Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF KARAMITROV AND OTHERS v. BULGARIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 13, P1-1

NUMERO: 53321/99/2008
STATO: Bulgaria
DATA: 10/01/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6 (first applicant) ; Violation of Art. 13+6 (first applicant) ; Preliminary objections joined to merits and dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies) ; Violation of P1-1 (second and third applicants) ; Violation of Art. 13+P1-1 (second and third applicants) ; Preliminary objections joined to merits and dismissed (non-exhaustion of domestic remedies)
FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF KARAMITROV AND OTHERS v. BULGARIA
(Application no. 53321/99)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
10 January 2008
FINAL
10/04/2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Karamitrov and Others v. Bulgaria,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Peer Lorenzen, President,
Snejana Botoucharova,
Volodymyr Butkevych,
Margarita Tsatsa-Nikolovska,
Rait Maruste,
Javier Borrego Borrego,
Renate Jaeger, judges,
and Claudia Westerdiek, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 4 December 2007,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 53321/99) against the Republic of Bulgaria lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by three Bulgarian nationals, who were members of one family, on 7 September 1999. The first, Mr V. P. K. was born in 1965 and lives in Pazardzhik (the “first applicant”). The second, Mrs E. R. K. was born in 1938 and lives in Pazardzhik (the “second applicant”). The third, Mr P. Io. K. was born in 1928, lived in Pazardzhik and died in 2000 (the “third applicant”). In a letter of 2 June 2004 the first applicant informed the Court that he wished to continue the application in respect of his father’s complaints.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr V. S., a lawyer practising in Pazardzhik.
3. The Bulgarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms M. Kotzeva, of the Ministry of Justice.
4. The first applicant alleged that the length of the criminal proceedings against him was excessive and that he lacked an effective remedy to speed them up and to have the case brought before a court. The second and third applicants complained that their car had been illegally seized and impounded, that it had been held as evidence for the duration of the criminal proceedings against the first applicant, that they had been deprived of their possession during that period, and that after the vehicle was returned to them they had not been able to obtain adequate compensation for the damage caused as a result of the aforesaid.
5. In a decision of 9 February 2006 the Court joined to the merits the question of exhaustion of domestic remedies in respect of the applicants’ respective complaints and declared the application admissible.
6. The applicants and the Government each filed observations on the merits (Rule 59 § 1).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. The criminal proceedings against the first applicant
7. On the night of 14 October 1991 a car was stolen from an unsecured car park. Early in 1992 a preliminary investigation in respect of the theft was opened against an unknown perpetrator.
8. On 28 May 1992 the first applicant was stopped by the police while driving the car of his parents – the second and third applicants. The police established a discrepancy between the numbers on the chassis of the vehicle and those in the registration documents of the vehicle which had been issued by the Pazardzhik Traffic Police on 17 July 1973. They seized and impounded the car in order to check its registration documents and ownership. The first applicant was questioned regarding the discrepancy in the car’s registration documents both on the above date and on 4 June 1992.
9. The investigating authorities commissioned a technical examination of the seized vehicle. In a report of 14 April 1993 the technical expert concluded that the number plate on the chassis of the car was not the original, but had been changed.
10. On 8 June 1993 the first applicant was charged with being an accessory to the theft of the car on 14 October 1991. He was questioned on the same day and then released. A restriction was imposed on the first applicant, not to leave his place of residence without the consent of the Prosecution Office.
11. No further investigative procedures were conducted in the course of the preliminary investigation.
12. On 3 April 1995 the first applicant complained to the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office about the length of the criminal proceedings. He did not receive a response.
13. Subsequently, the first applicant lodged similar complaints with the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office, the Pazardzhik Regional Prosecution Office, the Plovdiv Appellate Prosecution Office and the Chief Prosecutor about the length of the criminal proceedings. He did not receive a response to any of them.
14. Sometime in 1998 the investigator in charge of the preliminary investigation died, while the assistant investigator retired. The first applicant’s case was never reassigned to another investigator.
15. Sometime in September 1999 the first applicant lodged another complaint about the length of the criminal proceedings with the Supreme Cassation Prosecution Office. In response, the Plovdiv Appellate Prosecution Office was instructed to investigate the first applicant’s complaint.
16. In a decision of 20 October 1999 of the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office the preliminary investigation was discontinued in respect of the first applicant as unproven. The restriction on the first applicant not to leave his place of residence without the consent of the Prosecution Office was removed.
17. The criminal proceedings continued, against an unknown perpetrator, until 27 September 2004 when the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office terminated them due to the expiry of the statute of limitations for the offence. In its decision, the Prosecution Office expressly noted that no investigative procedures had been conducted in the proceedings after 8 June 1993, the date on which the first applicant was arrested and charged.
B. The seizure, impounding and return of the car
18. The car was seized and impounded by the police on 28 May 1992 in order to check its registration documents and ownership. No protocol of seizure was prepared and the second and third applicants were not given a receipt or any other document evidencing the impounding of the vehicle.
19. The car remained impounded by the police for the duration of the preliminary investigation against the first applicant as physical evidence of the offence.
20. On 9 November 1994 the person from whom the car had allegedly been stolen on 14 October 1991 requested possession of the vehicle.
21. The question of returning the vehicle to the second and third applicants was raised by the first applicant in his complaints regarding the length of the criminal proceedings lodged with the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office on 3 April 1995, the Supreme Cassation Prosecution Office on 19 October 1999 and the Chief Prosecutor in September 1999. No action was taken in response to any of them.
22. In its decision of 20 October 1999 to terminate the criminal proceedings against the first applicant the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office noted that no protocol or other document existed to show “who, when, why and how” the vehicle of the second and third applicants had been seized and impounded. Nevertheless, the Prosecution Office ordered that the car be handed over to the person from whom it had allegedly been stolen on 14 October 1991 because it considered that, inter alia, on the basis of the investigative procedures performed during the preliminary investigation she was the owner of the vehicle. The applicants appealed against the decision in respect of the order to hand over the car to another person.
23. On an unspecified date the police handed over the car of the second and third applicants to the person from whom it had allegedly been stolen.
24. In a decision of 10 November 1999 the Pazardzhik Regional Prosecution Office upheld the decision of the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office on grounds similar to those contained in the latter’s decision. The applicants appealed further.
25. On 18 November 1999 the Plovdiv Appellate Prosecution Office quashed the above decisions of the lower-level Prosecution Offices. It found, inter alia, that it was not within their competencies to determine the ownership of the vehicle and, in view of the termination of the preliminary investigation against the first applicant, the car had to be returned to the persons from whom it had been seized. It further found that the seizure of the vehicle and the resulting impounding had been unlawful because at the time the seizure had been made no protocol to that effect had been executed. The person to whom the car had been handed over appealed against the decision.
26. In a decision of 10 March 2000 the Supreme Cassation Prosecution Office upheld the decision of the Plovdiv Appellate Prosecution Office on grounds similar to those contained in the latter’s decision.
27. The car was returned to the second and third applicants on 19 May 2000. As a result of the period of impounding it had been damaged – its paintwork had deteriorated and the radiator was cracked. Parts of the car were also missing, such as two spark plugs and cables, the left headlight, the spare tyre, the indicators, the cover of the right back brake light, the door handles and other things. They estimated the damage to be worth around 100 Bulgarian levs (approximately 51 euros). The first applicant, who signed the protocol of transfer, made a reservation that he would make a further assessment of the damage caused to the vehicle and that a subsequent claim might be filed against the District Prosecution Office in that respect.
28. The second and third applicants did not initiate any action to seek compensation for the alleged damage caused to the vehicle.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Code of Criminal Procedure (1974)
29. Paragraphs 1, 2 and 4 of Article 107 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (1974) provided as follows:
“(1) Physical evidence must be carefully examined, described in detail in the respective record, and photographed, if possible.
(2) Physical evidence shall be attached to the case file while at the same time measures shall be taken not to spoil or alter the evidence.
...
(4) Physical evidence which, because of its size or other reasons, cannot be attached to the case file, must be sealed, if possible, and deposited for safekeeping at the places indicated by the respective authority.”
30. Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Article 108 of the Code, as in force at the relevant time and until 1 January 2000, provided as follows:
“(1) Physical evidence shall be held until the termination of the criminal proceedings.
(2) Chattels which have been collected as physical evidence can be returned to their owners before the termination of criminal proceedings only as long as this will not hinder the establishment of the facts in the case.”
31. Article 108 paragraph 2 of the Code was amended on 1 January 2000 to clarify that it was within the powers of the Prosecution Office to rule on requests for the return of chattels held as physical evidence. In addition, a right of appeal to a court was introduced against refusals by the Prosecution Office to return such chattels (Article 108 paragraph 4 of the Code of Criminal Procedure as in force after 1 January 2000).
32. If a dispute over ownership requiring adjudication by the civil courts arose in respect of items held as physical evidence, the authorities were obliged to keep those items safe until the relevant judgment became final (Article 110).
33. The Code of Criminal Procedure (1974) was replaced in 2006 by a new code of the same name.
B. State and Municipalities’ Responsibility for Damage Act (1988)
34. Section 1 (1) of the State and Municipalities’ Responsibility for Damage Act of 1988 (the “SMRDA”: title changed in 2006) provided, as in force at the relevant time, as follows:
“The State shall be liable for damage caused to [private persons] from unlawful acts, actions or inactions of its apparatus and officials [in the exercise] of administrative duties.”
