Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF CARSON AND OTHERS v. THE UNITED KINGDOM

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14, 29, P1-1

NUMERO: 42184/05/2008
STATO: Inghilterra
DATA: 04/11/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Remainder inadmissible ; No-violation of Art. 14+P1-1
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF CARSON AND OTHERS v. THE UNITED KINGDOM
(Application no. 42184/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
4 November 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Carson and Others v. the United Kingdom,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Lech Garlicki, President,
Nicolas Bratza,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijović,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ledi Bianku,
Mihai Poalelungi, judges,
and Fatoş Aracı, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 May 2007 and 7 October 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the last date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 42184/05) against the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) on 24 November 2005 by thirteen British nationals: Ms A. C., Mr B. J., Mrs V. S., Mrs E. K., Mr K. D., Mr R. B., Mr T. D., Mr J. G., Mr G. D., Ms P. H., Mr B. S., Mr L. M. and Mrs R. G..
2. The applicants were represented by Mr T. O. Q.C. and Mr B.., lawyers practising in London, and M. P. T. and H. G., lawyers practising in Toronto. The United Kingdom Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr D. Walton, Foreign and Commonwealth Office.
3. The applicants alleged that the refusal of the United Kingdom authorities to up-rate their pensions in line with inflation was discriminatory, in breach of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone.
4. On 17 February 2006 the Court decided to communicate the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
5. On 18 September 2007 the Court decided to adjourn its examination of the case pending the delivery by the Grand Chamber of its judgment in Burden v. the United Kingdom, no. 13378/05.
6. On 24 January 2008, the non-governmental organisation Age Concern England was granted leave to intervene as a third party (Article 36 § 2 of the Convention).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. The applicants
1. A. C.
7. Ms C. was born in 1931. She spent most of her working life in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before emigrating to South Africa in 1989, where she has been resident since 1990. From 1989 to 1999 she paid further National Insurance Contributions on a voluntary basis to maintain her entitlement to a full State retirement pension.
8. In 2000 she became eligible for a State pension and an additional pension under the State Earnings Related Pension Scheme (“SERPS”). She receives a total of GBP 103.62 per week, comprising GBP 67.50 basic State pension, GBP 32.17 SERPS and GBP 3.95 graduated pension. Her pension has remained fixed at this rate since 2000. Had her basic pension benefited from up-rating in line with inflation, it would now be worth GBP 82.05 per week.
9. There is no State social security system in South Africa. Ms C. therefore contends that she is dependent on her British pension to support her in retirement, having no other resources other than some earnings as a writer.
10. Ms Carson brought domestic proceedings challenging the refusal to up-rate her pension: see paragraphs 24-36 below.
2. B. J.
11. Mr J. was born in 1922. He spent 50 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full. He emigrated to Canada on his retirement in 1986 and became eligible for a State pension in 1987. His basic State pension was then GBP 39.50 a week, and it has remained fixed at that level since 1987. Had his State pension benefited from up-rating since 1987 it would now be worth GBP 82.05 a week.
3. V. S.
12. Mrs S. was born in 1931. She spent 15 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before emigrating to Canada in 1964. She became eligible for a State pension in 1991. Her basic State pension was then GBP 15.48 per week, and it has remained fixed at that level since 1991. Had her State pension benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 22.50 per week.
4. E. K.
13. Mrs K. was born in 1913. She spent 45 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before retiring in 1976. She became eligible for a State pension in 1973, and emigrated to Canada in 1986, at which point her State pension had increased to GBP 38.70 per week. It has remained fixed at that level. Had it benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 a week.
5. K. D.
14. Mr D. was born in 1923. He spent 51 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before retiring in 1991. He became eligible for a State pension in 1988, and emigrated to Canada in 1994, when his weekly State pension was GBP 57.60. It has remained fixed at that level since 1994. Had it benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 per week.
6. R. B.
15. Mr B. was born in 1924. He spent 47 years working in the United Kingdom, paying all applicable National Insurance Contributions in full, before emigrating to Canada in 1985. He became eligible for a State pension in 1989. His basic State pension was then GBP 41.15 per week, and it has remained fixed at that level since 1989. Had his State pension benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 per week.
7. T. D.
16. Mr D. was born in 1937. He spent 42 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before retiring in 1995 and emigrating to Canada in 1998. He became eligible for a State pension in 2002. His basic State pension was then GBP 75.50 per week, and it has remained fixed at that level since then. Had it benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 per week.
8. J. G.
17. Mr G. was born in 1933. He spent 44 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before retiring and emigrating to Canada in 1994. He became eligible for a State pension in 1998. His basic State pension was then GBP 64.70 per week, and it has remained fixed at that level since then. Had his State pension benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 per week.
9. G. D.
18. Mr D. was born in 1921. He spent 44 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before emigrating to Canada in 1981. He became eligible for a State pension in 1986. His basic State pension was then GBP 38.30 per week, and it has remained fixed at that level. Had it benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 per week.
10. P. H.
19. Mrs H. was born in Australia in 1940; it appears that she remains an Australian national. She lived and worked in the United Kingdom between 1963 and 1982, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before returning to Australia in 1982. She made further National Insurance Contributions for the tax years 1992-1999, and became eligible for a British State pension in 2000. Her basic State pension was then GBP 38.05 per week.
20. Between August 2002 and December 2004 she spent over half her time in London. During this period, her pension was increased to GBP 58.78, which included an up-rating of the basic State pension. When she returned to Australia, her pension returned to the previous level, including a basic State pension of GBP 38.05. Her pension has remained at this level subsequently. Had her State pension benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 43.08 per week.
11. B. S.
21. Mr S. was born in 1933. His contributions record in the United Kingdom qualified him for a full basic State pension in 1998. He emigrated to Australia in 2000, at which point his State pension had increased to GBP 67.40. Save for a period of seven weeks when he returned to the United Kingdom (during which time his pension was increased to take into account annual up-ratings), his State pension has remained fixed at that level since 2000. Had his State pension benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 per week.
12. L. M.
22. Mr M. was born in 1924. He spent 51 years working in the United Kingdom, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, and became eligible for a State pension in 1989. In 1993 he emigrated to Australia. His basic State pension was then worth GBP 56.10 a week, and it has remained fixed at that level. Had it benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 82.05 per week.
13. R. G.
23. Mrs G. was born in 1934. She spent 10 years working in the United Kingdom between 1954 and 1965, paying National Insurance Contributions in full, before emigrating to Australia in 1965. She became eligible for a State pension in 1994. Her basic State pension was then GBP 14.40 per week, and it has remained fixed at that level. Had it benefited from up-rating, it would now be worth approximately GBP 20.51 per week. Mrs G. contends that she is ineligible for any old age security benefits from the Australian Government, and is thus dependent on her British State pension as a source of income.
2. The domestic proceedings brought by Ms C.
24. In 2002, Ms C. brought proceedings by way of judicial review to challenge the failure to index-link her pension. At first instance she was supported by the Australian Government as an intervening party, but the Australian Government withdrew from the proceedings before the Court of Appeal and House of Lords.
1. The High Court
25. Before the High Court, Ms C. based her argument on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention. Stanley Burnton J, in a judgment handed down on 22 May 2002 (R (Carson) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2002] EWHC 978 (Admin)), dismissed her application for judicial review.
26. Applying the principles he drew from the case-law of the Court, the judge found that the pecuniary right that fell to be protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had to be defined by the domestic legislation that created it. He found that, by the operation of the domestic legislation, Ms C. had never been entitled to an up-rated pension, so that there could be no breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken in isolation.
27. The matter nonetheless fell within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, such that the judge had to consider whether Ms C. had suffered discrimination contrary to the provisions of Article 14. He held that residence, applied as a criterion for the differential treatment of citizens, was a ground within the scope of Article 14; like domicile and nationality, it was an aspect of personal status. This was not contested by the Secretary of State. Stanley Burnton J went on, however, to dismiss the claim following the reasoning of the European Commission of Human Rights in JW and EW v United Kingdom (no. 9776/82, decision of 3 October 1983, Decisions and Reports (DR) 34, p. 153) and Corner v United Kingdom (no. 11271/84, decision of 17 May 1985, unpublished), holding that the applicant was not in a comparable position to pensioners in countries attracting up-rating. The differing economic conditions in each country, including local social security provision and taxation, made it impossible simply to compare the amount in sterling received by pensioners.
28. Stanley Burnton J found that, in the alternative, even if the applicant could claim to be in an analogous position to a pensioner in the United Kingdom or a country where up-rating was paid subject to a bi-lateral agreement, the difference in treatment could be justified. He considered that the Government had a considerable margin of appreciation, that there was a lack of consistency in State practice, and that the limitation had been publicized for some time. He declined to accept that the payment of an up-rated pension in one country (or several) meant that there was an obligation under Article 14 to pay up-rated pensions to all pensioners living abroad. He found that the illogicality in the scope of bilateral agreements reflected their political nature, the relative complexity of the issue, and historical factors. He therefore concluded that the “remedy of the expatriate United Kingdom pensioners who do not receive up-rated pensions is political, not judicial. The decision to pay them up-rated pensions must be made by Parliament.”
2. The Court of Appeal
29. Ms C. appealed to the Court of Appeal, which dismissed her appeal on 17 June 2003 (R (Carson and Reynolds) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2003] EWCA Civ 797). For similar reasons to the High Court, the Court of Appeal (Lords Justice Simon Brown, Laws and Rix) found that, since Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 conferred no right to acquire property, the failure to up-rate Ms C.'s pension gave rise to no violation of that provision.
30. As to the complaint under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court of Appeal noted that the Secretary of State accepted that place of residence constituted a “status” for the purposes of the Article. However, it found that the applicant was in a materially different position to those she contended were her comparators. In this connection it was significant that the legislative scheme was entirely geared toward the impact of price inflation in the United Kingdom, such that it would be “inescapable that [an annual up-rate] being awarded across the board to all ... pensioners [in Ms C.'s position] would have random effects.”
31. The Court of Appeal also considered, in the alternative, the question of justification and found that the “true” justification of the refusal to pay the up-rate was that Ms C. and those in her position “had chosen to live in societies, more pointedly economies, outside the United Kingdom where the specific rationale for the uplift may by no means necessarily apply.” The Court of Appeal thus considered the decision to be objectively justified without reference to what they accepted would be the “daunting cost” of extending the up-rate to those in Ms C.'s position. Moreover, the cost implications were “in the context of this case a legitimate factor going in justification for the Secretary of State's position,” because to accept Ms C.'s arguments would be to lead to a judicial interference in the political decision as to the deployment of public funds which was not mandated by the Human Rights Act 1998, the jurisprudence of this Court or by a “legal imperative” which was sufficiently pressing to justify confining and circumscribing the elected Government's macro-economic policies.
3. The House of Lords
32. Ms C. appealed to the House of Lords, relying on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 read together with Article 14. Her appeal was dismissed on 26 May 2005 by a majority of four to one (R (Carson and Reynolds) v. Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2005] UKHL 37).
33. The majority (Lords Nicholls of Birkenhead, Hoffmann, Rodger of Earlsferry and Walker of Gestinghope) accepted that a retirement pension fell within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and that Article 14 was thus applicable. They further assumed that a place of residence was a personal characteristic and amounted to “any other status” within the meaning of Article 14, and was thus a prohibited ground of discrimination. However, because a person could choose where to live, less weighty grounds were required to justify a difference of treatment based on residence than one based on an inherent personal characteristic, such as race or sex.
34. The majority observed that in certain cases it was artificial to treat separately the questions, first, whether an individual complaining of discrimination was in an analogous position to a person treated more favourably and, secondly, whether the difference in treatment was reasonably and objectively justified. In the present case, the applicant was not in an analogous, or comparable position, to a pensioner resident in the United Kingdom or resident in a country with a bilateral agreement with the United Kingdom. The State pension was one element in an interconnected system of taxation and social security benefits, designed to provide a basic standard of living for the inhabitants of the United Kingdom. It was funded partly from the National Insurance Contributions of those currently in employment and their employers, and partly out of general taxation. The pension was not means tested, but pensioners with a high income from other sources paid some of it back to the State in income tax. Those with low incomes might receive other benefits, such as income support. The provision for index-linking was intended to preserve the value of the pension in the light of economic conditions, such as the cost of living and the rate of inflation, within the United Kingdom. Quite different economic conditions applied in other countries: for example, in South Africa, where Ms C. lived, although there was virtually no social security, the cost of living was much lower, and the value of the rand had dropped in recent years compared to sterling.
35. Lord Hoffmann, who gave one of the majority opinions, put the arguments as follows:
“18. The denial of a social security benefit to Ms C. on the ground that she lives abroad cannot possibly be equated with discrimination on grounds of race or sex. It is not a denial of respect for her as an individual. She was under no obligation to move to South Africa. She did so voluntarily and no doubt for good reasons. But in doing so, she put herself outside the primary scope and purpose of the UK social security system. Social security benefits are part of an intricate and interlocking system of social welfare which exists to ensure certain minimum standards of living for the people of this country. They are an expression of what has been called social solidarity or fraternité; the duty of any community to help those of its members who are in need. But that duty is generally recognised to be national in character. It does not extend to the inhabitants of foreign countries. That is recognised in treaties such as the ILO Social Security (Minimum Standards) Convention 1952 (article 69) and the European Code of Social Security 1961.
19. Mr B. QC, who appeared for Ms C., accepted the force of this argument. He agreed in reply that she could have no complaint if the United Kingdom had rigorously applied the principle that UK social security is for UK residents and paid no pensions whatever to people who had gone to live abroad. And he makes no complaint about the fact that she is not entitled to other social security benefits like jobseeker's allowance and income support. But he said that it was irrational to recognise that she had an entitlement to a pension by virtue of her contributions to the National Insurance Fund and then not to pay her the same pension as UK residents who had made the same contributions.
20. The one feature upon which Ms C. seizes as the basis of her claim to equal treatment (but only in respect of a pension) is that she has paid the same national insurance contributions. That is really the long and the short of her case. In my opinion, however, concentration on this single feature is an over-simplification of the comparison. The situation of the beneficiaries of UK social security is, to quote the European Court in Van der Mussele v Belgium (1983) 6 EHRR 163, 180, para. 46, 'characterised by a corpus of rights and obligations of which it would be artificial to isolate one specific aspect'.
21. In effect Ms C.'s argument is that because contributions are a necessary condition for the retirement pension paid to UK residents, they ought to be a sufficient condition. No other matters, like whether one lives in the United Kingdom and participates in the rest of its arrangements for taxation and social security, ought to be taken into account. But that in my opinion is an obvious fallacy. National insurance contributions have no exclusive link to retirement pensions, comparable with contributions to a private pension scheme. In fact the link is a rather tenuous one. National insurance contributions form a source of part of the revenue which pays for all social security benefits and the National Health Service (the rest comes from ordinary taxation). If payment of contributions is a sufficient condition for being entitled to a contributory benefit, Ms C. should be entitled to all contributory benefits, like maternity benefit and job-seekers allowance. But she does not suggest that she is.
22. The interlocking nature of the system makes it impossible to extract one element for special treatment. The main reason for the provision of state pensions is the recognition that the majority of people of pensionable age will need the money. They are not means-tested, but that is only because means-testing is expensive and discourages take-up of the benefit even by people who need it. So state pensions are paid to everyone whether they have adequate income from other sources or not. On the other hand, they are subject to tax. So the state will recover part of the pension from people who have enough income to pay tax and thereby reduce the net cost of the pension. On the other hand, those people who are entirely destitute would be entitled to income support, a non-contributory benefit. So the net cost of paying a retirement pension to such people takes into account the fact that the pension will be set off against their claim to income support.
23. None of these interlocking features can be applied to a non-resident such as Ms C.. She pays no United Kingdom income tax, so the state would not be able to recover anything even if she had substantial additional income. (Of course I do not suggest that this is the case; I have no idea what other income she has, but there will be expatriate pensioners who do have other income). Likewise, if she were destitute, there would be no saving in income support. On the contrary, the pension would go to reduce the social security benefits (if any) to which she is entitled in her new country.
