
45. Il richiedente non era d'accordo.
46. La Corte nota che al 21 agosto 2007 la decisione della Corte di Zaporizhzhya dell’ 8 giugno 1999 a favore del richiedente non è stata eseguita in pieno. Così, il periodo di non-esecuzione è pari a otto anni e due mesi.
47. La Corte ha già trovato violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in cause come la presente (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Voytenko c. Ucraina, n. 18966/02, §§ 43 e 55, 29 giugno 2004 e Dubenko c. Ucraina, n. 74221/01, §§ 47 e 51, 11 gennaio 2005). La Corte trova nessuna ragione per abbandonare la sua giurisprudenza in questa causa.
48. Avendo esaminato tutto il materiale i suo possesso, la Corte considera che il Governo non ha presentato alcun fatto o argomento capace di persuaderla a giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella causa presente.
49. Quindi, di conseguenza, non vi è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. MANCANZA ADDOTTA DELL'INDIPENDENZA DEI TRIBUNALI MILITARI
50. Il richiedente si lamentò della mancanza d'indipendenza dei tribunali militari, affermando che al tempo attinente fossero amministrativamente dipendenti dal Ministero della Difesa. Fece appellò all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che nella parte attinente si legge come segue:
Articolo 6
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ad ognuno è concesso una giusta... udienza... da parte di tribunale indipendente ed imparziale stabilito con legge.”
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
51. Il Governo presentò che riguardo alla terza e quarta serie di procedimenti il richiedente non era riuscito a fare appello contro le decisioni del 31 agosto 2000 e del 5 marzo 2001, e così non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso nazionali. Contese inoltre che riguardo alla prima e alla terza serie di procedimenti il richiedente aveva introdotto questa azione di reclamo fuori dal tempo-limite dei sei mesi. Asserì infine che il richiedente non era riuscito a provare che lui era stato colpito dalla violazione addotta della Convenzione e perciò non poteva pretendere di essere una vittima a questo proposito.
52. Il richiedente non era d'accordo con quelle osservazioni, dibattendo di aver introdotto la sua lamentela alla Corte in tempo ed di aver esaurito tutte le vie di ricorso che lui ha considerato pertinenti. Insistette inoltre che il suo diritto ad un tribunale indipendente fosse stato violato e che fosse perciò una vittima all'interno del significato della Convenzione.
2. La valutazione della Corte
a. L'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali (terza e quarta serie di procedimenti)
53. La Corte richiama che il fine dell’ Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione è riconoscere agli Stati Contraenti l'opportunità di ostacolare o mettere fine alle violazioni addotte contro loro prima che quelle dichiarazioni vengano presentate alla Corte. Comunque, le sole vie di ricorso che devono essere esaurite sono quelle che efficaci. Incombe sullo Stato rivendicare il non-esaurimento convincendo la Corte che la via di ricorso era efficace, disponibile in teoria ed in pratica al tempo attinente (vedere Khokhlich c. Ucraina, n. 41707/98, § 149 sentenza del 29 aprile 2003). La via di ricorso nazionale dovrebbe essere capace di offrire compensazione riguardo a delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e dovrebbe offrire prospettive ragionevoli di successo (vedere Selmouni c. Francia [GC], n. 25803/94, § 76 il 1999-V di ECHR).
54. La Corte nota che non è contestato fra le parti che il richiedente non ha fatto appello contro le decisioni delle corti militari del 31 agosto 2000 e del 5 marzo 2001 di. Comunque, rivendicando che il richiedente non si era servito delle procedure di ricorso contestate, il Governo non ha mostrato come i tribunali militari superiori, considerando simili ricorsi, avessero potuto trattare efficacemente l'essenza dell'azione di reclamo del richiedente. È poco chiaro alla Corte come le corti militari superiori si sarebbero rivolte al problema di dipendenza giudiziale che nasceva , secondo il richiedente dalle disposizioni legislative e che colpiva perciò il sistema intero delle corti militari. È anche bene menzionare che il richiedente non avrebbe potuto giovare della possibilità di depositare le sue rivendicazioni tramite altri tribunali nazionali poiché quelle rivendicazioni rientravano solamente all'interno della giurisdizione delle corti militari (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra). Ne segue che l'obiezione del Governo riguardo al non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali dovrebbe essere respinta.
