Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BALAN v. MOLDOVA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 29, P1-1

NUMERO: 19247/03/2008
STATO: Moldova
DATA: 29/01/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - award (global)
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF BALAN v. MOLDOVA
(Application no. 19247/03)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
29 January 2008
FINAL
29/04/2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Balan v. Moldova,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Josep Casadevall,
Giovanni Bonello,
Kristaq Traja,
Stanislav Pavlovschi,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 8 January 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 19247/03) against the Republic of Moldova lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Moldovan national, Mr P. B., on 27 February 2003.
2. The applicant was represented by Mr V. N., from Lawyers for Human Rights, a non-governmental organisation based in Chisinau. The Moldovan Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr V. Grosu.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that his rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention had been infringed as a result of the refusal of the domestic courts to compensate him for the unlawful use of his protected work.
4. The application was allocated to the Fourth Section of the Court. On 6 October 2006 the President of that Section decided to communicate the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it was decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1938 and lives in Chisinau.
6. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarized as follows.
7. In 1985 the applicant published the photograph 'Soroca Castle' in the album Poliptic Moldav. He received author's fees for that photograph.
8. In 1996 the Government adopted a decision regarding national identity cards using, inter alia, the photograph taken by the applicant as a background for the identity cards issued by the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Moldova (“the Ministry”). The applicant was not consulted and did not agree to such a use of the photograph.
9. In 1998 he requested the Ministry to compensate him for the infringement of his rights caused by the unlawful use of the photograph he had taken, as well as to conclude a contract with him for the future use of the photograph.
10. When his request was rejected, the applicant initiated court proceedings against the Ministry on 10 November 1998. On 24 March 1999 the Chisinau Regional Court partly allowed his claims and found that he had been the author of the photograph which had been used without his agreement. The court awarded him 4,050 Moldovan lei (MDL), equivalent to 568 United States dollars (USD). The court also obliged the Ministry to publish an apology but rejected the applicant's request that the Ministry be ordered to conclude a contract with him for the future use of the photograph.
11. The applicant appealed. He submitted, inter alia, that the reason why he had not asked for the withdrawal of the identity cards already issued in infringement of his rights and for new identity cards using the photograph taken by him not to be issued in the future was that this would have incurred unreasonably high costs for the Ministry and would have caused unnecessary problems for identity card holders. He had therefore requested the conclusion of a contract with the Ministry.
12. On 16 September 1999 the Court of Appeal quashed the lower court's judgment and rejected the applicant's requests.
13. On 22 December 1999 the Supreme Court of Justice quashed the Court of Appeal's judgment and upheld the judgment of the Chisinau Regional Court as regards the award to the applicant, while rejecting his request for an apology to be published. The court also ordered a re-examination of the case as regards the conclusion of a contract with the applicant for the future use of the photograph since, in its opinion, he had such a right.
14. From 1 May 2000 the Ministry ceased using the photograph taken by the applicant as a background for identity cards.
15. In a new set of proceedings the applicant requested compensation for the financial loss caused by the continued unlawful use of his photograph between the date of the judgment, 24 March 1999, and 1 May 2000. Since more than 260,000 identity cards had been issued during the relevant period, he claimed 10% of the amount paid by the identity cards' owners to the State (MDL 2,403,137). He also claimed compensation for infringement of his moral rights (MDL 200,000).
16. On 6 November 2001 the Chisinau Regional Court awarded the applicant MDL 180,000 in compensation for pecuniary damage and MDL 3,600 for non-pecuniary damage, while rejecting his request to oblige the Ministry to conclude a contract with him.
17. On 26 March 2002 the Court of Appeal quashed that judgment and rejected the applicant's claims. The court found that, while the applicant's authorship of the relevant photograph had been clearly established, he had been compensated by the judgment of 24 March 1999. Since the court had not prohibited the use of the photograph in future and since the applicant himself had not requested such a prohibition, the identity cards already issued or any cards issued in the future were no longer covered by the Copyright and Related Rights Act 1994 (“the 1994 Act”) (no.293-XII) (see paragraph 19 below). Accordingly, the applicant could not allege an infringement of his rights.
18. On 16 October 2002 the Supreme Court of Justice essentially repeated the reasons given in the judgment of the Court of Appeal and rejected an appeal by the applicant on points of law. While confirming the applicant's intellectual property rights in respect of the photograph he had taken, it added that an identity card was an official document which could not be subject to copyright.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
19. The relevant provisions of the Copyright and Related Rights Act (no. 293-XI) of 23 November 1994 read as follows:
“Section 4
(4) The author's rights do not depend on the property right over the material object in which the relevant protected work is embodied. Purchasing the object does not imply the transfer to the purchaser of any copyright set out in the present Act.
Section 6
(1) The author's rights cover literary, artistic and scientific protected works in the form of:
...
i) ... photographic works ...;
Section 7
(1) The following shall not constitute objects of copyright:
(a) official documents ...
Section 9
...
(2) The personal (moral) rights of the author cannot be assigned and continue to be protected if the copyright is assigned.
Section 19
The use of the author's protected work by third persons ... is permitted on the basis of a contract concluded with the author or with his or her successors, except for the cases mentioned in sections 20-23.
Section 24
(1) The copyright ... may be transferred by the authors or other copyright owners through authorship contracts.
Section 25
(1) The use of ... artistic works in breach of the copyright of their authors is unlawful.