State and private pensions
24. It is, I suppose, the words 'insurance' and 'contributions' which suggest an analogy with a private pension scheme. But, from the point of view of the citizens who contribute, national insurance contributions are little different from general taxation which disappears into the communal pot of the consolidated fund. The difference is only a matter of public accounting. And although retirement pensions are presently linked to contributions, there is no particular reason why they should be. In fact (mainly because the present system severely disadvantages women who have spent time in the unremunerated work of caring for a family rather than earning a salary) there are proposals for change. Contributory pensions may be replaced with a non-contributory 'citizen's pension' payable to all inhabitants of this country of pensionable age. But there is no reason why this should mean any change in the collection of national insurance contributions to fund the citizen's pension like all the other non-contributory benefits. On Ms C.'s argument, however, a change to a non-contributory pension would make all the difference. Once the retirement pension was non-contributory, the foundation of her argument that she had 'earned' the right to equal treatment would disappear. But she would have paid exactly the same national insurance contributions while she was working here and her contributions would have had as much (or as little) causal relationship to her pension entitlement as they have today.
Parliamentary choice
25. For these reasons it seems to me that the position of a non-resident is materially and relevantly different from that of a UK resident. I do not think, with all respect to my noble and learned friend, Lord Carswell, that the reasons are subtle and arcane. They are practical and fair. Furthermore, I think that this is very much a case in which Parliament is entitled to decide whether the differences justify a difference in treatment. It cannot be the law that the United Kingdom is prohibited from treating expatriate pensioners generously unless it treats them in precisely the same way as pensioners at home. Once it is accepted that the position of Ms C. is relevantly different from that of a UK resident and that she therefore cannot claim equality of treatment, the amount (if any) which she receives must be a matter for Parliament. It must be possible to recognise that her past contributions gave her a claim in equity to some pension without having to abandon the reasons why she cannot claim to be treated equally. And in deciding what expatriate pensioners should be paid, Parliament must be entitled to take into account competing claims on public funds. To say that the reason why expatriate pensioners are not paid the annual increases is to save money is true but only in a trivial sense: every decision not to spend more on something is to save money to reduce taxes or spend it on something else.
26. I think it is unfortunate that the argument for the Secretary of State placed such emphasis upon such matters as the variations in rates of inflation in various countries which made it inappropriate to apply the same increase to pensioners resident abroad. It is unnecessary for the Secretary of State to try to justify the sums paid with such nice calculations. It distracts attention from the main argument. Once it is conceded, as Mr B. accepts, that people resident outside the UK are relevantly different and could be denied any pension at all, Parliament does not have to justify to the courts the reasons why they are paid one sum rather than another. Generosity does not have to have a logical explanation. It is enough for the Secretary of State to say that, all things considered, Parliament considered the present system of payments to be a fair allocation of available resources.
27. The comparison with residents in treaty countries seems to me to fail for similar reasons. Mr B. was able to point to government statements to the effect that there was no logical scheme in the arrangements with treaty countries. They represented whatever the UK had from time to time been able to negotiate without placing itself at an undue economic disadvantage. But that seems to me an entirely rational basis for differences in treatment. The situation of a UK expatriate pensioner who lives in a country which has been willing to enter into suitable reciprocal social security arrangements is relevantly different from that of a pensioner who lives in a country which has not. The treaty enables the government to improve the social security benefits of UK nationals in the foreign country on terms which it considers to be favourable, or at least not unduly burdensome. It would be very strange if the government was prohibited from entering into such reciprocal arrangements with any country (for example, as it has with the EEA countries) unless it paid the same benefits to all expatriates in every part of the world.”
36. Lord Carswell, dissenting, found that Ms C. could properly be compared to other contributing pensioners living in the United Kingdom or other countries where their pensions were up-rated. He continued:
“How persons spend their income and where they do so are matters for their own choice. Some may choose to live in a country where the cost of living is low or the exchange rate favourable, a course not uncommon in previous generations, which may or may not carry with it disadvantages, but that is a matter for their personal choice. The common factor for purposes of comparison is that all of the pensioners, in whichever country they may reside, have duly paid the contributions required to qualify for their pensions. If some of them are not paid pensions at the same rate as others, that in my opinion constitutes discrimination for the purposes of Article 14 ...”
Lord Carswell therefore considered that the appeal turned on the question of justification. He accepted that the courts should be slow to intervene in questions of macro-economic policy. He further accepted that, had the Government put forward sufficient reasons of economic or State policy to justify the difference in treatment, he should have been properly ready to yield to its decision-making power in those fields. However, in the present case the difference in treatment was not justified: as the Department of Social Security itself accepted, the reason all pensions were not up-rated was simply to save money, and it was not fair to target the applicant and others in her position.
II. RELEVANT NON-CONVENTION MATERIAL
A. The State retirement pension
37. In the United Kingdom, the State pension is a contributory benefit payable from pensionable age to an individual who, for a requisite number of years during his or her “working life”, has paid or been credited with contributions to the National Insurance Fund (see the Social Security Contributions and Benefits Act 1992: “the 1992 Act”). National Insurance Contributions, payable by earners, employers and others under the 1992 Act, together with taxation, provide funds for the payment of a number of benefits, including the state retirement pension, job-seekers' allowance, incapacity benefit, maternity allowance and survivors' benefits. Contributions also part-fund the National Health Service.
B. Provision for index-linking within the United Kingdom
38. The level of the basic State pension for a given year is set down in section 44(4) of the 1992 Act. In each tax year the Secretary of State is obliged by virtue of section 150 of the Social Security Administration Act 1992 to review the sums specified in section 44(4) of the 1992 Act “in order to determine whether they have retained their value in relation to the general level of prices obtaining in Great Britain” and to lay an up-rating order before Parliament where it appears to him that the general level of prices is greater at the end of the review than it was at the beginning of the period. The draft order must increase the sum specified in section 44(4) by a percentage which is no less than that increase. Provided that Parliament approves the draft order, then by virtue of section 150(9) of the 1992 Act, the basic State pension is up-rated annually in line with United Kingdom inflation.
C. Payment of the State pension to expatriates
39. Section 113(1) of the 1992 Act creates a general rule withholding benefits, including pensions, from all expatriates:
“Except where regulations otherwise provide, a person shall be disqualified for receiving [benefits including the State pension] for any period during which the person –
is absent from Great Britain; ...”
40. However, section 113(3) of the 1992 Act provides that the Secretary of State may adopt secondary legislation allowing for a person resident overseas to receive any benefit to which he or she would be entitled if living in the United Kingdom. Regulation 4(1) of the Social Security Benefit (Persons Abroad) Regulations 1975 (SI 1975 No. 563: “the 1975 Regulations”), made under a similar provision in earlier legislation, provides, so far as material:
“Subject to the provisions of this regulation and of regulation 5 below, a person shall not be disqualified for receiving ... a retirement pension of any category ... by reason of being absent from Great Britain.”
D. Non-payment of pension up-ratings to expatriates
41. Regulation 5 of the 1975 Regulations, however, provides that a person not ordinarily resident in Great Britain shall, unless or until he or she becomes resident there again, be disqualified from receiving up-rated benefits.
42. The Regulations applicable at the time that Ms C. started her claim before the United Kingdom courts were the Social Security Benefits Up-rating Regulations 2001, SI 2001/910 (“the 2001 Regulations”). Regulation 3 of the 2001 Regulations provided for the application of the disqualification to the additional benefit payable by virtue of the Social Security Benefits Up-rating (No 2) Order 2000, SI 2001 No. 207 including the up-rating of the retirement pension introduced by article 4 of the 2001 order with effect from 9 April 2001:
“Regulation 5 of the Social Security Benefit (Persons Abroad) Regulations 1975 (application of disqualification in respect of up-rating of benefit) shall apply to any additional benefit payable by virtue of the Up-rating Order.”
The Regulations were publicised in a series of leaflets produced by the Department of Social Security and routinely sent to United Kingdom residents who, for example, applied to pay voluntary National Insurance Contributions from abroad.
E. Reciprocal agreements
43. By section 179(1) of the Social Security Administration Act 1992, the Queen is empowered by Order in Council to make provision for modifying or adapting the relevant legislation in its application to cases affected by an agreement with a country outside the United Kingdom which provides for reciprocity in matters relating to payments for purposes similar or comparable to the purposes of the 1992 Act. The purpose of a reciprocal agreement is to provide a reciprocal basis for wider social security cover to workers and their families moving between States Party than is available under national legislation alone. Reciprocal agreements are not entered into solely to allow for payment of annual up-rating increases to recipients of United Kingdom pensions resident abroad. Cover under reciprocal agreements varies. Each results from negotiations between the United Kingdom and the partner State, taking into account the scope for reciprocity between the two social security schemes.
44. Between 1948 and 1992 the United Kingdom entered into bilateral agreements, or reciprocal social security agreements, with a number of foreign States, principally the United States of America, Japan, Mauritius, Turkey, Bermuda, Jamaica and Israel. With one minor exception, the agreements entered into force after 1979 fulfilled earlier commitments given by the United Kingdom Government. Agreements with Australia, New Zealand and Canada, where the majority of British expatriate pensioners live, came into force in 1953, 1956 and 1959 respectively; however they did not require payment of up-rated pensions. The agreement with Australia was terminated by Australia with effect from 1 March 2001, because of the refusal of the United Kingdom Government to pay up-rated pensions to its pensioners living in Australia. Up-rating has never been applied to those living in South Africa, Australia, Canada and New Zealand.
45. The EC Regulations on social security for migrant workers (Regulation (EEC) No 1408/71, as updated) require up-rating of benefits throughout the European Union.
46. The existence of a bilateral agreement is not necessary for the up-rate to be paid, as the question is regulated purely by domestic legislation. However, it is the case that up-rating is not applied for non-resident pensioners save where a bilateral agreement is in place.
47. In the Third Report (January 1997) of the House of Commons Social Security Committee (Up-rating of State Retirement Pensions Payable to People Resident Abroad; HC Paper 143), the Committee reported that:
“It is impossible to discern any pattern behind the selection of countries with whom bilateral agreements have been made providing for up-rating.”
On 13 November 2000 the Minister of State (Mr Jeff Rooker) in a statement in the House of Commons (356 HC Official Report (6th Series) col 628) concluded as follows:
“I have already said I am not prepared to defend the logic of the present situation. It is illogical. There is no consistent pattern. It does not matter whether a country is in the Commonwealth or outside it. We have arrangements with some Commonwealth countries and not with others. Indeed, there are differences among Caribbean countries. This is an historical issue and the situation has existed for years. It would cost some £300 million to change the policy for all concerned.”
F. International law provisions
48. The International Labour Organisation's Social Security (Minimum Standards) Convention, 1952, provides in Article 69:
Article 69
“A benefit to which a person protected would otherwise be entitled in compliance with any of Parts II to X of this Convention may be suspended to such extent as may be prescribed –
(a) as long as the person concerned is absent from the territory of the Member; ...”
49. The above provision is echoed in Article 68 of the European Code of Social Security, 1964, which is one of the basic standard-setting instruments of the Council of Europe in the field of social security:
“A benefit to which a person protected would otherwise be entitled in compliance with any of Parts II to X of this Code may be suspended to such extent as may be prescribed:
as long as the person concerned is absent from the territory of the Contracting Party concerned; ...”
G. Up-rating: international practice
50. Many States impose some restriction on payment of benefits outside their territory. It appears, however, that the United Kingdom is unique in continuing to pay a pension to expatriates while restricting the extent to which expatriates living in certain countries can benefit from index-linking.
51. The applicants have also annexed to their application witness statements from civil servants working for the Australian and Canadian Governments. The former was produced in the context of the domestic proceedings brought by Ms C.; the latter has been produced in the context of the current application to this Court. The Australian statement is to the effect that: (1) the approach of the United Kingdom Government has a detrimental effect on most of the 220,000 United Kingdom pensioners resident in Australia; (2) the formal view of the Australian Government is that the approach of the United Kingdom does amount to unlawful discrimination; (3) in 2001 Australia terminated its Social Security Agreement with the United Kingdom because of the United Kingdom Government's refusal to provide up-rating of pensions to its nationals residing in Australia; and (4) Australian pensioners resident in the United Kingdom enjoy the same annual indexation of their pensions as those resident in Australia.
52. The Canadian statement is to the effect that: (1) the United Kingdom Government's approach directly affects virtually all the approximately 151,000 British pensioners resident in Canada; (2) indexation is a universal feature of social security systems and the United Kingdom's policy of arbitrarily restricting its application in respect of certain individuals is clearly discriminatory and contrary to acceptable international practice in the realm of public pensions; and (3) the United Kingdom's failure to index pensions into Canada is the reason why no arrangements on benefits or removal of barriers of exportability are contained in the Canada/United Kingdom Social Security Convention.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1, TAKEN ALONE AND IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION
53. The applicants complained that the failure to up-rate their pensions in line with inflation breached Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, taken alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, and Articles 8 and 14 taken together.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 states:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
Article 14 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
A. The parties' submissions
1. The Government
54. The Government accepted that the applicants' complaint fell within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
55. Although the House of Lords had been prepared to assume that Ms C.'s foreign residence was a ground protected under Article 14 as falling within the phrase “or other status”, the Government disagreed. They pointed out that the Court had consistently held that “status” within Article 14 meant “a personal characteristic ... by which persons or groups of persons are distinguishable from each other” (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen and Pedersen v. Denmark, judgment of 7 December 1976, Series A no. 23). That interpretation had more recently been followed by the Court in Budak v. Turkey ((dec.), no. 57345/00, 7 September 2004 ) and Beale v. the United Kingdom ((dec.) no. 16743/03, 12 October 2004). Choice of residence was not such a personal characteristic. They submitted that the decision to live outside the United Kingdom was a matter of choice rather than birth, and was not a choice dictated by the individual's conscience or deeply held belief system. It was difficult to see what core Convention value required the protection of choice of personal residence. Moreover, choice of residence in most cases inevitably led to a series of differences in the position of the person concerned, which flowed from differences in national systems, including social security systems. The differences between the positions of Ms C. and her two chosen comparators did not stem from any personal characteristic by which persons or groups were distinguishable from each other, but instead from the different systems and conditions under which individuals had chosen to live. Alternatively, even if choice of residence could be regarded as a personal characteristic within the concept of “other status”, the fact that it was a matter of choice meant that, unlike for example sex or race, it did not require special scrutiny and “very weighty reasons” to justify a difference of treatment.
56. Ms C. and other pensioners living outside the United Kingdom were not in an analogous situation to those resident in the United Kingdom or, if they were, the difference in treatment was reasonably and objectively justified, as the national courts had found. Social security benefits, including the State pension, were part of an intricate and interlocking system of social welfare and taxation which existed to ensure certain minimum standards of living for those in the United Kingdom. Contributions to the National Insurance Fund could not be equated to contributions to a private pension scheme, because the money was used, together with money provided from general taxation, to finance a range of different benefits and allowances. Social security and taxation systems in other States were similarly complex and tailored to local conditions, including the cost of living. Differences between countries as regards the rates of inflation, interest and currency exchange further made it difficult to compare the position of residents and non-residents and justified differences in treatment as regards pension up-rating. For example, because of the depreciation of the rand, Ms C.'s pension, paid in sterling, was worth 20% more in April 2002 than April 2001.
57. Lord Hoffmann was correct in observing that the duty of any community to help those of its members who are in need was “generally recognised to be national in character ... it does not extend to inhabitants of foreign countries”. That recognition was reflected in national legislation, which provided as a general rule that benefits funded by National Insurance were payable only to those in Great Britain. Moreover, the duty of review imposed on the Secretary of State by section 150 of the 1992 Act (see paragraph 38 above) was “in order to determine whether [the benefits] have retained their value in relation to the general level of prices obtaining in Great Britain”. The national character of welfare schemes was also recognised by international law, in treaties such as the ILO Social Security (Minimum Standards) Convention 1952 (Article 69) and the European Code of Social Security 1964 (see paragraphs 48-49 above). The pattern of bi-lateral agreements was the result of history and perceptions in each country as to perceived costs and benefits of such an arrangement. It was Ms C.'s case before the House of Lords that she could have had no complaint under Article 14 if the Government had chosen not to make any pension provision whatsoever for those who chose to live abroad. The Government agreed with Lord Hoffmann that it could not be the law that the United Kingdom was prohibited from treating expatriate pensioners generously unless it treated them in exactly the same way as pensioners at home.
58. Governments regularly had to make difficult decisions about the allocation of resources and the taxation needed to fund such spending; social security policy was inevitably about making distinctions between different groups in order to direct limited resources to achieve whatever result was considered most desirable at a given time. Such decisions were pre-eminently for elected governments in touch with local conditions.
