Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF DRUZSTEVNI ZALOZNA PRIA AND OTHERS v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 6, P1-1

NUMERO: 72034/01/2008
STATO: Repubblica Ceca
DATA: 31/07/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Reminder inadmissible ; Damage - reserved

FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF DRUŽSTEVNÍ ZÁLOŽNA PRIA AND OTHERS v. THE CZECH REPUBLIC
(Application no. 72034/01)
JUDGMENT
(merits)
STRASBOURG
31 July 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Družstevní Záložna Pria and Others v. the Czech Republic,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Rait Maruste,
Karel Jungwiert,
Renate Jaeger,
Mark Villiger,
Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre,
Zdravka Kalaydjieva, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 July 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 72034/01) against the Czech Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by D. Z. P., a credit union, and eight other applicants, Mr J. M., Mr F. Z., Mr V. O., Mr K. P., Mrs D. K., Mr J. F., Mrs L. K. and Mrs J. S., members of the credit union and of its management and supervisory organs, on 26 March 2001. In the course of the proceedings before the Court, 633 individuals1, members of the credit union, whose names have been submitted to the Court, joined the proceedings. The first applicant is a legal entity with registered seat in Brno (hereinafter “the applicant credit union”) created under the Credit Unions Act (zákon o sporitelních a uverních družstvech – “the Act”). Its incorporation became effective on 23 August 1995. The individuals are Czech nationals.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr M. N., a lawyer practising in Prague. The Czech Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr V.A. Schorm, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicants complained under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention of interference with their property rights and their right to an effective domestic remedy.
4. By a decision of 31 January 2006, the Court declared inadmissible the complaint of the individual applicants submitted under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, and declared the rest of the applicants’ complaints admissible, deciding to join to the merits the question concerning the victim status of the individual applicants.
5. The applicants and the Government each filed further written observations (Rule 59 § 1). The Chamber decided, after consulting the parties, that no hearing on the merits was required (Rule 59 § 3 in fine).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. On 11 January 2000 the Office for the Supervision of Credit Unions (Úrad pro dohled nad družstevními záložnami) (“the OSCU”) placed the applicant credit union in receivership (nucená správa) for a period of six months under section 28(3)(c) of the Act, on the ground that it had contravened the legislation in question, having engaged in activities outside its remit without authorisation. A receiver (nucený správce) was appointed to replace the applicant credit union’s decision-making bodies. The OSCU was acting under section 27(1) of the Act read in conjunction with section 26(2) of the Banks Act (zákon o bankách).
7. Referring to an audit of the applicant credit union’s activities, the OSCU noted that the applicant credit union had on 6 May 1999 concluded three contracts with S7, a limited liability company, under the terms of which the latter had assigned to the applicant credit union receivables due to it from two debtor companies, amounting to CZK 126,235,132 (EUR 3,366,5822) in total, for an agreed price of CZK 14,431,000 (EUR 384,862). The OSCU ruled that the applicant credit union had thereby purchased the receivables of a third party by effectively covering the latter’s debt. It qualified the transaction as a loan to a third party. Since section 3 of the Act prohibited credit unions from providing loans to non-members, the OSCU concluded that the applicant credit union had acted in flagrant breach of the Act.
8. The OSCU further noted that the auditors had discovered that the applicant credit union had entered into a contract on 2 and 5 August 1999 to grant a loan of CZK 22,000,000 (EUR 586,721) to a limited liability company, MLM Brno, and had signed two contracts on 25 June 1999 with OPES, a joint stock company, for the purchase of securities (cenné papíry) at a total price of CZK 41,200,056 (EUR 1,098,770). The OSCU ruled that these transactions were also illegal, as section 1(6) read in conjunction with section 3 of the Act did not allow credit unions to acquire securities other than public bonds (dluhopisy), municipal bonds (komunální obligace) or mortgage bonds (hypotecní zástavní listy).
9. The receivership became effective on 12 January 2000, when the applicant credit union was notified of the OSCU’s decision.
10. On 26 March 2000 the applicant credit union lodged a constitutional appeal (ústavní stížnost) with the Constitutional Court (Ústavní soud) against the receivership order and applied at the same time for an order striking down certain provisions of the Act. It relied, inter alia, on section 75(2)(a) of the Constitutional Court Act, which enables the Constitutional Court to hear a constitutional appeal even if domestic remedies have not been exhausted, if it substantially affects the appellant’s personal interests.
11. On 7 April 2000, following an administrative appeal by the applicant credit union, the Ministry of Finance upheld the receivership order of 11 January 2000.
12. On the same date a petition to adjudge the applicant credit union bankrupt (konkusní rízení) was filed with the Brno Regional Court (krajský soud). During 2001 a large number of creditors joined the proceedings.
13. On an unspecified date the applicant credit union applied for judicial review (správní žaloba) of the imposition of receivership under Article 247 et seq. of the Code of Civil Procedure, asserting that the statutory conditions for such a step on the part of the OSCU had not been met.
14. On 1 May 2000 Act no. 100/2000 entered into force, extensively amending the Act (hereinafter “the amended Act”). The powers of supervisory boards of credit unions were confined to the right to appeal decisions adopted by the OSCU.
15. On 21 June 2000 the OSCU granted the receiver permission to suspend withdrawals from deposit accounts held with the applicant credit union in view of its precarious financial situation. According to its findings, the sum owed by the applicant credit union on outstanding term deposits amounted to at least CZK 83,000,000 (EUR 2,213,539), while the cash available in its current accounts was only CZK 21,500,000 (EUR 573,386).
16. On 12 July 2000 the OSCU renewed the receivership order under the amended Act as the previously identified deficiencies remained. It referred, inter alia, to the first receivership order and to three decisions by which it had prohibited or restricted the applicant credit union’s activities, including withdrawals from deposit accounts (decision nos. 322/2000/II of 20 January 2000, 1217/2000/II of 9 March 2000 and 2407/2000/II of 25 April 2000).
17. On 9 November 2000 the Ministry of Finance upheld that decision.
18. On 12 December 2000 the Constitutional Court dismissed the applicant credit union’s constitutional appeal for non-exhaustion of ordinary remedies under section 75(1) of the Constitutional Court Act. It reiterated that the principle requiring the exhaustion of ordinary remedies could be derogated from in exceptional circumstances if the effective protection of constitutionally guaranteed fundamental rights and freedoms was endangered. It found that, contrary to section 72(1) of the Constitutional Court Act, which provides, inter alia, that “a constitutional appeal may be introduced by any natural person who claims to be the victim of a breach of the fundamental rights or freedoms recognised in a constitutional law or an international treaty by a valid decision taken in proceedings to which he was a party”, the applicant credit union had lodged its constitutional appeal before the receivership order had become effective.
19. On 15 January 2001 the applicant credit union, represented by the president of its supervisory board, applied for judicial review, challenging the Ministry of Finance’s decision of 9 November 2000.
20. On 10 and 25 January, 2 February, 4 April and 3 May 2001 respectively (decisions nos. 114/2001, 369/2001, 838/2001, 1645/2001 and 2134/2001), the OSCU allowed the receiver to suspend withdrawals from deposit accounts held with the applicant credit union.
21. According to the Government, on 6 June 2001 the OSCU granted the receiver permission to file on its own a petition with a court to adjudge the credit union bankrupt, which he did on 18 June 2001.
22. On 9 July 2001 the Regional Court appointed an interim trustee (predbežný správce).
23. On 12 July 2001 the OSCU again placed the applicant credit union in receivership. It based its decision on the applicant credit union’s report of 3 July 2001 which included a statement of its outstanding debts and available funds. It was noted in the report that the applicant credit union was insolvent, as it had only CZK 59,257,000 (EUR 1,580,333) at its disposal, which was insufficient to enable it to honour its outstanding debts of at least CZK 218,000,000 (EUR 5,813,872). Moreover, because of its lack of liquid assets the applicant credit union had omitted to pay an annual contribution to the OSCU that had fallen due on 30 April 2001. The OSCU further noted that the applicant credit union’s financial statements as of 31 December 2000 disclosed negative equity to the tune of CZK 222,949,000 (EUR 5,945,858).
24. On 4 October 2001 the Ministry of Finance upheld the third receivership order.
25. On 21 March 2002 the applicant credit union, represented by the president of its supervisory board, filed an application for judicial review of the Ministry’s decision.
26. On 17 April 2002 the applicant credit union filed a claim for damages with the Ministry of Finance under the State Liability Act (Act no. 82/1998).
27. On 19 April 2002 the OSCU withdrew the applicant credit union’s licence (povolení pusobit jako družstevní a úverní záložna). It found irregularities in the way the applicant credit union had conducted its affairs, as attested by its inability to meet its liabilities, and considered that no improvement could be expected. It observed that by 15 March 2002, the applicant credit union had recorded overdue liabilities totalling at least CZK 200,000,000 (EUR 5,333,828), while having at its disposal only CZK 56,006,000 (EUR 1,493,632). The cumulative value of the ratios reflecting the balance between assets and liabilities was just under 28%, whereas section 7(1) of Ministry of Finance Decree no. 387/2001 on the liquidity and solvency requirements for credit unions required a cumulative value from 31 December 2001 onwards of at least 45%.
28. The OSCU found that as of 15 March 2002 the applicant credit union had disclosed a negative capital value of CZK 243,705,000 (EUR 6,499,403), whereas under section 10(1) of Ministry of Finance Decree no. 386/2001 on the capital adequacy requirements for credit unions, cooperative savings associations were obliged to have achieved by 31 December 2001, and to maintain thereafter, a capital adequacy of at least 0.1%. The OSCU further stated that on 17 April 2002 the applicant credit union had submitted a report on its financial management results which showed that the irregularities in the applicant credit union’s affairs, including its failure to comply with the capital adequacy, liquidity and solvency requirements, were so serious that there was no reasonable prospect of their being remedied.
29. By a letter of 22 May 2002 the Ministry of Finance dismissed the applicant credit union’s claim for damages. On 28 May 2002 the applicant credit union, through its legal representative empowered by the presidents of the board of directors and the supervisory board, brought an action for damages against the Ministry of Finance.
30. In a judgment of 21 June 2002 the Prague High Court (Vrchní soud) dismissed the applicant credit union’s first request for judicial review as being unsubstantiated, finding that the applicant credit union had been placed in receivership in accordance with the national legislation then in force and that the OSCU had not decided outside its discretionary power (volné uvážení). The court held, inter alia, that:
“Placing a credit union in receivership is one of the measures which the [OSCU] may apply in addition to or instead of other sanctions specified in section 28(2) of [the Act]. ...
Admittedly, the [OSCU] chose the strictest measure. However, [it] did not breach the [Act] and did not proceed contrary to the [Act’s] aims, which are the only grounds on which [the OSCU’s] decision may be quashed (Article 245(2) of the Code of Civil Procedure)... If the [OSCU] found ... that the amount of available assets reserved for direct payments to members of [the applicant credit union] within three months had decreased to 6.77% of deposits (the Act lays down a minimum of 15%) ... as a consequence of ... a number of ... financial transactions entered into by the [applicant credit union], and if the [OSCU] discovered other breaches of the [Act] and the applicant credit union’s articles of association, then there is no ground for this court to find that the OSCU, when imposing the receivership, decided outside its discretionary powers.”
31. On 3 July 2002 the OSCU appointed its liquidator (likvidátor). On 31 October 2002, following an appeal by the applicant credit union, the Ministry of Finance upheld the appointment.
32. In the meantime, on 12 September 2002, the applicant credit union had lodged a constitutional appeal against the High Court’s judgment, alleging a violation of Article 11 § 4 and Articles 36 and 38 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms (Listina základních práv a svobod), as well as Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
33. On 5 December 2002 the High Court upheld the Regional Court’s decision of 9 July 2001 concerning the appointment of the interim receiver.
34. On 30 January 2003 the Constitutional Court rejected the constitutional appeal of 12 September 2002 as manifestly unfounded.
35. On 10 April 2003 two shareholders of the applicant credit union joined the proceedings concerning its action for damages.
36. On 23 April 2003 the Prague 1 District Court (obvodní soud) dismissed the applicant credit union’s action for damages on the ground that it had been lodged by an unauthorised person. It stated, inter alia, that members of the board of directors and of the supervisory board were not entitled to bring the action on behalf of the applicant credit union. At the same time, the court severed the two shareholders’ claims, ruling that they should be heard separately.
37. On 20 May 2003 the applicant credit union appealed. However, on 5 September 2003 the District Court discontinued the proceedings, stating in particular:
“Section 28(d)(1) of [the Act] grants the supervisory board of a credit union the right to challenge the conduct of receivership, but an action for damages sustained as a result of the receivership cannot be equated with the right of the supervisory board to appeal against decisions of [the OSCU] under section 28(d)(1) of [the Act].”
38. On 9 February 2004 the Supreme Administrative Court (Nejvyšší správní soud) rejected the second application for judicial review, lodged by the applicant credit union on 15 January 2001 against the Ministry of Finance’s decision of 9 November 2000 upholding the second receivership order. The court, referring to section 28(d) of the amended Act, found that the application had been lodged by an unauthorised person, as only the receiver had authority to lodge such an appeal.
39. On 23 April 2004 the applicant credit union lodged a constitutional appeal against the decision of the Supreme Administrative Court.
40. On 26 April 2004 the Prague Municipal Court (mestský soud) upheld the District Court’s decision of 5 September 2003.
41. On 28 April 2004 the Regional Court, on a petition filed by 217 creditors, shareholders of the applicant credit union, declared the applicant credit union to be insolvent. A trustee (správce konkurzní podstaty) was appointed, accordingly.
42. On 13 October 2004 a creditors’ meeting (schuze veritelu) was held, at which the creditors’ committee (veritelský výbor) was elected. On 8 December 2004, 7 November 2005 and 18 January 2006 respectively, three review meetings took place.
43. In the meantime, on 7 March 2005, the Constitutional Court had dismissed the applicant credit union’s latest constitutional appeal.