35. Section 2 of the SMRDA provides as follows:
“The State shall be liable for damage caused to [private] persons by the [apparatus] of ... the investigation authorities, the prosecution authorities, the court ... for an unlawful:
1. detention ... ;
2. charge for an offence, if the person has been acquitted or the opened criminal proceedings have been terminated because the act was not perpetrated by the person [in question] or the act is not an offence ... ;
3. sentence ... ;
4. ... forced medical treatment ... ;
5. ... imposition of administrative sanctions ... ;
6. enforcement of an imposed sentence in excess of the determined period ... ”
36. Compensation awarded under the Act comprises all pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage which is the direct and proximate result of the illegal act of omission (section 4). The person aggrieved has to lodge an “action ... against the [entity] ... whose illegal orders, actions, or omissions have caused the alleged damage” (section 7). Compensation for damage arising from instances falling under section 1 and 2 of the Act can only be sought under the Act and not under the general rules of tort (section 8 § 1).
37. The practice of the Bulgarian courts in the application of the Act has been very restrictive.
38. In particular, the domestic courts have ruled that liability for damage stemming from instances within the scope of section 1 of the Act are to be examined only under the Act and not under the general rules of tort (??????? ? 55 ?? 14.III.1994 ?. ?? ??.?. ? 599/93 ?., ??, IV ?.?.).
39. Similarly, liability of the investigation and the prosecution authorities may arise only in respect of the exhaustively listed instances under section 2 (1) and (2) of the Act and not under the general rules of tort (??????? ? 1370 ?? 16.XII.1992 ?. ?? ??.?. ? 1181/92 ?., IV ?.?. and ???????????? ??????? ? 3 ?? 22.04.2005 ?. ?? ?. ??. ?. ? 3/2004 ?., ???? ?? ???). No reported cases have been identified of successful claims for damage stemming from actions by the investigation or prosecution authorities which fall outside the list in section 2 of the Act.
40. Liability under section 2 of the Act may arise only for unlawful actions, but not for unlawful inactions by the investigation authorities, the prosecution authorities and the courts (??????? ? 183 ?? 05.IV.2001 ?. ?? ??. ?. ? 1362/2000 ?.).
41. Up to 2005 there existed conflicting domestic case law as to whether liability of the State arose under section 2 (2) of the Act in instances, such as in the present case, when criminal proceedings were discontinued as “unproven” (??????? ?? 04.02.2003 ?. ?? ???????? ??. ?. ? 1538/2002 ?. ?? ??? and ??????? ? 1085 ?? 26.07.2001 ?. ?? ??. ?. ? 2263/2000 ?., IV ?.?.). The issue was clarified by the General Assembly of the Civil Chambers of the Supreme Court of Cassation in Interpretative decision no. 3/2004 of 22 April 2005 (???????????? ??????? ? 3 ?? 22.04.2005 ?. ?? ?. ??. ?. ? 3/2004 ?., ???? ?? ???) which found that section 2 (2) of the Act was applicable in such instances.
42. The Government presented two hundred and one judgments under the SMRDA where the domestic courts had found the State liable to pay damages to claimants. Of these cases (a) thirty-seven judgments were based on section 2 (2) of the Act and related to being unlawfully charged with an offence; (b) forty-seven were based on section 1 of the Act relating to unlawful acts by the administration; (c) a further one hundred and one were also based on section 1 of the Act but stemmed from unlawful actions or inactions by the administration; and (d) sixteen cases related to more specific complaints falling under Article 3 and 5 of the Convention.
43. In their submissions, the Government stressed the existence of a judgment delivered by the Pazardzhik District Court on 14 December 2005. In that case the domestic court had ordered the Pazardzhik District Police Authority to pay compensation for the pecuniary damage suffered by a claimant as a result of the former’s inactivity in keeping safe a vehicle seized as physical evidence in a case. A related claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage had been dismissed and the Prosecution Office had also been ordered to pay the claimant compensation for the non-pecuniary damage suffered as a result of being unlawfully charged with an offence.
44. In their submissions in reply, the applicants informed the Court of the subsequent development of the above-mentioned case. The judgment relied on by the Government had been appealed against both by the Pazardzhik District Police Authority and the Prosecution Office. The Pazardzhik Regional Court examined the appeal and delivered a final judgment on 10 June 2006. It quashed the first-instance court’s judgment in respect of the liability of the Pazardzhik District Police Authority for the damage to the claimant’s vehicle as it found that the police’s actions, or inactions, as they related to the safekeeping of a vehicle as physical evidence, did not fall within the definition of “administrative duties” under section 1 nor under any of the instances under section 2 of the Act. Thus, the police could not be held liable for their actions or inactions in similar such instances. Separately, the Pazardzhik Regional Court upheld the first-instance court’s judgment against the Prosecution Office.
C. The Obligations and Contracts Act
45. The Obligations and Contracts Act provides in section 45 that a person who has suffered damage can seek redress by bringing a civil action against the person who has, through his fault, caused the damage. Under section 110 the claim for damage is extinguished with the expiry of a five year prescription period.
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLES 6 § 1 AND 13 OF THE CONVENTION
46. The first applicant complained of the excessive length of the criminal proceedings against him and the lack of an effective remedy relating thereto.
In its admissibility decision of 9 February 2006 the Court considered that these complaints fall to be examined under Articles 6 § 1 and 13 of the Convention, which provide, as relevant:
Article 6 (right to a fair hearing)
“In the determination of ... any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal...”
Article 13 (right to an effective remedy)
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The Government’s preliminary objection
47. The Government submitted that the first applicant had failed to exhaust the available domestic remedies. They claimed that he should have initiated an action under the SMRDA and should have sought compensation for all pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage which was the direct and proximate result of the alleged violation. The Government referred to the practice of the domestic courts in similar cases (see paragraphs 34-44 above).
48. The first applicant replied that the Government had failed to substantiate their objection because they had failed to show that an action under the SMRDA was an effective remedy for his complaint of the excessive length of the criminal proceedings against him and, therefore, that it was required of him to have exhausted it. He submitted that the violations complained of could neither be established nor compensated under the SMRDA.
49. In its admissibility decision of 9 February 2006 the Court found that the question of exhaustion of domestic remedies was so closely related to the merits of the first applicant’s complaint that he lacked an effective remedy for the excessive length of the criminal proceedings against him that it could not be detached from it, and therefore joined the Government’s objection to the merits (see paragraph 5 above).
Accordingly, the Court will examine the Government’s objection in the context of the merits of the first applicant’s complaint that he lacked an effective remedy for the excessive length of the criminal proceedings.
B. Period to be taken into consideration
50. The Court finds that the period to be taken into consideration lasted from 8 June 1993 when the first applicant was arrested and charged (see paragraph 10 above) to 20 October 1999 when the preliminary investigation was discontinued in respect of him as unproven (see paragraph 16 above).
51. This is a period of six years, four months and thirteen days during which the criminal proceedings remained at the preliminary investigation stage and no investigative procedures, whatsoever, had been performed after the initial arrest (see paragraph 17 above).
C. The parties’ submissions
52. The Government simply reiterated their assertion that the first applicant had failed to exhaust the available domestic remedies. They claimed that he could have initiated an action against the State under section 2 (2) of the SMRDA, which they considered to be an effective remedy. The Government referred in this respect to the alleged persistent practice of the domestic courts and the finding of the Court in the inadmissibility decision in the case of Ekimdjiev v. Bulgaria (no. 47092/99, 3 March 2005).
53. The first applicant disagreed with the Government and noted that the Pazardzhik District Prosecution Office, in its decision of 27 September 2004, had established that that no investigative procedures had been conducted in the course of the preliminary investigation after 8 June 1993, the date on which he was arrested and charged (see paragraph 17 above). Subsequently, for the next six and half years nothing had been done, but the restriction on his movements had been maintained and he remained concerned and anxious as to the possible outcome of the proceedings. In respect of the Government’s assertion that section 2 (2) of the SMRDA was a remedy that should have been exhausted, the first applicant claimed that at the relevant time there was no possibility of claiming damages in instances when the criminal proceedings were terminated as unproven (see paragraph 41 above) and, moreover, that this would not have remedied his complaint in respect of the excessive length of the proceedings. Thus, he considered the aforesaid provision not to have been an available effective remedy which he should have exhausted.
D. Compliance with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention regarding the length of the criminal proceedings
54. The Court reiterates that the reasonableness of the length of proceedings must be assessed in the light of the circumstances of the case and with reference to the following criteria: the complexity of the case, the conduct of the applicants and the relevant authorities (see, among many other authorities, Pélissier and Sassi v. France [GC], no. 25444/94, § 67, ECHR 1999-II).
55. Having examined all the material before it and noting the Government’s failure to submit observations on the merits of the complaint, the Court finds that no facts or arguments capable of persuading it that the length of the criminal proceedings in the present case was reasonable have been put forward. In particular, the criminal proceedings against the first applicant lasted six years, four months and thirteen days, remained at the preliminary investigation stage for the whole of that period (see paragraph 16 above) and, most notably, no investigative procedures whatsoever had been undertaken (see paragraph 17 above).
56. Thus, having regard to its case-law on the subject, the Court considers that in the instant case the length of the proceedings was excessive and failed to meet the “reasonable time” requirement.
There has accordingly been a breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
E. Compliance with Article 13 in conjunction with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention regarding the availability of an effective remedy
57. The Court reiterates that Article 13 of the Convention guarantees an effective remedy before a national authority for an alleged breach of the requirement under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention to hear a case within a reasonable time (see Kudla v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, § 156, ECHR 2000-XI).