2. The applicants
59. The applicants contended that entitlement to a basic State retirement pension was a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Section 113(1)(a) of the 1992 Act (see paragraph 39 above) operated as an interference with or deprivation of that possession, since there was a general entitlement to up-rating of the pension, from which a person resident abroad in a country without a reciprocal up-rating agreement with the United Kingdom (a “frozen” country) was disqualified. Over time, each applicant's continued residence in a “frozen” country, combined with the effect of inflation, had led to the erosion in value of his or her pension to the point where its essence as a possession was, or would soon be, destroyed. In this way, the purpose for which the applicants paid their pension contributions throughout their working lives, and which the basic pension was intended to achieve, was defeated. The interference lacked justification and amounted to a violation of the applicants' rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
60. In addition, since the complaint fell within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, Article 14 applied. The submitted that the narrow interpretation of the term “status” in the Kjeldsen case (cited above) had been superseded by subsequent decisions of the Court and that the circumstances of the inadmissibility decisions relied on by the Government were markedly different from those in the present case. They submitted that they were in any event the victims of a difference of treatment based on personal characteristics. The decision where to live on retirement was central to personal autonomy, and was frequently not a matter of free choice but conditioned by such factors as a desire or need to be close to adult children. In cases such as the present where discrimination on grounds of residence was capable of impacting heavily upon the enjoyment of core human rights such as the right to family life, freedom of movement and basic human dignity, and where there were differential impacts on women (because of their longevity) and the very elderly, the Court was justified in closely scrutinizing the Government's actions.
61. The applicants urged the Court to be careful not to undermine the requirement on a Government to provide justification for differential treatment by finding too readily that there was no true comparison between groups. Their rights to a basic State pension were secured differently and less favourably in comparison with at least two other relevant classes of individuals, namely pensioners with identical work and contributions histories resident either in the United Kingdom or in another country where pension up-rating was paid. The domestic courts had been wrong to conclude that the situations of one of the applicants and an individual within each of these two classes were not analogous. In particular, each would have spent precisely the same amount of time working in the United Kingdom; each would have made precisely the same contributions during his or her working life towards receipt of a basic State pension; each would have become entitled to the same amount of State pension at retirement age; each would have an identical interest in maintaining his or her standard of living beyond retirement.
62. The Government bore the burden of showing an objective and reasonable justification for differential treatment. However, in their public statements, the Government had accepted that the list of countries whose residents benefited from up-rating of the basic pension was a matter of historical accident, lacking logic or consistent pattern. Neighboring countries, such as the United States of America and Canada, or Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, were treated differently despite their similar economic conditions and even those countries, such as Canada and Australia, that made up-rating available unilaterally were not offered any relevant reciprocal bilateral agreement. Non-payment of up-rated pensions to British pensioners resident in “frozen” countries could not be justified on the basis of objective differences in their positions compared to pensioners resident in the United Kingdom, because the Government had never conducted any relevant analysis of their respective positions. It could not simply be assumed that since social security systems were essentially national, there must exist in those other countries in which British pensioners resided adequate and proper systems for the provision of social security to them. These points were, in the applicants' view, strongly supported by the evidence set out by Age Concern (see paragraphs 64-67 below), which showed that, in many countries to which they emigrated, British pensioners faced the loss of the welfare, health and social care benefits they would have received had they remained in the United Kingdom without obtaining access to comparable benefits in their host country.
3. The third party
63. Age Concern England emphasized that the strength of an older person's family and other social and support networks directly affected his or her ability to cope with increasing frailty. Kinship networks fulfilled a number of vital roles for older people, including the provision of informal care, the prevention of isolation and exclusion, and advocacy to help the elderly exercise their rights and access appropriate services. The Institute of Policy Research had found in a study published in 2006 that nearly one-fifth of older people residing abroad permanently had moved for family or personal reasons.
64. However, financial considerations and their impact on the family played an influential part in an older person's decision to migrate. Focus groups held by Age Concern England with older members of the Chinese community indicated that access to benefits and the up-rated State pension played a significant part in an individual's decision not to return to his or her country of origin in old age. The United Kingdom State pension was not up-rated in five of the ten most popular countries for British nationals' migration, namely China, Australia, Canada, South Africa and New Zealand. It could therefore be assumed that a large proportion of the older population had family residing in countries where the State pension was not up-rated and the refusal to up-rate might, therefore, limit the ability of a large number of older people to join their families abroad.
65. Age Concern England's research showed that in many countries an older migrant would not have the loss of welfare, health and social care benefits in the United Kingdom recompensed fully by any gain in the host country. Those who did choose to move abroad frequently faced extreme financial hardship as a result of the policy not to up-rate the State pension and Age Concern England was regularly contacted by older migrants in difficulty. For a significant number, the problems became insurmountable and there was no choice but to return to the United Kingdom. The most common reason for people over the age of 50 being repatriated was destitution and a move under these circumstances was likely to be extremely traumatic.
66. The policy of freezing the State pension had a particularly adverse effect on female pensioners. Because many women had taken time out of paid employment to care for children or other family members, as a group they were less likely than men to be eligible for a full State pension or to have built up private pension entitlement. Moreover, women in Britain over the age of 65 had an average life expectancy of 19.7 years whereas men's life expectancy at the same age was 16.9 years.
B. The Court's assessment
1. Admissibility
67. The Court recalls that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 applies only to a person's existing possessions and does not guarantee the right to acquire possessions (see Marckx v. Belgium, judgment of 13 June 1979, Series A no. 31, § 50). It follows that there is no right under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to receive a social security benefit or pension payment of any kind or amount, unless national law provides for such an entitlement (see Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.) [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 55, ECHR 2005-II).
68. In the present case, national law does not provide for index-linked up-rating to be paid to United Kingdom pensioners, such as the applicants, who live in countries which have not concluded reciprocal agreements with the United Kingdom (see paragraph 39 above). The fact that the applicants paid contributions to the National Insurance Fund, from which the State retirement pension is partially funded (see paragraph 37 above), does not provide a right under national law, comparable to a contractual right under a private pension scheme, to a State retirement pension of any particular amount (see Lord Hoffmann's comments in the House of Lords: paragraph 35 above).
69. It follows that the applicants' complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone is incompatible ratione materiae.
70. As for the applicants' complaint regarding discrimination in the denial of pension up-rating, the Court recalls that Article 14 complements the other substantive provisions of the Convention and the Protocols. It has no independent existence since it has effect solely in relation to “the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms” safeguarded by those provisions. The application of Article 14 does not necessarily presuppose the violation of one of the substantive rights guaranteed by the Convention. It is necessary but it is also sufficient for the facts of the case to fall “within the ambit” of one or more of the Convention Articles (see Stec and Others (dec.), cited above, § 39; Burden v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 13378/05, § 58, ECHR 2008). The prohibition of discrimination in Article 14 thus extends beyond the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms which the Convention and Protocols require each State to guarantee. It applies also to those additional rights, falling within the general scope of any Convention article, for which the State has voluntarily decided to provide (Stec and Others (dec.), cited above, § 40).
71. While, as stated above, there is no obligation on a State under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to create a welfare or pension scheme, the Court has held that if a Contracting State does decide to enact legislation providing for the payment as of right of a welfare benefit or pension - whether conditional or not on the prior payment of contributions - that legislation must be regarded as generating a proprietary interest falling within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for persons satisfying its requirements (Stec and Others (dec.), cited above, § 54). In cases, such as the present, concerning a complaint under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that the applicant has been denied all or part of a particular benefit on a discriminatory ground covered by Article 14, the relevant test is whether, but for the condition of entitlement about which the applicant complains, he or she would have had a right, enforceable under domestic law, to receive the benefit in question. Although Protocol No. 1 does not include the right to receive a social security payment of any kind, if a State does decide to create a benefits scheme, it must do so in a manner which is compatible with Article 14 (Stec and Others (dec.), cited above, § 55).
72. In the present case there is a clear difference in treatment between various categories of United Kingdom pensioners depending on their country of residence. The Court considers that the applicants' complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 raises complex issues of law and fact, the determination of which should depend on an examination of the merits.
It concludes, therefore, that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. No other ground of inadmissibility has been raised and it must be declared admissible.
2. The merits
73. The Court has established in its case-law that only differences in treatment based on an identifiable characteristic, or “status”, are capable of amounting to discrimination within the meaning of Article 14 (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen and Pedersen, cited above, § 56). Moreover, in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous, or relevantly similar, situations (D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic [GC], no. 57325/00, § 175, ECHR 2007). Such a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realized. The Contracting State enjoys a margin of appreciation in assessing whether and to what extent differences in otherwise similar situations justify a different treatment (Burden cited above, § 60). The scope of this margin will vary according to the circumstances, the subject-matter and the background. A wide margin is usually allowed to the State under the Convention when it comes to general measures of economic or social strategy. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the public interest on social or economic grounds, and the Court will generally respect the legislature's policy choice unless it is “manifestly without reasonable foundation” (Stec and Others v. the United Kingdom, [GC], nos. 65731/01 and 65900/01, § 52, ECHR 2006).
74. In the High Court and Court of Appeal, the Government conceded that a place of residence constituted a “status” within the meaning of Article 14 of the Convention; in the House of Lords, the Government likewise did not contend that the grounds of residence could not be included within the scope of Article 14 and it was assumed in the judgments of the House that being ordinarily resident in a country outside the United Kingdom was a “personal characteristic” for the purposes of the test in the Kjeldsen case (see paragraph 33 above).
75. The Court recalls that the list set out in Article 14 is illustrative and not exhaustive, as is shown by the words “any ground such as” (in French “notamment”) (see Engel and Others v. The Netherlands, judgment of 8 June 1976, Series A no. 22, § 72). It further recalls that the words “other status” (and a fortiori the French “toute autre situation”) have been given a wide meaning so as to include, in certain circumstances, a distinction drawn on the basis of a place of residence. Thus, in previous cases the Court has examined under Article 14 the legitimacy of alleged discrimination based, inter alia, on domicile abroad (Johnston v. Ireland, judgment of 18 December 1986, Series A no. 112, §§ 59-61) and registration as a resident (Darby v. Sweden, judgment of 23 October 1990, Series A no. 187, §§ 31-34). In addition, the Commission examined complaints about discrepancies in the law applying in different areas of a single Contracting State (Lindsay and Others v. the United Kingdom, no. 8364/78, Commission decision of 8 March 1979, Decisions and Reports 15, p. 247; Gudmundsson v. Iceland, no. 23285/94, Commission decision of 17 January 1996, unreported). It is true that regional differences of treatment, resulting from the application of different legislation depending on the geographical location of an applicant, have been held not to be explained in terms of personal characteristics (see, for example, Magee v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 6 June 2000, no. 28135/95, § 50, ECHR 2000-I). However, as pointed out by Stanley Burnton J., these cases are not comparable to the present case, which involves the different application of the same pensions legislation to persons depending on their residence and presence abroad.
76. The Court considers that, in the circumstances of the present case, ordinary residence, like domicile and nationality, is to be seen as an aspect of personal status and that the place of residence applied as a criterion for the differential treatment of citizens in the grant of State pensions is a ground falling within the scope of Article 14.
77. Discrimination means a failure to treat like cases alike; there is no discrimination when the cases are relevantly different. The applicants contend that they are in a relevantly similar position to United Kingdom pensioners living in the United Kingdom or in countries where up-rating is available, on the grounds, first, that they have spent the same amount of time working in the United Kingdom and have made the same contributions towards the National Insurance Fund and, secondly, that their need for a reasonable standard of living in their old age is the same. Every national judge who examined the applicants' complaints, with the exception of Lord Carswell (see paragraphs 24-36 above), held that the applicants were not in an analogous, or relevantly similar, situation to a pensioner of the same age and contribution record living in the United Kingdom or in a country where up-rating was available.
78. The Court will consider first whether the applicants are in an analogous situation to British pensioners who have chosen to remain in the United Kingdom. It notes in this respect that the Contracting State's social security system, including the system it has chosen to provide for those deemed too old for paid employment, is intended to provide a minimum standard of living for those resident within its territory (and this is all that is required under the International Labour Organisation and Council of Europe Conventions on Social Security: see paragraphs 48-49 above). For this reason, although the Court has held that the words “other status” are wide enough to include the place of residence, it considers that individuals ordinarily resident within the Contracting State are not in a relevantly analogous situation to those residing outside the territory insofar as concerns the operation of pension or social security systems. As the Commission found in J.W. and E.W. v. the United Kingdom (no. 9776/82, Commission decision of 3 October 1983, Decisions and Reports 34, p. 156), examining an application from a British pensioner who was denied an up-rated pension following a move to Australia:
“it is almost inevitable that where a person in effect changes over from one social security system to another, he may find that his entitlements differ from those of persons in other countries. Depending on the circumstances such differences may or may not favour the individual.
Furthermore the Commission notes that the applicants will only lose the benefit of future increases in their pensions, whose purpose broadly speaking is to compensate for rises in the cost of living in the United Kingdom. Given that they will not be living in the United Kingdom it appears reasonable that this element in their pension rights in particular should be replaced by the possibility of benefitting under the system of the country they are moving to.”
Moreover, the Court notes in this connection that it was Ms C.'s case before the House of Lords that she could have had no complaint under Article 14 if the Government had chosen not to make any pension provision whatsoever for those who chose to live abroad.
79. The Court is, further, hesitant to find an analogy between the positions of the applicants, who live in “frozen” countries, and British pensioners resident in countries outside the United Kingdom where up-rating is available. In this connection, the Court notes that National Insurance Contributions are only one part of the United Kingdom's complex system of taxation and that the National Insurance Fund is one of a number of sources of revenue used to pay for the United Kingdom's Social Security and National Health systems. It does not consider the applicants' payment of National Insurance Contributions during their working lives in the United Kingdom to be of any more significance than the fact that they may have paid income tax or other taxes while domiciled there (see Stec and Others (dec) [GC], cited above, § 50). Turning to the applicants' second argument (see paragraph 75 above), the Court is of the view that even between States in close geographical proximity, such as the United States of America and Canada, South Africa and Mauritius, or Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, differences in social security provision, taxation, rates of inflation, interest and currency exchange make it difficult to compare the respective positions of residents.
80. In any event, even if the applicants could be said to be in an analogous position to the residents of countries where pensions are up-rated under reciprocal agreements, the Court considers that the difference in treatment has objective and reasonable justification. While there is some force in the applicants' argument, echoed by Age Concern, that an elderly person's decision to move abroad may be driven by a number of factors, including the desire to be close to family members, place of residence is nonetheless a characteristic which can be changed as a matter of choice. The Court therefore agrees with the Government and the national courts that the individual does not require the same high level of protection against differences of treatment based on this ground as is needed in relation to differences based on an inherent characteristic, such as gender or racial or ethnic origin (see, for example, Van Raalte v. the Netherlands, judgment of 21 February 1997, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-I, § 39; D.H. and Others, cited above, § 176, and compare Magee, cited above, § 50). It is, moreover, relevant in this connection that the State took steps to inform United Kingdom residents moving abroad about the absence of index-linking for pensions in certain specified countries (see paragraph 42 above). Thus each of the applicants could have taken this factor into account amongst all the other reasons for and against the choice of country of residence.
81. As Lord Hoffmann emphasized, the pattern of reciprocal agreements is the result of history and perceptions in each country as to perceived costs and benefits of such an arrangement. They represent whatever the Contracting State has from time to time been able to negotiate without placing itself at an undue economic disadvantage and apply to provide reciprocity of social security cover across the board, not just in relation to pension up-rating. In the Court's view, the State does not exceed the very wide margin of appreciation which it enjoys in matters of macro-economic policy by entering into such reciprocal arrangements with certain countries but not others.
82. It follows that there has been no violation of Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol no. 1 on the facts of the present case.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 8
83. The applicants further complained that since some of them had had to choose between surrendering a large part of their pension entitlement or living far away from their families, the absence of up-rating also amounted to a breach of their rights under Article 14 taken in conjunction with Article 8. Article 8 provides:
“1. Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.
2. There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”
84. The Court considers that the same arguments apply in relation to Article 8 taken in conjunction with Article 14 as apply in relation to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken in conjunction with Article 14. It does not therefore consider it necessary to consider this complaint separately.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the complaint concerning Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible and the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 taken alone inadmissible;
2. Holds by six votes to one that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
3. Holds unanimously that it is not necessary to consider the complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 8.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 4 November 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Fatoş Aracı, Lech Garlicki
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the dissenting opinion of Lech Garlicki is annexed to this judgment.