44. On 8 March 2006 the Regional Court received a list of the applicant credit union’s assets. The realisation of the assets included in the list is, according to the Government, under way. In connection with this insolvency dispute, the Regional Court has registered 35 judicial disputes.
45. It would appear that the third application for judicial review filed by the applicant credit union is still pending before the Supreme Court.
According to the Commercial Register as it stands, the applicant credit union is still the subject of insolvency proceedings.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms (Constitutional Act no. 2/1993)
46. Article 11 § 4 provides that expropriation or other forcible limitation of ownership rights is possible only in the public interest and on the basis of law, and against compensation.
47. Under Article 36 § 1 anyone may assert his or her rights under a set procedure before an independent and impartial tribunal, and in specified cases before another organ. Under paragraph 2, anybody who claims that his or her rights have been violated by a decision of a public administrative organ may apply to a court for a review of the legality of that decision, unless the law provides otherwise. However, the review of decisions affecting the fundamental rights and freedoms listed in the Charter may not be excluded from the jurisdiction of the courts. Paragraph 3 provides that everybody is entitled to compensation for damage caused to him or her by an unlawful decision of a court, another organ of the State or the public authorities, or by maladministration. Under paragraph 4, the conditions and detailed provisions in this respect are determined by statute.
48. Under Article 38 § 1 nobody may be denied access to his lawful judge. The jurisdiction of the court and the competence of the judge are determined by statute. Paragraph 2 provides that everybody is entitled to have his or her case considered in public without unnecessary delay and in his or her presence, and to comment on all submitted evidence. The public may be excluded only in cases specified by law.
B. The Credit Union Act (no. 87/1995) as in force until 30 April 2000
49. Section 1 provided that a credit union is a legal entity governed by the provisions of the Commercial Code on cooperatives unless the Act provides otherwise.
50. Section 3 stipulated, inter alia, that credit unions may provide loans to and receive deposits from their members, other credit unions and banks.
51. Section 24(1) and (2) provided that the head of the OSCU is appointed and removed from office by the Minister of Finance and that he is empowered, subject to the Minister’s approval, to decide on the status, remit and policy of the OSCU.
52. Under section 27(1) the OSCU must have exercised its powers with due diligence and efficiently while respecting the interests of credit union shareholders.
53. In accordance with section 28(2) the OSCU may have imposed sanctions for any breach of the Act or other statute by a credit union or its organs or members.
54. Under section 28(3)(c) the OSCU was empowered, inter alia, to impose receivership for a period of six months instead of or together with the sanctions provided for in the preceding subsection.
55. In accordance with section 28(3) the OSCU may have issued repeated receivership orders.
56. Under section 28(6) receivership was governed by the Banks Act, which applies mutatis mutandis.
57. Section 28(10) provided that a decision on receivership may have been appealed before the Ministry of Finance within 15 days of its service.
58. Section 28(11) stipulated that proceedings before the OSCU are governed by the Code of Administrative Procedure unless the Act provides otherwise.
C. The Credit Union Act as amended by Act no. 100/2000, in force since 1 May 2000
59. The newly inserted section 28(d)(1) provides that the powers of all the organs of a credit union, with the exception of its supervisory board, are suspended on service of a receivership order and are assumed by the appointed receiver. The supervisory board is entitled to appeal the OSCU’s decisions.
60. Section 28c(1) provides that a receiver is appointed, removed and employed by the OSCU, which decides on his or her remuneration.
E. The Banks Act (Act no. 21/1992) as in force at the relevant time
61. Section 26(2) provided that a bank may be placed in receivership by the Czech National Bank without any prior notice or invitation to remedy deficiencies identified in its business.
62. Section 26(3) stipulated, inter alia, that business transactions to the detriment of a bank’s clients or transactions which constitute a risk to the stability and security of the banking sector of the financial market; infringements of the Banks Act or other statutes or secondary legislation adopted by the Czech National Bank; and a situation where the total volume of reserves and provisions set aside by the bank is not sufficient to cover the risks arising from the volume of classified assets recorded by it, are considered to be deficiencies within the meaning of the Act.
63. Under section 26(4) proceedings on receivership were governed by the administrative procedure legislation unless the Banks Act provides otherwise.
64. According to section 30 the Czech National Bank may have imposed receivership where deficiencies in a bank’s activities endangered the stability of the banking system and the shareholders had not taken the necessary steps to eliminate them.
E. The Code of Civil Procedure (Act no. 99/1963), as in force at the relevant time
65. Article 245(2) provided that a court, while reviewing a decision adopted by an administrative authority within its discretionary power granted by a statute, may have examined only whether such a decision had been taken in conformity with rules laid down by a statute.
66. Article 247 et seq. entitled individuals or legal entities claiming that their rights had been curtailed by a decision of an administrative authority to apply for judicial review to determine the legality of that decision.
67. Under Article 250i § 1 the court, when reviewing the legality of the decision, must have relied on the facts as they stood at the time of delivery of the impugned decision; no evidence was taken.
F. Code of Administrative Court Procedure (Act no. 150/2002)
68. The Code entered into force on 1 January 2003, replacing Part V of the Code of Civil Procedure.
69. Article 71 § 1(d) and (e) provides that a plaintiff is obliged to substantiate the relevant factual and legal grounds on which the action is based and to identify evidence in its support.
70. Under Article 75 § 2 the administrative court bases its decision on the facts and the law as they stood at the time of the impugned ruling. It may take evidence in this respect under Article 77 § 1.
G. Code of Administrative Procedure (Act no. 71/1967)
71. Under Article 59 § 1 an appellate authority has full jurisdiction to examine a contested decision. If need be, it may complete the proceedings in question and remedy any shortcomings identified.
H. Commercial Code (Act no. 513/1991)
72. Article 244 § 6 provides that the supervisory board of a cooperative is entitled to request from the board of directors any information concerning the financial situation of the cooperative. The board of directors is obliged to inform the supervisory board without delay of any fact which might have serious consequences for the financial situation of the cooperative or the status of the cooperative or its shareholders.
I. State Control Act
Section 17 provides that an audit made by a controlling authority may be contested by objections which have to be raised within five days from the service of the audit on a controlled person.
Under Section 18 an employee of a controlling authority is empowered to decide on raised objections. A controlled person may appeal that decision before the head of that authority within 15 days from that decision. The decision on the appeal is irrevocable.
According to Section 26 the Code of Administrative Procedure is not applicable on proceedings under Section 18.
J. Judgment of the Constitutional Court’s Plenary of 27 June 2001 (no. 276/2001)
73. Articles 244 – 250s [Part V] of the Code of Civil Procedure, in so far as they governed procedure of administrative courts, were repealed as of 31 December 2002 by this ruling. In its reasoning the Constitutional Court found these provisions contrary to Article 6 of the Convention as they, inter alia, limited jurisdiction of administrative courts to review administrative acts to issues of legality. It found that that the legislation in question empowered administrative courts to quash merely illegal decisions, not those embodying errors in fact. In other words, as the Constitutional Court put it, deliberation of administrative authorities could not be replaced, according to those provisions, by that of independent courts.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 IN RESPECT OF THE APPLICANT CREDIT UNION
74. The applicant credit union alleged a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicant credit union
75. The applicant credit union asserted that, in terms of its financial situation, the statutory requirements permitting the State to impose receivership had not been met. It alleged that its situation had not constituted a threat to the stability of the financial system of credit unions. At the time of the first receivership order, the applicant credit union had managed CZK 328,000,000 (EUR 13,105,835) in members’ deposits in fixed-term accounts and CZK 16,000,000 (EUR 639,309) in deposits in their current accounts, while the whole sector of that industry had in 1999 accumulated as much as 10,814,000,000,000 (EUR 432,092,993,892) in deposits. The share of the applicant credit union had thus amounted to only 3.07%. It followed that the receivership order could not be justified by concerns about the stability of the credit union industry as such. Moreover, under section 3(1) of the Act, the applicant credit union had provided its services only to its members and not to the public, unlike the national banks.
76. The applicant credit union also denied the illegality of the three business transactions the OSCU had relied on in imposing the receivership. It argued that the OSCU’s findings had been insufficiently established and had been misinterpreted. The receivership order had failed to explain why these transactions would have jeopardised the stability of the applicant credit union or its members’ interests.
77. Moreover, section 28(6) of the Act as then in force, together with section 30 of the Banks Act, excluded any possibility of placing the applicant credit union in receivership on the grounds relied on in the OSCU’s decision of 11 January 2000. Since 1 September 1998 receivership could only be ordered, under section 30 of the Banks Act if deficiencies established under section 26 thereof threatened the stability of the banking sector as a whole and if, at the same time, the shareholders of the bank had not undertaken the necessary steps to remedy the situation on their own.
78. The applicant credit union further maintained that even the need to protect its shareholders’ pecuniary interests could not justify the imposition of receivership. The possibility of placing a credit union in receivership contradicted the principles of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as there had been no public interest justifying such interference with the applicant credit union’s rights. Shareholders had the right to take part in the management of the credit union and in the composition of its statutory and supervisory bodies and therefore had the means to influence the credit union’s activities and its financial results, whereas the customers of banks, at whom the provisions on receivership in the Banks Act were primarily directed, did not.
79. The applicant credit union considered the duration of the receivership to have been illegal: under section 28(f)(1)(c) of the Act it should not have lasted more than twelve months, but in the present case it had remained in force for 30 months.
80. Furthermore, the applicant credit union had not had any legal instrument at its disposal by which to contest the receivership order and the fact that its supervisory board had been denied access by the receiver to those of its business and accountancy documents necessary for any challenge against such an order, at least until May 2000. Even after that date, access had been limited due to a lack of cooperation on the part of the receiver.
81. In respect of the second receivership ordered by the OSCU on 12 July 2000, the applicant credit union alleged that the data relied on by the OSCU had not reflected the situation as established by the applicant credit union’s supervisory board and subsequent expert opinions. It had considered itself able to honour its outstanding debts in respect of shareholders’ terminated deposits. The applicant credit union’s current accounts had amounted to CZK 31,500,000 (EUR 840,078) and its funds available within two months had represented CZK 45,000,000 (EUR 1,200,111). Moreover, this balance had not included CZK 22,000,000 (EUR 586,721) in the form of an investment in the non-share capital of MLM which could be immediately repaid, the receiver having assumed the powers of the executive director of the latter company. In sum, the applicant credit union’s available funds had been at least CZK 98,500,000 (EUR 2,626,910). According to an audit report drawn up by a third party, the applicant credit union had not recorded a loss of 57,500,000 (EUR 1,533,476), but had shown a profit of 14,236,524 (EUR 379,676).
82. Having disputed the data assessed and relied on by the OSCU, the applicant credit union argued that the statutory conditions for extending the receivership for the second time had not been met. It asserted that it could not be held responsible for any acts, including illegal acts, committed after the first receivership order, as these had been carried out by the receiver, without its participation and contrary to its will.
83. Furthermore, the persons acting on its behalf had not taken all legal steps to defend the applicant credit union’s rights and those of its members. In its view, the receiver had artificially created – with the tacit approval of the OSCU – the preconditions for extension of the receivership and at the same time had deliberately created the conditions for the credit union’s financial collapse. It also claimed to have lost part of its property as a result of the receiver’s management.
2. The Government
84. The Government conceded that the imposition of receivership constituted an infringement of the applicant credit union’s property rights. Nevertheless, they contended that the receivership had been imposed on the applicant credit union in order to protect the stability of the relevant financial market and, in particular, the interests of its shareholders. It therefore amounted to control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Given the serious crisis in the credit union sector at the relevant time and the large-scale, illegal deficiencies and irregularities in the management of the applicant credit union, consisting mainly of providing loans and dealing in securities contrary to the Act, and the instability of the vast majority of credit unions at the material time, the Government further asserted that the impairment of the applicant credit union’s rights had been proportionate to the legitimate aim of stabilising the relevant financial market, the system of insurance of deposits and the protection of depositors’ interests. They maintained that for the above-mentioned reasons the receivership order had had to be issued immediately and hence without giving the applicant credit union an opportunity to remedy its financial situation. Relying on section 26(2) of the Banks Act, the Government contested the applicant credit union’s assertion that this step had been illegal.
85. As regards the second and third receivership orders, the Government maintained, referring to the findings of the OSCU, that the statutory condition for issuing repeated receivership orders had been met, as the applicant credit union had been insolvent and thus in breach of its obligations under section 11(3) of the Act. They referred to other breaches of the Act and of the capital adequacy, liquidity and solvency requirements found in the impugned decisions of the OSCU. The Government finally asserted that the poor financial situation of the applicant credit union had been caused by the unprofessional and illegal conduct of its management, some of whose members had been prosecuted for these acts. Therefore, for the reasons outlined above, the State had had to replace the management with a receiver.
B. The Court’s assessment
86. The gist of the applicant credit union’s complaint consists in the allegation that it was placed in receivership contrary to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, losing control of its business during the intervention by the receiver. The Court therefore considers that it is the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which is applicable (see Capital Bank AD v. Bulgaria, no. 49429/99, § 86, ECHR 2005-XII (extracts), with further reference to, mutatis mutandis, AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 24 October 1986, Series A no. 108, § 51; and Bosphorus Hava Yollari Turizm ve Ticaret Anonim Sirketi v. Ireland [GC], no. 45036/98, §§ 153-154, ECHR 2005-VI). This finding is not altered by the fact that the applicant credit union alleged that its financial losses had been due to the unprofessional conduct of the receiver, as this matter shall be taken into consideration in the assessment of the claims submitted under Article 41 of the Convention.
87. The Court reiterates that its power to review compliance of impugned acts with national law is limited and it is not its task to take the place of the domestic courts (see Sovtransavto Holding v. Ukraine, no. 48553/99, § 95, ECHR 2002-VII). However, that does not dispense with the need for the Court to determine whether the interference in issue complied with the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (ibid.).
88. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law” and the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention (see Capital Bank AD v. Bulgaria, cited above, with further reference to Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999-II).