Section 38
(1) The owner of the copyright can request from the person who has infringed this right:
(a) the recognition of this right;
(b) the re-establishment of the situation pertaining before the infringement of the right and the cessation of the actions infringing the author's rights or which may lead to such an infringement;
(c) compensation for losses or lost revenue;
(d) transfer of the revenues obtained through the unlawful use of the protected work, in lieu of compensation for the losses or lost revenue;
(e) compensation of between 10,000 and 20,000 times the minimum wage in lieu of compensation for losses or the transfer of the revenues obtained through the unlawful use of the protected work;
(2) The sanctions mentioned under paragraph (1) (c)-(e) above are applied in accordance with the choice of the holder of the copyright”.
20. The relevant provisions of the Administrative Proceedings Act (no. 793) of 10 February 2000 read as follows:
“Section 4
The following cannot be challenged before administrative courts:
...
(c) laws, Presidential Decrees with a normative character, Government orders and decisions with a normative character, ...”
THE LAW
21. The applicant complained of a violation of his right to a trial within a reasonable time, as guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention.
Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, in so far as relevant, provides:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair hearing ... within a reasonable time...”
22. The applicants also complained of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention as a result of the failure to award him compensation following the breach of his intellectual property rights.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
I. ADMISSIBILITY
23. In his initial application the applicant complained of the excessive length of the proceedings in his case, contrary to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. However, in his observations on the admissibility and merits of the case he asked the Court not to proceed with the examination of this complaint. The Court finds no reason to examine it.
24. The Court considers that the applicant's complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention raises questions of fact and law which are sufficiently serious that their determination should depend on an examination of its merits. No grounds for declaring it inadmissible have been established. The Court therefore declares the complaint admissible. In accordance with its decision to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention (see paragraph 4 above), the Court will immediately consider the merits of the complaint.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
A. Arguments of the parties
1. The Government
25. The Government submitted that in examining the applicant's case the domestic courts had applied the wrong law. The 1994 Act (see paragraph 19 above) was not applicable, since the applicant's protected work had been created in 1985, before the enactment of the 1994 Act. Moreover, the 1994 Act had no provisions regarding rights over works created before its entry into force. Accordingly, the courts should have applied the old Civil Code, in force between 1964 and 2003. The Government advanced arguments as to what the applicant's legal position would have been had the old Civil Code been applied.
26. The Government also referred to the applicant's failure to request the courts in 1999 to prohibit the further use of his photograph by the Ministry, which he had been entitled to do under section 38 (1) (b) of the 1994 Act (see paragraph 19 above). They considered that, as a result, no interference with the applicant's rights had taken place when the courts rejected his claims for compensation and when the Court of Appeal found that the past or future use of his photograph in issuing identity cards did not come under the protection of the 1994 Act. Moreover, since identity cards were official documents, no intellectual property rights could be exercised over them, as found by the domestic courts (see also section 7 of the 1994 Act, paragraph 19 above). The compensation which the applicant had received in 1999 constituted full reparation for any damage caused to him as a result of the unauthorised use of his protected work.
27. The Government finally argued that the applicant had not had “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, but only claims, which the domestic courts had rejected and which therefore could not be the subject of interference. Were it otherwise, any person lodging a claim before the domestic courts could automatically invoke an interference with his or her Convention rights.
2. The applicant
28. The applicant submitted that he had had “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, since intellectual property rights, according to the jurisprudence of the Court, were included in the above notion. He also considered that an interference with that right had taken place in the light of the unauthorised use of his protected work. He drew certain financial advantages from the use of his work, including when he had received his fees when the photograph was first published in 1985 (see paragraph 7 above) and when he had been awarded compensation in 1999 (see paragraph 13 above).
29. The applicant also considered that he had a legitimate expectation of obtaining compensation for any infringement of his intellectual property rights, since the law provided clearly for such a right. The domestic courts' judgments did not therefore create any property right, which existed by virtue of the law, but only had the function of determining the exact amount of compensation. The refusal to award him any compensation had therefore constituted an interference with his property right. Moreover, the courts had awarded him compensation in 1999 in identical conditions. This confirmed, in the applicant's view, his right to obtain such compensation in the case of any future infringement of his rights.
30. The applicant also considered that the Court of Appeal had interfered with his property rights when it stated, in its judgment of 24 March 1999, that, following the compensation awarded to the applicant for the unauthorised use of the photograph taken by him and because of his failure to request a prohibition on its future unauthorised use, that work was no longer protected by the 1994 Act. He considered that this limitation had not been provided for by law, since section 38 of the 1994 Act provided for the right to claim compensation for past violations and did not refer to on-going breaches. Moreover, the applicant argued that he could not ask for the prohibition of further use of his protected work since the decision to use the photograph taken by him had been adopted by the Government. According to the legislation in force (see paragraph 20 above), an individual could not challenge a Government decision in court unless the decision related specifically to him or her. The decision which included the use of his protected work had been adopted in respect of national identity documents in general and thus had not related to the applicant specifically. Neither did individuals in Moldova have the right to ask the Constitutional Court to review the lawfulness of a Government decision. The applicant finally considered that he had been subjected to an excessive and individual burden as a result of the court judgments.
B. The Court's assessment
1. General principles
31. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention does not guarantee the right to acquire property (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004-IX, and Van der Mussele v. Belgium, judgment of 23 November 1983, Series A no. 70, p. 23, § 48). Moreover, “an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions related to his “possessions” within the meaning of this provision. “Possessions” can be either “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right. By way of contrast, the hope of recognition of a property right which it has been impossible to exercise effectively cannot be considered a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, nor can a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfilment of the condition” (see Kopecký, cited above, § 35; Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein v. Germany [GC], no. 42527/98, §§ 82-83, ECHR 2001-VIII; and Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, § 69, ECHR 2002-VII).