L.G.
F.A.
DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE GARLICKI
To my regret, I cannot subscribe to the Chamber's finding of no violation.
This case is about the exclusion of pensioners living abroad from the index-linked up-rating scheme applicable to all pensioners in the United Kingdom. It is not contested that there is a clear difference between various categories of pensioners depending on their actual country of residence. It is further not contested that, in the circumstances of this case, the fact that residence was applied as a criterion for the differential treatment brings the case within the scope of Article 14.
In my opinion, however, the difference in treatment has no objective and reasonable justification. There is some force in the arguments submitted by the majority which, to a large extent, reproduce the position taken by the majority of the House of Lords. There are, however, at least four arguments that may warrant another conclusion.
First, the State pension scheme is compulsory and is based upon the principle of contributions. Even if there is no automatic connection between the amount of contributions and the amount of the future pension, the very idea is the distribution of obligations: those who work have to contribute to the State pension fund and the State has to pay pensions to those who are no longer of working age. Ms C., as well as the other applicants, fulfilled her side of the deal in full: for most of her working life she paid contributions (as well as taxes) and those contributions were gladly accepted by the State. Her contributions were spent (as we should hope) on the pensions of current pensioners and also on the annual indexation of their pensions. There was no difference at all between her and other persons working in the UK at that time. Now she is no longer of working age, it is time for the State to meet its obligations. However, the State treats her differently from other fellow contributors solely because of her new place of residence. The fact that she does not reside in the UK does not incur any additional costs for the State. While it is true that she is no longer a UK taxpayer, there are no prohibitions – under our Convention – on imposing a UK tax on her UK-based income, whatever its amount. But unlike those who have remained in the UK, she has been deprived of the index-linking privilege. Considerations of social justice and equity require that persons who have duly contributed towards the pensions of others should not be treated differently in the subsequent calculation of their own pension. Differential treatment based solely on current residence has no link to the contributory nature of pensions and, therefore, is deprived of a reasonable justification.
Secondly, one of the arguments raised by both the House of Lords and our Court concerns the economic differences between the UK and the actual countries of residence. It is true that there are different levels of inflation, different paces of growth and different exchange rates in relation to the UK currency. But there is a common feature for all countries involved, and this feature is inflation. Thus, it is difficult to accept that the situation of UK residents is basically different from that of non-UK residents. The legislature has, of course, no obligation to up-rate pensions according to inflation in the host country. It is also entitled to adjust indexation to take into account differences between particular countries, but it cannot simply ignore the very existence of inflation as a common economic characteristic of the modern world. Such a regulation penalizes persons who, after having fulfilled their side of the contributory scheme, move abroad. Such penalization runs counter to the principle of individual freedom and, therefore, cannot be regarded as reasonably justified.
Third, the existing system is not based upon any cogent scheme. As was observed by the domestic authorities (see paragraph 47 of the judgment), it would be difficult “to defend the logic of the present situation ... There is no consistent pattern”. In consequence, the situation of British pensioners varies from country to country. This makes the majority's references to the margin-of-appreciation doctrine (see paragraph 81 of the judgment) less convincing. Under this doctrine, the State is allowed to devise its own ways of addressing social and economic problems. Had the UK developed a coherent and logical solution to the issue of index-linking for foreign residents, it would have been easier to accept it. But the doctrine of the margin of appreciation cannot legitimize a situation of an illogical and, therefore, arbitrary nature.
Finally, I have complete respect for the House of Lords' position that the matter is more legislative than judicial in nature. However, such an argument, while convincing at the domestic level, cannot prevail before our Court. A violation that results from legislative omissions is still within the reach of European supervision.
This Court has on several occasions found that nationality-based differentiations in social benefits are inherently suspect. Particularly in Gaygusuz v. Austria (16 September 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-IV), Koua Pouirrez v. France (no. 40892/98, ECHR 2003-X) and Luczak v. Poland (no. 77782/01, ECHR 2007-...), differentiation between residents based on nationality (citizenship) was found to be in violation of Article 14. I am not convinced that the differentiation between nationals based on place of residence is so fundamentally different that Ms C. should enjoy lesser protection than that offered to the applicants in the above-mentioned cases.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Resto inammissibile; Nessuna violazione dell’ Art. 14+P1-1
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA CARSON ED ALTRI C. REGNO UNITO
(Richiesta n. 42184/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
4 novembre 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Carson ed Altri c. Regno Unito,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Lech Garlicki, Presidente, Nicolas Bratza il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijović, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ledi Bianku, Mihai Poalelungi, giudici, e Fatoş Aracı, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 3 maggio 2007 e il 7 ottobre 2008,
Consegna la s seguente entenza che fu adottata in quest’ultima data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 42184/05) contro il Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda Settentrionale depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) il 24 novembre 2005 da tredici cittadini britannici: la Sig.ra A. C., il Sig. B. J., la Sig.ra S.V S., la Sig.ra E. K., il Sig. K. D., il Sig. R. B., il Sig. T. D., il Sig. J. G., il Sig. G. D., la Sig.ra P. H., il Sig. B. S., il Sig. L. M. ed la Sig.ra R. G..
2. I richiedenti sono stati rappresentati dal Sig. T. O. Q.C. ed il Sig. B.O., avvocati che praticano a Londra e M. P. T, e H. G. ., avvocati che praticano a Toronto. Il Governo del Regno Unito (“il Governo”) è stato rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. D. Walton Ufficio Estero e Commonwealth.
3. I richiedenti addussero che il rifiuto delle autorità del Regno Unito di aggiornare le loro pensioni in linea con l’inflazione era discriminatorio, in violazione dell’ Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 8 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ed in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo.
4. Il 17 febbraio 2006 la Corte decise di comunicare la richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
5. Il 18 settembre 2007 la Corte decise di aggiornare il suo esame della causa dopo la consegna da parte della Grande Camera della sua sentenza Burden c. Regno Unito, n. 13378/05.
6. Il 24 gennaio 2008, all'organizzazione non-governativa Age Concern England fu accordato il permesso di intervenire come terza parte (Articolo 36 § 2 della Convenzione).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. I richiedenti
1. A. C.
7. La Sig.ra C. nacque nel 1931. Passò la maggior parte della sua vita lavorativa nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di emigrare in Sud Africa nel 1989 dove è residente dal 1990. Dal 1989 al 1999 pagò gli ulteriori Contributi di Previdenza Sociale su base volontaria per mantenere il suo diritto ad una piena pensione di pensionamento Statale.
8. Nel 2000 acquisì il diritto ad avere una pensione Statale ed una pensione supplementare sotto lo Schema Pensionistico in relazione ai Guadagni Statali (“SERPS”). Riceve un totale di GBP 103.62 alla settimana, che comprendeva GBP 67.50 di pensione di Stato di base, GBP 32.17 di SERPS e GBP 3.95 pensione progressiva. La sua pensione è rimasta fissa a questo tasso dal 2000. Se la sua pensione di base avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione in linea con l’inflazione, ora varrebbe GBP 82.05 alla settimana.
9. Non c'è sistema di previdenza sociale Statale in Sud Africa. La Sig.ra C. contende perciò che lei dipende dalla sua pensione britannica per il suo sostentamento durate il pensionamento, non avendo altre risorse se non dei guadagni come scrittrice.
10. La Sig.ra C. intraprese procedimenti nazionali che impugnavano il rifiuto di adeguare la sua pensione: vedere paragrafi 24-36 sotto.
2. B. J.
11. Il Sig. Jackson nacque nel 1922. Passò 50 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale. Lui emigrò in Canada nel momento del suo pensionamento nel 1986 e acquisì il diritto ad una pensione Statale nel 1987. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 39.50 la settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello dal 1987. Se la sua pensione Statale avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione dal 1987 ora varrebbe GBP 82.05 la settimana.
3. V. S.
12. La Sig.ra S. nacque nel 1931. Passò 15 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di emigrare in Canada nel 1964. Acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1991. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 15.48 la settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello dal 1991. Se la sua pensione statale avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 22.50 la settimana.
4. E. K.
13. La Sig.ra K. nacque nel 1913. Lei passò 45 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di andare in pensione nel 1976. Acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1973, ed emigrò in Canada nel 1986 e a quel punto la sua pensione Statale era aumentata a GBP 38.70 la settimana. È rimasta fissa a quel livello. Se avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 la settimana.
5. K. D.
14. Il Sig. D. nacque nel 1923. Passò 51 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di andare in pensione nel 1991. Acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1988, ed emigrò in Canada nel 1994, quando la sua pensione Statale settimanale era di GBP 57.60. È rimasta fissa a quel livello dal 1994. Se avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 la settimana.
6. R. B.
15. Il Sig. B. nacque nel 1924. Passò 47 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente tutti i Contributi di Previdenza Socialeapplicabili, prima di emigrare in Canada nel 1985. Acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1989. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 41.15 la settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello dal 1989. Se la sua pensione Statale avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 la settimana.
7. T. D.
16. Il Sig. D. nacque nel 1937. Passò 42 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di andare in pensione nel 1995 ed emigrare in Canada nel 1998. Acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 2002. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 75.50 per settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello da allora in poi. Se avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 per settimana.
8. J. G.
17. Il Sig. G. nacque nel 1933. Passò 44 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di andare in pensione ed emigrare in Canada nel 1994. Acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1998. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 64.70 la settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello da allora in poi. Se la sua pensione Statale avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 la settimana.
9. G. D.
18. Il Sig. D. nacque nel 1921. Passò 44 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di emigrare in Canada nel 1981. Acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1986. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 38.30 la settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello. Se avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 la settimana.
10. P. H.
19. La Sig.ra H. nacque in Australia nel 1940; sembra che resti un cittadino australiano. Visse e lavorò nel Regno Unito fra il 1963 ed il 1982, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di ritornare in Australia nel 1982. Versò ulteriori Contributi di Previdenza Socialeper gli anni fiscali 1992-1999, e acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale britannica nel 2000. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 38.05 la settimana.
20. Fra agosto 2002 e dicembre 2004 trascorse metà del suo tempo a Londra. Durante questo periodo, la sua pensione fu aumentata a GBP 58.78 che includeva un’indicizzazione della pensione Statale di base. Quando ritornò in Australia, la sua pensione ritornò al livello precedente, incluso una pensione Statale di base di GBP 38.05. La sua pensione è rimasta successivamente a questo livello. Se la sua pensione avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione , ora varrebbe circa GBP 43.08 la settimana.
11. B. S.
21. Il Sig. S. nacque nel 1933. La registrazione dei suoi contributi nel Regno Unito gli conferirono il diritto a una piena pensione di Stato di base nel 1998. Emigrò in Australia nel 2000 e in quel momento la sua pensione Statale era aumentata a GBP 67.40. Salvo per un periodo di sette settimane quando ritornò nel Regno Unito (durante il cui tempo la sua pensione fu aumentata per prendere in considerazione gli adeguamenti annuali), la sua pensione Statale è rimasta fissa a quel livello dal 2000. Se la sua pensione Statale avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione , ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 la settimana.
12. L. M.
22. Il Sig. M. nacque nel 1924. Passò 51 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito, pagando completamente i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, e acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1989. Nel 1993 emigrò in Australia. La sua pensione Statale di base valeva allora GBP 56.10 la settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello. Se avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 82.05 la settimana.
13. R. G.
23. Il Sig.ra G. nacque nel 1934. Passò 10 anni lavorando nel Regno Unito fra il 1954 ed il 1965, pagando completamente A Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, prima di emigrare in Australia nel 1965. Lei acquisì il diritto a una pensione Statale nel 1994. La sua pensione Statale di base era allora di GBP 14.40 la settimana, ed è rimasta fissa a quel livello. Se avesse tratto profitto dall’indicizzazione, ora varrebbe circa GBP 20.51 la settimana. La Sig.ra G. contende che lei non ha diritto a nessuna previdenza pensionistica per anzianità da parte del Governo australiano, e dipende così dalla sua pensione Statale britannica come unica fonte di reddito.
2. I procedimenti nazionali intrapresi dalla Sig.ra C.
24. Nel 2002, la Sig.ra C. iniziò procedimenti tramite controllo giurisdizionale per impugnare l'insuccesso d’indicizzazione della sua pensione. In prima istanza fu sostenuta dal Governo australiano come terzo intervenuto, ma il Governo australiano si ritirò dai procedimenti di fronte alla Corte d'appello e la Casa dei Lord .
1. L’Alta Corte
25. Di fronte all’Alta Corte, la Sig.ra C. basò il suo argomento sull’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Stanley Burnton J, in una sentenza resa il 22 maggio 2002 (R (Carson) c. Ministro di Stato per Lavoro e Pensioni [2002] EWHC 978 (Admin)), respinse la sua richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale.
26. Applicando i principi dedotti dalla giurisprudenza della Corte, il giudice trovò che il diritto materiale che deve essere protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 doveva essere definito dalla legislazione nazionale che l’aveva creato. Trovò che, tramite l'operatività della legislazione nazionale, alla Sig.ra C. non era mai stata concessa una pensione sottoposta all’indicizzazione, così che non avrebbe potuto esserci nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso isolatamente.
27. La questione rientrava nondimeno all'interno dell'ambito dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, così che il giudice doveva considerare se la Sig.ra C. avesse sofferto di una discriminazione contraria alle disposizioni dell’ Articolo 14. Sostenne che la residenza, applicata come criterio per il trattamento differente di cittadini era un fatto che rientrava all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 14; come domicilio e nazionalità, era un aspetto di status personale. Questo non fu contestato dal Ministro dello Stato. Comunque, Stanley Burnton J continuò a respingere la rivendicazione seguendo il ragionamento della Commissione europea dei Diritti umani in JW ed EW v Regno Unito (n. 9776/82, decisione del 3 ottobre 1983, Decisioni e Relazioni (DR) 34, p. 153) ed Corner v Regno Unito (n. 11271/84, decisione del 17 maggio 1985 inedita), sostenendo che il richiedente non era in una posizione comparabile ai pensionati in paesi che richiedono l’indicizzazione. Le condizioni economiche differenti in ogni paese, incluso le disposizioni di previdenza sociale locale e la tassazione rendono semplicemente impossibile comparare l'importo in sterline ricevuto dai pensionati.
28. Stanley Burnton J trovò che, in alternativa, anche se il richiedente potesse chiedere di essere in una posizione analoga ad un pensionato nel Regno Unito o in un paese in cui l’indicizzazione veniva pagato in base ad un accordo bi-laterale, la differenza nel trattamento potrebbe essere giustificata. Lui considerò che il Governo aveva un margine considerevole di valutazione che c'era una mancanza di consistenza nella pratica dello Stato e che la limitazione era stata pubblicizzata per un certo tempo. Si rifiutò di accettare che il pagamento di una pensione adeguata in un paese (o diversi) significava che c'era un obbligo sotto l’Articolo 14 di pagare pensioni adeguate a tutti i pensionati che vivevano all'estero. Trovò che l'illogicità nella sfera degli accordi bilaterali rifletteva la loro natura politica, la relativa complessità del problema e i fattori storici. Lui concluse perciò che “la misura giuridica del pensionati emigrati del Regno Unito che non ricevono pensioni con indicizzazione è politica, non giudiziale. La decisione di pagare loro pensioni con adeguamenti deve essere resa dal Parlamento.”
2. La Corte d'appello
29. Il Sig.ra C. fece appello alla Corte d'appello che respinse il suo ricorso il 17 giugno 2003 (R (Carson e Reynolds) c. Ministro dello Stato per Lavoro e Pensioni [2003] EWCA Civ 797). Per ragioni simili a quelle dell’Alta Corte , la Corte d'appello (Lord della Giustizia Simon Brown, Laws e Rix) trovò che, poiché l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non aveva conferito alcun diritto di acquisizione di proprietà, l'insuccesso nell’indicizzazione della pensione della Sig.ra C. non generò violazione di quella disposizione.