89. The requirement of lawfulness, within the meaning of the Convention, presupposes, among other things, that domestic law must provide a measure of legal protection against arbitrary interferences by the public authorities with the rights safeguarded by the Convention (see Hasan and Chaush v. Bulgaria [GC], no. 30985/96, § 84, ECHR 2000-XI). Furthermore, the concepts of lawfulness and the rule of law in a democratic society require that measures affecting fundamental rights be, in certain cases, subject to some form of adversarial proceedings before an independent body competent to review the reasons for the measures and the relevant evidence (see, mutatis mutandis, Al-Nashif v. Bulgaria, no. 50963/99, § 123, 20 June 2002). It is true that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements and the absence of judicial review does not amount, in itself, to a violation of that provision (see Fredin v. Sweden (no. 1), judgment of 18 February 1991, Series A no. 192, § 50). Nevertheless, it implies that any interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions must be accompanied by procedural guarantees affording to the individual or entity concerned a reasonable opportunity of presenting their case to the responsible authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision. In ascertaining whether this condition has been satisfied, a comprehensive view must be taken of the applicable judicial and administrative procedures (see Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 45, ECHR 2002-IV with further references).
90. Turning to the specific facts of the case, the Court observes that the receiver, exercising the powers of the statutory organ of the applicant credit union during the receivership, was in full control of all of its business and accountancy documents showing its overall financial situation. Whilst exercising those powers he was the sole person entitled to grant access to those documents. He was nevertheless not obliged to do so under the law then in force. According to the applicant credit union, he denied its supervisory board access to the documents in question. The Government did not dispute that allegation.
91. The Court notes that the financial situation of a given entity is one of the decisive factors in the decision to impose receivership. Accordingly, it plays a central role in any subsequent review of such a decision and is often determinative of its outcome. Therefore, it is indispensable, in the Court’s view, for any entity intending to contest a decision to place it in receivership to have access to all of its documents and other materials which may be of assistance in substantiating and establishing its appeal against such a decision. Business and accountancy documents fall within that category. It is true that the right to such access is not an absolute one, as there may be competing interest at stake. However, any limitation must not impair the very essence of that right. Otherwise the right to appeal decisions on receivership would be somewhat illusory, as an appellant would not have any reasonable opportunity of contesting those rulings and adducing evidence in support of its allegations. This is particularly so in proceedings where the decision whether to grant access to business and accountancy documents rests with a receiver, an employee of a regulatory authority who is appointed under the decision imposing receivership. In such cases, whether or not an entity has a reasonable opportunity of challenging the receivership to which it is made subject is determined by a receiver appointed, removed from office and employed by the State authority whose decision the entity intends to contest. In this situation, the executive branch of the State can frustrate any reasonable attempt to contest the imposition of receivership by means of a decision denying access to indispensable documents, which is not amenable to review. Taking into account the gravity of a decision to impose receivership and its consequences for an entity operating on the financial market, such denials must be, in the Court’s view, subject to judicial scrutiny by an independent tribunal and not just by an employee of the executive branch of the State. Applying these principles in the instant case, the Court finds that none of the above-mentioned requirements regarding the denial of access to the applicant credit union’s documents was met in respect of the review of the decision of 11 January 2000 imposing the receivership. It follows that the applicant credit union was deprived of the procedural guarantees affording it a reasonable opportunity of presenting its case to the responsible authorities with a view to effectively challenging the decision to place it in receivership.
92. The Court notes that the applicant credit union did not allege that the denial of access continued when it challenged the decisions of 12 July 2000 and 12 July 2001 extending the receivership. However, the only legal avenue by which the applicant credit union could dispute the receivership had ceased to exist by that time, as its supervisory board lost its standing to appeal with the entry into force of the amendment to the Act on 1 May 2000. The Court’s conclusion with regard to the decision adopted on 11 January 2000 therefore also applies mutatis mutandis to those two decisions.
93. It is true that in such a sensitive economic area as the stability of the financial market the Contracting States enjoy a wide margin of appreciation (see Olczak v. Poland (dec.), no. 30417/96, § 85, ECHR 2002-X (extracts)) and that in certain situations – especially in the context of a credit union crisis such as the one facing the Czech Republic at the relevant time – there may be a paramount need for the State to act in order to avoid irreparable harm to a credit union, its depositors and other creditors, or credit unions and the financial system as a whole. Nevertheless, if such margin were limitless, the rights embodied in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 would become illusory. Therefore, it has to be construed so as to guarantee to individuals that the essence of their rights is protected.
94. Applying this principle to the instant case, the Court considers that the taking of control of the applicant credit union’s business by the receiver could in itself be regarded as falling within that margin of appreciation, as it was not established by the applicant credit union that the responsible State authorities had lacked a reasonable suspicion that its financial situation required them to impose receivership. However, on the facts of the present case, in which the applicant credit union was denied access to its business documents (see paragraph 90) and was unable subsequently to challenge that denial before a court, this aspect of the imposition of the receivership under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 remains subject to the Court’s review for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Once the State was in full control of the applicant credit union’s business, thus substantially reducing the threat constituting the reason for placing it in receivership, the Court, having regard to the fact that the Government did not put forward any arguments to justify the denial in question, sees no reason which would dispense the State from affording the applicant credit union a reasonable opportunity to have access its business documents or to contest the denial before a court.
95. In the light of the foregoing, the Court concludes that the interference with the applicant credit union’s possessions was not surrounded by sufficient guarantees against arbitrariness and was thus not lawful within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, H.L. v. the United Kingdom, no. 45508/99, § 124, ECHR 2004-IX). This conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether the other requirements of that provision have been complied with (see Iatridis, cited above, § 62). The Court thus expresses no opinion on the question whether the statutory requirements for the imposition of receivership were met in the instant case or on the issue of whether the impairment struck a fair balance between the applicant credit union’s rights and the demands of the general interest of the community.
96. There has therefore been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 IN RESPECT OF 641 MEMBERS OF THE APPLICANT CREDIT UNION
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicants
97. The applicants complained of the decision to place the credit union in receivership and its effect on their shares and deposits. They alleged that neither they nor the credit union had had any effective remedy at their disposal in that regard and that their property rights had been impaired as they could not dispose of their property due to the receivership. They raised in essence the same arguments as the applicant credit union.
2. The Government
98. The Government maintained, referring to the case of Agrotexim and Others v. Greece (judgment of 24 October 1995, Series A no. 330-A), that their application should be declared inadmissible as the applicants had failed to establish with sufficient certainty that it was impossible for the applicant credit union to lodge an application with the Court. They further contended that the applicants had eventually been paid compensation amounting to 90% of their insured deposits.
B. The Court’s assessment
99. The Court reiterates that the piercing of the “corporate veil” or the disregarding of a company’s legal personality will be justified only in exceptional circumstances, in particular where it is clearly established that it is impossible for the company to apply to the Convention institutions through the organs set up under its articles of incorporation or – in the event of liquidation – through its liquidators (see Agrotexim and Others v. Greece, cited above, § 66). In assessing those circumstances, the Court takes into consideration in the first place the nature of the complaint and the conflict of interests between the parties involved.
100. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that the applicants’ complaints are essentially the same as those raised by the applicant credit union. Having regard to its finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the applicant credit union (see paragraph 96), the Court considers that the applicant credit union, acting through its supervisory board, successfully raised before the Court the claims asserted by its members. In these circumstances and with regard to the criteria established by the Court’s case-law, the applicants cannot be regarded as having standing to apply to the Court (see Agrotexim and Others v. Greece, cited above, §§ 66 and 71, and Minda and Others v. Hungary, (dec.), no. 6690/02, 13 September 2005). The Government’s objection in this regard must therefore be upheld.
101. The Court recalls that Article 35 § 4 of the Convention in fine enables it to dismiss an application it considers inadmissible “at any stage of the proceedings”. Thus, even at the merits stage the Court may reconsider a decision to declare an application admissible if it concludes that it should be declared inadmissible for one of the reasons given in the first three paragraphs of Article 35 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Blecic v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 65, ECHR 2006).
In the light of the foregoing, the Court declares this part of the application incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 and rejects it under Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
102. The applicant credit union complained that the decisions concerning its receivership could not be contested before independent and impartial national authorities with full jurisdiction to examine its case. It also maintained that it had been deprived of access to a court while seeking to challenge the decisions extending the receivership.
103. In its decision on admissibility adopted on 31 January 2006 the Court decided to examine these complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which, in so far as material, provides:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing ... by an independent and impartial tribunal. ...”
A. The parties’ submissions
1. The applicant credit union
104. The applicant credit union maintained that its appeals against the OSCU’s decisions imposing and extending the receivership had been dealt with by the Ministry of Finance, which was the State authority to which the OSCU was answerable and was thus not independent. The judicial review of those administrative proceedings had been conducted by courts which had been empowered only to examine their legality. It further asserted that it could not efficiently contest the facts of the case assessed by the OSCU.
2. The Government
105. The Government conceded that the rules in force before 31 December 2002 had not allowed for the review of administrative decisions by judicial bodies with full jurisdiction. The administrative courts could review only the legality of administrative decisions and not the merits. However, to rectify this unsatisfactory situation, the new Code of Administrative Court Procedure had been adopted and had come into force on 1 January 2003.
106. The Government recalled in this regard that the Supreme Administrative Court, when dealing with the applicant credit union’s application for judicial review of the first receivership order, had applied the new rules under that Code. Moreover, as demonstrated by its judgment adopted on 21 June 2002, the Prague High Court had carried out a full review in the instant case despite the applicable law then in force, reflecting the occasional practice of the domestic courts.
B. The Court’s assessment
107. The Court reiterates that for the determination of civil rights and obligations by a tribunal to satisfy Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, the tribunal in question must have jurisdiction to examine all questions of fact and law relevant to the dispute before it (see Terra Woningen B.V. v. the Netherlands, judgment of 17 December 1996, Reports 1996-VI, § 52; Chevrol v. France [GC], no. 49636/99, § 77, ECHR 2003-III; and I.D. v. Bulgaria, no. 43578/98, § 45, 28 April 2005). It is to be therefore examined whether the imposition of receivership by the OSCU was subject to direct review by a court with full jurisdiction (see British-American Tobacco Company Ltd v. the Netherlands, judgment of 20 November 1995, Series A no. 331, §§ 84-87, and I.D., cited above, § 53). In doing so, the Court should confine itself as far as possible to examining the question raised by the case before it. Accordingly, it should only decide whether, in the circumstances of the case, the relevant national authorities had jurisdiction required by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (Fischer v. Austria, judgment of 26 April 1995, Series A no. 312, § 33). The Court recalls in this regard that the lack of full jurisdiction by a court might be found, in the particular circumstances of a given case, to be compatible with Article 6 of the Convention. In assessing the sufficiency of a judicial review available to an applicant, it is necessary to have regard to matters such as the subject-matter of the decision appealed against, the manner in which that decision was arrived at and the content of the dispute, including the desired and actual grounds of appeal (see Bryan v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 22 November 1995, Series A no. 335-A, § 45).
108. The Court observes that the OSCU carried out the audit of the applicant company’s economic standings on its own motion. The gathering of evidence and its assessment, i.e. establishing the facts of the case, was thus exclusively reserved for the OSCU. The audit was made accessible to applicant credit union on 10 January 2000, thus triggering the five-day limit under Section 17 of the State Control Act for the latter to contest it by raising objections. Pursuant to Section 18 thereof the objections raised by the applicant credit union were dealt with by an employee of the OSCU. His/her decision may have been contested before the head of the OSCU within 15 days of its service on the applicant credit union. Application of the Code of Administrative Procedure in that procedure was expressly excluded by Section 26 of the Act, however. There was no other administrative remedy against the finding of the audit. Whilst it is true that the decision imposing the receivership based on the aforementioned finding could, and indeed was, appealed before the Ministry of Finance, the audit, i.e. the finding as to the facts, was not reviewed as the Ministry found that it had been taken by the OSCU under the State Control Act and the former was therefore bound by it. The facts as assessed by the OSCU were not reviewable in administrative proceedings by any other administrative authority.
Moreover, according to section 24(1) and (2) of the Act, the OSCU was managed by a director appointed and removed from office by the Minister of Finance, who also exercised the power to approve in detail the OSCU’s status, remit and policy. Hence, the OSCU was an authority subordinated to and dependent on the Ministry, which forms part of the executive branch and cannot therefore be deemed to be an independent and impartial tribunal conforming to the requirements of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
In the light of the foregoing, this case must be distinguished from the case of Bryan v. the United Kingdom (cited above) where there was no dispute as to the primary facts and where the safeguards available to the applicant in the administrative proceedings were uncontested.
109. As regards the judicial review of the case, the Court observes that until 31 December 2002 the Czech administrative courts did not have full jurisdiction to review administrative acts, their scrutiny being limited under Part V of the Code of Civil Procedure to the examination of issues of legality. It further notes that the application of that legislation by administrative courts was found by the Constitutional Court in 2001 incompatible with Article 6 of the Convention, as, in that court’s view, administrative courts were not empowered to quash unlawful decisions but merely those which were illegal. The Court further notes that the newly adopted Code of Administrative Court Procedure, providing for full scrutiny of the law and the facts, entered into force on 1 January 2003. The impugned proceedings were conducted by the administrative courts under the latter Code on its entry into force. Accordingly, the impugned judicial decisions adopted after the above-mentioned date were delivered by courts which had full jurisdiction.