58. The Court notes that in similar cases against Bulgaria it has found that at the relevant time there was no formal remedy under Bulgarian law that could have expedited the determination of the criminal charges against the first applicant (see Osmanov and Yuseinov v. Bulgaria, nos. 54178/00 and 59901/00, §§ 38-42, 23 September 2004; and Sidjimov v. Bulgaria, no. 55057/00, § 41, 27 January 2005). The Court sees no reason to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
59. As regards compensatory remedies and the Government’s preliminary objection, the Court observes that they submitted that the applicant had failed to exhaust an available domestic remedy under section 2 (2) of the SMRDA and referred to the existing possibility therein to obtain redress for having been unlawfully charged with an offence. They did not, however, indicate how that would have remedied the complaint currently before this Court in respect of the alleged excessive length of the criminal proceedings. Moreover, the Government failed to present copies of domestic court judgments where awards had been made under the SMRDA providing redress for excessive length of criminal proceedings. Likewise, the Court’s findings in the case of Ekimdjiev (cited above) did not relate to the possibility of obtaining redress for excessive length of criminal proceedings.
60. In view of the aforesaid, the Court does not find it proven by the Government that in the circumstances of the present case an action under the SMRDA would have provided for an enforceable right to compensation which could be considered an effective, sufficient and accessible remedy in respect of the applicant’s complaint in respect of the alleged excessive length of the criminal proceedings (see, likewise, Osmanov and Yuseinov, cited above, §41; Sidjimov, cited above, § 42, and Nalbantova v. Bulgaria, no. 38106/02, § 36, 27 September 2007).
61. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in that the applicant had no effective domestic remedy for his complaint under Article 6 of the Convention that the length of the criminal proceedings against him was excessive.
It follows that the Government’s preliminary objection (see paragraphs 47-49 above) must be dismissed.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
62. The second and third applicants complained under several provisions of the Convention regarding the unlawful seizure and prolonged impounding of their vehicle and the lack of effective remedies relating thereto.
In its admissibility decision of 9 February 2006 the Court considered that these complaints fall to be examined under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 13 of the Convention. In respect of the latter, the Court found that the second and third applicants complained of the lack of a substantive right of action under domestic law rather than of the existence of procedural bars preventing or limiting the possibilities of bringing potential claims to court. Thus, it considered that their complaint should be examined under Article 13 of the Convention in respect of the alleged lack of effective domestic remedies against the interference with their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possession, rather than under Article 6 of the Convention as an access to court issue (see, mutatis mutandis, Fayed v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 21 September 1994, Series A no. 294 B, p. 49, § 65).
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 13 of the Convention provide as follows:
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (protection of property)
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
Article 13 (right to an effective remedy)
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. The Government’s preliminary objection
63. The Government submitted that the second and third applicants had failed to exhaust the available domestic remedies. They claimed that they should have initiated an action under the SMRDA and should have sought compensation for all pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage which was the direct and proximate result of the alleged violations. The Government referred to the practice of the domestic courts in similar cases (see paragraphs 34-44 above).
64. The Government also considered that they could have initiated a tort action and could have sought compensation for damage from the persons responsible for the alleged violations (see paragraph 45 above). They referred to the rebuttable presumption of guilt of the respondent in such actions and that claimants need only prove the size of the pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage suffered, such as, for example, for loss of value, loss of income and amortisation of a vehicle.
65. The second and third applicants replied that the Government had failed to substantiate their objection because they had failed to show that the suggested remedies were effective and, therefore, that it was required of them to have exhausted them. They submitted that the violations they complained of could not be compensated under the SMRDA and referred to the restrictive interpretation of the domestic courts in respect of the liability of the investigation authorities, the prosecution authorities and the courts (see paragraph 37-40 above).
66. In respect of the Government’s assertion that they could have initiated a tort action against the persons responsible, the second and third applicants responded that that was not an effective remedy either. In particular, they referred to the fact that no protocol or other document had been executed for the seizure and impounding of their vehicle. Neither had they received any responses to the numerous complaints they had lodged with the Prosecution Office. Accordingly, they could never have designated a respondent party in such a tort action. They also noted that the investigator in charge of the preliminary investigation had died in 1998 and, in addition, that the investigation and prosecution authorities enjoyed immunity from civil prosecution stemming from their official activities.
67. In its admissibility decision of 9 February 2006 the Court found that the question of exhaustion of domestic remedies was so closely related to the merits of the second and third applicants’ complaint that they lacked effective remedies in respect of the alleged interference with their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possession that it could not be detached from it, and therefore joined the Government’s objection to the merits (see paragraph 5 above).
Accordingly, the Court will examine the Government’s objection in the context of the merits of the second and third applicants’ complaint that they lacked effective remedies in respect of the alleged interference with their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possession.
B. The parties’ submissions
68. The Government simply reiterated their assertion that the second and third applicants had failed to exhaust the available domestic remedies. They claimed that they could have initiated an action against the State under the SMRDA, which they considered to be an effective domestic remedy. In particular, the Government referred to the judgment of the Pazardzhik District Court of 14 December 2005 which found the Pazardzhik District Police Authority liable for damage suffered by a claimant as a result of the former’s inactivity in keeping safe a vehicle seized as evidence in a case (see paragraph 43 above).
69. In their reply, the second and third applicants observed that the Government had not challenged their assertion that the authorities had seized and held their vehicle for a considerable length of time in violation of the applicable legislation. Thus, they argued that the interference with their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possession had been unlawful and, therefore, in contravention of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
70. In respect of the availability of an action against the State under the SMRDA and the domestic case law presented by the Government, the second and third applicants noted that the presented judgments dated from 2005-2006 or related to cases which were factually different from theirs. They also observed that the judgment of the Pazardzhik District Court of 14 December 2005, on which the Government relied so heavily, had been quashed on appeal in respect of the liability of the Pazardzhik District Police Authority. Moreover, the second and third applicants noted that in the final judgment of 10 June 2006 the Pazardzhik Regional Court had essentially found that the police could not be held liable under the SMRDA for actions or inactions relating to damaged items seized as physical evidence (see paragraph 44 above).
C. Compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
71. The Court notes at the outset that the second and third applicants’ possession was seized by the authorities on 28 May 1992 while the Convention entered into force for Bulgaria more than three months later, on 7 September 1992. Thus, the act of the seizure itself falls outside the Court’s jurisdiction ratione temporis.
However, the Court notes that the second and third applicants also complained that the authorities had held their vehicle unlawfully and that they were unable to retrieve and use it for a considerable length of time after the Convention entered into force for Bulgaria, which amounted to a continuing situation ending on 19 May 2000 (see, mutatis mutandis, Loizidou v. Turkey, judgment of 18 December 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-VI, pp. 2231-32, §§ 46 and 47, and Vasilescu v. Romania, judgment of 22 May 1998, Reports 1998 III, § 49).
The total period, therefore, during which they were denied use of the vehicle was seven years, eleven months and twenty-three days, of which seven years, eight months and twelve days was within the Court’s competence ratione temporis (see, mutatis mutandis, T.H. and S.H. v. Finland, no. 19823/92, Commission decision of 9 February 1993, unreported).
72. In reiterating its case-law that the seizure of property for legal proceedings relates to the control of the use of property, the Court finds that this complaint falls within the ambit of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Raimondo v. Italy, judgment of 22 February 1994, Series A no. 281-A, § 27). Moreover, the seizure of the vehicle did not deprive the second and third applicants of their possession, but only prevented them from using it, because it was held as physical evidence in the course of the pending investigation into the theft of the car (ibid.) and, more importantly, it was not within the powers of the Prosecution Office to determine the ownership of the vehicle, something which only the courts could do. In such case, it would be necessary to assess the lawfulness and purpose of the interference, as well as its proportionality.
73. The Court observes that in the present case the Plovdiv Appellate Prosecution Office on 18 November 1999 (see paragraph 25 above) and the Supreme Cassation Prosecution Office on 10 March 2000 (see paragraph 26 above) established that the interference with the second and third applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possession was both unlawful and arbitrary because both the seizure, which falls outside the Court’s competence ratione temporis, and the resulting prolonged impounding, which does not, were in violation of the applicable national law.
74. Thus, in view of the principle of subsidiarity inherent in the machinery of the Convention, the Court finds that the interference in question was incompatible with the second and third applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possession under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. There has, accordingly, been a violation of that provision.
This conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 58 and 62, ECHR 1999-II).
D. Compliance with Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention regarding the availability of an effective remedy
75. The Court notes that the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention arises out of the same facts as those to be examined when dealing with the Government’s objection of non-exhaustion and the complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. However, there is a difference in the nature of the interests protected by Article 13 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention: the former affords a procedural safeguard, namely the “right to an effective remedy”, whereas the procedural requirement inherent in the latter is ancillary to the wider purpose of ensuring respect for the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions. Having regard to the difference in purpose of the safeguards afforded by the two Articles, the Court judges it appropriate in the instant case to examine the same set of facts under both Articles (see Iatridis, cited above, § 65).