30. Riguardo all'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte d'appello notò che il Ministro dello Stato accettò che la residenza costituiva un “uno status” ai fini dell'Articolo. Comunque, trovò che il richiedente era in una posizione materialmente diversa da quelle in cui sosteneva si trovassero le altre persone di paragone. In questo contesto era significativo che lo schema legislativo era completamente imperniato sull'impatto dell'inflazione dei prezzi nel Regno Unito, tanto che sarebbe “inevitabile che [un’indicizzazione annuale] assegnato tramite consiglio a tutti... i pensionati [nella posizione della Sig.ra C.] abbia effetti accidentali.”
31. La Corte d'appello considerò anche, in alternativa, la questione della giustificazione e trovò che la “vera” giustificazione del rifiuto del pagamento dell’indicizzazione era che la Sig.ra C. e quelli nella sua posizione “avevano scelto di vivere in società, più precisamente in economie fuori dal Regno Unito in cui la specifica base razionale per l’aumento può necessariamente non essere applicata in nessun modo.” La Corte d'appello considerò così che la decisione fosse giustificata obiettivamente senza riferimento al fatto che ciò che avevano accettato sarebbe stato il “costo scoraggiante” di estendere l’indicizzazione a quelli nella posizione della Sig.ra C.. Inoltre, le implicazioni del costo erano “nel contesto di questa causa un fattore legittimo che andava a giustificazione della posizione del Ministro dello Stato,” perché accettare gli argomenti della Sig.ra C. avrebbe condotto ad un'interferenza giudiziale nella decisione politica riguardo allo spiegamento di finanziamenti pubblici che non furono affidati dall’Atto dei Diritti umani del 1998, dalla giurisprudenza di questa Corte o da un “imperativo giuridico” che era sufficientemente pressante per giustificare confinando e circoscrivendo le politiche macro-economiche del Governo eletto.
3. La Casa dei Lord
32. La Sig.ra C. fece appello alla Casa dei Lord, appellandosi all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 letto insieme all’Articolo 14. Il suo ricorso fu respinto il 26 maggio 2005 con una maggioranza di quattro ad uno (R (Carson e Reynolds) c. Ministro dello Stato per Lavoro e Pensioni [2005] UKHL 37).
33. La maggioranza (i Lord Nicholls di Birkenhead, Hoffmann Rodger di Earlsferry e Walker of Gestinghope) accettò che una pensione di pensionamento rientrasse all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e che l’Articolo 14 era così applicabile. Loro presunsero inoltre che una residenza era una caratteristica personale e corrispondeva a “qualsiasi altro status” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 14, ed era così un terreno proibito alla discriminazione. Comunque, poiché una persona può scegliere dove vivere, dei motivi meno rilevanti erano richiesti per giustificare una differenza di trattamento basata sulla residenza rispetto a una basata su una caratteristica personale inerente, come razza o sesso.
34. La maggioranza osservò che in certi casi risultava artificiale trattare separatamente le questioni, in primo luogo se uno che si lamenta lamentarsi individualmente della discriminazione era in una posizione analoga ad una persona trattata in modo più favorevole e, in secondo luogo, se la differenza nel trattamento era ragionevolmente ed obiettivamente giustificata. Nella presente causa, il richiedente non era in una posizione analoga, o comparabile, ad un pensionato residente nel Regno Unito o residente in un paese con un accordo bilaterale col Regno Unito. La pensione Statale era un elemento in un sistema interconnesso di tassazione e la previdenza sociale progettata per offrire uno standard di vita di base per gli abitanti del Regno Unito. Era procurata in parte dai Contributi di Previdenza Sociale di quelli attualmente al lavoro e dai loro datori di lavoro, ed in parte dalla tassazione generale. La pensione non era sottoposta a verifica, ma pensionati con un reddito alto da altre fonti hanno ridato parte di questa allo Stato sotto forma di imposta sul reddito. È probabile che quelli con redditi bassi ricevano altri benefici, in appoggio al reddito. La disposizione per l’indicizzazione fu voluta per preservare il valore della pensione alla luce delle condizioni economiche, come il costo della vita ed il tasso d’ inflazione, all'interno del Regno Unito. Condizioni economiche piuttosto diverse si applicano agli altri paesi: per esempio, in Sud Africa dove la Sig.ra C. visse, benché non ci fosse virtualmente previdenza sociale, il costo della vita era molto era più basso, ed il valore del rand era sceso negli ultimi anni in confronto alla sterlina.
35. Lord Hoffmann che diede una delle opinioni di maggioranza espose gli argomenti come segue:
“18. Il rifiuto di un beneficio di previdenza sociale alla Sig.ra C. sul fatto che lei viveva all'estero non può essere associato possibilmente a una discriminazione sulla base di razza o sesso. Non è un rifiuto di rispetto per lei come individuo. Non si trovava sotto nessun obbligo di trasferirsi in Sud Africa. Fece così volontariamente e senza dubbio per buone ragioni. Ma nel fare così, lei si pose al di fuori della sfera primaria e dal fine del sistema di previdenza sociale del Regno Unito. Benefici di previdenza sociale sono parte di un intricato e collegato sistema di benessere sociale esistente per assicurare certi standard minimi di vita per le persone di questo paese. Sono un'espressione di ciò che è stata chiamata solidarietà sociale o fraternité; il dovere di qualsiasi comunità di aiutare i suoi membri che sono in bisogno. Ma che il dovere generalmente è riconosciuto essere nazionale per carattere. Non si estende agli abitanti di paesi esteri. Quel è riconosciuto nei trattati come la Convenzione ILO Social Security (Minimi Standard) del 1952 (articolo 69) ed il Codice europeo della Social Security del 1961.
19. Il Sig. B. QC che comparì per la Sig.ra C. accettò la forza di questo argomento. Lui convenne in replica che lei non avrebbe potuto avere azione di reclamo se il Regno Unito avesse applicato rigorosamente il principio che la previdenza sociale del Regno Unito è per i residenti del Regno Unito e avesse pagato alcuna pensione a nessuna delle persone che erano andate a vivere all'estero. E lui non si oppone al fatto che non le sono concessi gli altri benefici di previdenza sociale come l'assegno di disoccupazione ed il supporto di reddito. Ma disse che era irrazionale riconoscere che lei aveva un diritto ad una pensione in virtù dei suoi contributi versati al Fondo Nazionale Assicurativo e poi non corrispondere la stessa pensione dei residenti del Regno Unito che avevano effettuato gli stessi contributi.
20. La caratteristica che la Sig.ra C. prende come base della sua rivendicazione all'uguaglianza di trattamento (ma solamente riguardo ad una pensione) è che lei ha pagato gli stessi contributi assicurativi nazionali. E questo è realmente la questione principale della sua causa . Secondo me, comunque la concentrazione su questa sola caratteristica è una semplificazione eccessiva del paragone. La situazione dei beneficiari della previdenza sociale del Regno Unito è, citando la Corte europea in der Van Mussele v Belgio (1983) 6 EHRR 163, 180, paragrafo 46, 'caratterizzata da un corpo di diritti ed obblighi del quale sarebbe artificiale isolare un specifico aspetto.'
21. In effetti l'argomento della Sig.ra C. è che poiché i contributi sono una condizione necessaria per la pensione di pensionamento pagata ai residenti del Regno Unito, dovrebbero essere una condizione sufficiente. Nessun altra questione, come se uno vive nel Regno Unito e partecipa al resto delle sue disposizioni per la tassazione e la previdenza sociale, dovrebbe essere presa in considerazione. Ma questo secondo me è un errore ovvio. I contributi nazionali assicurati non hanno collegamento esclusivo alle pensioni per pensionamento , comparabile con contributi ad uno schema pensionistico privato. Infatti il collegamento è un piuttosto labile. I Contributi di Previdenza Sociale costituiscono una fonte di parte dell'ufficio imposte che paga tutti i benefici di previdenza sociale ed il Servizio Sanitario Statale (il resto viene dalla tassazione ordinaria). Se il pagamento dei contributi fosse una condizione sufficiente per acquisire il diritto ad un beneficio di contributi, alla Sig.ra C. dovrebbero essere concessi tutti i benefici di contributi, come beneficio della maternità e l’assegno di disoccupazione. Ma lei non suggerisce che sia così.
22. La natura di collegamento all’interno del sistema rende impossibile estrarre un elemento per trattamento speciale. La ragione principale per la predisposizione di pensioni statali è il riconoscimento che la maggioranza delle persone di età pensionabile avrà bisogno di soldi. Loro non sono verificati, ma solo perché l’esame è costoso e scoraggia l’utilizzo del beneficio anche da parte di persone di cui ne hanno bisogno. Così le pensioni così statali sono pagate a ciascuno a prescindere che abbiano o meno un reddito adeguato da altre fonti. D'altra parte sono soggetti a tassazione. Quindi lo stato recupererà parte della pensione dalle persone che hanno abbastanza reddito per pagare la tassa e con ciò riduce il costo netto della pensione. D'altra parte a quelle persone che sono completamente bisognose sarebbe concesso in appoggio del reddito, un beneficio non di contributi. Quindi il costo netto di pagare una pensione di pensionamento a simili di persone prende in conto il fatto che la pensione sarà predisposta contro la loro rivendicazione di supporto di reddito.
23. Nessuna di queste caratteristiche che si collegano tra loro può essere applicata ad un non-residente come la Sig.ra C.. Lei non paga l’ imposta sul reddito del Regno Unito, così lo stato non sarebbe in grado di recuperare nulla anche se lei avesse un reddito supplementare sostanziale. (Chiaramente non suggerisco che questo sia il caso; io non ho idea di quale altro reddito abbia, ma ci saranno altri pensionati emigrati che hanno un altro reddito). Similmente, se lei fosse bisognosa, non ci sarebbe risparmio nel supporto del reddito. Al contrario, la pensione andrebbe a ridurre i benefit di previdenza sociale (se ce ne fossero) che le sarebbero concessi nel suo nuovo paese.
Stato e pensioni private
24. Sono, suppongo, le parole 'assicurazione' e 'contributi’ che suggeriscono un'analogia con uno schema di pensione privato. Ma, dal punto di vista dei cittadini contribuenti, i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale sono poco diversi dalla tassazione generale che scompare nella cassa comunale del finanziamento consolidato. La differenza è solamente una questione di contabilità pubblica. E benché le pensioni di pensionamento siano collegate al momento a contributi, non c'è particolare ragione per cui dovrebbero esserlo. Infatti (principalmente perché il sistema attuale svantaggia severamente le donne che hanno speso del tempo per il lavoro non remunerato di accudire la famiglia piuttosto che guadagnando un salario) ci sono proposte per un cambiamento. Le pensioni su contributi possono essere sostituite da una non a contributi ' pensione di cittadino' pagabile a tutti gli abitanti di questo paese di età pensionabile. Ma non c'è ragione perché questo dovrebbe significare un cambiamento qualsiasi nella raccolta di Contributi di Previdenza Sociale per procurare la pensione di cittadino come tutti gli altri benefici non a contributi. Sull'argomento della Sig.ra C., comunque un cambio ad una pensione non a contributi farebbe tutta la differenza. Una volta che la pensione di pensionamento non fosse a contributi , il fondamento del suo argomento secondo il quale aveva 'guadagnato' il diritto all'uguaglianza di trattamento scomparirebbe. Ma avrebbe pagato precisamente gli stessi Contributi di Previdenza Sociale mentre stava lavorando qui ed i suoi contributi avrebbero avuto molta (o poca) relazione causale al suo diritto di pensione come hanno oggi.
Scelta parlamentare
25. Per queste ragioni mi sembra che la posizione di un non-residente sia materialmente e in modo pertinente diversa da quella di un residente del Regno Unito. Non penso, con tutto rispetto per il mio amico nobile e dotto, Lord C., che le ragioni siano sottili ed arcane. Sono pratiche ed eque. Inoltre, io penso che questa sia proprio una causa in cui al Parlamento è concesso di decidere se le differenze giustificano una differenza nel trattamento. Non può essere una legge che al Regno Unito sia proibito trattare generosamente i pensionati emigrati a meno che li tratti precisamente allo stesso modo dei pensionati nazionali. Una volta che si accetta che la posizione della Sig.ra C. sia diversa in modo pertinente da quella di un residente del Regno Unito e che non possa rivendicare perciò un uguaglianza di trattamento, l'importo (se ce ne fosse) che da ricevere dovrebbe essere una questione che riguarda il Parlamento. Deve essere possibile riconoscere che i suoi contributi passati le conferirono il diritto a una rivendicazione in equità di una pensione senza dovere abbandonare le ragioni per le quali non si può dire che sia stata trattata ugualmente. E nel decidere in quale misura i pensionati emigrati dovrebbero essere pagati, al Parlamento deve essere concesso di prendere in considerazione rivendicazioni competenti dei finanziamenti pubblici. Dire che la ragione per cui ai pensionati emigrati non vengono pagati gli aumenti annuali è quella di risparmiare soldi è vero ma solamente in un senso banale: ogni decisione di non spendere più per qualche cosa è risparmiare soldi per ridurre tasse o per spenderli per qualche altra cosa.
26. Penso che sia una sfortuna che l'argomento per il Ministro dello Stato abbia posto una simile enfasi su simili questioni come le variazioni dei tassi di inflazione nei vari paesi che rende inappropriato applicare all'estero lo stesso aumento dei pensionati residenti. Non è necessario per il Ministro dello Stato tentare di giustificare le somme pagate con calcoli così belli. Distrae l’attenzione dall'argomento principale. Una volta che viene concesso, come il Sig. B. accetta, che le persone residente fuori dal Regno Unito siano in modo pertinente diverse e si potrebbe negare loro qualsiasi pensione del tutto, il Parlamento non deve giustificare ai tribunali le ragioni per le quali a loro viene pagata una somma piuttosto che un’altra. La generosità non deve avere un chiarimento logico. È abbastanza dire che , per il Ministro dello Stato che, considerarono tutte le cose, il Parlamento ha considerato che l’attuale sistema di pagamenti fosse un’equa distribuzione delle risorse disponibili.
27. Mi sembra che il paragone con i residenti in paesi del trattato manchi di ragioni simili. Il Sig. B. era in grado sottolineare dichiarazioni statali per dimostrare che non c'era schema logico nelle disposizioni con paesi del trattato. Rappresentarono ciò che il Regno Unito era stato in grado negoziare di volta in volta senza mettersi in uno svantaggio economico indebito. Ma questa mi sembra una base completamente razionale per le differenze nel trattamento. La situazione di un pensionato emigrato Regno Unito che vive in un paese disposto a sottoscrivere disposizioni di previdenza sociale reciproche ed appropriate è in modo pertinente diverso da quella di un pensionato che vive in un paese che non si comporta così. Il trattato abilita il governo a migliorare i benefici di previdenza sociale dei cittadini del Regno Unito nel paese estero in termini che considera essere favorevoli, o almeno non impropriamente gravosi. Sarebbe molto strano se al governo fosse proibito di sottoscrivere così disposizioni reciproche con qualsiasi paese (per esempio, come ha fatto coi paesi della EEA) a meno che non paghi gli stessi benefici a tutti gli emigrati in ogni parte del mondo.”
36. Lord Carswell, dissentendo, trovò che la Sig.ra C. potrebbe essere comparata in modo appropriato agli altri pensionati contribuenti che vivono nel Regno Unito o in altri paesi in cui le loro pensioni sono state adeguate. Lui continuò:
“Come le persone spendono il loro reddito e dove lo fanno è una questioni riguardante una loro propria scelta. Alcuni possono scegliere di vivere in un paese dove è basso il costo di vivere o il cambio è favorevole, un’abitudine molto comune nelle generazioni precedenti che può o meno portare con sé svantaggi, ma questa è una questione di loro scelta personale. Il fattore comune ai fini di un paragone è che tutti i pensionati, in qualunque paese possano risiedere, hanno pagato debitamente i contributi richiesti per qualificare le loro pensioni. Se ad alcuni di loro non vengono pagate pensioni allo stesso tasso degli altri, secondo me ciò costituisce discriminazione ai sensi dell’ Articolo 14...”
Lord Carswell ha considerato perciò che il ricorso verteva sulla questione della giustificazione. Lui accettò che i tribunali dovrebbero essere lenti nell’intervento in questioni di politica macro-economica. Lui accettò inoltre che, se il Governo avesse esposto ragioni sufficienti di politica economica o Statale per giustificare la differenza nel trattamento, avrebbe dovuto essere pronto in modo appropriato a dare la precedenza al suo potere decisionale in quei campi. Comunque, nella presente causa la differenza nel trattamento non fu giustificata: come il Dipartimento stesso delle Social Security ha accettato, la ragione che tutte le pensioni non sono state adeguate era semplicemente risparmiare soldi, e non era equo designare come bersaglio il richiedente ed altri nella sua stessa posizione.