32. The concept of “possessions” referred to in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning which is not limited to ownership of physical goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law: certain other rights and interests constituting assets can also be regarded as “property rights”, and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision. The issue that needs to be examined in each case is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, confer on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Iatridis v. Greece, [GC], no. 31107/96; Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000-I; Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 129, ECHR 2004-V; and Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 63, ECHR 2007-...).
33. In certain circumstances, a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining an “asset” may also enjoy the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Thus, where a proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, the person in whom it is vested may be regarded as having a “legitimate expectation” if there is a sufficient basis for the interest in national law, for example where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming its existence (see Kopecký, cited above, § 52). However, no legitimate expectation can be said to arise where there is a dispute as to the correct interpretation and application of domestic law and the applicant's submissions are subsequently rejected by the national courts (see Kopecký, cited above, § 50).
2. Application of these principles to the present case
(a) Whether the applicant had “possessions”
34. The Court reiterates that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable to intellectual property (see Anheuser-Busch Inc., cited above, § 72). In the present case, the Court notes that the applicant's rights in respect of the photograph he had taken were confirmed by the domestic courts (see paragraphs 10, 17 and 18 above). Therefore, unlike in the above-cited judgment of Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal, there was no dispute in the present case as to whether the applicant could claim protection of his intellectual property rights. In this connection, the Court takes note of the applicant's submission (see paragraph 29 above) that he asked the courts to protect his already established right over the protected work by awarding him compensation, and not to establish his “property right” over such compensation. He had, in the Court's opinion, a right recognised by law and by a previous final judgment (see paragraph 13 above), and not merely a legitimate expectation of obtaining a property right.
35. The Court notes that the Supreme Court of Justice decided, on 16 October 2002, that identity cards were official documents within the meaning of section 7 of the 1994 Act and could not be subject to the applicant's intellectual property rights (see paragraphs 16, 18 and 19 above). However, the court only referred to identity cards and not to the photograph taken by the applicant, in respect of which there was no dispute. Moreover, section 4 of the 1994 Act expressly distinguishes between the author's rights in respect of works created by him or her and the property right over the material object in which that creation is embodied (see paragraph 19 above). It follows that the finding of the Supreme Court of Justice that identity cards could not be subject to copyright had no bearing on the applicant's rights in respect of the photograph he had taken. This finding is confirmed by the fact that the domestic courts found, in the first set of proceedings, that the applicant's rights had been infringed. The courts awarded him compensation despite the Ministry's use of the photograph in an identical manner both before and after 1999, that is as a background for identity cards.
36. In view of the above, the Court concludes that the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(b) Whether there has been interference
37. The Court also notes the Government's position that the domestic courts had relied on legislation which was not applicable to the applicant's case (see paragraph 25 above). However, the Court reiterates that it is not its task to take the place of the national authorities who ruled on the applicant's case. It primarily falls to them to examine all the facts of the case and set their reasons out in their decisions. In the present case, the Court does not see any reason for questioning the domestic courts' application of a law adopted specifically to regulate intellectual property rights issues and which came into force before the alleged violation of the applicant's rights.
Accordingly, the Government's new reasons, which were raised for the first time in the proceedings before the Court, are irrelevant (see, mutatis mutandis, Sarban v. Moldova, no. 3456/05, § 102, 4 October 2005). The Court will therefore examine the case on the basis of the law as applied by the domestic courts.
38. In so far as the judgment of the Supreme Court of Justice is to be interpreted as meaning that, because of the applicant's failure to ask the courts for a prohibition on the unauthorised use of his protected work, such use after the 1999 judgment did not interfere with his possessions for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court is unable to accept this view. The Court notes that section 25 (1) of the 1994 Act states in unequivocal terms that “the use of ... artistic works in breach of the copyright of their authors is unlawful”. The illegal character of unauthorised use is not conditioned in the law by any particular act of the copyright owner, such as a request for a court injunction against such use. The finding of a violation of the applicant's rights in the 1999 judgment confirms this.
39. Moreover, it cannot be said, as argued by the Government, that the applicant tacitly accepted the use of his protected work without remuneration. On the contrary, by lodging a new court action he clearly expressed his view that such use was in violation of his rights. Moreover, the fact that he consistently claimed the protection of his right by asking the Ministry to conclude a contract with him and to pay him author's fees or compensation (see paragraphs 10 and 15 above) is evidence of the fact that he has continuously opposed unauthorised use of his protected work. It follows that the applicant's failure to request the prohibition of the unauthorised use of his work by the Ministry could not make such use lawful as unauthorised use was expressly prohibited by law and was opposed by the applicant.
40. In the light of the above, the Court finds that there has been interference with the applicant's property rights within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(c) Whether the interference was “lawful”
41. The Court further notes that the 1994 Act does not provide for the termination of an author's rights by virtue of his or her failure to ask the courts to prohibit the use of his protected work. The only means of extinguishing the author's right is a contract with the author or his or her successors (see sections 19 and 24 of the 1994 Act, cited in paragraph 19 above), while the author's “moral rights” can never be transmitted to third persons (see section 9 of the 1994 Act, cited in paragraph 19 above). In addition, it is for the author of a protected work to decide which of the penalties provided by law he or she wants to apply in case of an infringement of his or her rights under the 1994 Act (see section 38 of the 1994 Act, cited in paragraph 19 above).