76. In the present case, the Court finds that at the relevant time national law did not provide for recourse to the domestic courts to challenge a decision by the Prosecution Office to continue to hold chattels seized as physical evidence in criminal proceedings (see paragraph 31 above). In so far as the second and third applicants were not aware that their vehicle had been unlawfully seized and believed that it was being legally held as physical evidence in the criminal proceedings against the first applicant, it would be unreasonable to expect them to have initiated any other type of proceedings, such as rei vindicatio proceedings. The only possibility for them in such a case would have been to complain to the higher-level Prosecution Office, which the second and third applicants attempted on several occasions, but received no responses. It is true that the Prosecution Office eventually did find that the vehicle of the second and third applicants had been unlawfully seized and returned it to them, but that resulted from its decision to terminate the criminal proceedings against the first applicant rather than as a response to one of the many requests to return the car (see paragraphs 22-26 above).
77. In respect of the lack of compensation for the interference under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the Court notes that such a right is not inherent in the second paragraph of that provision regarding the control of the use of property (see Banér v. Sweden, no. 11763/85, Commission decision of 9 March 1989, DR 60, p. 128, at p. 142). Nor does Article 13 require that compensation be paid under all circumstances. However, the Court considers that in circumstances such as in the present case when the authorities seize and hold chattels as physical evidence the possibility should exist in domestic legislation to initiate proceedings against the State and to seek compensation for any damage resulting from the authorities’ failure to keep safe the said chattels in reasonably good condition. This is especially true in instances when the interference itself is found to have been unlawful.
78. In the present case, the Court finds it unproven that at the relevant time domestic law provided the second and third applicants with the possibility to seek compensation for the damage to their vehicle as a result of the prolonged interference with their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possession. In particular, the Government failed to prove that at the relevant time an action under the SMRDA, or any other type of action for that matter, could be considered to be have been an effective remedy that should have been exhausted. Most notably even the much later judgment of the Pazardzhik District Court of 14 December 2005 was quashed in the relevant part on appeal and the Pazardzhik Regional Court found that the police could not be held liable under the SMRDA for actions or inactions relating to damaged items seized as physical evidence (see paragraph 44 above).
79. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in that at the relevant time the second and third applicants had no effective domestic remedy for their complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
It follows that the Government’s preliminary objection (see paragraph 63-67 above) must be dismissed.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
80. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
81. The applicants did not submit a claim in respect of damage. Accordingly, the Court considers that there is no call to award them any sum on that account.
B. Costs and expenses
82. The applicants initially claimed 9,000 euros (EUR) for 180 hours of legal work by their lawyer before the Court, at an hourly rate of EUR 50. Subsequently, they claimed a further EUR 2,500 for 24 hours of legal work by their lawyer before the Court and for three hours of translation and technical work by their lawyer, at an hourly rate of EUR 100. The applicants submitted timesheets in support of their claims. They also requested that the costs and expenses incurred should be paid directly to their lawyer, Mr V. S..
83. The Government did not submit comments on the applicants’ claims for costs and expenses.
84. The Court reiterates that according to its case-law, an applicant is entitled to reimbursement of his or her costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. Noting all the relevant factors, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 2,000 in respect of costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants on that amount.
C. Default interest
85. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Holds that in respect of the first applicant there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention;
2. Holds that in respect of the first applicant there has been a violation of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 6 of the Convention and, accordingly, dismisses the Government’s preliminary objection based on non-exhaustion of domestic remedies;
3. Holds that in respect of the second and third applicants there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
4. Holds that in respect of the second and third applicants there has been a violation of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and, accordingly, dismisses the Government’s preliminary objection based on non-exhaustion of domestic remedies;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay to the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final according to Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into Bulgarian levs at the rate applicable on the date of settlement :
(i) EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros) in respect of costs and expenses, payable into the bank account of the applicants’ lawyer in Bulgaria, Mr V. S.;
(ii) any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants on the above amount;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 10 January 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Claudia Westerdiek Peer Lorenzen
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6 (primo richiedente); Violazione dell’Art. 13+6 (primo richiedente); obiezioni Preliminari congiunte ai meriti e respinte ( non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali); Violazione di P1-1 (secondo e terzo richiedente); Violazione dell’ Art. 13+P1-1 (secondo e terzo richiedente); obiezioni Preliminari congiunte ai meriti e respinti (non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali)
QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA KARAMITROV ED ALTRI C. BULGARIA
(Richiesta n. 53321/99)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
10 gennaio 2008
DEFINITIVO
10/04/2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte ell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Karamitrov ed Altri c. Bulgaria,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quinta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Pari Lorenzen, Presidente,
Snejana Botoucharova, Volodymyr Butkevych, Margarita Tsatsa-Nikolovska, Rait Maruste, Javier Borrego Borrego, Renate Jaeger, giudici, e Claudia Westerdiek, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 4 dicembre 2007,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 53321/99) contro la Repubblica della Bulgaria depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da tre cittadini bulgari che erano membri di una famiglia il 7 settembre 1999. Il primo, il Sig. V. P. K. nacque nel 1965 e vive a Pazardzhik (“primo il richiedente”). Il secondo, la Sig.ra E. R. K. nacque nel 1938 e vive a Pazardzhik (“secondo richiedente”). Il terzo, il Sig. P. I. K. nacque nel 1928, visse a Pazardzhik e morì nel 2000 (“terzo richiedente”). In una lettera del 2 giugno 2004 il primo richiedente informò la Corte che lui deisderava continuare la richiesta riguardo le lagnanze di suo padre.
2. I richiedenti furono rappresentati dal Sig. V. S., un avvocato che pratica a Pazardzhik.
3. Il Governo bulgaro (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente, la Sig.ra M. Kotzeva, del Ministero della Giustizia.
4. Il primo richiedente addusse che la lunghezza dei procedimenti penali a suo carico era eccessiva e che gli mancò una via di ricorso effettiva per accelerarli ed portare la causa di fronte ad un tribunale. Il secondo e il terzo richiedente si lamentarono del fatto che la loro macchina era stata sequestrata illegalmente e confiscata, che era stato trattenuta come prova per la durata dei procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente durante il quale loro erano stati privati della loro proprietà durante quel periodo, e che dopo che il veicolo fu restituito loro non erano stati in grado di ottenere il risarcimento adeguato per il danno causato come risultato di ciò che è stato detto sopra.
5. In una decisione del 9 febbraio 2006 la Corte unì ai meriti la questione dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali riguardo le rispettive lagnanze dei richiedenti e dichiarò la richiesta ammissibile.
6. I richiedenti ed il Governo ognuno depositarono delle osservazioni sui meriti (Articolo 59 § 1).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
A. I procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente
7. Nella notte del 14 ottobre 1991 una macchina fu rubata da un posteggio non custodito. Agli inizi del 1992 un'indagine preliminare riguardo al furto fu aperta contro un perpetratore ignoto.
8. Il 28 maggio 1992 il primo richiedente fu fermato dalla polizia mentre guidava la macchina dei suoi genitori -il secondo e il terzo richiedente. La polizia stabilì una discrepanza fra i numeri sul telaio del veicolo e quelli nei documenti di registrazione del veicolo che era stato emesso dalla Polizia Stradale di Pazardzhik il 17 luglio 1973. Sequestrarono e confiscarono la macchina per controllare i suoi documenti di registrazione e di proprietà. Il primo richiedente fu interrogato riguardo alla discrepanza nei documenti della registrazione della macchina documenta sia nella data sopra indicata che il 4 giugno 1992.
9. Le autorità inquirenti commissionarono un esame tecnico del veicolo sequestrato. In un rapporto del 14 aprile 1993 l'esperto tecnico concluse che il numero della piastra sul telaio della macchina non era l'originale, ma era stato cambiato.
10. L’ 8 giugno 1993 il primo richiedente fu accusato di essere complice nel furto della macchina il 14 ottobre 1991. Fu interrogato lo stesso giorno e poi fu rilasciato. Fu imposta una restrizione al primo richiedente, di non lasciare la sua residenza senza il beneplacito dell’ Ufficio Accusatore.
11. Nessuna ulteriore procedura investigativa fu condotta nel corso dell'indagine preliminare.
12. Il 3 aprile 1995 il primo richiedente si lamentò presso l’Ufficio d’Accusa Distrettuale di Pazardzhik sulla lunghezza dei procedimenti penali. Non ricevette una risposta.
13. Successivamente, il primo richiedente presentò reclami simili presso l’Ufficio d’Accusa Distrettuale di Pazardzhik, l’ Ufficio d’Accusa Regionale di Pazardzhik, l’Ufficio d’Accusa e d’Appello di Plovdiv e l'Accusatore Principale sulla lunghezza dei procedimenti penali. Non ricevette alcuna risposta da nessuno di loro.
14. In un cero momento nel 1998 l'investigatore in carica dell'indagine preliminare morì, mentre l'investigatore assistente andò in pensione. La causa del primo richiedente non fu mai riassegnata ad un altro investigatore.
15. Nel settembre 1999 il primo richiedente presentò ad un certo punto un altro reclamo sulla lunghezza dei procedimenti penali presso l'Ufficio Supremo d'Accusa della Cassazione. In risposta, l’Ufficio d’Accusa e d’Appello di Plovdiv fu istruito per investigare la lagnanza del primo richiedente.
16. In una decisione del 20 ottobre 1999 l’Ufficio Distrettuale d’Accusa di Pazardzhik l'indagine preliminare in merito al primo richiedente fu chiusa perché non provata. La restrizione sul primo richiedente di non lasciare la sua residenza senza il beneplacito dell' Ufficio d’Accusa fu tolta.