II. MATERIALE ATTINENTE DI NON-CONVENZIONE
A. La pensione di pensionamento Statale
37. La pensione Statale è un beneficio di contributi pagabile dall’ età pensionabile ad un individuo nel Regno Unito, che, per un numero richiesto di anni durante la sua “ vita lavorativa”, ha pagato o è stato accreditato con contributi al Fondo Nazionale Assicurativo (vedere l’Atto dei Contributi dei Benefici Previdenziali del 1992: “l'Atto del 1992”). I Contributi di Previdenza Sociale, pagabili dai lavoratori, datori di lavoro ed altri sotto l'Atto del 1992, insieme con tassazione, offre finanziamenti per il pagamento di un numero di benefici, incluso la pensione di pensionamento statale, l'assegno di disoccupazione, beneficio di incapacità, assegno di maternità ed i benefici per i superstiti. I contributi sono anche parte del finanziamento del Servizio Sanitario Statale.
B. Provvedimento per l’indice di collegamento all'interno del Regno Unito
38. Il livello della pensione Statale di base per un determinato anno è esposto nella sezione 44(4) dell'Atto del 1992. In ogni anno fiscale il Segretario di Stato è obbligato in virtù della sezione 150 dell’Atto Amministrativo Previdenziale del 1992 a fare una revisione delle somme specificate nelle sezione 44(4) dell'Atto del 1992 “per determinare se hanno mantenuto il loro valore in relazione al livello generale dei prezzi applicati in Gran Bretagna” ed a emettere un ordine d’indicizzazione di fronte al Parlamento nel caso in cui ritenga che il livello generale dei prezzi sia più elevato alla fine della revisione che all'inizio del periodo. La bozza dell’ordine deve aumentare la somma specificata nella sezione 44(4) di una percentuale che non inferiore a quella dell'aumento. A patto che il Parlamento approvi la bozza dell’ordine, allora in virtù della sezione 150(9) dell'Atto del 1992, la pensione Statale di base viene indicizzata annualmente in linea con l’inflazione del Regno Unito.
C. Pagamento della pensione Statale agli emigrati
39. La sezione 113(1) dell'Atto del 1992 crea un articolo generale che trattiene benefici, incluso le pensioni da tutti gli emigrati:
“Eccetto dove le regolamentazioni prevedono altrimenti, una persona sarà esclusa dal ricevere [benefici incluso la pensione Statale] per qualsiasi periodo durante il quale la persona è assente dalla Gran Bretagna;...”
40. Comunque, la sezione 113(3) dell'Atto del 1992 prevede che il Segretario di Stato possa adottare una legislazione secondaria che permetta ad una persona residente all’estero di ricevere un qualunque beneficio che le verrebbe concesso se vivesse nel Regno Unito. L’Articolo 4(1) delle Regolamentazioni del Beneficio Previdenziale ( Persone All'estero) del 1975 (SI 1975 N.ro 563: “le Regolamentazioni del 1975”), fatta sotto una disposizione simile nella precedente legislazione, prevede, nella parte attinente:
“Soggetta alle disposizioni di questa regolamentazione e della regolamentazione 5 sotto, ad una persona non sarà concesso di ricevere... una pensione di pensionamento di qualsiasi categoria... a ragione della sua assenza dalla Gran Bretagna.”
D. Non- pagamento agli emigrati dell’indicizzazione della pensione
41. L’Articolo 5 delle Regolamentazioni del1975 , comunque prevede che una persona che generalmente non risieda in Gran Bretagna, a meno che o finché non divengano di nuovo residenti, venga esonerata dal ricevere benefici d’indicizzazione.
42. Le Regolamentazioni applicabili al tempo in cui la Sig.ra C. avviò la sua rivendicazione di fronte ai tribunali del Regno Unito erano le Regolamentazioni dell’indicizzazione dei Benefici Previdenziali del 2001, SI 2001/910 (“le Regolamentazioni del 2001”). L’Articolo 3 delle 2001 Regolamentazioni prevede la richiesta di esonero al beneficio supplementare pagabile in virtù dell’Ordine d’indicizzazione dei Benefici Previdenziali (N. 2) del 2000, SI 2001 N.ro 207 incluso l’indicizzazione della pensione di pensionamento introdotta con l’articolo 4 dell'ordine del 2001 con effetto dal 9 aprile 2001:
“L’articolo 5 delle Regolamentazioni del Beneficio Previdenziale ( Persone All'estero) del 1975 (la richiesta dell’esonero rispetto all’indicizzazione del beneficio) si applicherà a qualsiasi beneficio supplementare pagabile in virtù dell’Ordine d’indicizzazione.”
Le Regolamentazioni furono pubblicate in una serie di volantini prodotti dal Dipartimento di Previdenza e di norma spedite ai residenti del Regno Unito che, per esempio, applicavano per pagare dall'estero i Contributi di Previdenza Sociale volontari .
E. accordi Reciproci
43. Con la sezione 179(1) dell’Atto Amministrativo Previdenziale del 1992, alla Regina vengono conferiti poteri tramite l’ Ordine nel Consiglio di creare disposizione per cambiare o adattare la legislazione attinente nella sua applicazione a casi riguardati da un accordo con un paese fuori dal Regno Unito che preveda la reciprocità in questioni relative a pagamenti ai fini simili o comparabili ai fini dell'Atto del 1992. Il fine di un accordo reciproco è di offrire una base reciproca di copertura di previdenza sociale più ampia a lavoratori e alle loro famiglie che si spostano fra gli Stati facenti parte dell’accordo che è disponibile solo sotto una legislazione nazionale. Accordi reciproci non sono stati stipulati solamente per permettere il pagamento degli aumenti annuali dell’indicizzazione ai beneficiari di pensioni residenti all'estero di pensioni del Regno Unito. La copertura degli accordi reciproci varia. Ciascuna risulta da negoziazioni fra il Regno Unito e lo Stato partner , prendendo in considerazione lo scopo per la reciprocità fra i due schemi di previdenza sociale.
44. Fra il 1948 ed il 1992 il Regno Unito entrò in accordi bilaterali, o accordi di previdenza sociale reciproci, con un numero di Stati esteri principalmente gli Stati Uniti d’ America, Giappone, Mauritius, Turchia, Bermuda, Giamaica e Israele. Con un'eccezione minore, gli accordi entrarono in vigore dopo il 1979 dopo l’adempimento dei più primi impegni dati dal Governo del Regno Unito. Accordi con Australia, Nuova Zelanda ed Canada, in cui vive la maggioranza dei pensionati emigrati inglesi, entrò in vigore rispettivamente nel 1953, 1956 e 1959; comunque non richiedevano il pagamento di pensioni indicizzate. L'accordo con l'Australia fu terminato dall'Australia con effetto dal 1 marzo 2001, a causa del rifiuto del Governo del Regno Unito di pagare pensioni indicizzate ai suoi pensionati che vivono in Australia. L’indicizzazione non è mai stata applicata a coloro che vivevano in Sud Africa, Australia, Canada e Nuova Zelanda.
45. Le Regolamentazioni dell’ EC sulla previdenza sociale per i lavoratori emigrati (la Regolamentazione (CEE) N. 1408/71, aggiornata) richiedono l’indicizzazione di benefici in tutta l'Unione europea.
46. L'esistenza di un accordo bilaterale non è necessaria per il pagamento dell’indicizzazione, siccome la questione viene regolata puramente dalla legislazione nazionale. Comunque, succede che indicizzazione non venga applicata ai pensionati non residenti a meno che non ci sia un accordo bilaterale .
47. Nella terza Relazione (gennaio 1997) della Casa del Comitato dei Comuni di Previdenza (Indicizzazione delle Pensioni Statali di Pensionamento Pagabile a Persone Residenti all’Estero; HC Paper 143), il Comitato riportò questo:
“È impossibile per discernere qualsiasi modello dietro alla selezione di paesi con i quali sono stati fatti accordi bilaterali che prevedevano l’indicizzazione.”
Il 13 novembre 2000 il Segretario di Stato (il Sig. Jeff Rooker) in una dichiarazione nella Casa dei Comuni (356 HC Relazione Ufficiale ( Serie 6) col. 628) concluse come segue:
“Io già ho detto non sono pronto a difendere la logica della situazione presente. È illogica. Non c'è modello coerente. Non importa se un paese sia nel Commonwealth o fuori da questo. Noi abbiamo disposizioni con dei paesi del Commonwealth e non con altri. Ci sono effettivamente, differenze fra i paesi dei Caraibi. Questo è un problema storico e la situazione esiste da anni. Costerebbe circa £300 milioni per cambiare la politica per tutti riguardati.”
F. Disposizioni di diritto internazionale
48. La Convenzione di Previdenza dell’Organizzazione Internazionale dei Lavoratori ( Standard Minimi) del 1952,prevede nell’ Articolo 69:
Articolo 69
“Un beneficio che altrimenti sarebbe concesso a una persona protetta in ottemperanza con qualsiasi della disposizione dalla Parte II alla X di questa Convenzione può essere sospeso nella misura in cui può essere prescritto-
(a) dal momento che la persona riguardata è assente dal territorio del Membro;...”
49. La disposizione sopra viene ripresa nell’ Articolo 68 del Codice europeo di Previdenza del 1964 che sono uno degli strumenti di base per la definizione degli standard del Consiglio d'Europa nel campo della previdenza sociale:
“Un beneficio che sarebbe altrimenti concesso a una persona in ottemperanza con una qualsiasi disposizione dalla Parte II alla X di questo Codice può essere sospeso nella misura in cui può essere prescritto:
dal momento che la persona riguardata è assente dal territorio della Parte Contraente riguardata;...”
G. Indicizzazione: pratica internazionale
50. Molti Stati impongono una restrizione sul pagamento di benefici fuori dal loro territorio. Comunque, sembra che il Regno Unito sia il solo a continuare a pagare una pensione agli emigrati restringendo la misura in cui gli emigrati che vivono in certi paesi possano trarre profitto dall’indice di collegamento.
51. I richiedenti hanno anche annesso alla loro istanza dichiarazioni di testimoni di impiegati statali che lavoravano per i Governi australiani e canadesi. La prima fu prodotta nel contesto dei procedimenti nazionali intrapresi dalla Sig.ra C.; la seconda è stato prodotta nel contesto della presente richiesta a questa Corte. La dichiarazione australiana dice che: (1) l'approccio del Governo del Regno Unito ha un effetto dannoso sulla maggior parte dei 220,000 pensionati del Regno Unito residenti in Australia; (2) la prospettiva formale del Governo australiano è che l'approccio del Regno Unito corrisponda a discriminazione illegale; (3) nel 2001 Australia terminò il suo Accordo Previdenziale col Regno Unito a causa del rifiuto del Regno Unito Governo di offrire un’indicizzazione delle pensioni ai suoi cittadini che risiedono in Australia; e (4) i pensionati australiani residenti nel Regno Unito godono della stessa indicizzazione annuale delle loro pensioni di quelli residenti in Australia.
52. La dichiarazione canadese dice che: (1) l'approccio del Governo Regno Unito colpisce virtualmente in modo diretto tutti i circa 151,000 pensionati britannici residenti in Canada; (2) l’indicizzazione è una caratteristica universale dei sistemi di previdenza sociale e la politica del Regno Unito di restringere arbitrariamente la sua applicazione riguardo a certi individui chiaramente è discriminatoria e contraria alla pratica internazionale accettabile nel campo delle pensioni pubbliche; e (3) l'insuccesso del Regno Unito di indicizzare le pensioni in Canada è la ragione per cui nessuna disposizioni sui benefici o l’abolizione di barriere per l’export sono contenute nella Convenzione Previdenziale Canada/ Regno Unito.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1, PRESO DA SOLO ED IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE
53. I richiedenti si lamentarono che la mancanza d’indicizzazione delle loro pensioni in linea con l’inflazione violò l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, preso da solo ed in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione, e gli Articoli 8 e 14 presi insieme.
L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 stabilisce:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato della sua proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, i provvedimenti precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire tali leggi se ritiene necessario controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
L’Articolo 14 della Convenzione legge come segue:
“Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà stabilite [nella] Convenzione verrà garantito senza discriminazione in merito a qualsiasi campo come il sesso, la razza, il colore, la lingua, la religione,l’ opinione politica o altro, cittadino o all’origine sociale, l'associazione con una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o altro status.”
A. le osservazioni delle parti
1. Il Governo
54. Il Governo ha accettato che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti rientrsse all'interno della sfera dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
55. Benché la Casa dei Lord fosse stata pronta a presumere che la residenza estera della Sig.ra C. fosse un fatto protetto sotto l’Articolo 14 poiché rientrava all'interno della frase “o altro status”, il Governo non era d'accordo. Indicò che la Corte aveva sostenuto costantemente che “lo status” all'interno dell’ Articolo 14 significava “una caratteristica personale... con la quale persone o gruppi di persone sono distinguibili da altre” (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen e Pedersen c. Danimarca, sentenza del 7 dicembre 1976 Serie A n. 23). Questa interpretazione era stata seguita più recentemente dalla Corte in Budak c. Turchia (( dec.), n. 57345/00, 7 settembre 2004) e Beale c. Regno Unito (( dec.) n. 16743/03, 12 ottobre 2004). La scelta della residenza non era simile caratteristica personale. Presentò che la decisione di vivere fuori dal Regno Unito era una questione di scelta piuttosto che di nascita, e non era una scelta dettata dalla coscienza dell'individuo o dal sistema di credenza profondamente sostenuto. Era difficile vedere quale valore centrale della Convenzione richiedesse la protezione della scelta personale della residenza. Inoltre, la scelta della residenza in più casi conduce inevitabilmente ad una serie di differenze nella posizione della persona riguardata derivanti da differenze nei sistemi nazionali incluso i sistemi di previdenza sociale. Le differenze fra la posizione della Sig.ra C. e dei due comparatori da lei scelti non sono scaturiti da nessuna caratteristica personale con la quale persone o gruppi erano distinguibili dall'un l'altro, ma invece da sistemi diversi e da condizioni che degli individui avevano scelto di vivere. Alternativamente, anche se la scelta di residenza potrebbe essere considerata una caratteristica personale all'interno del concetto di “altro status”, il fatto che era una questione di scelta voleva dire che, diversamente ad esempio per il sesso o la razza, non richiedeva uno scrutinio speciale e “ragioni molto pesanti” per giustificare una differenza di trattamento.
56. La Sig.ra C. e gli altri pensionati che vivono fuori dal Regno Unito non erano in una situazione analoga a quelli residenti nel Regno Unito o, se lo fossero, la differenza nel trattamento era ragionevolmente ed obiettivamente giustificata, come avevano trovato i tribunali nazionali. I Benefici di previdenza sociale, incluso la pensione Statale, facevano parte di un intricato e collegato sistema di benessere sociale e di tassazione esistenti per assicurare certi minimi standard di vita per quelli che vivono nel Regno Unito. Il Fondo Nazionale dei Contributi Assicurativi non potevano essere associati ai contributi di uno schema di pensione privato, perché i soldi sono stati usati, insieme con i soldi previsti dalla tassazione generale, per finanziare una serie di benefici diversi ed concessioni. La previdenza sociale e sistemi di tassazione negli altri Stati erano similmente complessi e concepiti su misura alle condizioni locali, incluso il costo della vita. Le differenze fra paesi riguardo ai tassi di inflazione, il tasso di scambio della valuta hanno reso inoltre difficile comparare la posizione dei residenti e dei non-residenti e le differenze hanno giustificato il trattamento riguardo all’indicizzazione della pensione. Per esempio, a causa del deprezzamento del rand la pensione della Sig.ra C., pagata in sterlina, valeva il 20% in più nell’ aprile 2002 che nell’ aprile 2001.