110. The Court considers, however, that the same conclusion does not apply to the judgment of the Prague High Court of 21 June 2002. The Government nonetheless argued that the procedural law as applied at the relevant time did not prevent the courts from exercising full judicial review of administrative decisions. They asserted that the administrative courts also occasionally reviewed factual aspects of a given case. The examination of the applicant union’s case by the High Court prior to delivery of the judgment of 21 June 2002, consisting in detailed scrutiny of the objections raised by the applicant union against the decision of the OSCU imposing the first receivership order, proved that such a practice by the national courts was possible. It followed, in the Government’s view, that the proceedings before the High Court had been in conformity with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
111. The Court reiterates that, in a given case where full jurisdiction is contested, proceedings might still satisfy requirements of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention if the court deciding on the matter considered all applicant’s submissions on their merits, point by point, without ever having to decline jurisdiction in replying to them or ascertaining facts (see Zumtobel v. Austria, judgment of 21 September 1993, Series A no. 268-A, § 31-32 and Fischer v. Austria, cited above, § 34). By way of contrast, the Court found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in other cases where the domestic courts had considered themselves bound by the prior findings of administrative bodies which were decisive for the outcome of the cases before them, without examining the relevant issues independently (see Obermeier v. Austria, judgment of 28 June 1990, Series A no. 179, pp. 22-23, §§ 69-70; Terra Woningen B.V., cited above, pp. 2122-23, §§ 52-55; I.D., cited above, §§ 46 and 50-55; and Capital Bank AD v. Bulgaria, cited above §§ 99-108 ). The Court found a violation of the right to access to a court where the applicant could not challenge before a court an assessment of facts in a decision adopted by an administrative authority acting within its discretionary power (see Tinnelly & Sons Ltd and Others and McElduff and Others v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 10 July 1998, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-IV, § 74). It that case, the judicial review never led to a full scrutiny of the factual basis of such a decision.
112. In the present case, the applicant credit union’s appeal to the Prague High Court against the decision of the OSCU and the Ministry of Finance imposing the receivership was twofold. Firstly, the applicant credit union contested the legal assessment of the OSCU declaring the transactions entered into by the applicant credit union contrary to the Act. Secondly, it was asserted in the appeal that the OSCU, deciding entirely within its discretion provided for by the Act, imposed on the applicant credit union a disproportionate measure when opting for receivership, although other less strict measures were available under the Act. According to the applicant credit union, that decision was partly due to an erroneous assessment of the facts, namely of its economic standings, by the OSCU.
The Court notes that due to its jurisdiction limited to review of legality, the Prague High Court when dealing with the second limb of the appeal, abstained, as it is apparent from its reasoning, from conducting its own examination of whether the applicant credit union was in fact in a situation justifying the imposition of receivership. Admitting that receivership was the strictest measure available under the Act, it held that that legislation reserved for the OSCU acting within its discretionary power the decision as to what measure to adopt in case of breach of the Act’s provisions. Instead of ruling on the question of proportionality of the receivership, it only confined itself to the verification whether the OSCU did not act beyond its discretionary power as reserved by the Act when imposing the receivership. That finding was made on the assumption, not verification, by the High Court that the economic standing of the applicant credit union as assessed by the OSCU was accurate.
113. It ensues that the High Court, prevented from assessing whether there was indeed any factual basis for imposing the receivership, and limited to reviewing whether the impugned decision was adopted within the OSCU’s discretionary power instead of examining lawfulness of that decision, did not exercise full judicial review.
114. The Court therefore finds that the OSCU’s determination of the applicant company’s civil rights in the case at hand was not subject to judicial scrutiny of the scope required by Article 6 § 1
115. It follows that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
116. In the view of the applicant credit union, the facts underlying its complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention also gave rise to a violation of Article 13 of the Convention, which provides:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
117. The Court does not consider it necessary to rule on this submission, because the requirements of Article 13 are less strict than, and are here absorbed by, those of Article 6 § 1 (see British-American Tobacco Company Ltd, cited above, p. 29, § 89, and, more recently, Zwiazek Nauczycielstwa Polskiego v. Poland, no. 42049/98, § 43, ECHR 2004-IX).
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
118. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
119. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the further procedure fixed with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Czech Government and the applicant credit union.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of the applicant credit union;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
3. Holds that it is not necessary to rule on the allegation of a violation of Article 13 of the Convention;
4. Declares inadmissible the complaint of the individual applicants submitted under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
5. Holds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Czech Government and the applicant credit union to submit, within the forthcoming three months, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 31 July 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Peer Lorenzen
Deputy Registrar President
1 A list of the individual applicants is available from the Registry

2 1 EUR = 37.55 CZK at the relevant time

TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; il restante inammissibile; Risarcimento - riservato


QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA DRUŽSTEVNÍ ZÁLOŽNA PRIA ED ALTRI C. REPUBBLICA CECA
(Richiesta n. 72034/01)
SENTENZA
( meriti)
STRASBOURG
31 luglio 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Družstevní Záložna Pria ed Altri c. Repubblica ceca,
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente, Rait Maruste Karel Jungwiert, Renate Jaeger il Mark Villiger, Isabelle Berro-Lefèvre, Zdravka Kalaydjieva, giudici,
e Stefano Phillips, Cancelliere Aggiunto di Sezione
Avendo deliberato in privato l’8 luglio 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 72034/01) contro la Repubblica ceca depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da D. Z. P., un'unione di credito, ed otto altri richiedenti, il Sig. J. M., il Sig. F. Z., il Sig. V. O., il Sig. K. P., il Sig.ra D. K., il Sig. J. F., la Sig.ra L. K. ed la Sig.ra J. S., membri dell'unione di credito e della sua management ed organi direttivi, il 26 marzo 2001. Nel corso dei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, 633 individui1, membri dell'unione di credito i cui nomi sono stati presentati alla Corte congiunsero i procedimenti. Il primo richiedente è una persona giuridica con sede registrata a Brno (in seguito “l'unione di credito deli richiedente”) creata sotto l'Atto delle Unioni del Credito (zákon o sporitelních a uverních družstvech -“l'Atto”). La sua incorporazione divenne effettiva il 23 agosto 1995. Gli individui sono cittadini cechi.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. M. N., un avvocato che pratica a Praga. Il Governo ceco (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, il Sig. V.A. Schorm, del Ministero di Giustizia.
3. I richiedenti si lamentarono sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e degli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione dell’ interferenza coi loro diritti di proprietà ed il loro diritto ad una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva.
4. Con una decisione del 31 gennaio 2006, la Corte dichiarò inammissibile la lagnanza dei richiedenti individuali presentata sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, e dichiarò il resto delle lagnanze dei richiedenti ammissibile, decidendo di congiungere ai meriti la questione riguardo allo status di vittima dei richiedenti individuali.
5. I richiedenti ed il Governo depositarono inoltre osservazioni scritte (l'Articolo 59 § 1). La Camera decise, dopo avere consultato le parti che nessuna udienza sui meriti era richiesta (Articolo 59 § 3 in fine).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. L’11 gennaio 2000 l'Ufficio per la Soprintendenza delle Unioni di Credito (Úrad pro dohled nad družstevními záložnami) (“l'OSCU”) mise l'unione di credito del richiedente in curatela fallimentare (nucená správa) per un periodo di sei mesi sotto la sezione 28(3)(c) dell'Atto, per il fatto che aveva contravvenuto alla legislazione in oggetto, avendo intrapreso attività al di fuori delle sue competenze senza autorizzazione. Un curatore fallimentare (nucený správce) fu nominato per sostituire i corpi decisionali dell'unione di credito del richiedente. L'OSCU stava agendo sotto la sezione 27(1) dell'Atto letta in concomitanza con la sezione 26(2) dell’Atto delle Banche ( zákon o bankách).
7. Riferendosi ad una revisione delle attività dell'unione di credito del richiedente, l'OSCU notò che l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva concluso il 6 maggio 1999 tre contratti con S7, una società a responsabilità limitata , sotto i termini dei quali la seconda avevano assegnato all’unione di credito del dei crediti esigibili dovuti a questa da due società debitrici corrispondenti a CZK 126,235,132 (EUR 3,366,5822) in totale, per un prezzo convenuto di CZK 14,431,000 (EUR 384,862). L'OSCU decretò che l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva acquistato così i crediti esigibili di una terza parte coprendo efficacemente il debito di quest’ultima. Qualificò l'operazione come un prestito ad una terza parte. Poiché la sezione 3 dell'Atto delle unioni di credito proibisce di offrire prestiti a coloro che non sono membri, l'OSCU concluse che l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva agito in flagrante violazione dell'Atto.
8. L'OSCU notò inoltre che i revisori dei conti avevano scoperto che l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva stipulato un contratto il 2 e 5 agosto 1999 per accordare un prestito di CZK 22,000,000 (EUR 586,721) ad una società a responsabilità limitata, MLM Brno, ed aveva firmato due contratti il 25 giugno 1999 con OPES, una società per azioni per l'acquisto di titoli (cenné papíry) ad un prezzo totale di CZK 41,200,056 (EUR 1,098,770). L'OSCU decretò che anche queste operazioni erano illegali, siccome la sezione 1(6) letta in concomitanza con la sezione 3 dell'Atto non permette ad unioni di credito di acquisire i titoli a meno che non siano obbligazioni pubbliche ( dluhopisy), obbligazioni municipali (komunální obligace) od obbligazioni ipotecarie (hypotecní zástavní listy).
9. I crediti esigibili divennero effettivi il 12 gennaio 2000, quando all'unione di credito del richiedente fu notificata la decisione dell'OSCU.
10. Il 26 marzo 2000 l'unione di credito del richiedente depositò un ricorso costituzionale (ústavní stížnost) con la Corte Costituzionale (soud di Ústavní) contro l'ordine curatela fallimentare e fece istanza allo stesso tempo per un ordine che annullasse l’effetto di certe disposizioni dell'Atto. Si appellò, inter l'alia, alla sezione 75(2)(a) dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale che abilita la Corte Costituzionale ad ascoltare un ricorso costituzionale anche se le vie di ricorso nazionali non sono state esaurite, se colpisce sostanzialmente gli interessi personali dell'appellante.
11. Il 7 aprile 2000, seguendo un ricorso amministrativo da parte dell'unione di credito del richiedente, il Ministero delle Finanze sostenne la curatela fallimentare ordinata l’ 11 gennaio 2000.
12. Nella stessa data un ricorso per giudicare la bancarotta dell'unione di credito del richiedente (konkusní rízení) fu registrata dalla Corte Regionale di Brno (krajský soud). Nel corso del 2001 un gran numero di creditori si unirono ai procedimenti.
13. In una data non specificata l'unione di credito del richiedente presentò istanza per un controllo giurisdizionale ( správní žaloba) dell'imposizione della curatela fallimentare sotto l’Articolo 247 e succ. del Codice di Procedura Civile, asserendo che le condizioni legali per intraprendere tale passo da parte dell'OSCU non erano state soddisfatte.
14. Il 1 maggio 2000 l’Atto n. 100/2000 entrò in vigore, correggendo estensivamente l'Atto (in seguito “l'Atto corretto”). I poteri dei consigli direttivi delle unioni di credito furono confinati al diritto fare appello alle decisioni adottate dall'OSCU.
15. Il 21 giugno 2000 l'OSCU accordò il permesso al curatore fallimentare di sospendere i ritiri dai conti di deposito tenuti dall'unione di credito del richiedente in considerazione della sua situazione finanziaria precaria. Secondo le sue sentenze, la somma dovuta dall'unione di credito del richiedente su depositi a condizioni insolute corrispondeva ad almeno CZK 83,000,000 (EUR 2,213,539), mentre i soldi disponibili su i suoi conti correnti erano solamente CZK 21,500,000 (EUR 573,386).
16. Il 12 luglio 2000 l'OSCU ha rinnovato la curatela fallimentare sotto l'Atto corretto siccome le deficienze identificate prima erano rimaste. Ha fattor riferimento, inter l'alia, al primo ordine di curatela fallimentare ed a tre decisioni con le quali aveva proibito o aveva restretto le attività dell'unione di credito del richiedente, incluso i ritiri da conti di deposito ( decisione N. 322/2000/II del 20 2000 gennaio, 1217/2000/II del 9 marzo 2000 e 2407/2000/II del 25 aprile 2000).
17. Il 9 novembre 2000 il Ministero delle Finanze sostenne questa decisione.
18. Il 12 dicembre 2000 la Corte Costituzionale respinse il ricorso costituzionale dell'unione di credito del richiedente per il non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso ordinarie sotto la sezione 75(1) dell’Atto della Corte Costituzionale. Reiterò che si potrebbe derogare al principio che richiede l'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso in circostanze eccezionali se la protezione effettiva dei diritti essenziali costituzionalmente garantiti e la libertà fosse messa in pericolo. Trovò che, contrarimente alla sezione 72(1) dell’ Atto della Corte Costituzionale che prevede inter l'alia che “un ricorso costituzionale possa essere introdotto da qualsiasi persona fisica che si dichiara vittima di una violazione dei diritti essenziali o delle libertà riconosciute in una legge costituzionale o un trattato internazionale con una decisione valida presa in procedimenti nei quali lui era una parte”, l'unione di credito del richiedente ha depositato il suo ricorso costituzionale prima che l'ordine di curatela fallimentare fosse divenuto effettivo.
19. Il 15 gennaio 2001 l'unione di credito del richiedente, rappresentata dal presidente del suo consiglio direttivo,ha richiesto un controllo giurisdizionale impugnando la decisione del Ministero delle Finanze del 9 novembre 2000.
20. Il 10 e il 25 gennaio, il 2 febbraio, il 4 aprile e il 3 maggio 2001 rispettivamente (decisioni N. 114/2001, 369/2001, 838/2001 1645/2001 e 2134/2001), l'OSCU permise al ricevitore di sospendere i ritiri dai conti di deposito tenuti dall'unione di credito del richiedente.
21. Il 6 giugno 2001 l'OSCU accordò al curatore fallimentare il permesso di registrare per conto suo un ricorso con una corte per giudicare l'unione di credito in bancarotta il che venne fatto il 18 giugno 2001 secondo il Governo.