42. The Court notes that neither the domestic courts nor the Government referred to any specific provision in the 1994 Act which expressly provides for the termination of an author's rights in respect of his or her creation by virtue of a failure to prohibit its unauthorised use. Section 38 of the 1994 Act, cited above, refers to the right to ask for the prohibition of the unlawful use but does not attach any negative consequences to a failure to do so.
43. The Court also notes the discrepancies in the manner in which the domestic authorities interpreted the 1994 Act in the first proceedings (see paragraph 13 above) and the second proceedings (see paragraphs 17 and 18 above), even though they decided on essentially the same legal situation. Moreover, the Government considered that the 1994 Act did not apply at all in the applicant's case, contrary to the position of the domestic courts. This suggests that the 1994 Act had not been sufficiently foreseeable in its application and this in itself might be a sufficient basis for the conclusion that the interference was not “lawful”. However, the Court does not consider it necessary finally to decide this issue, having regard to its conclusions set out below.
(d) Purpose and lawfulness of the interference
44. Even assuming that the 1994 Act was sufficiently foreseeable in its application, the Court must determine whether the interference with the applicant's rights was proportionate to the aims pursued. The Court notes the applicant's argument that he could not prevent infringement of his rights since he had no standing to challenge in court the Government decision which had enabled the unlawful use of his protected work (see paragraphs 8, 20 and 30 above). The Government did not comment on this. The Court considers that it does not have to take a definitive view on this issue in view of its findings below.
45. The Court accepts that issuing identity cards to the population serves an undoubtedly important public interest. However, it is apparent that this socially important aim could have been reached in a variety of ways not involving a breach of the applicant's rights. For instance, another photograph could have been used or a contract could have been concluded with the applicant. The Court is unaware of any compelling reason for the use of the particular photograph taken by the applicant or of any impediments to the use of other materials for the same purpose. Indeed, the photograph taken by the applicant was no longer used as a background in identity cards after 1 May 2000, which confirms that the public interest could be served without violating the applicant's rights.
46. It follows that the domestic courts failed to strike a fair balance between the interests of the community and those of the applicant, placing on him an individual and excessive burden. There has, accordingly, been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
47. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
48. The applicant claimed 20,267 euros (EUR) for pecuniary damage and EUR 5,000 for non-pecuniary damage. He relied on the award of damages made by the Chisinau Regional Court on 6 November 2001 (see paragraph 16 above) and the period (three years) during which he had not been able to use that amount. He also referred to the frustration caused to him by the use of his work without authorisation and the refusal to compensate him. Having seen the photograph he had taken widely used in Government-issued documents, he expected fair compensation and was bitterly disappointed when that was refused.
49. The Government submitted that the award made on 6 November 2001 was irrelevant, since that judgment had been quashed and the applicant had had no expectation of obtaining that amount. Moreover, the judgment of 24 March 1999, which had been upheld in respect of the award in favour of the applicant (see paragraphs 10 and 13 above), had constituted full compensation for any damage caused to the applicant. They argued that no damage had been caused to the applicant, who did not submit any evidence that he had derived any profit or otherwise benefited from his authorship of the photograph he had taken.
50. The Court considers that the applicant must have been caused damage as a result of the infringement of his rights in respect of the photograph he had taken and the refusal of the domestic courts to award compensation for that violation, the more so seeing that the photograph had been reproduced on a large scale (see paragraph 15 above), despite the authorities' awareness of the unlawful character of such use. Moreover, the Court finds that the award in the applicant's favour made in 1999 (see paragraphs 10 and 13 above) compensated him only for the infringement of his rights prior to the initiation of the 1999 proceedings and not for the subsequent use of the photograph taken by him.
51. In the light of the above and deciding on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant EUR 5,000 for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
52. The applicant claimed EUR 2,872 for costs and expenses, of which EUR 2,812 for legal representation before the Court. The applicant's lawyer submitted a contract with the applicant and a detailed time sheet according to which he had spent 37.5 hours. As to the hourly fee of EUR 75, the lawyer argued that it was within the limits of the hourly rates recommended by the Moldovan Bar Association, which were EUR 40-150.
53. The Government disagreed with the amount claimed for representation. They considered it excessive and argued that the amount claimed by the lawyer was not the amount actually paid to him by the applicant. They disputed the number of hours worked by the applicant's lawyer and the hourly rate he charged. They also argued that the rates recommended by the Moldovan Bar Association were too high in comparison to the average monthly salary in Moldova and referred to the non-profit nature of the organisation Lawyers for Human Rights.
54. In the present case, regard being had to the itemised list submitted and the complexity of the case, the Court awards the applicant EUR 2,000 for costs and expenses.
C. Default interest
55. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention the following amounts, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros) in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros) in respect of costs and expenses;
(iii) any tax that may be chargeable on the above amounts;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 29 January 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; danno Materiale e giuridico - assegnazione (globale)
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA BALAN C. MOLDAVIA
(Richiesta n. 19247/03)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
29 gennaio 2008
DEFINITIVO
29/04/2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Balan c. Moldavia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Josep Casadevall il Giovanni Bonello, Kristaq Traja, Stanislav Pavlovschi, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato l’8 gennaio 2008,
Consegna la sentenza seguente che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 19247/03) contro la Repubblica della Moldavia depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino moldavo, il Sig. P. B., 27 febbraio 2003.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dal Sig. V. N., degli Avvocati per i Diritti umani un'organizzazione non-governativa con sede in Chisinau. Il Governo moldavo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal loro Agente, il Sig. V. Grosu.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che il suo diritto sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione era stato infranto come risultato del rifiuto dei tribunali nazionali di ricompensarlo per l'uso illegale del suo lavoro protetto da diritti d’autore.