57. Lord Hoffmann aveva ragione nell'osservare che il dovere di qualsiasi comunità di aiutare qui suoi membri che sono in situazione di bisogno era “generalmente riconosciuto aver un carattere nazionale... non estendibile agli abitanti di paesi esteri.” Questo riconoscimento fu riflesso nella legislazione nazionale che prevedeva come regola generale che benefici procurati dall’ Assicurazione Nazionale erano pagabili solamente a coloro che abitavano in Gran Bretagna. Inoltre, il dovere di revisione imposto al Segretario di Stato dalla sezione 150 dell'Atto del 1992 (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra) era “di determinare se [i benefici] avevano trattenuto il loro valore in relazione al livello generale dei prezzi applicati in Gran Bretagna.” Il carattere nazionale degli schemi di welfare fu riconosciuto anche dal diritto internazionale, in trattati come la Convenzione Previdenziale ILO (Minimi Standard) del 1952 (Articolo 69) ed il Codice europeo di Previdenza del 1964 (vedere paragrafi 48-49 sopra). Il modello degli accordi bi-laterali era il risultato della storia e delle percezioni in ogni paese riguardo ai costi percepiti e ai benefici di tale disposizione Sarebbe stato il caso della Sig.ra C. di fronte alla Casa dei Lord che lei non avrebbe potuto rivendicare alcuna azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 se il Governo avesse scelto di non fare alcun provvedimento pensionistico ciò che per coloro che scelsero di vivere all'estero. Il Governo ha concordato con Lord Hoffmann che non potesse essere la legge che al Regno Unito fosse proibito di trattare generosamente i pensionati emigrati a meno che li trattasse precisamente allo stesso modo dei pensionati nazionali.
58. I Governi dovevano prendere decisioni difficili sullo stanziamento di risorse e sulla tassazione necessaria per procurare regolarmente simili uscite; la politica della previdenza sociale doveva inevitabilmente vertere sul fare distinzioni fra gruppi diversi per dirigere le risorse limitate per raggiungere un qualsiasi risultato considerato più auspicabile ad un determinato periodo . Simili decisioni spettavano prevalentemente a governi eletti in contatto con condizioni locali.
2. I richiedenti
59. I richiedenti contesero che diritto ad una pensione di pensionamento Statale di base era un “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La sezione 113(1)(a) dell'Atto del 1992 (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra) operò come interferenza o privazione di quella proprietà, poiché c'era un diritto generale all’indicizzazione della pensione da cui una persona residente all'estero in un paese senza un accordo reciproco d’indicizzazione col Regno Unito (un paese “congelato” ) era esclusa. Col tempo, la residenza continuata di ogni richiedente in un paese “congelato”, combinata con l'effetto dell'inflazione, aveva condotto all'erosione del valore della sua pensione al punto tale che la sua essenza come proprietà, sarebbe stata o lo sarebbe stata presto, distrutta. Così, il fine per il quale i richiedenti pagarono i loro contributi pensionistici per tutta la loro vita lavorativa, e atti a costituire la pensione di base, è stato annullato. All'interferenza è mancata la giustificazione e corrispose ad una violazione dei diritti dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
60. Inoltre, poiché l’ azione di reclamo ricadeva all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, si applicava l’Articolo 14. Presentarono che l'interpretazione stretta del termine “lo status” nella causa Kjeldsen (citata sopra) era stato sostituito da successive decisioni della Corte e che le circostanze delle decisioni di inammissibilità a cui il Governo si appellava erano marcatamente diverse da quelle nella presente causa. Presentarono che loro erano in qualsiasi caso le vittime di una differenza di trattamento basato su caratteristiche personali. La decisione in merito a dove vivere una volta raggiunto il pensionamento era il punto centrale dell’autonomia personale, e non era spesso una questione di libera scelta ma condizionata da fattori tali come un desiderio o il bisogno di restare vicino ai figli adulti. In cause come la presente in cui la discriminazione per motivi di residenza era in grado di avere un impatto pesante sul godimento dei diritti umani basilari come il diritto alla vita famigliare, la libertà di circolazione e la dignità della creatura umana, e in cui c'erano ripercussioni differenziali sulle donne (a causa della loro longevità) e sugli anziani, la Corte era autorizzata ad esaminare da vicino le azioni del Governo.
61. I richiedenti esortarono la Corte a guardarsi bene dal minare il requisito posto su un Governo di offrire una giustificazione per il trattamento differenziale trovando troppo prontamente che non c'era vero paragone fra i gruppi. I loro diritti ad una pensione Statale di base furono assicurati differentemente e meno favorevolmente rispetto ad almeno due altre classi attinenti di individui, vale a dire i pensionati con identiche storie lavorative e di contributi residenti sia nel Regno Unito sia in un altro paese in cui veniva pagata una pensione indicizzata. I tribunali nazionali si erano sbagliati nel concludere che la situazioni di uno dei richiedenti e di un individuo all'interno di ognuno di queste due classi non fossero analoghe. In particolare, ciascuno avrebbe speso precisamente lo stesso importo di tempo lavorando nel Regno Unito; ognuno avrebbe versato precisamente gli stessi contributi durante la sua vita lavorativa per ricevere una pensione Statale di base; ad ognuno sarebbe stato concesso lo stesso importo di pensione Statale raggiunta l’età del pensionamento; ognuno avrebbe un interesse identico nel sostenere il suo standard di vita dopo il pensionamento.
62. Il Governo sosteneva il carico di mostrare una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole per il trattamento differenziale. Nelle sue dichiarazioni pubbliche, il Governo aveva accettato comunque, che il ruolo dei paesi i cui residenti traevano profitto dall’indicizzazione della pensione di base era una questione di incidente storico, che mancava di logica o modello coerente. Paesi Vicini, come gli Stati Uniti di America ed il Canada o la Giamaica e Trinidad ed il Tobago, furono trattati differentemente nonostante le loro condizioni economiche simili ed anche a quei paesi, come Canada e Australia che hanno reso disponibile un’indicizzazione non fu offerto unilateralmente un qualsiasi accordo bilaterale reciproco attinente. Il non pagamento di pensioni indicizzate a pensionati britannici residenti in paesi “congelati” non poteva essere giustificato sulla base delle differenze obiettive delle loro posizioni comparate a pensionati residenti nel Regno Unito, perché il Governo non aveva condotto mai alcuna analisi attinente delle loro rispettive posizioni. Non si poteva semplicemente presumere che poiché i sistemi di previdenza sociale erano essenzialmente nazionali, doveva esistere in quegli altri paesi nei quali pensionati britannici risiedevano sistemi adeguati e corretti per la disposizione della previdenza sociale. Questi punti erano, nella prospettiva dei richiedenti, sostenuti fortemente dalla prova esposta da Age Concern (vedere paragrafi 64-67 sotto) che mostrò che, in molti paesi nei quali emigravano, i pensionati britannici affrontavano la perdita del benessere, dei benefici di previdenza sanitaria e sociale che avrebbero ricevuto se fossero rimasti nel Regno Unito senza ottenere accesso a benefici comparabili nel loro paese ospitante.
3. La terza parte
63. L’Age Concern dell’Inghilterra ha enfatizzato che la forza della famiglia di una persona più anziana ed di un'altra rete di sostegno sociale influenza direttamente la sua capacità di affrontare la loro fragilità in aumento. Le reti di parentela hanno adempiuto un numero di ruoli vitali per le persone più anziane , incluso la disposizione della cura informale, la prevenzione dell’ isolamento e dell’esclusione, e l'avvocatura per aiutare l'esercizio dei diritti dei più anziani e l’ accesso a servizi appropriati. L'Istituto della Politica di Ricerca aveva trovato in un studio pubblicato nel 2006 che quasi un quinto delle persone più anziane residenti all'estero si erano trasferiti permanentemente per la famiglia o per ragioni personali.
64. Comunque, le considerazioni finanziarie ed la loro ripercussione sulla famiglia hanno giocato una parte influente nella decisione di una persona più anziana di emigrare. Gruppi di focalizzazione sostenuti dall’Age Concern dell’Inghilterra coi membri più anziani della comunità cinese indicava che l’accesso a benefici e alla pensione Statale indicizzata ha giocato una parte significativa nella decisione di un individuo a non ritornare al suo paese di origine alla vecchiaia. La pensione Statale del Regno Unito non è stata indicizzata in cinque dei dieci paesi più popolari per la migrazione dei cittadini britannici, vale a dire Cina, Australia, Canada, Sud Africa e Nuova Zelanda. Si potrebbe presumere perciò che una grande proporzione della popolazione più anziana avesse una famiglia residente in paesi in cui la pensione Statale non era stata indicizzata ed il rifiuto forzato di indicizzazione limita, perciò la capacità di un gran numero di persone più anziane di ricongiungersi all'estero con le loro famiglie.
65. La ricerca dell’Age Concern dell’Inghilterra ha mostrato che in molti paesi a un emigrante più anziano non verrebbe pienamente ricompensata la perdita di welfare e di benefici di previdenza sociale e sanitaria del Regno Unito da nessun guadagno nel paese ospite. Coloro che hanno scelto di trasferirsi all'estero frequentemente affrontarono uno sforzo finanziario estremo come risultato della politica di non indicizzare la pensione Statale e l’Age Concern d’Inghilterra fu regolarmente contattato dagli emigranti anziani in difficoltà. Per un certo numero significativo, i problemi sono diventati insormontabili e non c'era nessuna alternativa se non quella di ritornare nel Regno Unito. La ragione più comune per le persone dell'età di circa 50 che sono rimpatriate era l’indigenza ed un trasferimento sotto queste circostanze era probabilmente estremamente traumatico.
66. La politica di congelare la pensione Statale ha avuto un effetto particolarmente avverso per le pensionate donne. Perché molte donne si erano astenute dal lavoro retribuito per accudire i figli o gli altri membri di famiglia, come gruppo era meno probabile rispetto a quello degli uomini che venisse concesso loro una pensione Statale completa o che avessero acquisito un diritto ad una pensione privata. Inoltre, le donne in Gran Bretagna dell'età di circa 65 avevano una presunta aspettativa media di vita di 19.7 anni mentre la presunta aspettativa della vita degli uomini della stessa età era di 16.9 anni.
B. la valutazione della Corte
1. Ammissibilità
67La Corte richiama che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 si applica solamente alla proprietà realmente esistente di una persona e non garantisce il diritto ad acquisire una proprietà (vedere Marckx c. Belgio, sentenza del 13 giugno 1979 Serie A n. 31, § 50). Ne segue che non c'è nessuno diritto sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 di ricevere un beneficio di previdenza sociale o un pagamento di una pensione di qualsiasi il genere o importo, a meno che la legge nazionale preveda tale diritto (vedere Stec ed Altri c. Regno Unito ( dec.) [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 55 ECHR 2005-II).
68. Nella presente causa, la legge nazionale non prevede che un’indicizzazione collegata venga pagata a pensionati del Regno Unito, che come i richiedenti vivono in paesi che non hanno concluso accordi reciproci col Regno Unito (vedere paragrafo 39 sopra). Il fatto che i richiedenti pagarono contributi al Fondo Nazionale di Previdenza Sociale dal quale si sono procurati parzialmente la pensione di pensionamento Statale (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra), non offre un diritto sotto la legge nazionale, comparabile ad un diritto contrattuale sotto uno schema pensionistico privato, ad una pensione di pensionamento Statale di qualsiasi particolare importo (vedere i commenti di Lord Hoffmann nella Casa dei Lord: paragrafo 35 sopra).
69. Ne segue che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto lArticolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo è ratione materiae incompatibile.
70. Riguardo all'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti in merito alla discriminazione causata dal rifiuto d’indicizzare la oensione, la Corte richiama che l'Articolo 14 è complementare alle altre disposizioni effettive della Convenzione e dei Protocolli. Non ha esistenza indipendente poiché ha solamente effetto in relazione al “pacifico godimento dei diritti e delle libertà” salvaguardate da quelle disposizioni. L’applicazione dell’ Articolo 14 non presuppone necessariamente la violazione di uno dei diritti effettivi garantiti dalla Convenzione. È necessario ma è anche sufficiente per i fatti della causa rientrare “all'interno dell'ambito” di uno o più degli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Stec ed Altri ( dec.), citata sopra, § 39; Burden c. Regno Unito [GC], n. 13378/05, § 58 ECHR 2008). La proibizione della discriminazione nell’ Articolo 14 si estende così oltre al godimento dei diritti e delle libertà che la Convenzione e Protocolli costringe ogni Stato a garantire. Si applica anche a quei diritti supplementari, rientrando all'interno della sfera generale di qualsiasi articolo della Convenzione che lo Stato ha deciso volontariamente di prevedere (Stec ed Altri (dec.), citata sopra, § 40).
71. Mentre, come affermato sopra, non c'è obbligo per uno Stato sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 di creare uno schema di welfare o pensionistico, la Corte ha sostenuto che se un Stato Contraente decide di decretare una legislazione che preveda di pieno diritto il pagamento di un beneficio di welfare o pensionistico - sia condizionale o meno sul pagamento precedente di contributi - questa legislazione deve essere considerata come generatrice di un interesse di proprietà riservato che incorre all'interno dell'ambito dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 per persone che soddisfano i suoi requisiti (Stec ed Altri (dec.), citata sopra, § 54). In cause, come la presente riguardo ad un'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 al motivo che al richiedente è stato negato tutto o parte di un particolare beneficio sulla base di un fatto discriminatorio coperto dall’ Articolo 14, la verifica attinente è se, eccetto per la condizione di diritto circa la quale il richiedente si lamenta, abbia avuto un diritto, esecutorio sotto il diritto nazionale, di ricevere il beneficio in oggetto. Benché Protocollo N.ro 1 non includa il diritto di ricevere un pagamento di previdenza sociale di qualsiasi genere, se un Stato decide di creare un schema di benefici, deve fare in modo che sia compatibile con l’Articolo 14 (Stec ed Altri (dec.), citata sopra, § 55).
72. Nella presente causa c'è una differenza chiara di trattamento fra le varie categorie di pensionati del Regno Unito che dipendono dal loro paese di residenza. La Corte considera che l'azione di reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 sollevi dei problemi complessi di legge e di fatto, la cui determinazione dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei meriti.
Conclude, perciò, che questa parte della richiesta non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell' Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nessun altro fatto d'inammissibilità è stato sollevato e deve essere dichiarata ammissibile.
2. I meriti
73. La Corte ha stabilito nella sua giurisprudenza che solamente le differenze di trattamento basate su una caratteristica identificabile, o “sullo status”, sono in grado di corrispondere ad una discriminazione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 14 (Kjeldsen, Busk Madsen e Pedersen citata sopra, § 56). Inoltre, perché una questione possa essere posta sotto l’ Articolo 14 ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento di persone in situazioni analoghe, o relativamente simili (D.H. ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca [GC], n. 57325/00, § 175 ECHR 2007). Tale differenza di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; in altre parole, se non persegue un scopo legittimo o se non c'è un rapporto ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi adottati e lo scopo che ci si auspica di raggiungere. Lo Stato Contraente gode di un margine di valutazione nel valutare se ed in quale misura le differenze in situazioni in altro modo simili giustifichino un trattamento diverso (Burden citata sopra, § 60). La sfera di questo margine varierà secondo le circostanze, la materia-questione e l’ambito. Un margine ampio è concesso allo Stato sotto la Convenzione di solito quando tratta misure generali di strategia economica o sociale. A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue necessità, le autorità nazionali sono in principio messe meglio rispetto al giudice internazionale per valutare ciò che è nell'interesse pubblico per motivi sociali o economici, e la Corte generalmente rispetterà la scelta della politica della legislatura a meno che sia “manifestamente senza fondamento ragionevole” (Stec ed Altri c. Regno Unito, [GC], N. 65731/01 e 65900/01, § 52 ECHR 2006).
74. Nell’Alta Corte e nella Corte d'appello, il Governo concedette, che la residenza costituiva uno “status” all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 14 della Convenzione; nella Casa dei Lord, il Governo non contese similmente, che i motivi di residenza non potevano essere inclusi all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 14 e si è presunto nelle sentenze della Casa che essere residente in un paese fuori dal Regno Unito ordinariamente era una “caratteristica personale” ai fini della verifica nella causa Kjeldsen (vedere paragrafo 33 sopra).