17. I procedimenti penali continuarono, contro un perpetratore ignoto, sino al 27 settembre 2004 quando l’Ufficio Distrettuale d’Accusa di Pazardzhik li terminò a causa della scadenza della prescrizione per il reato. Nella sua decisione, l' Ufficio d’Accusa notò espressamente, che nessuna procedura investigativa era stata condotta nei procedimenti dopo l’8 giugno 1993, la data in cui il primo richiedente fu arrestato e fu accusato.
B. Il sequestro, la confisca e la restituzione della macchina
18. La macchina fu sequestrata e confiscata dalla polizia il 28 maggio 1992 per controllare i suoi documenti di registrazione e di proprietà. Nessun protocollo della confisca fu preparato ed al secondo e al terzo richiedente non fu data una ricevuta o qualsiasi altro documento che attestava la confisca del veicolo.
19. La macchina è rimasta confiscata dalla polizia per la durata dell'indagine preliminare contro il primo richiedente come prova fisica del reato.
20. Il 9 novembre 1994 la persona dalla quale la macchina era stata presumibilmente rubata il 14 ottobre del 1991 richiestala proprietà del veicolo.
21. La questione di restituire il veicolo al secondo e al terzo richiedente sollevata dal primo richiedente nelle sue lagnanze riguardo alla lunghezza dei procedimenti penali depositata presso l’Ufficio Distrettuale d’Accusa di Pazardzhik il 3 aprile 1995, l'Ufficio Supremo d'Accusa della Cassazione il 19 ottobre 1999 e l'Accusatore Principale nel settembre 1999. Nessuna causa fu intentata in risposta ad una qualsiasi di queste.
22. Nella sua decisione del 20 ottobre 1999 di terminare i procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente l’Ufficio Distrettuale d’Accusa di Pazardzhik notò che non esisteva nessun protocollo o nessun documento che mostrasse “chi, quando, perché e come” il veicolo del secondo e terzo richiedente era stato sequestrato ed era stato confiscato. Ciononostante, l' Ufficio d’ Accusa ordinò che la macchina fosse ridata alla persona dalla quale era stata presumibilmente rubata il 14 ottobre 1991 perché considerò che, inter alia, sulla base delle procedure investigative compiute durante l'indagine preliminare questa era il proprietario del veicolo. I richiedenti fecero appello contro la decisione riguardo l'ordine di ridare la macchina ad un'altra persona.
23. In una data non specificata la polizia diede la macchina del secondo e terzo richiedente alla persona dalla quale era stata presumibilmente rubata.
24. In una decisione del 10 novembre 1999 l’Ufficio Regionale d’Accusa di Pazardzhik confermò la decisione dell’Ufficio Distrettuale d’Accusa di Pazardzhik sulla base di motivi simili a quelli contenuti nella precedente decisione. I richiedenti fecero ulteriore appello.
25. Il 18 novembre 1999 L’Ufficio d’Accusa e d’Appello di Plovdiv annullò le decisioni sopra dei livelli inferiori degli Uffici dell'Accusa. Trovò, inter alia, che non rientrava nelle loro competenze determinare la proprietà del veicolo e, in prospettiva della conclusione dell'indagine preliminare contro il primo richiedente, la macchina doveva essere restituita alle persone dalle quali era stata sequestrata. Trovò inoltre che il sequestro del veicolo ed la risultante confisca erano state illegali perché al tempo della confisca non era stato fatto alcun protocollo di ciò che fu eseguito. La persona alla quale la macchina era stata ridata fece appello contro la decisione.
26. In una decisione del 10 marzo 2000 l'Ufficio Supremo d'Accusa della Cassazione confermò la decisione dell’Ufficio d’Accusa e d’Appello di Plovdiv sulla base di motivi simili a quelli contenuti nella precedente decisione.
27. La macchina fu restituita al secondo e terzo richiedente il 19 maggio 2000. Come risultato del periodo di confisca la macchina era stata danneggiato-la sua verniciatura si era deteriorata ed il radiatore fu rotto. Inoltre delle parti della macchina andarono perse, come due candele e cavi, il faro sinistro, il pneumatico di ricambio gli indicatori, la luce posteriore destra del freno e le maniglie delle portiere e altre cose. Valutarono il danno a circa 100 levs bulgari (approssimativamente 51 euro). Il primo richiedente che firmò il protocollo di trasferimento espresse una riserva per fare un'ulteriore valutazione del danno causato al veicolo e che era probabile che una susseguente richiesta avrebbe potuto essere registrata contro l'Ufficio Distrettuale dell'Accusa a questo proposito.
28. Il secondo e il terzo richiedente non iniziarono alcuna azione per chiedere il risarcimento del danno addotto causato al veicolo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
A. Codice di Diritto processuale penale (1974)
29. Paragrafi 1, 2 e 4 dell’ Articolo 107 del Codice di Diritto processuale penale (1974) prevede ciò che segue:
“(1) una prova fisica deve essere esaminata attentamente, deve essere descritta in dettaglio nel rispettivo documento, e deve essere fotografata, se possibile.
(2) una prova fisica sarà legata all'archivio di causa mentre allo stesso tempo saranno prese le misure necessarie per non guastare o alterare la prova.
...
(4) una prova fisica che, a causa della sua taglia o di altre ragioni, non può essere allegata all'archivio della causa, deve essere sigillata, se possibile, e depositata per custodia nei posti indicati dalla rispettiva autorità.”
30. Paragrafi 1 e 2 dell’ Articolo 108 del Codice, come in vigore al tempo attinente e sino al 1 gennaio 2000, prevede ciò che segue:
“(1) una prova fisica sarà trattenuta fino alla conclusione dei procedimenti penali.
(2) dei beni principali che sono stati raccolti come prova fisica possono essere restituiti ai loro proprietari prima della conclusione dei procedimenti penali solo nella misura in cui questo non impedirà la costituzione dei fatti nella causa.”
31. L’Articolo 108 paragrafo 2 del Codice è stato emendato il 1 gennaio 2000 per chiarire che rientrava tra i poteri dell'Ufficio d’Accusa decretare su richieste per la restituzione di beni principali trattenuti come prova fisica. In oltre, un diritto di appello ad un tribunale fu introdotto contro i rifiuti d parte dell’Ufficio d’Accusa di restituire simili beni principali (Articolo 108 paragrafo 4 del Codice del Diritto processuale penale come in vigore dopo il 1 gennaio 2000).
32. Se una disputa su proprietà che richiede l'aggiudicazione con le corti civili sorse in riguardo di articoli sostenuto come prova fisica, le autorità furono obbligate per tenere quelle cassaforte di articoli finché la sentenza attinente divenne definitiva (Articolo 110).
33. Il Codice di Diritto processuale penale (1974) fu sostituito nel 2006 con un codice nuovo dello stesso nome.
B. Atto della responsabilità dello Stato e dei Municipi per Danno Atto (1988)
34. La Sezione 1 (1) dell’Atto della Responsabilità dello Stato e dei per Danno Atto di 1988 (il “SMRDA”: titolo cambiato nel 2006) prevede, come in vigore al tempo attinente, ciò che segue:
“Lo Stato sarà responsabile per il danno causato a [persone private] da atti illegali, azioni o inazioni del suo apparato ed ufficiali [nell'esercizio] dei doveri amministrativi.”
35. Sezione 2 del SMRDA prevede ciò che segue:
“Lo Stato sarà responsabile per danno causato a persone [private] da [l'apparato] delle... autorità di indagine, delle autorità d’accusa, del tribunale ... per illegale:
1. detenzione... ;
2. accusa di reato reato, se la persona è stata assolta o i procedimenti penali aperti sono stati chiusi perché l'atto non fu perpetrato dalla persona [in oggetto] o l'atto non è un reato... ;
3. frase... ;
4. ... trattamento medico costretto... ;
5. ... l'imposizione di sanzioni amministrative... ;
6. esecuzione di una sentenza imposta oltre al periodo deciso... ”
36. Il Risarcimento assegnato sotto l'Atto comprende un danno ogni materiale e morale che è il diretto risultato immediato dell'atto illegale di omissione (sezione 4). La persona colpita deve depositare un’ “azione... contro [l'entità]... i cui ordini illegali, azioni, od omissioni hanno provocato il danno allegato” (sezione 7). Il risarcimento per danno che sorge da casi contemplati nella sezione 1 e 2 dell'Atto sotto può essere chiesto solamente sotto l'Atto e non sotto gli articoli generali dell’ illecito civile (la sezione 8 § 1).
37. La pratica dei tribunali bulgari nella richiesta dell'Atto è stata molto restrittiva.
38. In particolare, i tribunali nazionali hanno decretato che responsabilità per danni che scaturisce dai casi all'interno della sfera della sezione 1 dell'Atto sarà esaminata solamente sotto l'Atto e non sotto gli articoli generali dell’ illecito civile ( ??????? ? 55 ?? 14.III.1994 ?. ?? ??.?. ? 599/93 ?., ??, IV ?.?.).
39. Similmente la responsabilità dell'indagine e delle autorità d’ accusa possono scaturire solamente riguardo ai casi esaurientemente elencati sotto la sezione 2 (1) e (2) dell'Atto e non sotto gli articoli generali dell’ illecito civile ( ??????? ? 1370 ?? 16.XII.1992 ?. ?? ??.?. ? 1181/92 ?., IV ?.?. ed ??????? di ???????????? ? 3 ?? 22.04.2005 ?. ?? ?. ??. ?. ? 3/2004 ?., a di ???? ???). Nessun caso riportato è stato identificato come richiesta riuscita per danno che scaturisce da azioni da parte delle autorità di accusa o d’indagine che non rientrano nella lista della sezione 2 dell'Atto.