22. Il 9 luglio 2001 la Corte Regionale nominò un amministratore provvisorio (predbežný správce).
23. Il 12 luglio 2001 l'OSCU mise di nuovo l'unione di credito del richiedente in curatela fallimentare. Basò la sua decisione sul rapporto dell'unione di credito del richiedente del 3 luglio 2001 che includeva una dichiarazione delle sue pendenze debitorie e i fondi disponibili. Fu notato nel rapporto che l'unione di credito del richiedente era insolvente, siccome aveva a sua disposizione solamente CZK 59,257,000 (EUR 1,580,333) che era insufficiente per abilitarla a onorare le sue pendenze debitorie di almeno CZK 218,000,000 (EUR 5,813,872). A causa della sua mancanza di liquidità l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva omesso inoltre, di pagare un contributo annuale all'OSCU che era scaduto il 30 aprile 2001. L'OSCU notò inoltre che i rendiconti gestionali dell'unione di credito del richiedente come al31 dicembre 2000 rivelavano un equity negativa per l’importo di CZK 222,949,000 (EUR 5,945,858).
24. Il 4 ottobre 2001 il Ministero delle Finanze sostenne il terzo ordine di curatela fallimentare.
25. Il 21 marzo 2002 l'unione di credito del richiedente, rappresentata dal presidente del suo consiglio direttivo registrò una richiesta per un controllo giurisdizionale della decisione del Ministero.
26. Il 17 aprile 2002 l'unione di credito del richiedente registrò una richiesta per danni da parte del Ministero delle Finanze sotto l'Atto di Responsabilità Statale (Atto n. 82/1998).
27. Il 19 aprile 2002 l'OSCU ritirò la licenza dell'unione di credito del richiedente (povolení pusobit jako družstevní a úverní záložna). Trovò delle irregolarità nel modo in cui l'unione di credito di richiedente aveva condotto i suoi affari, come attestato dalla sua incapacità di soddisfare le sue responsabilità, e considerato che non ci si sarebbe potuto aspettare nessun miglioramento . Osservò che il 15 marzo 2002, l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva registrato un importo totale di passività in ritardo di almeno CZK 200,000,000 (EUR 5,333,828), avendo invece a sua disposizione solamente CZK 56,006,000 (EUR 1,493,632). Il valore cumulativo dei rapporti che riflettono l'equilibrio fra le attività e le passività era appena sotto il 28%, mentre la sezione 7(1) del Decreto n. 387/2001 del Ministero delle Finanze sulla liquidità e requisiti di solvibilità per le unioni di credito richiedeva un valore cumulativo dal 31 dicembre 2001 in avanti di almeno 45%.
28. L'OSCU trovò che come il 15 marzo 2002 l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva mostrato un valore di capitale negativo di CZK 243,705,000 (EUR 6,499,403), mentre sotto la sezione 10(1) del Decreto n. 386/2001 del Ministero delle Finanze sui requisiti di adeguatezza di capitale per le unioni di credito, le associazioni di risparmio cooperative erano obbligate ad avere chiuso in positivo entro il 31 dicembre 2001, e di sostenere da allora in poi, un'adeguatezza di capitale di almeno 0.1%. L'OSCU affermò inoltre che il 17 aprile 2002 l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva presentato un rapporto sui risultati della sua gestione finanziaria che mostrò che le irregolarità negli affari dell’unione di credito del richiedente, incluso la sua inosservanza in merito all'adeguatezza di capitale, la liquidità e requisiti di solvibilità erano così seri che non c'era nessuna prospettiva ragionevole di rimedio.
29. Con una lettera del 22 maggio 2002 il Ministero delle Finanze respinse la richiesta dell'unione di credito del richiedente per danni. Il 28 maggio 2002 l'unione di credito del richiedente, tramite il suo rappresentante legale conferito di poteri dai presidenti dei consiglio di amministrazione ed il consiglio direttivo intentò un'azione per danni contro il Ministero delle Finanze.
30. In una sentenza del 21 giugno 2002 L’ Alta Corte di Praga (Vrchní soud) respinse la prima richiesta dell'unione di credito del richiedente per il controllo giurisdizionale in quanto non comprovato, trovando che l'unione di credito del richiedente era stata messa poi in curatela fallimentare in conformità con la legislazione nazionale in vigore e che l'OSCU non aveva deciso al di fuori del suo potere discrezionale (volné uvážení). La corte sostenne, inter l'alia che:
“Mettere un'unione di credito in curatela fallimentare è una delle misure che l’ [OSCU] può richiedere al posto o in aggiunta delle altre sanzioni specificate nella sezione 28(2) di [l'Atto]. ...
Per ammissione, l’ [OSCU] scelse la misura più severa. Comunque, [egli] non violò [l'Atto] e non procedette in modo contrario agli scopi dell’ [Atto] che sono i soli motivi sulla base dei quali decisione [dell'OSCU] può essere annullata (Articolo 245(2) del Codice di Procedura Civile)... Se l’ [OSCU] trova... che l'importo degli attivi disponibili riservati ai pagamenti diretti dei membri dell’ [unione di credito del richiedente] in tre mesi è diminuito fino al 6.77% dei depositi (l'Atto stabilisce un minimo del 15%)... come conseguenza di... un numero di... operazioni finanziarie intraprese dall’ [unione di credito di richiedente], e se l’ [OSCU] ha trovato anche altre violazioni del [l'Atto] e degli articoli dell’unione di credito del richiedente di associazione, non c’è campo per questa corte di trovare che l'OSCU, imponendo la curatela fallimentare, ha preso una decisione che esula dai suoi poteri discrezionali.”
31. Il 3 luglio 2002 l'OSCU nominò il suo liquidatore ( likvidátor). Il 31 ottobre 2002, in seguito a un ricorso da parte dell'unione di credito del richiedente, il Ministero delle Finanze sostenne la nomina.
32. Il 12 settembre 2002, l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva depositato nel frattempo, un ricorso costituzionale contro la sentenza dell’Alta Corte, adducendo una violazione dell’ Articolo 11 § 4 ed degli Articoli 36 e 38 dello Statuto dei Diritti essenziali e le Libertà (Listina základních práv a svobod), così come degli Articoli 6 e 13 della Convenzione e dell’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
33. Il 5 dicembre 2002 l’Alta Corte sostenne la decisione della Corte Regionale del 9 luglio 2001 riguardo alla nomina del ricevitore provvisorio.
34. Il 30 gennaio 2003 la Corte Costituzionale respinse il ricorso costituzionale del 12 settembre 2002 come manifestamente infondato.
35. Il 10 aprile 2003 due azionisti dell’unione di credito del richiedente congiunsero i procedimenti concernenti la sua azione per danni.
36. Il 23 aprile 2003 La del 1 Distretto di Praga (obvodní soud) respinse l'azione dell'unione di credito del richiedente per danni per il fatto che era stato depositato da una persona non autorizzata. Affermò, inter l'alia che i membri del consiglio dei dirigenti e del consiglio direttivo non erano abilitati a portare l'azione in favore dell'unione di credito del richiedente. Allo stesso tempo, la corte decise le istanze dei due azionisti , decretando che avrebbero dovuto essere ascoltati separatamente.
37. Il 20 maggio 2003 l'unione di credito del richiedente fece appello. Il 5 settembre 2003 la Corte distrettuale interruppe comunque, i procedimenti, affermando in particolare:
“La Sezione 28(d)(1) dell’ [l'Atto] concede al consiglio direttivo di un'unione di credito il diritto d’impugnare la condotta di curatela fallimentare, ma un'azione per danni subiti come risultato della curatela fallimentare non può essere associata al diritto del consiglio direttivo di fare appello contro decisioni dell’ [OSCU] sotto la sezione 28(d)(1) dell’ [l'Atto].”
38. Il 9 febbraio 2004 la Corte amministrativa Suprema (Nejvyšší správní soud) ha respinto la seconda richiesta per controllo giurisdizionale, depositata dall'unione di credito del richiedente il 15 gennaio 2001 contro la decisione del Ministero delle Finanze del 9 novembre 2000 sostenendo il secondo ordine di curatela fallimentare. La corte, riferendosi alla sezione 28(d) dell'Atto corretto, trovò che la richiesta era stata depositata da una persona non autorizzata, siccome solamente il curatore fallimentare aveva l’autorità di depositare tale ricorso.
39. Il 23 aprile 2004 l'unione di credito del richiedente depositò un ricorso costituzionale contro la decisione della Corte Suprema Amministrativa.
40. Il 26 aprile 2004 La Corte Municipale di Praga (mestský soud) sostenne la decisione della Corte distrettuale del 5 settembre 2003.
41. Il 28 aprile 2004 la Corte Regionale, su ricorso introdotto da 217 creditori azionisti dell’unione di credito del richiedente, dichiarò l'unione di credito del richiedente come insolvente. Un amministratore (správce konkurzní podstaty) fu nominato, di conseguenza.
42. Il 13 ottobre 2004 si tenne un’assemblea di creditori (schuze veritelu) durante la quale fu eletto un comitato di creditore (veritelský výbor). Rispettivamente l’8 dicembre 2004, il 7 novembre 2005 e il 18 gennaio 2006, le tre riunioni di revisione ebbero luogo.
43. Il 7 marzo 2005, la Corte Costituzionale aveva respinto nel frattempo, l'ultimo ricorso costituzionale dell'unione di credito del richiedente.
44. L’ 8 marzo 2006 la Corte Regionale ricevette una lista di beni dell'unione di credito del richiedente. Il realizzo dei beni inclusi nella lista è, secondo il Governo, in corso. In connessione con questa controversia di insolvenza, la Corte Regionale ha registrato 35 controversie giudiziali.
45. Sembrerebbe che la terza richiesta per il controllo giurisdizionale registrato dall'unione di credito del richiedente sia ancora pendente di fronte alla Corte Suprema.
Secondo il Registro delle imprese così com’è, l'unione di credito del richiedente è ancora oggetto di procedure fallimentari.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE E PRATICA ATTINENTI
A. Carta dei Diritti essenziali e delle Libertà (Atto Costituzionale n. 2/1993)
46. L’ Articolo 11 § 4 prevede che l'espropriazione o ogni altra limitazione forzata di diritti di proprietà è possibile solamente nell'interesse pubblico e sulla base della legge, e con risarcimento.
47. Sotto l'Articolo 36 § 1 chiunque può far valere uno o più dei suoi diritti tramite una procedura fissa di fronte ad un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale, ed in casi specifici di fronte ad un altro organo. Sotto il paragrafo 2, chiunque i cui diritti sono stati violati da una decisione di un organo amministrativo e pubblico può fare domanda ad una corte per una revisione della legalità di quella decisione, a meno che la legge preveda altrimenti. Comunque, la revisione delle decisioni che colpiscono i diritti essenziali e le libertà elencati nello Statuto non può essere esclusa dalla giurisdizione delle corti. Sotto il paragrafo 3 viene previsto che ad ognuno venga concesso al risarcimento per il danno causato a lui o a lei da una decisione illegale di una corte, di un altro organo dello Stato o delle autorità pubbliche o da cattiva amministrazione. Sotto il paragrafo 4, le condizioni e i provvedimenti dettagliati a questo proposito vengono determinate tramite statuto.
48. Sotto l'Articolo 38 § 1 non si può negare a nessuno l’ accesso al suo giudice legale. La giurisdizione della corte e la competenza del giudice è determinata tramite statuto. Sotto il paragrafo 2 si prevede che tutti hanno diritto affinché la sua causa venga considerata in pubblico senza ritardi non necessari ed in sua presenza, e a fare commenti su tutte le prove presentate. Il pubblico può essere escluso solamente in casi specificati dalla legge.
B. L'Atto dell'Unione di Credito (n. 87/1995) come in vigore sino al 30 aprile 2000
49. La Sezione 1 prevede che un'unione di credito sia una persona giuridica governata tramite delle disposizioni del Codice Commerciale sulle cooperative a meno che l'Atto preveda altrimenti.
50. La Sezione 3 prevede, inter alia che le unioni di crediti possano offrire prestiti ad e possano ricevere depositi dai loro membri, dalle altre unioni di credito e dalle banche.
51. La Sezione 24(1) e (2) prevede che il capo dell'OSCU sia nominato e rimosso dall’ ufficio del Ministero delle Finanze e che gli vengano conferiti poteri, soggetti all'approvazione del Ministro, decisionali in merito allo status, rimessa e alla politica dell'OSCU.
52. Sotto la sezione 27(1) l'OSCU deve esercitare i suoi poteri con la dovuta diligenza ed efficientemente avendo riguardo degli interessi degli azionisti dell’ unione di credito.
53. In conformità con la sezione 28(2) l'OSCU deve poter imporre sanzioni per qualsiasi violazione dell'Atto o altro statuto da parte di un'unione di credito o dei suoi organi o membri.
54. Sotto la sezione 28(3)(c) all'OSCU sono stati conferiti poteri, inter l'alia, di imporre una curatela fallimentare per un periodo di sei mesi invece o insieme alle sanzioni previste nella sottosezione precedente.
55. In conformità con la sezione 28(3) l'OSCU potrebbe emettere ordini ripetuti di curatela fallimentare .
56. Sotto la sezione 28(6) la curatela fallimentare è disciplinata dall’Atto delle Banche che si applica mutatis mutandis.
57. La Sezione 28(10) prevede che si possa fare appello a una decisione in merito a una curatela fallimentare di fronte al Ministero di Finanza entro 15 giorni dalla sua notifica.
58. La Sezione 28(11) prevede che procedimenti di fronte all’ OSCU siano disciplinati dal Codice di Procedura Amministrativa a meno che l'Atto preveda altrimenti.
C. L'Atto dell'Unione di Credito corretto dall’ Atto n. 100/2000, in vigore fin dal 1 maggio 2000
59. La sezione 28(d)(1) di recente inserita prevede che i poteri di tutti gli organi di un'unione di credito, ad eccezione del suo consiglio direttivo siano sospesi su notifica di un ordine di curatela fallimentare e siano assunti dal curatore fallimentare nominato. Al consiglio direttivo viene concesso di fare appello alle decisioni dell'OSCU.
60. La Sezione 28c(1) prevede che un curatore fallimentare venga nominato, rimosso ed assunto dall'OSCU che decide alla sua rimunerazione.