b. L'osservanza del periodo dei sei mesi (prima, seconda, e terza serie di procedimenti)
55. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione prevede che la Corte potrebbe trattare una questione solamente nel caso in cui sia stata introdotta entro sei mesi dalla data della decisione finale nel processo di esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali. Nel caso in cui non fosse disponibile al richiedente nessuna via di ricorso effettiva, il tempo limite scade sei mesi dopo che la data degli atti o delle misure di cui ci si lamenta, o dopo la data di conoscenza di quell’ atto o del suo effetto o danno sul richiedente (vedere Younger c. Regno Unito ( dec.), n. 57420/00, ECHR 2003-I). Non è aperto alla Corte accantonare l’applicazione della regola dei sei mesi in assenza dell'attinente obiezione dal Governo (vedere Belaousof ed Altri c. Grecia, n. 66296/01, sentenza del 27 maggio 2004 § 38).
56. Nella presente causa il richiedente si è lamentato di una mancanza d'indipendenza da parte del tribunale riguardo a quattro serie dei suoi procedimenti di fronte alle corti militari. La Corte osserva che la prima, la seconda e la terza serie di procedimenti sono terminate l’ 8 giugno 1999, il 3 novembre 2000, e il 31 agosto 2000, rispettivamente cioè più di sei mesi prima della data in cui la richiesta fu presentata alla Corte (10 maggio 2001). La Corte sostiene perciò che la prima, la seconda e la terza serie di procedimenti escono dal periodo dei sei mesi e respinge questa parte della richiesta facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 1 e 4 della Convenzione.
c. Status di vittima (quarta serie di procedimenti)
57. La Corte considera che l'obiezione del Governo riguardo allo status di vittima del richiedente riguardo alla quarta serie di procedimenti è collegata da vicino ai meriti dell'azione di reclamo. Di conseguenza, unisce l'obiezione preliminare del Governo ai meriti (vedere Bączkowski ed Altri c. Polonia, n. 1543/06, §§ 45-48 sentenza del 3 maggio 2007).
58. La Corte nota inoltre che questa parte della richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
59. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i giudici delle corti militari possedevano garanzie forti riguardanti la loro designazione e licenziamento, così come la durata del loro termine di ufficio. Ha affermato inoltre che le salvaguardie e le immunità previste per i giudici dal diritto nazionale avevano impedito efficacemente qualsiasi influenza esterna su di loro. Il Governo infine presentò che il Ministero della Difesa non aveva influenza sulle corti militari e che non c'era stata di conseguenza nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
60. Il richiedente non era d'accordo, dibattendo che le corti militari dipendevano dal Ministero della Difesa, riferendosi in particolare al modo in cui venivano finanziati ed allo status vulnerabile dei giudici militari che erano membri delle Forze Armate militari e perciò subordinati al Ministero della Difesa.
2. La valutazione della Corte
61. La Corte richiama all'inizio che il diritto ad un processo equo, di cui il diritto ad un'udienza di fronte ad un tribunale indipendente è una componente essenziale, occupi un posto prominente in una società democratica (vedere, mutatis mutandis, la sentenza De Cubber c. Belgio del 26 ottobre 1984, Serie A n. 86, p. 16, § 30 in fine). La Corte reitera che per stabilire se un tribunale può essere considerato “indipendente”, bisogna avere riguardo , inter alia, al metodo di designazione dei suoi membri e del loro termine di ufficio all'esistenza di garanzie contro pressioni esterne ed alla questione se il corpo presenta una apparenza d'indipendenza. A questo riguardo secondo ciò che è in pericolo è la fiducia che simile tribunali in una società democratica devono inspirare al pubblico e, soprattutto, alle parti ai procedimenti. Nel decidere se c'è una ragione legittima di temere che ad una particolare corte sono mancate l'indipendenza o l'imparzialità, il posto d'osservazione della parte ai procedimenti è importante senza essere decisivo. Ciò che è decisivo è se si possano ritenere i dubbi della parte come obiettivamente giustificati (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Incal c. Turchia, sentenza del 9 giugno 1998, Relazioni 1998-IV, pp. 1572-73, § 71; e Bottaio c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 48843/99, § 104 ECHR 2003-XII).
62. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa , la Corte concorda col Governo che c'erano garanzie d'indipendenza dei giudici delle corti militari, purché, inter alia, grazie al metodo della loro designazione, il termine del loro ufficio, la loro inviolabilità, e la proibizione di interferenza con l'amministrazione della giustizia (vedere paragrafi 30 e 37 sopra).