40. La responsabilità sotto la sezione 2 dell'Atto può sorgere solamente per azioni illegali, ma non per inazioni illegali da parte delle autorità di indagine, le autorità di accusa e i tribunali ( ??????? ? 183 ?? 05.IV.2001 ?. ?? ??. ?. ? 1362/2000 ?.).
41. Fino al 2005 esisteva un diritto giurisprudenziale nazionale conflittuale riguardo a se la responsabilità dello Stato derivava dalla sezione 2 (2) dell'Atto nei casi, come nella presente causa, in cui i procedimenti penali venivano terminati come “non provati” (??????? ?? 04.02.2003 ?. ?? di ???????? di ??. ?. ? 1538/2002 ?. ?? ??? e ??????? ? 1085 ?? 26.07.2001 ?. ?? ??. ?. ? 2263/2000 ?., IV ?.?.). Il problema fu chiarificato dalla Riunione Generale delle Camere Civili della Corte Suprema di Cassazione nella decisione Interpretativa n. 3/2004 del 22 aprile 2005 (??????? di ???????????? ? 3 ?? 22.04.2005 ?. ?? ?. ??. ?. ? 3/2004 ?., il ?? di ???? ???) che stabilì che la sezione 2 (2) dell'Atto era applicabile in simili casi.
42. Il Governo presentò duecento uno sentenze sotto il SMRDA in le corti nazionali avevano trovato lo Stato responsabile di pagare danni ai rivendicatori. Di queste cause (a) trenta-sette sentenze furono basate sulla sezione 2 (2) dell'Atto e si riferivano al fatto di essere accusati illegalmente di reato; (b) quaranta-sette furono basate sulla sezione 1 dell'Atto e si riferivano ad atti illegali da parte dell'amministrazione; ( c) altre cento uno furono allo stesso modo basate sulla sezione 1 dell'Atto ma scaturivano da azioni illegali o inazioni da parte dell'amministrazione; e (d) sedici cause fecero riferimento a lagnanze più specifiche che ricadevano sotto l’ Articolo 3 e 5 della Convenzione.
43. Nelle loro osservazioni, il Governo sottolineò l'esistenza di una sentenza consegnata da parte della Corte distrettuale di Pazardzhik il 14 dicembre 2005. In questa causa la corte nazionale aveva ordinato all’Autorità Distretto Polizia di Pazardzhik di pagare il risarcimento per il danno materiale sofferto da un rivendicatore come risultato dell'inattività precedente nel trattenere in sicurezza un veicolo sequestrato come prova fisica in una causa. Un reclamo relativo al danno morale era stata respinto e all' Ufficio d’Accusa era stato ordinato anche di pagare il risarcimento del rivendicatore per il danno morale sofferto come risultato di essere stato accusato illegalmente di reato.
44. Nelle loro osservazioni in replica, i richiedenti informarono la Corte dello sviluppo susseguente della causa summenzionata. La sentenza sulla quale faceva affidamento il Governo era stata impugnata sia dall’Autorità Distrettuale di Polizia di Pazardzhik e sia dall' Ufficio d'Accusa. La Corte Regionale di Pazardzhik esaminò l'appello e consegnò una sentenza finale il 10 giugno 2006. Annullò la sentenza del tribunale di prima istanza riguardo alla responsabilità del’Autorità Distrettuale di Polizia di per il danno al veicolo del rivendicatore in quanto stabilì che le azioni della polizia, o inazioni, siccome si riferivano alla custodia di un veicolo come prova fisica, non rientravano all'interno della definizione dei “doveri amministrativi” sotto la sezione 1 né sotto qualsiasi dei casi sotto la sezione 2 dell'Atto. Così, la polizia non poteva essere ritenuta responsabile per le loro azioni o inazioni in simili circostanze. Separatamente, la Corte Regionale di Pazardzhik confermò la sentenza del tribunale di prima istanza contro l' Ufficio d’Accusa.
C. L’Atto degli Obblighi e dei Contratti
45. L’Atto degli Obblighi e dei Contratti prevede nella sezione 45 che una persona che ha sofferto un danno può chiedere una compensazione intentando un'azione civile contro la persona che ha, per sua colpa provocato il danno. Sotto la sezione 110 la richiesta per danno viene annullata dalla scadenza di un periodo di prescrizione di cinque anni.
LA LEGGE
I. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DEGLI ARTICOLI 6 § 1 E 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
46. Il primo richiedente si lamentò della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali contro lui e inoltre della mancanza di una relativa via di ricorso effettiva.
Nella sua decisione di ammissibilità del 9 febbraio 2006 la Corte considerò che queste lagnanze dovevano essere esaminate sotto gli Articoli 6 § 1 e 13 della Convenzione che nelle parti attinenti prevedono ciò che segue:
Articolo 6 (diritto ad un'udienza giusta)
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...da[un] tribunale…”
Articolo 13 (diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva)
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
A. l'obiezione preliminare del Governo
47. Il Governo presentò che il primo richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili. Affermò che avrebbe dovuto iniziare un'azione sotto il SMRDA ed avrebbe dovuto chiedere il risarcimento per l’intero danno materiale e morale che era il diretto risultato immediato della violazione addotta. Il Governo si riferì alla pratica dei tribunali nazionali in cause simili (vedere paragrafi 34-44 sopra).
48. Il primo richiedente rispose che il Governo era non era riuscito a provare la sua obiezione perché non era riuscito a mostrare che un'azione sotto il SMRDA era una via di ricorso effettiva per la sua lagnanza in merito alla lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali a suo carico e, perciò, che fosse costretto ad esaurirla . Lui presentò che le violazioni di cui si lamentava non avrebbero potuto essere state stabilite né essere state compensate sotto il SMRDA.
49. Nella sua decisione di ammissibilità del 9 febbraio 2006 la Corte trovò che la questione dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali si riferiva così da vicino ai meriti della lagnanza del primo richiedente per il fatto che gli mancò una via di ricorso effettiva per la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali contro lui che non poteva essere distaccata da questi, e perciò unì l'obiezione del Governo ai meriti (vedere paragrafo 5 sopra).
Di conseguenza, la Corte esaminerà l'obiezione del Governo nel contesto dei meriti della lagnanza del primo richiedente riguardo al fatto gli mancò una via di ricorso effettiva per la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali.
B. Periodo da prendere in esame
50. La Corte costata che il periodo da prendere in esame durò dall’ 8 giugno 1993 quando il primo richiedente fu arrestato e fu accusato (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra) al 20 ottobre 1999 quando l'indagine preliminare fu terminata nei suoi confronti come non provata (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra).
51. Questo è un periodo di sei anni, quattro mesi e tredici giorni durante il quale i procedimenti penali rimasero allo stadio di indagine preliminare e senza che alcuna procedura investigativa, fosse stata compiuta dopo l'arresto iniziale (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra).
C. Le osservazioni delle parti
52. Il Governo reiterò semplicemente la sua asserzione che il primo richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili. Disse che avrebbe potuto iniziare un'azione contro lo Stato sotto la sezione 2 (2) del SMRDA che considerarono essere una via di ricorso effettiva. Il Governo si riferì a questo proposito ala pratica persistente addotta dei tribunali nazionali e alla sentenza della Corte nella decisione di inammissibilità nella causa di Ekimdjiev c. la Bulgaria (n. 47092/99, 3 marzo 2005).
53. Il primo richiedente non fu d'accordo col Governo e notò che l’Ufficio Distrettuale d’Accusa di Pazardzhik, nella sua decisione del 27 settembre 2004 aveva stabilito che nessuna procedura investigativa era stata condotta nel corso dell'indagine preliminare dopo l8 giugno 1993, data in cui lui fu arrestato e fu accusato (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra). Successivamente per i successivi sei anni e mezzo no era stato fatto nulla, ma la restrizione sui suoi movimenti era stata mantenuta e rimase preoccupato ed ansioso in merito alla possibile conseguenza dei procedimenti. Riguardo all'asserzione del Governo secondo la quale la sezione 2 (2) del SMRDA fosse una via di ricorso che avrebbe dovuto essere esaurita, il primo richiedente affermò che al tempo attinente non vi era nessuna possibilità di chiedere danni nei casi in cui i procedimenti penali venivano chiusi come non provati (vedere paragrafo 41 sopra) e, inoltre, che questo non avrebbe rimediato alla sua lagnanza riguardo la lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti. Così, lui considerò che la disposizione suddetta non fosse una via di ricorso effettiva e disponibile che lui avrebbe dovuto esaurire.
D. Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione riguardo alla lunghezza dei procedimenti penali
54. La Corte reitera che la ragionevolezza della lunghezza dei procedimenti deve essere valutata alla luce delle circostanze della causa e con riferimento al criterio seguente: la complessità della causa, la condotta dei richiedenti e le autorità attinenti (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Pélissier e Sassi c. la Francia [GC], n. 25444/94, § 67 ECHR 1999-II).
55. Avendo esaminato tutto il materiale di fronte a sé e notando l'insuccesso del Governo nel presentare le osservazioni sui meriti della lagnanza, la Corte trova che nessuno dei fatti o degli argomenti sia in grado di persuaderla che la lunghezza dei procedimenti penali nella causa presente fosse stata ragionevolmente protratta in avanti. In particolare, i procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente durarono sei anni, quattro mesi e tredici giorni, rimasero allo stadio di indagine preliminare per l'intero periodo (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra) e, più notevolmente, nessuna procedura investigativa era stata impegnato (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra).