E. L’Atto delle Banche (Atto n. 21/1992) come in vigore al tempo attinente
61. La Sezione 26(2) prevede che una banca possa essere messa in curatela fallimentare dalla Banca Nazionale ceca senza alcun precedente avviso o invito a rimediare le deficienze identificate nei suoi affari.
62. La Sezione 26(3) stabilisce, inter l'alia , che le operazioni commerciali a danno dei clienti di una banca od operazioni che costituiscono un rischio alla stabilità e alla sicurezza del settore tecnico bancario del mercato finanziario; le violazioni del’Atto delle Banche o gli altri statuti o legislazioni secondarie adottate dalla Banca Nazionale ceca; ed una situazione in cui il volume totale di riserve e delle disposizioni accantonate dalla banca non è sufficiente a coprire i rischi che sorgono dal volume delle disponibilità finanziare classificate registrati da questa, vengano considerate come deficienze all'interno del significato dell'Atto
63. Sotto la sezione 26(4) i procedimenti su curatela fallimentare sono governati dalla legislazione di procedura amministrativa a meno che l’Atto delle Banche non preveda altrimenti.
64. Secondo la sezione 30 della Banca Nazionale ceca può imporre una curatela fallimentare dove le deficienze nelle attività di una banca mettono in pericolo la stabilità del sistema tecnico bancario e gli azionisti non hanno intrapreso dei passi necessari per eliminarle.
E. Il Codice di Procedura Civile (Atto n. 99/1963), come in vigore al tempo attinente
65. L’Articolo 245(2) prevede che una corte, riedendo una decisione adottata da un'autorità amministrativa all'interno del suo potere discrezionale accordato da uno statuto, può esaminare solo se tale decisione era stata presa in conformità agli articoli stabiliti da un statuto.
66. L’Articolo 247 et seq. permettono ai singoli individui o a persone giuridiche che sostengono che i loro diritti erano stati limitati da una decisione di un'autorità amministrativa di richiedere un controllo giurisdizionale per determinare la legalità di quella decisione.
67. Sotto l'Articolo 250i § 1 la corte, durante la revisione della legalità della decisione, deve appellarsi ai fatti come erano al tempo della consegna della decisione contestata; nessuna prova è stata presa.
F. Codice della Procedura della Corte amministrativa (Atto n. 150/2002)
68. Il Codice è entrato in vigore il 1 gennaio 2003, sostituendo la Parte V del Codice di Procedura Civile.
69. L’Articolo 71 § 1(d) e (e) prevede che un querelante sia obbligato a comprovare gli attinenti fatti giuridici ed effettivi sui quali è basata l'azione ed a identificare una prova in loro appoggio.
70. Sotto l'Articolo 75 § 2 la corte amministrativa basa la sua decisione sui fatti e la legge come erano al tempo del decreto contestato. Può prendere prova a questo riguardo sotto l’Articolo 77 § 1.
G. Codice di Procedura Amministrativa (Atto n. 71/1967)
71. Sotto l'Articolo 59 § 1 un'autorità di appello ha la piena giurisdizione per esaminare una decisione contestata. All’occorrenza, può completare i procedimenti in oggetto e porre rimedio a qualsiasi difetto identificato.
H. Codice Commerciale (Atto n. 513/1991)
72. L’Articolo che 244 § 6 prevede che al consiglio direttivo di una cooperativa sia concesso di richiedere al consiglio di amministrazione qualsiasi informazione riguardo alla situazione finanziaria della cooperativa. Il consiglio di amministrazione è obbligato a informare il consiglio esecutivo senza alcuna omissione di qualsiasi fatto che avrebbe conseguenze serie per la situazione finanziaria della cooperativa o lo status della cooperativa o dei suoi azionisti.
I. Atto Statale di Controllo
La Sezione 17 prevede che una revisione resa da un'autorità di controllo può essere contestata tramite obiezioni che devono essere sollevate entro cinque giorni dalla notifica della revisione nei confronti una persona controllata.
Sotto la Sezione 18 a un impiegato di un'autorità di controllo vengono conferiti poteri per decidere sulle obiezioni sollevate. Una persona controllata di fare appello a quella decisione di fronte al capo dell’ autorità entro 15 giorni da quella decisione. La decisione sul ricorso è irrevocabile.
Secondo la Sezione 26 il Codice di Procedura Amministrativa non è applicabile ai procedimenti sotto la Sezione 18.
J. Sentenza della Plenaria della Corte Costituzionale del 27 giugno 2001 (n. 276/2001)
73. Gli Articoli 244-250s [Parte V] del Codice di Procedura Civile, dal momento che governarono la procedura delle corti amministrative, furono abrogati a partire dal 31 dicembre 2002 da questa direttiva. Nel suo ragionamento la Corte Costituzionale ha trovato queste disposizioni contrarie all’Articolo 6 della Convenzione siccome, inter l'alia, limitavano la giurisdizione delle corti amministrative di revisionare gli atti amministrativi a questioni di legalità. Trovo che la legislazione in oggetto conferiva alle corti amministrative poteri per annullare solamente decisioni semplicemente illegali, non quelli che incorporavano errori di fatto. In altre parole, come stabilito dalla Corte Costituzionale, la deliberazione delle autorità amministrative non poteva essere sostituita, secondo quelle disposizioni, da quella di corti indipendenti.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 RIGUARDO L'UNIONE DI CREDITO DEL RICHIEDENTE
74. L'unione di credito del richiedente addusse una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato della sua proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, i provvedimenti precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire tali leggi se ritiene necessario controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. L'unione di credito del richiedente
75. L'unione di credito del richiedente asserì che, ai termini della sua situazione finanziaria, i requisiti legali che permettono allo Stato di imporre una curatela fallimentare non erano stati soddisfatti. Addusse che la sua situazione non aveva costituito una minaccia alla stabilità del sistema finanziario delle unioni di credito. Al tempo del primo ordine di curatela fallimentare, l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva gestito CZK 328,000,000 (EUR 13,105,835) nei depositi dei membri in conti a condizioni fisse e CZK 16,000,000 (EUR 639,309) in depositi nei loro conti correnti, mentre l’intero ramo di questo settore aveva nel 1999 accumulato fino a 10,814,000,000,000 (EUR 432,092,993,892) in depositi. La quota dell'unione di credito del richiedente corrispondeva così solamente al 3.07%. Ne segue che l’ordine di curatela fallimentare non poteva essere giustificato da preoccupazioni in merito alla stabilità del settore di unione di credito in questi termini. Inoltre, sotto la sezione 3(1) dell'Atto, l'unione di credito del richiedente aveva offerto i suoi servizi solamente ai suoi membri e non al pubblico, diversamente dalle banche nazionali.
76. L'unione di credito del richiedente negò anche l'illegalità delle tre operazioni commerciali alle quali l'OSCU si era appellato nell'imporre la curatela fallimentare. Sostenne che le scoperte dell'OSCU erano state stabilite in modo insufficiente ed erano state mal interpretate . L'ordine di curatela fallimentare era andato non era riuscito a spiegare perché queste operazioni avrebbero messo in pericolo la stabilità dell'unione di credito del richiedente o degli interessi dei suoi membri .
77. Inoltre, la sezione 28(6) dell'Atto come in vigore attualmente, insieme con la sezione 30 dell’Atto delle Banche , escludeva qualsiasi possibilità di mettere l'unione di credito del richiedente in curatela fallimentare per motivi che fanno riferimento alla decisione dell'OSCU dell’ 11 gennaio 2000. Dal 1 settembre 1998 la curatela fallimentare poteva essere ordinata solamente, sotto la sezione 30 dell’Atto delle Banche se le deficienze stabilite in tal proposito sotto la sezione 26 minacciavano la stabilità del settore tecnico bancario nell'insieme e se, allo stesso tempo, gli azionisti della banca non avevano intrapreso da soli i passi necessari per rimediare alla situazione.
78. L'unione di credito del richiedente sostenne inoltre che anche il bisogno di proteggere gli interessi materiali dei suoi azionisti non poteva giustificare l'imposizione di una curatela fallimentare. La possibilità di mettere un'unione di credito in curatela fallimentare era contraria ai principi dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, in quanto non vi era nessun interesse pubblico che giustificasse simile interferenza coi diritti dell'unione di credito del richiedente. Gli azionisti avevano diritto a prendere parte alla gestione dell'unione di credito e nella composizione dei suoi corpi giuridici e direttivi e perciò avevano i mezzi di influenzare le attività dell'unione di credito ed i suoi risultati finanziari, mentre i clienti delle banche, ai quali le disposizioni sulla curatela fallimentare nell’Atto delle Banche erano dirette primariamente, non potevano farlo.
79. L'unione di credito del richiedente considerò che la durata della curatela fallimentare fosse stata illegale: sotto la sezione 28(f)(1)(c) dell'Atto non sarebbe dovuta durare più di dodici mesi, ma nel presente caso rimaneva in vigore da 30 mesi.
80. Inoltre, l'unione di credito del richiedente non aveva avuto qualsiasi strumento giuridico a sua disposizione col quale contestare la curatela fallimentare ordinata ed il fatto che al suo consiglio direttivo fosse stato negato l’accesso dal curatore fallimentare a quei documenti contabili amministrativi e degli affari necessari per fare appello contro tale ordine, almeno sino al maggio 2000. Anche dopo questa data, l’accesso era stato limitato a causa di una mancanza di cooperazione da parte del curatore fallimentare.
81. Riguardo alla secondo curatela fallimentare ordinata dall'OSCU il 12 luglio 2000, l'unione di credito del richiedente addusse, che i dati a cui si appellava l'OSCU non riflettevano la situazione come stabilita dal consiglio direttivo dell'unione di credito del richiedente e le susseguenti opinioni competenti. Si era considerato in grado onorare le sue pendenze debitorie riguardo i depositi conclusi degli azionisti. I conti correnti dell'unione di credito del richiedente corrispondevano a CZK 31,500,000 (EUR 840,078) ed i suoi finanziamenti disponibili entro due mesi rappresentavano CZK 45,000,000 (EUR 1,200,111). Inoltre, questo bilancio non aveva incluso CZK 22,000,000 (EUR 586,721) in forma di un investimento nel capitale non di quota di MLM che poteva essere immediatamente rimborsato, avendo assunto il curatore fallimentare i poteri del direttore esecutivo della seconda società. Insomma, i fondi disponibili dell'unione di credito del richiedente erano almeno pari a CZK 98,500,000 (EUR 2,626,910). Secondo un rendiconto di certificazione redatto da una terza parte, l'unione di credito del richiedente non aveva registrato una perdita di 57,500,000 (EUR 1,533,476), ma aveva mostrato un profitto di 14,236,524 (EUR 379,676).
82. Avendo contestato i dati valutati e su cui faceva affidamento l'OSCU, l'unione di credito del richiedente dibatté che non erano stata soddisfatte le condizioni legali per prolungare la curatela fallimentare per la seconda volta. Asserì che non poteva essere ritenuta per responsabile per qualsiasi atti, incluso gli atti illegali commessi dopo il primo ordine di curatela fallimentare, siccome questi erano stati commessi dal curatore fallimentare, senza la sua partecipazione e contro la sua volontà.
83. Inoltre, le persone che agiscono per suo conto non avevano intrapreso tutti i passi giuridici per difendere i diritti dell'unione di credito del richiedente e quelli dei suoi membri. Nella sua prospettiva, il curatore fallimentare aveva creato artificialmente,-con l'approvazione tacita dell'OSCU-i requisiti indispensabili per la proroga della curatela fallimentare ed allo stesso tempo aveva creato intenzionalmente le condizioni per il crollo finanziario dell'unione di credito. Rivendicò anche di aver perso parte della sua proprietà come risultato della gestione del curatore fallimentare.
2. Il Governo
84. Il Governo concedette che l'imposizione della curatela fallimentare costituì una violazione dei diritti di proprietà dell'unione di credito del richiedente. Ciononostante, contese che la curatela fallimentare era stata imposta all'unione di credito del richiedente per proteggere la stabilità del mercato finanziario attinente e, in particolare, gli interessi dei suoi azionisti. Corrispose perciò ad un controllo dell'uso di proprietà all'interno del significato del secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Dato la crisi seria nel settore delle unioni di credito al tempo attinente ed i su grande scala, le deficienze illegali e le irregolarità nella gestione dell'unione di credito del richiedente, che consistevano principalmente nell’offrire prestiti e trattare titoli contrari all'Atto, e l'instabilità della grande maggioranza delle unioni di credito al tempo reale, il Governo asserì inoltre che il danneggiamento dei diritti dell'unione di credito del richiedente era stato proporzionato allo scopo legittimo di stabilizzazione del mercato finanziario attinente, del sistema di assicurazione dei depositi e della protezione degli interessi dei depositanti gli. Sostenne che per le ragioni summenzionate l'ordine di curatela fallimentare doveva essere immediatamente e da subito istruito senza dare all'unione di credito del richiedente un'opportunità di rimediare alla sua situazione finanziaria. Appellandosi alla sezione 26(2) dell’Atto delle Banche, il Governo contestò l'asserzione dell'unione di credito del richiedente secondo la quale questo passo era stato illegale.
85. Riguardo al secondo e al terzo ordine di curatela fallimentare, il Governo sostenne, riferendosi alle scoperte dell'OSCU, che la condizione legale per emettere ordini di curatela fallimentare ripetuti era stata rispettata, siccome l'unione di credito del richiedente era stata insolvente e in violazione così dei suoi obblighi sotto la sezione 11(3) dell'Atto. Si riferì alle altre violazioni dell'Atto e all'adeguatezza di capitale, la liquidità e ai requisiti di solvibilità trovati nelle decisioni contestate dell'OSCU. Il Governo infine asserì che la povera situazione finanziaria dell'unione di credito del richiedente era stata causata dalla condotta non professionale e illegale della sua gestione, tanto che alcuni dei suoi membri erano stati perseguiti per questi atti. Per le ragioni delineate sopra, lo Stato aveva dovuto perciò, sostituire il management con un curatore fallimentare.