75. La Corte richiama che la lista esposta nell’ Articolo 14 è illustrativi e non esauriente, siccome mostrato dalle parole “qualsiasi campo come” (in francese “ notamment”) (vedere Engel ed Altri c. Paesi Bassi, sentenza dell’ 8 giugno 1976 Serie A n. 22, § 72). Richiama ulteriore che alle parole “altro status” (ed a fortiori in francese “toute autre situation”) è stato dato un significato ampio così da includere, in certe circostanze una distinzione derivata sulla base della residenza. Nelle precedenti cause la Corte ha esaminato così, sotto l’Articolo 14 la legittimità della discriminazione addotta basata, inter alia, sul domicilio all'estero (Johnston c. Irlanda, sentenza del 18 dicembre 1986 Serie A n. 112, §§ 59-61) e la registrazione come residente (Darby c. Svezia, sentenza del 23 ottobre 1990 Serie A n. 187, §§ 31-34). Inoltre, la Commissione ha esaminato azioni di reclamo in merito a discrepanze nella legge che si applica in aree diverse di un singolo Stato Contraente (Lindsay ed Altri c. Regno Unito, n. 8364/78, decisione della Commissione dell’ 8 marzo 1979, Decisioni e Relazioni 15, p. 247; Gudmundsson c. Islanda, n. 23285/94, decisione della Commissione del 17 gennaio 1996 non riportata). È vero si è ritenuto che le differenze regionali di trattamento, essendo il risultato dell’applicazione di una diversa legislazione che dipende dall'ubicazione geografica di un richiedente, non debbano essere spiegate in termini di caratteristiche personali (vedere, per esempio, Magee c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 6 giugno 2000 n. 28135/95, § 50 ECHR 2000-I). Comunque, come indicato da Stanley Burnton J., queste cause non sono comparabili alla presente causa che comporta l’applicazione diversa della stessa legislazione pensionistica a persone che dipendono dalla loro residenza e presenza all'estero.
76. La Corte considera che, nelle circostanze della presente causa, la residenza ordinaria, come il domicilio e la nazionalità sarà considerata un aspetto di status personale e che la residenza applicato come criterio per il trattamento differenziale di cittadini nella concessione di pensioni Statali è un ambito che ricade all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 14.
77. La discriminazione significa un insuccesso nel trattare allo stesso modo casi simili; non c'è discriminazione quando le cause sono effettivamente diverse. I richiedenti contendono di essere in una posizione effettivamente simile a quella dei pensionati del Regno Unito che vivono nel Regno Unito o in paesi in cui vi è a disposizione un’indicizzazione , per i motivi, in primo luogo, che hanno speso lo stesso importo di tempo lavorativo nel Regno Unito e hanno versato gli stessi contributi al Fondo Nazionale di Previdenza Sociale e, in secondo luogo, che il loro bisogno di un standard di vita ragionevole durante la loro vecchiaia è lo stesso. Ogni giudice nazionale che ha esaminato le azioni di reclamo dei richiedenti, ad eccezione di Lord Carswell (vedere paragrafi 24-36 sopra), ha sostenuto che i richiedenti non si trovassero in una situazione analoga, o effettivamente simile, a quella di un pensionato della stessa età e di stessa vita di versamento di contributi che vive nel Regno Unito o in un paese in cui era disponibile un’indicizzazione.
78. La Corte prima considererà se i richiedenti sono in una situazione analoga ai pensionati britannici che hanno scelto di rimanere nel Regno Unito. Nota a questo riguardo che si intende che il sistema di previdenza sociale dello Stato Contraente, incluso il sistema che ha scelto di prevedere per coloro che sono ritenuti troppo vecchi per il lavoro remunerato offra un minimo di standard di vita per, quelli residenti all'interno del suo territorio (e tutto questo è richiesto sotto l'Organizzazione Internazionale del Lavoro e le Convenzioni del Consiglio d’Europa sulla Previdenza Sociale: vedere paragrafi 48-49 sopra). Per questa ragione, benché la Corte abbia sostenuto che le parole “altro status” sia abbastanza ampio da includere la residenza, considera che gli individui ordinariamente residenti all'interno dello Stato Contraente non siano in una situazione effettivamente analoga a quelli che risiedono fuori dal territorio per quanto riguarda l'operazione pensionistica o i sistemi di previdenza sociale. Come la Commissione ha trovato in J.W. ed E.W. c. Regno Unito (n. 9776/82, decisione della Commissione del 3 ottobre 1983, Decisioni e Relazioni 34, p. 156), esaminando una richiesta da parte di un pensionato britannico al quale fu negata una pensione indicizzata a seguito di un trasferimento in ad Australia:
“è quasi inevitabile che nel caso in cui una persona in effetti cambi da un sistema di previdenza sociale ad un altro, possa trovare che i suoi diritti differiscano da quelli delle persone in altri paesi. A seconda delle circostanze simili differenze possono o meno essere a favore dell'individuo.
Inoltre la Commissione nota che i richiedenti perderanno solamente il beneficio degli aumenti futuri delle loro pensioni il cui fine deve compensare parlando in generale gli aumenti del costo della vita nel Regno Unito. Dato che loro non vivono più nel Regno Unito sembra ragionevole che questo elemento nei loro diritti pensionistici in particolare dovrebbe essere sostituito dalla possibilità di ottenere benefici sotto il sistema del paese in cui si trasferiscono .”
Inoltre, la Corte nota in questo contesto che si trattava del caso della Sig.ra C. di fronte alla Casa dei Lord il fatto che lei non avrebbe potuto avere azione di reclamo sotto l’ Articolo 14 se il Governo avesse scelto di non fare alcun provvedimento pensionistico per quelli che hanno scelto di vivere all'estero.
79. La Corte , inoltre, esita nel trovare un'analogia fra le posizioni dei richiedenti che vivono in paesi“congelato”, e i pensionati britannici residenti in paesi fuori dal Regno Unito in cui è disponibile l’indicizzazione . In questo contesto, la Corte nota, che i Contributi di Previdenza Nazionale sono solamente una parte del sistema complesso di tassazione del Regno Unito e che il Fondo Nazionale di Previdenza e è uno delle fonti di reddito utilizzate per finanziare i sistemi di Previdenza Sociale e Sanitaria per il Cittadino del Regno Unito. Non considera che il pagamento dei richiedenti dei Contributi di Previdenza Sociale Nazionale durante le loro vite lavorative nel Regno Unito abbia più significato del fatto che loro abbiano potuto pagare un’ imposta sul reddito o altre tasse mentre erano residenti là (vedere Stec ed Altri (dec) [GC], citata sopra, § 50). Rivolgendosi al secondo argomento dei richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 75 sopra), la Corte è dell’opinione che anche fra Stati in prossimità geografica e vicini, come gli Stati Uniti d’ America e il Canada, il Sud Africa e Mauritius, o Giamaica e Trinidad ed il Tobago le differenze nelle disposizioni della previdenza sociale, nella tassazione,nei tassi di inflazione, nell’interesse e nel cambio di valuta rendono difficili confrontare le rispettive posizioni dei residenti.
80. In qualsiasi caso, anche se si potesse dire che i richiedenti fossero in una posizione analoga ai residenti dei paesi, in cui le pensioni sono indicizzate sotto accordi reciproci, la Corte considera che la differenza nel trattamento abbia una giustificazione obbiettiva e ragionevole. Mentre c'è del vigore nell'argomento dei richiedenti, a cui ha fatto eco l’Age Concern, per il quale la decisione di una persona anziana di trasferirsi all'estero possa essere guidata da un certo numero di fattori, incluso il desiderio di essere vicino ai membri della famiglia il posto della residenza è nondimeno una caratteristica che può essere cambiata come questione di scelta. La Corte si concorda perciò col Governo e con i tribunali nazionali per cui l'individuo non richieda lo stesso alto livello di protezione contro le differenze di trattamento basate su questo fatto come richiesto in relazione alle differenze basate su una caratteristica inerente, come genere od origine razziale o etnica (vedere, per esempio, Van Raalte c. Paesi Bassi, sentenza del 21 febbraio 1997 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-I, § 39; D.H. ed Altri, citata sopra, § 176, e confronta Magee, citata sopra, § 50). È, inoltre, pertinente in questo contesto che lo Stato intraprenda dei passi per informare i residenti del Regno Unito che si trasferiscono all'estero in merito all’assenza di collegamento dell’indice per le pensioni in certi paesi specificati (vedere paragrafo 42 sopra). Così ognuno dei richiedenti avrebbe potuto prendere in considerazione questo fattore fra tutte le altre ragioni a favore e contro per la scelta del paese di residenza.
81. Come Lord Hoffmann ha enfatizzato, il modello degli accordi reciproci è il risultato della storia e delle percezioni in ogni paese riguardo alla percezione dei costi e benefici di tale disposizione. Loro rappresentano tutto ciò che lo Stato Contraente è stato in grado negoziare senza mettersi in uno svantaggio economico indebito e di applicare per offrire reciprocità di copertura di previdenza sociale attraverso l'asse, non solo in relazione all’indicizzazione della pensione. Nella prospettiva della Corte, lo Stato non supera il margine molto ampio di valutazione di cui gode nelle questioni di politica macro-economica entrando in disposizioni così reciproche con certi paesi ma non con altri.
82. Ne segue che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 sui fatti della presente causa.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESA IN CONCOMITANZA CON L’ARTICOLO 8
83. I richiedenti si lamentarono inoltre che poiché alcuni di loro hanno dovuto scegliere fra sacrificare una grande parte del loro diritto alla pensione o vivere lontano dalle loro famiglie, l'assenza d’indicizzazione è corrisposta anche ad una violazione dei loro diritti sotto l’Articolo 14 preso in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 8. L’Articolo 8 prevede:
“1. Ognuno ha diritto al rispetto della sua vita privata famigliare, della sua casa e della sua corrispondenza.
2. Non ci sarà interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica con l'esercizio di questo diritto ad eccezione che sia in conformità con la legge e sia necessario in una società democratica negli interessi della sicurezza nazionale, della sicurezza pubblica o del benessere economico del paese, per la prevenzione del disturbo o del crimine, per la protezione della salute o della morale, o per la protezione dei diritti e delle libertà altrui.”
84. La Corte considera che gli stessi argomenti applicati in relazione all’ Articolo 8 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14 si applicano in relazione all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 14. Non considera perciò necessario considerare separatamente questa azione di reclamo.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità l'azione di reclamo riguardo all’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ammissibile e l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 preso da solo inammissibile ;
2. Sostiene per sei voti ad uno che non c'è stata nessuna violazione dell’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
3. Sostiene all’unanimità che non è necessario considerare l'azione di reclamo sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in concomitanza con l’ Articolo 8.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 4 novembre 2008, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli della Corte.
Fatoş Aracı, Lech Garlicki
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 74 § 2 degli Articoli della Corte, l'opinione dissidente di Lech Garlicki è annessa a questa sentenza.
L.G.
F.A.
OPINIONE DISSIDENTE DEL GIUDICE GARLICKI
Con mio rammarico, non posso sottoscrivere la costatazione della Camera di nessuna violazione.
Questa causa è sull'esclusione dei pensionati che vivono all'estero dallo schema d’indicizzazione collegato applicabile a tutti i pensionati nel Regno Unito. Non si contesta che c'è una differenza chiara fra le varie categorie di pensionati che dipendono dal loro paese effettivo di residenza. Non è contestato inoltre che, nelle circostanze di questa causa, il fatto che la residenza sia stata applicata come criterio per il trattamento differenziale porta la causa all'interno della sfera dell’ Articolo 14.
Secondo me, comunque la differenza nel trattamento non ha giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole. C'è del vigore negli argomenti presentati dalla maggioranza per i quali, in grande misura, riproducono la posizione presa dalla maggioranza della Casa dei Lord. Ci sono almeno comunque, quattro argomenti che possono garantire un'altra conclusione.
In primo luogo, lo schema di pensione Statale è obbligatorio ed è basato sul principio dei contributi. Anche se non c'è collegamento automatico fra l'importo dei contributi e l'importo della pensione futura, l’ idea stessa è la distribuzione degli obblighi: quelli che lavorano devono contribuire al fondo pensioni Statale e lo Stato deve pagare pensioni a quelli che non sono più in età lavorativa. La Sig.ra C., così come gli altri richiedenti, hanno adempiuto la loro parte completamente : per la maggior parte della sua vita lavorativa lei pagò contributi (così come le tasse) e quei contributi sono stati accettati volentieri dallo Stato. I suoi contributi furono spesi (come noi dovremmo sperare) per le pensioni dei pensionati attuali ed anche per l'indicizzazione annuale delle loro pensioni. Non c'era differenza fra lei e tutte le altre persone che lavoravano nel Regno Unito a quel tempo. Ora lei non è più in età lavorativa, è tempo per lo Stato di soddisfare i suoi obblighi. Lo Stato la tratta differentemente comunque, solamente dagli altri contribuenti a causa della sua nuova residenza. Il fatto che lei non risieda nel Regno Unito non comporta alcuna spesa extra per lo Stato. Mentre è vero che lei non è più una contribuente nel Regno Unito, non ci sono proibizioni-sotto la nostra Convenzione –d’imposizione di una tassa del Regno Unito basata sul suo reddito del Regno Unito-, qualunque sia il suo importo. Ma diversamente da quelli che sono rimasti nel Regno Unito, lei è stata privata del diritto d’indicizzazione di collegamento. Le considerazioni di giustizia sociale e d'equità richiedono che persone che hanno contribuito debitamente alle pensioni altrui non dovrebbero essere trattate differentemente nel successivo calcolo susseguente della loro propria pensione. Il trattamento differenziale basato solamente sulla residenza attuale non ha collegamento con la natura contribuente delle pensioni e, perciò, è privo di una giustificazione ragionevole.
In secondo luogo, uno degli argomenti sollevati sia dalla Casa dei Lord dia dalla nostra Corte concerne le differenze economiche fra il Regno Unito e i paesi effettivi di residenza. È vero che ci sono livelli diversi d'inflazione, ritmi diversi di crescita e cambi diversi in relazione alla valuta del Regno Unito. Ma c'è una caratteristica comune per tutti i paesi coinvolti, e questa caratteristica è l'inflazione. Così, è difficile accettare che la situazione dei residenti del Regno Unito sia fondamentalmente diversa da quella dei non residenti nel Regno Unito. La legislatura non ha, chiaramente, nessun obbligo d’indicizzare le pensioni secondo l'inflazione del paese ospite. Le è concesso anche correggere l’indicizzazione per prendere in conto e differenze fra i particolari paesi, ma non può ignorare semplicemente la stessa esistenza dell'inflazione come una caratteristica economica e comune del mondo moderno. Tale regolamentazione penalizza persone che, dopo avere adempiuto la loro parte a favore dello schema contribuente, si trasferiscono all'estero. Simile penalizzazione va contro al principio della libertà individuale e, perciò, non può essere considerata ragionevolmente come giustificata.
In terzo luogo, il sistema esistente non è basato su un qualunque schema convincente. Come fu osservato dalle autorità nazionali (vedere paragrafo 47 della sentenza), sarebbe difficile “difendere la logica della presente situazione... Non c'è modello coerente.” Di conseguenza, la situazione dei pensionati britannici varia da paese a paese. Questo rende i riferimenti della maggioranza alla dottrina del margine -di- valutazione (vedere paragrafo 81 della sentenza) meno convincente. Sotto questa dottrina, allo Stato è permesso di ideare i suoi propri modi per affrontare i problemi sociali ed economici. Se il Regno Unito avesse sviluppato una soluzione coerente e logica al problema di collegamento d’indicizzazione per i residenti esteri, sarebbe stato più facile accettarlo. Ma la dottrina del margine di valutazione non può legittimare una situazione di natura illogica e, perciò, arbitraria.
Infine, ho rispetto completo per la posizione della Casa dei Lord per la quale la questione è più legislativa che giudiziale per natura. Comunque, tale argomento, pur convincendo a livello nazionale, non può prevalere di fronte alla nostra Corte. Una violazione che è il risultato di omissioni legislative è ancora all'interno della portata della soprintendenza europea.
Questa Corte ha in molte occasioni trovato che le differenziazioni nei benefici sociali basate sulla nazionalità sono inerentemente sospette. Particolarmente in Gaygusuz c. Austria (16 settembre 1996, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-IV), Koua Pouirrez c. Francia (n. 40892/98, ECHR 2003-X) e Luczak c. Polonia (n. 77782/01, ECHR 2007 -...), la differenziazione fra i residenti basata sulla nazionalità (la cittadinanza) fu trovata essere in violazione dell’ Articolo 14. Non sono convinto che la differenziazione fra cittadini basata sulla residenza sia così fondamentalmente diversa tanto che la Sig.ra C. dovrebbe godere di una minore protezione rispetto a quella offerta ai richiedenti nelle cause summenzionate.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.