56. Così, avendo riguardo della sua giurisprudenza in materia, la Corte considera, che nella presente causa la lunghezza dei procedimenti era eccessiva e non riuscì a soddisfare il requisito del “ termine ragionevole”.
C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
E. Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 13 in congiunzione con l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione riguardo alla disponibilità di una via di ricorso effettiva
57. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale per una violazione addotta del requisito sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione di ascoltare una causa all'interno di un termine ragionevole (vedere Kudla c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 156 ECHR 2000-XI).
58. La Corte nota che in cause simili contro la Bulgaria ha trovato che al tempo attinente non vi era alcuna via di ricorso formale sotto la legge bulgara che avrebbe potuto accelerare la determinazione delle accuse penali contro il primo richiedente (vedere Osmanov e Yuseinov c. Bulgaria, N. 54178/00 e 59901/00, §§ 38-42 23 settembre 2004; e Sidjimov c. Bulgaria, n. 55057/00, § 41 27 gennaio 2005). La Corte non vede nessuna ragione di giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella causa presente.
59. Riguardo alla via di ricorso compensativa e all'obiezione preliminare del Governo, la Corte osserva che presentò che il richiedente non era riuscito ad esaurire una via di ricorso nazionale disponibile sotto la sezione 2 (2) del SMRDA e si riferì alla possibilità esistente di ottenere compensazione per essere stato accusato illegalmente di reato. Comunque, non indicò come questo avrebbe rimediato alla lagnanza attualmente di fronte a questa Corte riguardo alla lunghezza eccessiva addotta dei procedimenti penali. Inoltre, il Governo non presentò copie delle sentenze dei tribunali nazionali in cui le assegnazioni erano state rese sotto il SMRDA offendo compensazione per lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali. Similmente, le sentenze della Corte nella causa Ekimdjiev (citata sopra) non si riferiscono alla possibilità di ottenere compensazione per lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti penali.
60. In prospettiva di quello detto sopra, la Corte non trova che il Governo abbia provato che nelle circostanze della causa presente un'azione sotto il SMRDA avrebbe previsto un diritto esecutivo al risarcimento che avrebbe potuto essere considerato come una via di ricorso effettiva, sufficiente ed accessibile riguardo alla lagnanza del richiedente in merito alla lunghezza eccessiva addotta dei procedimenti penali (vedere, similmente, Osmanov e Yuseinov, citata sopra, §41; Sidjimov, citata sopra, § 42, e Nalbantova c. Bulgaria, n. 38106/02, § 36 27 settembre 2007).
61. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione per il fatto che il richiedente non aveva una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva per la sua lagnanza sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione riguardo al fatto che la lunghezza dei procedimenti penali a suo carico era stata eccessiva.
Segue che l'obiezione preliminare del Governo (vedere paragrafi 47-49 sopra) deve essere respinta.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
62. Il secondo e il terzo richiedente si lamentarono sotto molte disposizioni della Convenzione del sequestro illegale e della confisca prolungata del loro veicolo e inoltre della mancanza di una via di ricorso effettiva relativa .
Nella sua decisione di ammissibilità del 9 febbraio 2006 la Corte considerò che queste lagnanze debbano essere esaminate sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione. Riguardo al secondo, la Corte trovò, che il secondo e il terzo richiedente si lamentarono della mancanza di un diritto effettivo di azione sotto il diritto nazionale piuttosto che dell'esistenza di ostacoli procedurali che ostacolano o limitano le possibilità di intentare potenziali rivendicazioni di fronte al tribunale. Così, considerò che la loro lagnanza avrebbe dovuto essere esaminata sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione riguardo alla mancanza addotta di una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva contro l'interferenza col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà, piuttosto che sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione come un accesso al tribunale (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Fayed c. Regno Unito, sentenza del 21 settembre 1994 la Serie A n. 294 B, p. 49, § 65).
L’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione prevedono ciò che segue:
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 (protezione della proprietà)
Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
Articolo 13 (diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva)
“Chiunque i cui diritti e le libertà come riconosciuti [dalla] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale anche se la violazione fosse stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale.”
A. l'obiezione preliminare del Governo
63. Il Governo presentò che il secondo e il terzo richiedente non erano riusciti ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili. Affermò che avrebbero dovuto iniziare un'azione sotto il SMRDA ed avrebbero dovuto chiedere il risarcimento per l’intero danno materiale e giuridico che erano il diretto risultato immediato delle violazioni addotte. Il Governo si riferì alla pratica dei tribunali nazionali in cause simili (vedere paragrafi 34-44 sopra).
64. Il Governo considerò anche che avrebbero potuto iniziare un'azione di illecito civile ed avrebbero potuto chiedere il risarcimento per danno dalle persone responsabile delle violazioni addotte (vedere paragrafo 45 sopra). Si riferì alla presunzione di colpa respingibile del convenuto in simile azioni e che i rivendicatori hanno bisogno solamente di provare la misura del danno materiale e morale sofferto, come, per esempio, per deprezzamento, perdita di utili ed ammortizzazione di un veicolo.
65. Il secondo e il terzo richiedente risposero che il Governo non era riuscito a provare la sua obiezione perché non era riuscito a mostrare che le via di ricorso suggerite erano effettive e, perciò, che loro erano costretti ad esaurirle . Loro presentarono che le violazioni delle quali loro si sono lamentati non potevano essere ricompensate sotto il SMRDA e facevano riferimento all'interpretazione restrittiva dei tribunali nazionali riguardo alla responsabilità delle autorità di indagine, le autorità di accusa e i tribunali (vedere paragrafo 37-40 sopra).
66. Riguardo all'asserzione del Governo per la quale loro avrebbero potuto iniziare un'azione di illecito civile contro le persone responsabili, il secondo e il terzo richiedente risposero che quella non era una via di ricorso effettiva. In particolare, loro si riferirono al fatto che nessun protocollo o nessun altro documento erano stati eseguiti per il sequestro e la confisca del loro veicolo. Non avevano neanche ricevuto alcuna risposta alle numerose lagnanze che avevano depositato presso l' Ufficio d’Accusa. Loro non avrebbero mai potuto, di conseguenza ,designare una parte convenuta in tale azione di illecito civile. Loro notarono anche che l'investigatore incaricato dell'indagine preliminare era morto nel 1998 e, in oltre, che le autorità d’investigazioni e d’ accusa godevano dell'immunità dall’ accusa civile che scaturisce dalle loro attività ufficiali.
67. Nella sua decisione di ammissibilità del 9 febbraio 2006 la Corte stabilì che la questione dell'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali si riferiva così da vicino ai meriti delle lagnanze del secondo e terzo richiedente riguardo al fatto che a loro mancò una via di ricorso effettive riguardo all'interferenza addotta col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà che non poteva essere staccata, e perciò l’unì all'obiezione del Governo ai meriti (vedere paragrafo 5 sopra).
Di conseguenza, la Corte esaminerà l'obiezione del Governo nel contesto dei meriti della lagnanza secondo e terzo richiedente per il fatto che a loro mancò una via di ricorso effettiva riguardo all'interferenza addotta col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà.
B. Le osservazioni delle parti
68. Il Governo reiterò semplicemente la sua asserzione che il secondo e il terzo richiedente non erano riusciti ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali disponibili. Disse che loro avrebbero potuto iniziare un'azione contro lo Stato sotto il SMRDA che considera essere una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva. In particolare, il Governo si riferì alla sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Pazardzhik del 14 dicembre 2005 che giudicò le Autorità Distrettuali di Pazardzhik responsabili di danno sofferto da un rivendicatore come risultato dell'inattività precedente nel trattenere in sicurezza un veicolo sequestrato come prova in una causa (vedere paragrafo 43 sopra).
69. Nella loro replica, il secondo e il terzi richiedente osservarono, che il Governo non aveva impugnato la loro asserzione che le autorità avevano sequestrato ed avevano trattenuto il loro veicolo per una lunghezza considerevole in violazione alla legislazione applicabile. Così, dibatterono che l'interferenza col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà era stata illegale e, perciò, in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 delProtocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
70. Riguardo alla disponibilità di un'azione contro lo Stato sotto il SMRDA ed il diritto giurisprudenziale nazionale presentata dal Governo, il secondo e il terzo richiedenti notarono, che le sentenze presentate erano datate 2005-2006 o relative a cause che erano effettivamente diverse dalla loro. Loro osservarono anche che la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Pazardzhik del 14 dicembre 2005 alla quale il Governo si appellò così pesantemente, era stato annullata su ricorso riguardo alla responsabilità delle Autortà Distrettuali di Polizia di Pazardzhik. Inoltre, il secondo e terzo richiedente notarono che nella sentenza finale del 10 giugno 2006 la Corte Regionale di Pazardzhik aveva essenzialmente trovato che la polizia non poteva essere ritenuta responsabile sotto il SMRDA per azioni o inazioni relative ad articoli danneggiati sequestrati come prova fisica (vedere paragrafo 44 sopra).
C. Ottemperanza con l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
71. La Corte nota all'inizio che la proprietà del secondo e il terzo richiedente è stata sequestrata dalle autorità il 28 maggio 1992 mentre la Convenzione entrò in vigore per la Bulgaria più di tre mesi più tardi, il 7 settembre 1992. Così, l'atto della confisca stessa non rientra nella rationae temporis della giurisdizione della Corte.