B. La valutazione della Corte
86. L'essenza della lagnanza dell'unione di credito del richiedente consiste nella dichiarazione che è stata messa in curatela fallimentare contrariamente all’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, perdendo il controllo dei suoi affari durante l'intervento da parte del curatore fallimentare. La Corte considera perciò che è applicabile il secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Capital Bank Ad c. Bulgaria, n. 49429/99, § 86 ECHR 2005-XII (estratti), con l'ulteriore riferimento a, mutatis mutandis, AGOSI c. il Regno Unito, sentenza del 24 ottobre 1986 la Serie A n. 108, § 51; e Bosphorus Hava Yollari Turizm ve Ticaret Anonim Sirketi c. Irlanda [GC], n. 45036/98, §§ 153-154 ECHR 2005-VI). Questa sentenza non è alterata dal fatto che l'unione di credito del richiedente ha addotto che le sue perdite finanziarie erano state dovute alla condotta non professionale del curatore fallimentare, siccome questa questione sarà presa in esame nella valutazione delle richiesta presentate sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione.
87. La Corte reitera che il suo potere per fare una revisione dell’ottemperanza degli atti impugnati con la legge nazionale è limitata e non è compito suo prendere il posto dei tribunali nazionali (vedere Sovtransavto Holding c. Ucraina, n. 48553/99, § 95 ECHR 2002-VII). Comunque, questo non dispensa la necessità per la Corte di determinare se l'interferenza in questione si sia attenuta ai requisiti dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (ibid.).
88. La Corte reitera che il primo requisito e quello più importante dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica col tranquillo godimento della proprietà dovrebbe essere legale: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione della proprietà solamente “ se soggetta alle condizioni previste dalla legge” ed il secondo paragrafo riconosce che gli Stati hanno diritto al controllo dell'uso della proprietà applicando “le leggi.” Inoltre, la norma giuridica, uno dei principi fondamentali in una società democratica è inerente a tutti gli Articoli della Convenzione (vedere Capital Bank AD c. Bulgaria, citata sopra, con l'ulteriore riferimento a Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 58 ECHR 1999-II).
89. Il requisito della legalità, all'interno del significato della Convenzione presuppone, fra le altre cose, che diritto nazionale deve fornire una misura di tutela giuridica contro le interferenze arbitrarie da parte delle autorità pubbliche con i diritti salvaguardati dalla Convenzione (vedere Hasan e Chaush c. Bulgaria [GC], n. 30985/96, § 84 ECHR 2000-XI). Inoltre, i concetti della legalità e della norma giuridica in una società democratica richiedono che le misure riguardanti i diritti essenziali siano, in certi casi, soggette all’istituzione di procedimenti in contrari di fronte ad un corpo indipendente competente per revisionare le ragioni per le misure e le prove attinenti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Al-Nashif c. Bulgaria, n. 50963/99, § 123 20 giugno 2002). È vero che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non contiene nessuno requisito procedurale esplicito e l'assenza di controllo giurisdizionale non corrisponde, di per sé, ad una violazione di quel provvedimento (vedere Fredin c. Svezia (n. 1), sentenza del 18 febbraio 1991, Serie A n. 192, § 50). Ciononostante, implica che qualsiasi interferenza col tranquillo godimento della proprietà deve essere accompagnata da garanzie procedurali che riconoscano all'individuo o all'entità riguardata un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare la loro causa alle autorità responsabili al fine di impugnare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono coi diritti garantiti da questa disposizione. Nell'accertare se questa condizione è stata soddisfatta, bisogno prendere una prospettiva comprensiva delle procedure giudiziali ed amministrative applicabili (vedere Jokela c. Finlandia, n. 28856/95, § 45 ECHR 2002-IV con ulteriori riferimenti).
90. Rivolgendosi agli specifici fatti della causa, la Corte osserva che il curatore fallimentare, esercitando i poteri dell'organo legale dell'unione di credito del richiedente durante la curatela fallimentare, era nel pieno controllo di tutti i suoi affari e dei documenti contabili che mostravano la sua situazione finanziaria complessiva. Esercitando quei poteri era la sola persona a cui era permesso avere accesso a quei documenti. Non era obbligato ciononostante a fare così secondo la legge in vigore all’epoca. Secondo l'unione di credito del richiedente, lui negò l’ accesso ai documenti in oggetto al consiglio direttivo. Il Governo non ha contestato questa dichiarazione.
91. La Corte nota che la situazione finanziaria di una determinata entità è uno dei fattori decisivi nella decisione di imporre la curatela fallimentare. Di conseguenza, ha un ruolo centrale in qualsiasi revisione successiva di tale decisione ed è spesso l’elemento determinante del suo risultato. Perciò, è indispensabile, nella prospettiva della Corte per qualsiasi entità che intende contestare una decisione di imporre una curatela fallimentare di avere accesso a tutti i suoi documenti e agli altri materiali che possono essere di assistenza per sostenere e stabilire il suo ricorso contro tale decisione. Affari e documenti contabili rientrano in questa categoria. È vero che il diritto a simile accesso non è assoluto, poiché potrebbe esserci un interesse competitivo in gioco. Comunque qualsiasi limitazione non deve danneggiare l’ essenza stessa di questo diritto. Altrimenti il diritto di fare appello contro le decisioni di curatela fallimentare sarebbe piuttosto illusorio, siccome un appellante non avrebbe alcuna opportunità ragionevole di contestare quelle direttive ed addurre prova in appoggio delle sue dichiarazioni. Questo è particolarmente vero in procedimenti in cui la decisione di accordare un ‘accesso agli affari e ai documenti contabili è nelle mani di un curatore fallimentare, un impiegato di un'autorità regolatrice che viene nominata con la decisione dell’imposizione della curatela fallimentare. In simile casi, il fatto che un'entità abbia o meno un'opportunità ragionevole di impugnare la curatela fallimentare di cui è soggetta è determinato da un ricevitore nominato, rimosso d’ ufficio ed assunto dall'autorità Statale la cui decisione l'entità intende contestare. In questa situazione, il ramo esecutivo dello Stato può frustrare, qualsiasi ragionevole tentativo di contestare l'imposizione della curatela fallimentare tramite una decisione che nega l’accesso a documenti indispensabili che non è soggetta a una revisione. Prendendo in considerazione la gravità di una decisione d’imposizione di curatela fallimentare e le sue conseguenze per un'entità che opera sul mercato finanziario, simile rifiuto deve essere, nella prospettiva della Corte, soggetto a scrutinio giudiziale da parte di un tribunale indipendente e non solo da un impiegato del ramo esecutivo dello Stato. Applicando questi principi alla presente causa, la Corte costata che nessuno dei requisiti summenzionati riguardo al rifiuto di accesso ai documenti dell'unione di credito del richiedente è stato rispettato riguardo la revisione della decisione dell’ 11 gennaio 2000 che imponeva la curatela fallimentare. Ne consegue che l'unione di credito del richiedente fu privata delle garanzie procedurali che riconoscevano un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare la sua causa alle autorità responsabili in prospettiva di impugnare efficacemente la decisione di metterla in curatela fallimentare.
92. La Corte nota che l'unione di credito del richiedente non addusse che il rifiuto di accesso continuò quando impugnò le decisioni del12 luglio 2000 e 12 luglio 2001 che prolungavano la curatela fallimentare. Comunque, la sola via giuridica con la quale l'unione di credito del richiedente avrebbe potuto contestare la curatela fallimentare aveva cessato di esistere per quel momento, siccome il suo consiglio direttivo perse la sua condizione di fare appello con l'entrata in vigore dell'emendamento all'Atto il 1 maggio 2000. La conclusione della Corte riguardo alla decisione adottata l’ 11 gennaio 2000 si applica quindi anche ,mutatis mutandis , a quelle due decisioni.
93. È vero che in un area economica e sensibile come la stabilità del mercato finanziario gli Stati Contraenti godono di un ampio margine di valutazione (vedere Olczak c. Polonia ( dec.), n. 30417/96, § 85 ECHR 2002-X ( estratti)) e che incerte situazioni-specialmente nel contesto di una crisi delle unioni di credito come quello che stava affrontando la Repubblica ceca al tempo attinente -ci può essere un bisogno sovrano per lo Stato di agire per evitare un danno irreparabile ad un'unione di credito, ai suoi depositanti e agli altri creditori, o unioni di credito ed il sistema finanziario nell'insieme. Ciononostante, se simile margine fosse illimitato, i diritti concretizzati nell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 diverrebbe illusori. Perciò, ha dovuto essere costruito in modo tale da garantire agli individui che l'essenza dei loro diritti venga protetta.
94. Applicando questo principio alla presente causa , la Corte considera che la presa di controllo degli affari dell'unione di credito del richiedente da parete del curatore fallimentare potrebbe essere considerata di per sé all’interno del margine di valutazione, in quanto non fu stabilito dall'unione di credito del richiedente che alle autorità Statali responsabili era mancato un ragionevole sospetto che la sua situazione finanziaria richiedesse loro di imporre una curatela fallimentare. Comunque, sui fatti della presente causa per i quali all'unione di credito del richiedente fu negato l’ accesso ai suoi documenti commerciali (vedere paragrafo 90) e che non è stata successivamente capace di impugnare questo rifiuto di fronte ad un tribunale, questo aspetto dell'imposizione della curatela fallimentare sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 resta soggetto alla revisione della Corte ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. Una volta che lo Stato si trovava nel pieno controllo degli affari dell'unione di credito del richiedente, riducendo sostanzialmente così la minaccia che costituiva la ragione di metterla in curatela fallimentare, la Corte avuto riguardo del fatto che il Governo non ha presentato argomenti per giustificare il rifiuto in oggetto, non vede nessuna ragione che dispenserebbe lo Stato dal riconoscere all'unione di credito del richiedente un'opportunità ragionevole di avere accesso ai suoi documenti commerciali o di contestare il rifiuto di fronte ad un tribunale.
95. Alla luce di ciò che precede, la Corte conclude, che l'interferenza con la proprietà dell'unione di credito del richiedente non è stata circondata da garanzie sufficienti contro l'arbitrarietà e non era così legale all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, H.L. c. Regno Unito, n. 45508/99, § 124 ECHR 2004-IX). Questa conclusione non rende necessario accertare se gli altri requisiti di questo provvedimento sono stati rispettati (vedere Iatridis, citata sopra, § 62). La Corte non esprime così nessuna opinione sulla questione se i requisiti legali per l'imposizione di curatela fallimentare sono stati soddisfatti nella presente causa o sulla questione se il danneggiamento ha colpito il giusto equilibrio fra i diritti dell'unione di credito del richiedente e le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità.
96. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 RIGUARDO I 641 MEMBRI DELL'UNIONE DI CREDITO DEL RICHIEDENTE
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. I richiedenti
97. I richiedenti si lamentarono della decisione di mettere l'unione di credito in curatela fallimentare ed il suo effetto sulle loro quote e depositi. Loro addussero che né loro né l'unione di credito, avevano avuto qualsiasi via di ricorso effettiva a loro disposizione a questo proposito e che il loro diritto di proprietà era stato danneggiato siccome non hanno potuto disporre della loro proprietà a causa del curatela fallimentare. Hanno sollevato essenzialmente gli stessi argomenti dell'unione di credito del richiedente.
2. Il Governo
98. Il Governo sostenne, riferendosi alla causa Agrotexim ed Altri c. Grecia (sentenza del 24 ottobre 1995, Serie A n. 330-a), che la loro richiesta dovrebbe essere dichiarata inammissibile siccome i richiedenti non erano riusciti a stabilire con certezza sufficiente che era impossibile per l'unione di credito del richiedente di depositare una richiesta con la Corte. Loro contesero inoltre che ai richiedenti era stato pagato infine un risarcimento corrispondente al 90% dei loro depositi assicurati.
B. La valutazione della Corte
99. La Corte reitera che il penetrare nel “ velo aziendale” o il trascurare la personalità giuridica di una società sono giustificati solamente in circostanze eccezionali, in particolare quando viene chiaramente stabilito che è impossibile per la società appellarsi alle istituzioni della Convenzione attraverso gli organi stabiliti sotto i suoi statuti societari o –nel caso di liquidazione -tramite i suoi liquidatori (vedere Agrotexim ed Altri c. Grecia, citata sopra, § 66). La Corte prende in esame al primo posto la natura della lagnanza ed il conflitto di interessi fra le parti coinvolte nel valutare queste circostanze.
100. Rivolgendosi alla presente causa, la Corte nota che le lagnanze dei richiedenti sono essenzialmente le stesse di quelle sollevate dall'unione di credito del richiedente. Avendo riguardo della sua costatazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 riguardo l'unione di credito del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 96), la Corte considera che l'unione di credito del richiedente, agendo tramite il suo consiglio esecutivo, ha sollevato con successo di fronte alla Corte le richieste asserite dai suoi membri. In queste circostanze e riguardo al criterio stabilito dalla giurisprudenza della Corte, i richiedenti non possono essere considerati come nella posizione di appellarsi alla Corte (vedere Agrotexim ed Altri c. Grecia, citata sopra, §§ 66 e 71, e Minda ed Altri c. Ungheria, ( dec.), n. 6690/02, 13 settembre 2005). L'obiezione del Governo a questo riguardo a deve essere perciò sostenuto.
101. La Corte richiama che l'Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione in fine l'abilita a respingere una richiesta considerata inammissibile “a qualsiasi stadio dei procedimenti.” Così, anche ai meriti insceni la Corte può riconsiderare una decisione della dichiarazione di una richiesta ammissibile se conclude che dovrebbe essere dichiarata inammissibile per una delle ragioni date nei primi tre paragrafi dell’ Articolo 35 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Blecic c. Croatia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 65 ECHR 2006).
La Corte dichiara questa parte dell’istanza incompatibile ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 alla luce di ciò che precede, e la respinge sotto l’Articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
102. L'unione di credito del richiedente si lamentò che le decisioni concernenti al sua curatela fallimentare non potevano essere contestate di fronte alle autorità nazionali indipendenti ed imparziali con piena giurisdizione per esaminare la sua causa. Sostenne anche che era stata privata dell’ accesso ad una corte cercando di impugnare le decisioni di prolungamento della curatela fallimentare.