4. La richiesta fu assegnata alla quarta Sezione della Corte. Il 6 ottobre 2006 il Presidente di questa Sezione decise di comunicare la richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, fu deciso di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1938 e vive a Chisinau.
6. I fatti della causa, come presentati dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.
7. Nel 1985 il richiedente pubblicò la fotografia 'Castello di Soroca ' nell'album Poliptic Moldav. Lui ricevette i diritti di autore per quella fotografia.
8. Nel 1996 il Governo adottato una decisione riguardo a carte d’identità nazionali usando, inter alia, la fotografia presa dal richiedente come sfondo per le carte d’ identità emesse dal Ministero degli Affari Interni della Moldavia (“il Ministero”). Il richiedente non fu consultato e non accettò tale uso della fotografia.
9. Nel 1998 lui richiese al Ministero di compensarlo per la violazione dei suoi diritti causata dall'uso illegale della fotografia che aveva scattato, così come concludere un contratto per l'uso futuro della fotografia.
10. Quando la sua richiesta fu respinta, il richiedente iniziò atti contro il Ministero il 10 novembre 1998. Il 24 marzo 1999 la Corte Regionale di Chisinau concedette parzialmente le sue richieste e trovò che lui era stato l'autore della fotografia che era stata usata senza il suo accordo. La corte gli assegnò 4,050 lei moldavi (MDL), equivalente a 568 dollari degli Stati Uniti (USD). La corte obbligò anche il Ministero a pubblicare una scusa ma respinse la richiesta del richiedente per far sì che il Ministero orinasse di concludere un contratto con lui per l'uso futuro della fotografia.
11. Il richiedente fece appello. Lui presentò, inter alia che la ragione per la quale non aveva già chiesto il ritiro delle carte d’ identità emesse in violazione dei suoi diritti e per le nuove carte d’identità che usavano la fotografia da lui scattata di non essere emesse in futuro era che il Ministero sarebbe incorso irragionevolmente in costi alti per ed avrebbe provocato problemi non necessari peri possessori delle carte d’ identità. Lui aveva richiesto perciò la conclusione di un contratto col Ministero.
12. Il 16 settembre 1999 la Corte d'appello annullò la sentenza della corte più bassa e respinto le richieste del richiedente.
13. Il 22 dicembre 1999 la Corte di giustizia Suprema annullò la sentenza della Corte d'appello e sostenne la sentenza della Corte Regionale di Chisinau riguardo all'assegnazione al richiedente, mentre respinse la sua richiesta affinché venisse pubblicata una scusa. La corte ordinò anche un riesame della causa riguardo alla conclusione di un contratto col richiedente per l'uso futuro della fotografia poiché, secondo lui, aveva tale diritto.
14. Dal 1 maggio 2000 il Ministero smise di usare la fotografia presa dal richiedente come un sfondo per le carte d’ identità.
15. In una nuova serie di procedimenti il richiedente richiese il risarcimento per la perdita finanziaria causata dall'uso illegale e continuato della sua fotografia fra la data della sentenza, il 24 marzo 1999, e il 1 maggio 2000. Poiché più di 260,000 carte d’ identità erano state emesse durante il periodo attinente, rivendicò il 10% dell'importo pagato dai proprietari delle carte d’identità allo Stato (MDL 2,403,137). Richiese anche il risarcimento per violazione dei suoi diritti morali (MDL 200,000).
16. Il 6 novembre 2001 la Corte Regionale di Chiºinãu assegnò MDL 180,000 al richiedente per risarcimento del danno materiale e MDL 3,600 per danno morale, mentre respinse la sua richiesta per obbligare il Ministero a concludere un contratto con lui.
17. Il 26 marzo 2002 la Corte d'appello annullò questa sentenza e respinse le richieste del richiedente. La corte trovò che, siccome il diritto d’autore del richiedente riguardo alla fotografia attinente era chiaramente stato stabilito, era stato compensato con la sentenza del 24 marzo 1999. Poiché la corte non aveva proibito l'uso della fotografia in futuro e poiché il richiedente stesso non aveva richiesto tale proibizione, le carte d’identità già emesse o qualsiasi carta emessa nel futuro non erano più coperte dai diritti d’autore e Diritti Relativi (“Atto del 1994”) (no.293-XII) (vedere paragrafo 19 sotto). Di conseguenza, il richiedente non poteva addurre una violazione dei suoi diritti.
18. Il 16 ottobre 2002 la Corte di giustizia Suprema essenzialmente ripeté le ragioni date nella sentenza della Corte d'appello e respinse un appello da parte del richiedente su questioni di diritto. Mentre confermò i diritti di proprietà intellettuali del richiedente riguardo la fotografia che aveva scattato, aggiunse che una carta d’ identità era un documento ufficiale che non poteva essere soggetto a diritti d'autore.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
19. Le disposizioni attinenti dei Diritti d’autore e i Diritti Relativi (n. 293-XI) del 23 novembre si leggono come segue:
“Sezione 4
(4) i diritti d’autore non dipendono dal diritto di proprietà sull'oggetto materiale nel quale è inglobato il lavoro protetto attinente. L’acquisto dell'oggetto non implica il trasferimento all'acquirente di alcun diritto d’autore stabilito nell'Atto presente.