Comunque, la Corte nota che il secondo e il terzo richiedente si lamentarono anche che le autorità avevano trattenuto illegalmente il loro veicolo e che loro non erano stati in grado di recuperarlo ed usarlo per una lunghezza considerevole di tempo dopo che la Convenzione entrò in vigore per la Bulgaria il che corrispose ad una situazione continua terminata il 19 maggio 2000 (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Loizidou c. Turchia, sentenza del 18 dicembre 1996, Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-VI, pp. 2231-32, §§ 46 e 47, e Vasilescu c. Romania, sentenza del 22 maggio 1998 le Relazioni 1998 III, § 49).
Il periodo totale, perciò durante il quale a loro fu negato l’ uso del veicolo era di sette anni, undici mesi e ventitré giorni dei quali sette anni, otto mesi e dodici giorni erano all'interno della ratione temporis di competenza della Corte (vedere, mutatis mutandis, T.H. e S.H. c. Finlandia, n. 19823/92, decisione della Commissione del 9 febbraio 1993 non segnalata).
72. Nel reiterare la sua giurisprudenza che la confisca di proprietà per procedimenti giuridici si riferisce al controllo dell'uso di proprietà, la Corte costata che questa lagnanza rientra all'interno dell'ambito del secondo paragrafo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere Raimondo c. Italia, sentenza del 22 febbraio 1994 Serie A n. 281-a, § 27). Inoltre, la confisca del veicolo non spogliò il secondo e il terzi richiedente della loro proprietà, ma solamente impedì loro il suo utilizzo, perché fu trattenuta come prova fisica nel corso dell'indagine pendente nel furto della macchina (l'ibid.) e, più importante , non rientrava tra i poteri dell' Ufficio d’Accusa determinare la proprietà del veicolo, il che potrebbe essere fatto are solamente dai tribunali. In simile causa, sarebbe necessario valutare la legalità e il fine dell'interferenza, così come la sua proporzionalità.
73. La Corte osserva che nella causa presente l’Ufficio d’Accusa e d’Appello di Plovdiv il 18 novembre 1999 (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra) e l'Ufficio Supremo dell'Accusa della Cassazione il 10 marzo 2000 (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra) stabilirono che l'interferenza col diritto del secondo e terzo richiedente al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà era sia illegale che arbitraria perché sia il sequestro che esce dalla ratione temporis di competenza della Corte ed la confisca prolungata risultante di cui non ne fa parte erano in violazione della legge nazionale applicabile.
74. Così, in prospettiva del principio di sussidiarietà inerente nel sistema della Convenzione, la Corte costata che l'interferenza in oggetto era incompatibile col diritto del secondo e terzo richiedente al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Là, di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione di questa disposizione.
Questa conclusione non rende necessario accertare se un giusto equilibrio sia stato previsto fra le richieste d’interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti di protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, §§ 58 e 62, ECHR 1999-II).
D. Ottemperanza con Articolo 13 unito all’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione riguardo alla disponibilità di una via di ricorso effettiva
75. La Corte nota che la lagnanza sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione deriva dagli stessi fatti di quelli esaminati quando si trattava l'obiezione del Governo del non-esaurimento e le lagnanze sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. C'è comunque, una differenza nella natura degli interessi protetti dall’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione e dall’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione: il primo riconosce una salvaguardia procedurale, vale a dire il “diritto ad una via di ricorso effettiva”, mentre il requisito procedurale inerente al secondo è subordinato al fine più ampio di assicurare il diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà. Avendo riguardo alla differenza infine delle salvaguardie riconosciute dai due Articoli, la Corte giudica appropriato nella presente causa esaminare gli stessi fatti stabiliti sotto ambo gli Articoli (vedere Iatridis, citata sopra, § 65).
76. Nella presente causa, la Corte costata che al tempo attinente la legge nazionale non ha offerto alcun ricorso ai tribunali nazionali per impugnare una decisione da parte dell’ Ufficio d’Accusa di continuare a trattenere i beni principali sequestrati come prova fisica nei procedimenti penali (vedere paragrafo 31 sopra). Siccome il secondo e il terzo richiedente non erano consapevoli che il loro veicolo era stato sequestrato illegalmente ed credevano che venisse trattenuto legalmente come prova fisica nei procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente, sarebbe irragionevole aspettarsi che loro iniziassero qualsiasi altro tipo di procedimento, come i procedimenti di rei vindicatio . La possibilità sola per loro in tale causa sarebbe stata lamentarsi all'Ufficio dell'Accusa di alto livello il che fu tentato in molte occasioni dal secondo e terzo richiedente, senza ricevere risposte. È vero che l' Ufficio d’Accusa trovò infine che il veicolo del secondo e terzo richiedente era stato sequestrato illegalmente ed era stato restituito a loro, ma questo fu il risultato della sua decisione di terminare i procedimenti penali contro il primo richiedente piuttosto che una risposta ad una delle molte richieste per la restituzione della macchina (vedere paragrafi 22-26 sopra).
77. Riguardo alla mancanza di risarcimento per l'interferenza sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, la Corte nota che tale diritto non è inerente al secondo paragrafo di questo provvedimento riguardo al controllo dell'uso della proprietà (vedere Banér c. Svezia, n. 11763/85, decisione della Commissione del 9 marzo 1989, DR 60, p. 128, a p. 142). Né l’Articolo 13 richiede che il risarcimento sia pagato in tutte le circostanze. Comunque, la Corte considera che in circostanze come nella causa presente quando le autorità sequestrano e trattengono beni principali come prova fisica dovrebbe esistere la possibilità nella legislazione nazionale di iniziare procedimenti contro lo Stato e chiedere il risarcimento di qualsiasi danno che è il risultato dell'insuccesso delle autorità di trattenere in modo sicuro i suddetti beni principali ragionevolmente in buon condizione. Questo è specialmente vero in casi in cui l'interferenza stessa è stata trovata illegale.
78. Nella presente causa, la Corte trova non provato che al tempo attinente il diritto nazionale abbia fornito al secondo e terzo richiedente la possibilità di chiedere il risarcimento per il danno al loro veicolo come risultato dell'interferenza prolungata col loro diritto al godimento tranquillo della loro proprietà. In particolare, il Governo non riuscì a provare che al tempo attinente un'azione sotto il SMRDA, o qualsiasi altro tipo di azione per questa questione, si potesse considerare che ci fosse stata una via di ricorso effettiva che avrebbe dovuto essere esaurita. Più notevolmente anche la sentenza molto posteriore della Corte distrettuale di Pazardzhik del 14 dicembre 2005 fu annullata nella parte attinente all’appello e la Corte Regionale di Pazardzhik trovò che la polizia non poteva essere ritenuta responsabile sotto il SMRDA per azioni o inazioni relative ad articoli danneggiati sequestrati come prova fisica (vedere paragrafo 44 sopra).
79. C'è stata di conseguenza, una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione per il fatto che al tempo attinente il secondo e terzo richiedene non avevano alcuna via di ricorso nazionale effettiva per la loro lagnanza sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
Segue che l'obiezione preliminare del Governo (vedere paragrafo 63-67 sopra) deve essere respinta.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
80. L’Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosce una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
81. I richiedenti non presentarono alcuna richiesta riguardo al danno. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che non c'è nessuna chiamata per assegnarli qualsiasi la somma su questo conto.
B. Costi e spese
82. I richiedenti chiesero inizialmente 9,000 euro (EUR) per le 180 ore di lavoro legale da parte del loro avvocato di fronte alla Corte, ad una tariffa oraria di EUR 50. Successivamente, loro chiesero ulteriori EUR 2,500 per 24 ore di lavoro legale da parte del loro avvocato di fronte alla Corte e per tre ore di traduzione e lavoro tecnico da parte del loro avvocato, ad una tariffa oraria di EUR 100. I richiedenti presentarono fogli di presenza in appoggio alle loro richieste. Loro richiesero anche che i costi e le spese incorsi dovrebbero essere pagate direttamente al loro avvocato, il Sig. V. S..
83. Il Governo non presentò commenti sulle richieste dei richiedenti per costi e spese.
84. La Corte reitera che secondo la sua giurisprudenza,a un richiedente viene concesso il rimborso dei suoi costi e spese solamente se viene dimostrato che questi siano stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e siano stati ragionevoli relativamente al quantum. Prendendo nota di tutti i fattori attinenti, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 2,000 riguardo ai costi e spese, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti su quel l'importo.
C. Interesse moratorio
85. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse moratorio dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Sostiene che riguardo al primo richiedente vi è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione;
2. Sostiene che riguardo al primo richiedente vi è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 in congiunzione con l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione e, di conseguenza, respinge l'obiezione preliminare del Governo basata sul non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali;
3. Sostiene che riguardo al secondo e al terzo richiedenti vi è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. Sostiene che riguardo al secondo e terzo richiedente vi è stata una violazione dell’Articolo 13 in congiunzione con l’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e, di conseguenza, respinge l'obiezione preliminare del Governo basata sul non-esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare ai richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva secondo l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti, da convertire in levs bulgari al tasso applicabile nella data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 2,000 (due mila euro) per costi e spese, pagabili sul conto bancario dell’avvocato dei richiedenti in Bulgaria, il Sig. V. S.;
(ii) qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico dei richiedenti sull'importo sopra;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della richiesta dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglesi, e notificato per iscritto il 10 gennaio 2008, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Claudia Westerdiek Pari Lorenzen
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.