103. Nella sua decisione sull’ ammissibilità adottata il 31 gennaio 2006 la Corte decise di esaminare queste lagnanze sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ad ognuno viene concessa un’ udienza pubblica equa... da parte di un tribunale indipendente ed imparziale. ...”
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
1. L'unione di credito del richiedente
104. L'unione di credito del richiedente sostenne che i suoi ricorsi contro le decisioni dell'OSCU che imponevano e prolungavano la curatela fallimentare sono stati trattati dal Ministero delle Finanze che era l'autorità Statale garante dell'OSCU e che quindi non era così indipendente. Il controllo giurisdizionale di quei procedimenti amministrativi era stato condotto da tribunali ai quali erano stati conferiti poteri solamente per esaminare la loro legalità. Asserì inoltre di non aver potuto contestare efficientemente i fatti della caso valutati dall'OSCU.
2. Il Governo
105. Il Governo concedette che gli articoli in vigore prima del31 dicembre 2002 non avevano lasciato spazio alla revisione delle decisioni amministrative da parte di corpi giudiziali con piena giurisdizione. I tribunali amministrativi avrebbero potuto revisionare solamente la legalità di decisioni amministrative e non i meriti. Comunque, il Nuovo Codice della Procedura della Corte amministrativa era stato adottato per rettificare questa situazione insoddisfacente, ed era entrato in vigore il 1 gennaio 2003.
106. Il Governo richiamò a questo proposito che la Corte amministrativa Suprema, quando tratta con la richiesta dell'unione di credito del richiedente per il controllo giurisdizionale del primo ordine di curatela fallimentare, ha applicato i nuovi articoli sotto quel Codice. Inoltre, come dimostrato dalla sua sentenza adottata il 21 giugno 2002, L’Alta Corte di Praga aveva eseguito poi una piena revisione nella presente causa nonostante la legge applicabile in vigore, riflettendo la pratica occasionale dei tribunali nazionali.
B. La valutazione della Corte
107. La Corte reitera che per la determinazione dei diritti civili ed obblighi da parte di un tribunale per soddisfare l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, il tribunale in oggetto deve avere la giurisdizione per esaminare tutte le questioni di fatto e di diritto attinenti alla controversia di fronte a sé (vedere Terra Woningen B.V. c. Paesi Bassi, sentenza del 17 dicembre 1996, Relazioni 1996-VI § 52; Chevrol c. Francia [GC], n. 49636/99, § 77 ECHR 2003-III; ed I.D. c. Bulgaria, n. 43578/98, § 45 28 aprile 2005). Bisogna anche perciò esaminare se l'imposizione della curatela fallimentare dell'OSCU era soggetta a revisione diretta da parte di un tribunale con piena giurisdizione (vedere Società del Tabacco britannico-americana Ltd c. Paesi Bassi, sentenza del 20 novembre 1995 Serie A n. 331, §§ 84-87, ed I.D., citata sopra, § 53). Nel fare così, la Corte dovrebbe limitarsi il più possibile ad esaminare la questione sollevata dalla causa di fronte a sé. Dovrebbe di conseguenza decidere solamente, se, nelle circostanze della causa, le autorità nazionali attinenti avevano la giurisdizione richiesta dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (Fischer c. Austria, sentenza del 26 aprile 1995 la Serie A n. 312, § 33). La Corte richiama a questo proposito che è probabile che si trovi che una mancanza di piena giurisdizione da parte di un tribunale, in particolari circostanze di una determinata causa, sia compatibile con l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Nel valutare la sufficienza di un controllo giurisdizionale disponibile ad un richiedente, è necessario avere riguardo a questioni come il soggetto-questione della decisione contro la quale è stato fatto appello, il modo in cui si è arrivati alla decisione fu arrivata ed il contenuto della controversia, incluso i motivi desiderati ed effettivi del ricorso (vedere Bryan c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 22 novembre 1995 la Serie A n. 335-a, § 45).
108. La Corte osserva che l'OSCU eseguì la revisione delle posizioni economiche della società del richiedente su sua propria istanza. La raccolta delle prove e la loro valutazione, cioè la determinazione dei fatti della causa, fu riservata così esclusivamente all'OSCU. La revisione fu resa accessibile all’unione di credito del richiedente il 10 gennaio 2000, iniziando così il limite di cinque giorni sotto la Sezione 17 dell’Atto di controllo Statale per quest’ultima per contestarla sollevando obiezioni. Facendo seguito alla Sezione 18 le obiezioni sollevate dall'unione di credito del richiedente furono trattate in tal proposito da un impiegato dell'OSCU. La sua decisione avrebbe potuto essere contestata di fronte al capo dell'OSCU entro 15 giorni dalla notifica all’unione di credito del richiedente. L’applicazione del Codice di Procedura Amministrativa in quella procedura fu comunque espressamente esclusa dalla Sezione 26 dell'Atto. Non c'era altra via di ricorso amministrativa contro la sentenza della revisione. Mentre era vero che la decisione che imponeva la curatela fallimentare basata sulla sentenza summenzionata poteva, e davvero era così, essere impugnata di fronte al Ministero delle Finanze, la revisione, cioè la sentenza come dai fatti, non fu fatta siccome il Ministero trovò che era stata presa dall'OSCU sotto l’Atto Statale di Controllo ed la precedente era perciò legata a questa. I fatti come valutati dall'OSCU non erano rivedibili in procedimenti amministrativi da nessun altra autorità amministrativa.
Inoltre, secondo la sezione 24(1) e (2) dell'Atto, l'OSCU fu gestito da un direttore nominato e rimosso d’ ufficio dal Ministro delle Finanze che anche esercitò il potere per approvare in dettaglio lo status, la politica e i rinvii dell'OSCU. Quindi, l'OSCU era un'autorità subordinata e dipendente dal Ministero di cui forma la parte del ramo esecutivo e non può essere ritenuto perciò come tribunale indipendente ed imparziale che si adatta ai requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Alla luce di ciò che precede, questa causa deve essere distinta dalla causa Bryan c. Regno Unito (citata sopra) in cui non c'era controversia relativamente ai fatti primari e in cui la salvaguardia disponibile al richiedente nei procedimenti amministrativi era incontestata.
109. Riguardo al controllo giurisdizionale della causa, la Corte osserva che sino al 31 dicembre 2002 le corti amministrative ceche non avevano la piena giurisdizione per fare una revisione degli atti amministrativi, essendo il loro scrutinio limitato sotto la Parte V del Codice di Procedura Civile all'esame dei problemi di legalità. Si noti inoltre che l’applicazione di quella legislazione da parte dei tribunali amministrativi stata trovata dalla Corte Costituzionale nel 2001 incompatibile con l’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, siccome, secondo la corte, ai tribunali amministrativi non furono conferiti poteri per annullare decisioni non legittime ma soltanto quelle che erano illegali. La Corte nota inoltre che il Codice recentemente adottato di Procedura Amministrativa della Corte , che prevede il completo scrutinio della legge e dei fatti, è entrato in vigore il 1 gennaio 2003. I procedimenti contestati furono condotti dai tribunali amministrativi sotto quest’ultimo Codice dal momento della sua entrata in vigore. Di conseguenza, le decisioni giudiziali contestate adottate dopo data summenzionata furono rese da tribunali che avevano la piena giurisdizione.
110. Comunque, la Corte considera che la stessa conclusione non si applica alla sentenza dell’Alta Corte di Praga del 21 giugno 2002. Il Governo dibatté nondimeno che il diritto procedurale come applicato al tempo attinente non avrebbe impedito ai tribunali di esercitare il pieno controllo giurisdizionale delle decisioni amministrative. Asserì che i tribunali amministrativi facevano di quando in quando una revisione degli aspetti relativi ai fatti di una determinata causa anche . L'esame della causa dell'unione del richiedente da parte dell’Alta Corte precedente alla consegna del giudizio del 21 giugno 2002, che consisteva in uno scrutinio particolareggiato delle obiezioni sollevate dall'unione del richiedente contro la decisione dell'OSCU che imponeva il primo ordine di curatela fallimentare, provò che tale pratica da parte dei tribunali nazionali era possibile. Ne consegue, secondo il Governo che i procedimenti di fronte all’Alta Corte erano stati in conformità all’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
111. La Corte reitera che, in una determinata causa in cui la piena giurisdizione viene contestata, è probabile che procedimenti soddisfino ancora requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione se la corte che decide sulla questione considerasse tutte osservazioni del richiedente sui loro meriti, punto per punto, senza dovere mai declinare la giurisdizione nel rispondere loro o nell’ accertamento dei fatti (vedere Zumtobel c. Austria, sentenza del 21 settembre 1993 la Serie A n. 268-a, § 31-32 e Fischer c. Austria, citata sopra, § 34). Per contrasto, la Corte trovò violazioni dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione nelle altre cause in cui i tribunali nazionali si erano considerati legati alle precedenti conclusioni di corpi amministrativi che erano decisive per la chiusura delle cause di fronte a loro, senza esaminare indipendentemente i problemi attinenti (vedere Obermeier c. Austria, sentenza del 28 giugno 1990 la Serie A n. 179, pp. 22-23, §§ 69-70; Terra Woningen B.V., citata sopra, pp. 2122-23, §§ 52-55; I.D., citata sopra, §§ 46 e 50-55; e Capital Bank Ad c. Bulgaria, §§ 99-108 citata sopra). La Corte trovò una violazione del diritto di accesso ad un tribunale laddove il richiedente non poteva impugnare di fronte ad un tribunale una valutazione dei fatti in una decisione adottata da un'autorità amministrativa che agisce all'interno del suo potere discrezionale (vedere Tinnelly & Sons Ltd ed Altri e McElduff ed Altri c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 10 luglio 1998, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-IV § 74). In questo caso, la revisione giurisdizionale non condusse mai ad un pieno scrutinio della base relativa ai fatti di tale decisione.
112. Nella presente causa, il ricorso dell'unione di credito del richiedente all’Alta Corte di Praga contro la decisione dell'OSCU ed il Ministero delle Finanze che imponeva la curatela fallimentare era duplice. In primo luogo, l'unione di credito del richiedente contestò la valutazione giuridica dell'OSCU che dichiarava le operazioni impegnate dall’unione di credito del richiedente contrarie all'Atto. In secondo luogo, si sostenne in appello che l'OSCU, decidendo completamente all'interno della sua discrezione come previsto dall'Atto, impose all'unione di credito del richiedente una misura sproporzionata optando per la curatela fallimentare, benché altre misure meno severe fossero disponibili sotto l'Atto. Secondo l'unione di credito del richiedente, questa decisione era in parte a causa di una valutazione erronea dei fatti, vale a dire delle sue posizioni economiche, da parte dell'OSCU.
La Corte nota che a causa della sua giurisdizione limitata q fare una revisione, l’Alta Corte di Praga trattando il secondo risvolto del ricorso, si astenne, come è evidente dal suo ragionamento, dal condurre il suo proprio esame del se l'unione di credito del richiedente si trovasse effettivamente in una situazione che giustificava l'imposizione della curatela fallimentare. Ammettendo che la curatela fallimentare fosse la misura più severa disponibile sotto l'Atto, sostenne che quella legislazione ha riservato all’ OSCU che agiva all'interno del suo potere discrezionale la decisione riguardo a quale misura adottare in caso di violazione delle disposizioni dell'Atto. Invece di decretare sulla questione della proporzionalità della curatela fallimentare, si confinò solamente a verificare se l'OSCU non avesse agito oltre il suo potere discrezionale come stabilito dall'Atto imponendo la curatela fallimentare. Questo verdetto fu reso su un presupposto, non sulla verifica da parte dell’Alta Corte che la posizione economica dell'unione di credito del richiedente come valutata dal'OSCU fosse accurata.
113. Ne consegue che l’Alta Corte, astenendosi dal valutare se c'era davvero una qualsiasi base che riguardasse i fatti per imporre la curatela fallimentare, e limitandosi a fare una revisione del se la decisione contestata fu adottata all'interno del potere discrezionale dell'OSCU invece di esaminare la legittimità di quella decisione, non abbia esercitato il pieno controllo giurisdizionale.
114. La Corte perciò costata che la determinazione dell'OSCU dei diritti civili della società del richiedente nella presente causa non è stata soggetta a scrutinio giudiziale della sfera richiesta dall’Articolo 6 § 1
115. Ne consegue che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
116. Secondo l'unione di credito del richiedente, i fatti sottostanti le sue lagnanze sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione hanno generato una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Tutti coloro i cui diritti e le libertà stabiliti [dalla] Convenzione vengono violati avranno una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
117. La Corte non considera necessario decidere su questa osservazione, perché i requisiti dell’Articolo 13 sono meno restrittivi di quelli di Articolo 6 § 1 e sono qui incorporati in questo (vedere Società del Tabacco britannico-americana Ltd, citata sopra, p. 29, § 89 e, più recentemente, Zwiazek Nauczycielstwa Polskiego c. Polonia, n. 42049/98, § 43 ECHR 2004-IX).
VI. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
118. L’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette di rendere una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
119. La Corte considera che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione. La questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e l'ulteriore procedura deve essere fissata con dovuto riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo al quale potrebbero giungere il Governo ceco ed l’unione di credito del richiedente.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione nei confronti dell'unione di credito di richiedente;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non è necessario decidere sulla dichiarazione di una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
4. Dichiara inammissibile la lagnanza dei richiedenti individuali presentata sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1;
5. Sostiene che la questione dell’applicazione dell’ Articolo 41 non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserva detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo ceco ed l’unione di credito del richiedente a presentare, entro i prossimi tre mesi le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale possono giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 31 luglio 2008, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Stefano Phillips Peer Lorenzen
Cancelliere Aggiunto Presidente
1 una lista dei richiedenti individuali è disponibile della Cancelleria

2 1 EUR = 37.55 CZK al tempo attinente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.