Sezione 6
(1) i diritti dell'autore coprono lavori protetti letterari, artistici e scientifici nella forma di:
...
i)... lavori fotografici...;
Sezione 7
(1) ciò che segue non sarà oggetto di diritti d'autore:
(a) documenti ufficiali...
Sezione 9
...
(2) i diritti personali (morale) dell'autore non possono essere assegnati e continuano ad essere protetti se il diritto d'autore viene assegnato.
Sezione 19
L'uso del lavoro protetto dell'autore da parte di una terza persona... è permesso sulla base di un contratto concluso con l'autore o con il suo o i suoi successori, a parte i casi menzionati nelle sezioni 20-23.
Sezione 24
(1) il diritto d'autore... può essere trasferito dagli autori o dagli altri proprietari dei diritti d’autore tramiti contratti di diritti d’autori.
Sezione 25
(1) l'uso di... lavori artistici in violazione del diritto d'autore dei loro autori sono illegali.
Sezione 38
(1) il proprietario del diritto d'autore può richiedere dalla persona che ha infranto questo diritto:
(a) il riconoscimento di questo diritto;
(b) il ristabilimento della situazione pertinente prima della violazione del diritto e la cessazione delle azioni che infrangono i diritti dell'autore o che possono condurre a tale violazione;
(c) il risarcimento per perdite o reddito perduto;
(d) trasferimento dei redditi ottenuti per l'uso illegale del lavoro protetto, al posto del risarcimento per le perdite o reddito perduto;
(e) il risarcimento compreso fra 10,000 e 20,000 volte il salario minimo al posto del risarcimento per perdite o il trasferimento dei redditi ottenuto dall'uso illegale del lavoro protetto;
(2) le sanzioni economiche menzionate sotto il paragrafo (1) (c)-(e) sopra vengono applicate in conformità alla scelta del possessore del diritto d'autore.”
20. Le disposizioni attinenti all’Atto dei Procedimenti Amministrativi (n. 793) del 2000 del 10 febbraio si legge come segue:
“Sezione 4
Ciò che segue non può essere impugnato di fronte a corti amministrative:
...
(c) le leggi, Decreti Presidenziali con un carattere normativo, ordini Statali e decisioni con un carattere normativo,...”
LA LEGGE
21. Il richiedente si lamentò di una violazione del suo diritto ad una prova all'interno di un termine ragionevole, come garantito dall’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
L’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, nella parte attinente, prevede:
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... all'interno di un termine ragionevole...”
22. I richiedenti si lamentarono anche di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione come un risultato della mancata assegnazione di risarcimento conseguente alla violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà intellettuali.
L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione si legge come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
I. AMMISSIBILITÀ
23. Nella sua richiesta iniziale il richiedente si lamentò della lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti nella sua causa, contrari All’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Nelle sue osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e meriti della causa lui chiese comunque, alla Corte di non procedere con l'esame di questa lagnanza. La Corte non trova nessuna ragione per esaminarla.
24. La Corte considera che la lagnanza del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione pone questioni di fatto e diritto che sono sufficientemente seri la cui determinazione dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei suoi meriti. Nessuno motivo per dichiararla inammissibile è stato stabilito. La Corte dichiara perciò la lagnanza ammissibile. In conformità con la sua decisione di applicare l’Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 4 sopra), la Corte considererà immediatamente i meriti della lagnanza.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’I ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
A. Argomenti delle parti
1. Il Governo
25. Il Governo presentò che nell'esaminare la causa del richiedente i tribunali nazionali avevano applicato la legge sbagliata. L'Atto del 1994 (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra) non era applicabile, poiché il lavoro protetto da diritti d’autore del richiedente era stato creato nel 1985, prima della promulgazione dell'Atto del 1994. Inoltre, l'Atto del 1994 non aveva disposizioni riguardo a diritti su lavori creati prima della sua entrata in vigore. Di conseguenza, i tribunali avrebbero dovuto applicare il vecchio Codice civile, in vigore fra il 1964 ed il 2003. Il Governo avanzò argomenti in merito a quale sarebbe stata la posizione giuridica del richiedente se fosse stato applicato il vecchio Codice civile.
26. Il Governo si riferì anche alla mancanza del richiedente di richiedere ai tribunali nel 1999 di proibire l'ulteriore uso della sua fotografia da parte del Ministero ciò che poteva fare sotto la sezione 38 (1) (b) dell'Atto del 1994 (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra). Considerò che, di conseguenza, nessuna interferenza coi diritti del richiedente aveva avuto luogo quando i tribunali respinsero le sue richieste per il risarcimento e quando la Corte d'appello trovò che l'uso passato o futuro della sua fotografia per l’emissione delle carte d’identità non ricadeva sotto la protezione dell'Atto del 1994 . Inoltre, poiché le carte d’identità erano documenti ufficiali, nessuno diritto di proprietà intellettuale avrebbe potuto essere esercitato su di esse, come trovato dai tribunali nazionali (vedere anche sezione 7 dell'Atto del 1994, paragrafo 19 sopra). Il risarcimento che il richiedente aveva ricevuto nel 1999 costituiva piena riparazione per qualsiasi danno causato a lui come un risultato dell'uso non autorizzato del suo lavoro protetto da diritti d’autore.