63. Comunque, la Corte nota che era previsto dal diritto nazionale che i giudici delle corti militari fossero membri delle Forze Armate militari, ed in quella veste loro costituivano una parte del personale subalterno delle Forze armate al Ministero della Difesa (vedere paragrafi 33, 35, e 39 sopra). La Corte osserva inoltre che spettava al Ministero della Difesa fornire ai giudici delle corti militari appartamenti appropriati o alloggi nel caso avessero avuto bisogno di migliorare le loro condizioni abitative (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra). Infine, la Corte nota che le entità del Ministero della Difesa eseguirono il finanziamento, la logistica e la manutenzione delle corti militari a livello pratico. Sebbene non fosse di competenza del Ministero della Difesa decidere sulla sfera del finanziamento e del mantenimento annuale delle corti militari, ha amministrato comunque il finanziamento e il mantenimento su una base quotidiana (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra). È notevole che questa procedura di finanziamento dei tribunali militari fu abrogata nel 2002 con la susseguente legge.
64. Secondo la Corte i precedenti aspetti dello status dei tribunali militari e dei loro giudici, presi cumulativamente hanno dato motivi obiettivi al richiedente per dubitare del fatto che le corti militari si fossero attenute al requisito d'indipendenza nel trattare la sua rivendicazione contro il Ministero della Difesa. La Corte sostiene perciò che il richiedente non aveva avuto un'opportunità di presentare la sua causa di fronte ad un tribunale indipendente, come richiesto dalla Convenzione, ed a questo riguardo possedeva chiaramente uno status di vittima. Respinge perciò l'obiezione preliminare del Governo riguardo allo status di vittima del richiedente e costata che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a causa della mancanza di un tribunale indipendente nella quarta serie di procedimenti del richiedente.
III. IL RESTO DELLA RICHIESTA
65. Il richiedente si lamentò sotto gli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione sul risultato e sulla lunghezza dei procedimenti nelle sue cause. Lui invocò anche gli Articoli 1 e 14 della Convenzione, lamentandosi che lo Stato non era riuscito ad assicurare i suoi diritti garantiti dalla Convenzione e di aver sofferto di una discriminazione, non offrendo ulteriori dettagli.
66. La Corte ha esaminato il resto delle azioni di reclamo del richiedente e ha considerato che, alla luce di tutto il materiale in suo possesso per ciò che concerne le questioni di cui ci si lamenta che rientravano all'interno della sua competenza, non ha rilevato alcuna apparenza di una violazione dei diritti e delle libertà espose nella Convenzione o nei suoi Protocolli. La Corte li respinge di conseguenza, come manifestamente mal-fondate, facendo seguito all’ Articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
67. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosce una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
68. Il richiedente ha chiesto 60,000 euro (EUR) riguardo al danno morale. Il richiedente ha chiesto anche un danno materiale senza alcuna ulteriore specifica.
69. Il Governo ha presentato che le rivendicazioni del richiedente per danno morale erano esorbitanti e non comprovate. Secondo il Governo, la costatazione di una violazione, se ci fosse, costituirebbe la soddisfazione equa sufficiente.
70. Riguardo alle rivendicazioni del richiedente per danno morale, la Corte, decidendo su base equa assegna al richiedente EUR 2,000.
B. Costi e spese
71. Il richiedente non ha presentato alcuna richiesta sotto questo capo; la Corte non concede perciò assegnazione per costi e spese.
C. Interesse di mora
72. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse di mora dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara le azioni di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo alla non-esecuzione della decisione del tribunale dell’8 giugno 1999 e l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione sulla mancanza d'indipendenza delle corti militari nella quarta serie di procedimenti del richiedente ammissibile ed il resto della richiesta inammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa della non-esecuzione della decisione della corte dell’ 8 giugno 1999;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione a causa della mancanza d'indipendenza delle corti militari nella quarta serie di procedimenti del richiedente;
4. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato rispondente deve pagare al richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione EUR 2,000 (due mila euro), più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile, riguardo al danno morale da convertire nella valuta dell'Ucraina al tasso applicabile alla data dell’ accordo;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo un interesse semplice sarà pagabile sull'importo sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
5. Respinge il resto della rivendicazione del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 27 novembre 2008, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stefano Phillips Rait Maruste
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.