27. Il Governo infine dibatté che il richiedente non aveva avuto “le proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, ma solo rivendicazioni, che erano state respinte dai tribunali nazionali e che non potevano essere perciò materia di interferenza. Se non fosse altrimenti qualsiasi persona che deposita una richiesta di fronte ai tribunali nazionali potrebbe invocare automaticamente un'interferenza con il suo o i suoi diritti di Convenzione.
2. Il richiedente
28. Il richiedente presentò che lui aveva avuto una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, poiché i diritti di proprietà intellettuale, secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte erano inclusi nella nozione sopra. Considerò anche che un'interferenza con questo diritto aveva avuto luogo alla luce dell'uso non autorizzato del suo lavoro protetto da diritti d’autore. Lui dedusse certi vantaggi finanziari dall'uso del suo lavoro, incluso quando aveva ricevuto il suo onorario quando la fotografia fu pubblicata nel 1985 (vedere paragrafo 7 sopra) e quando gli era stato assegnato il risarcimento nel 1999 (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra).
29. Il richiedente considerò anche che lui aveva un'aspettazione legittima di ottenere il risarcimento per qualsiasi violazione dei suoi diritti di proprietà intellettuali, poiché la legge chiaramente prevedeva tale diritto. Le sentenze dei tribunali nazionali non crearono perciò alcun diritto di proprietà che esisteva in virtù della legge ma avevano solo la funzione di determinare l'importo esatto del risarcimento. Il rifiuto di assegnare qualsiasi risarcimento aveva costituito perciò un'interferenza col suo diritto di proprietà. Inoltre, i tribunali gli avevano assegnato un risarcimento nel 1999 in condizioni identiche. Questo confermava, nella prospettiva del richiedente, il suo diritto ad ottenere simile risarcimento nel caso di qualsiasi violazione futura dei suoi diritti.
30. Il richiedente considerò anche che la Corte d'appello aveva interferito col suo diritto di proprietà quando dichiarò che , nella sua sentenza del 24 marzo 1999 in seguito al risarcimento assegnato al richiedente per l'uso non autorizzato della fotografia da lui scattata ed a causa della sua mancanza di richiedere una proibizione sul suo futuro uso non autorizzato quel lavoro non era più protetto dall’ l'Atto del 1994. Lui considerò che questa limitazione non fosse stata offerta dalla legge, poiché la sezione 38 dell'Atto del 1994 prevedeva il diritto di chiedere il risarcimento per violazioni passate e non faceva riferimento alle violazioni future. Inoltre, il richiedente dibatté che non poteva chiedere la proibizione dell’ulteriore uso del suo lavoro protetto poiché la decisione di usare la fotografia da lui scattata era stata adottata dal Governo. Secondo la legislazione vigente (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra), un individuo non poteva impugnare una decisione Statale in tribunale a meno che la decisione si riferisse specificamente a lui. La decisione che includeva l'uso del suo lavoro protetto era stata adottata riguardo a documenti d’identità nazionali in generale e così non aveva si era specificamente riferita al richiedente. E nemmeno gli individui in Moldavia avevano il diritto di chiedere alla Corte Costituzionale di passare in rassegna la legalità di una decisione Statale. Il richiedente infine considerò che lui era stato sottoposto ad un carico eccessivo individuale come risultato delle sentenze dei tribunali.
B. la valutazione di La Corte
1. Principi Generali
31. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione non garantisce il diritto di acquisire proprietà (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004-IX, ed il der i Van Mussele c. Belgio, sentenza del 23 novembre 1983 la Serie A n. 70, p. 23, § 48). Inoltre, “un richiedente può addurre una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 solamente dal momento che le decisioni contestate si riferivano alla“proprietà” all'interno del significato di questa disposizione. “La proprietà” può essere una “proprietà esistente” o dei beni, incluse le rivendicazioni in rispetto dei quali il richiedente può dibattere che lui abbia almeno un “aspettativa legittima” di ottenere un effettivo godimento di un diritto di proprietà. Per contrasto, la speranza di un riconoscimento di un diritto di proprietà che è stato impossibile esercitare non può essere efficacemente considerata, una “ proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’i Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, e nemmeno può esserlo una rivendicazione condizionale che risulta dal non-adempimento della condizione” (vedere Kopecký, citata sopra, § 35; il Principe Hans-Adamo II del Liechtenstein c. Germania [GC], n. 42527/98, §§ 82-83 ECHR 2001-VIII; e Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. Repubblica ceca ( dec.) [GC], n. 39794/98, § 69 ECHR 2002-VII).
32. Il concetto della“ proprietà” enunciato nella prima parte dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato alla proprietà di beni fisici ed è indipendente dalla classificazione formale in diritto nazionale: anche certi altri diritti ed interessi che costituiscono dei beni possono essere considerati come “diritti di proprietà”, e così come “ proprietà” ai fini di questa disposizione. Il problema che bisogna esaminare in ogni causa è se le circostanze della causa, considerate nell'insieme, conferiscono a titolo del richiedente un interesse effettivo protetto dall’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Iatridis c. Grecia, [GC], n. 31107/96; Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 100 ECHR 2000-io; Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 129 il 2004-V di ECHR; ed Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 63 ECHR 2007 -...).
33. Nelle certe circostanze, anche una “legittima aspettativa” di ottenere un “bene” può godere la protezione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Così, dove un interesse di proprietà riservata è nella natura di una rivendicazione, la persona a cui viene legittimamente assegnata tale rivendicazione a può essere riguardato come possessore di una “legittima aspettativa” se c'è una base sufficiente per l'interesse nella legge nazionale, per esempio laddove viene stabilito dalla giurisprudenza dei tribunali nazionali che confermano la sua esistenza (vedere Kopecký, citata sopra, § 52). Comunque, si può dire che nessuna aspettativa legittima risulti, dove c'è una disputa in merito all'interpretazione corretta e l’applicazione del diritto nazionale e le osservazioni del richiedente vengono successivamente respinte dai tribunalinazionali (vedere Kopecký, citata sopra, § 50).
2. L’applicazione di questi principi alla causa presente
(a) Se il richiedente aveva “le proprietà”
34. La Corte reitera che l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile alla proprietà intellettuale (vedere Anheuser-Busch Inc., citata sopra, § 72). Nella presente causa, la Corte nota che i diritti del richiedente riguardo alla fotografia da lui scattata erano confermati dai tribunali nazionali (vedere in paragrafi 10, 17 e 18 sopra). Perciò, diversamente dalla sentenza sopra-citata di Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo, non c'era disputa nella presente causa in merito a se il richiedente potesse chiedere protezione dei suoi diritti di proprietà intellettuale. In questo contesto, la Corte prende nota dell'osservazione del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 29 sopra) nella quale chiese alle corti di proteggere il suo diritto già stabilito sul lavoro protetto assegnandogli un risarcimento, e non di stabilire il suo “diritto di proprietà” in base a simile risarcimento. Aveva, nell'opinione della Corte, un diritto riconosciuto dalla legge e da una sentenza definitiva precedente (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra), e non soltanto una legittima aspettativa di ottenere un diritto di proprietà.
35. La Corte nota che la Corte di giustizia Suprema decise, il 16 ottobre 2002, che le carte d’identità erano documenti ufficiali all'interno del significato della sezione 7 dell'Atto del 1994 e non potevano essere soggette ai diritti di proprietà intellettuali del richiedente (vedere paragrafi 16, 18 e 19 sopra). La corte si riferì ,comunque, solo alle carte d’identità e non alla fotografia scattata dal richiedente, a riguardo della quale non c'era disputa. La Sezione 4 dell'Atto del 1994 distingue espressamente inoltre, fra i diritti dell'autore riguardo dei lavori creati da lui ed il diritto di proprietà sull'oggetto materiale nel quale la creazione viene inglobata (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra). Segue che la sentenza della Corte di giustizia Suprema secondo la quale le carte d’identità non potessero essere soggette a diritti d'autore non portava conseguenze sui diritti del richiedente riguardo a fotografia che aveva scattato. Questa costatazione è confermata dal fatto che i tribunali nazionali fondarono, nella prima serie di procedimenti che i diritti del richiedente erano stati infranti. Le corti gli assegnarono risarcimento nonostante l'uso da parte del Ministero della fotografia in modo identico sia prima e che dopo il 1999, cioè come sfondo per carte d’identità.
36. In prospettiva del sopra, la Corte conclude, che il richiedente aveva un “la proprietà” all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(b) Se c'è stata interferenza
37. La Corte nota anche la posizione del Governo secondo la quale le corti nazionali si erano appellate alla legislazione che non era applicabile alla causa del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra). Comunque, la Corte reitera che non è suo compito sostituirsi alle autorità nazionali che hanno deliberato sulla causa del richiedente. Spetta a loro primariamente esaminare tutti i fatti della causa ed esporre le loro ragioni nelle loro decisioni. Nella presente causa, la Corte non vede alcuna ragione per mettere in dubbio l’applicazione da parte dei tribunali nazionali di una legge specificamente adottata per regolare le questioni di diritti di proprietà intellettuale e che entrò in vigore prima della violazione addotta dei diritti del richiedente.
Di conseguenza, le nuove ragioni del Governo che furono sollevate nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte per la prima volta sono irrilevanti (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Sarban c. Moldavia, n. 3456/05, § 102 4 ottobre 2005). La Corte esaminerà perciò la causa sulla base della legge come applicata dai tribunali nazionali.
38. Per quanto riguarda il fatto che la sentenza della Corte di giustizia Suprema debba essere interpretata nel senso che, a causa dell'inosservanza del richiedente di chiedere ai tribunali una proibizione sull'uso non autorizzato del suo lavoro protetto, simile uso dopo che la sentenza del 1999 non interferì con le sue proprietà ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte non è capace di accettare questa prospettiva. La Corte nota che la sezione 25 (1) dell’Atto del 1994 enuncia in termini inequivocabili che “l'uso di... lavori artistici in violazione del diritto d'autore dei loro autori sono illegali.” Il carattere illegale dell’ uso non autorizzato non è condizionato giuridicamente da nessun particolare atto del proprietario dei diritti riservati, come una richiesta per un'ingiunzione del tribunale contro simile uso. La costatazione di una violazione dei diritti del richiedente nella sentenza del 1999 conferma questo.
39. Inoltre, non si può dire , come dibattuto dal Governo, che il richiedente accettò tacitamente l'uso del suo lavoro protetto senza rimunerazione. Depositando una nuova azione del tribunale chiaramente espresse la sua opinione in merito al contrario, cioè che simile uso era in violazione dei suoi diritti. Inoltre, il fatto che lui richiese costantemente la protezione del suo diritto chiedendo al Ministero di concludere un contratto con lui e di pagargli i diritti di autore o il risarcimento (vedere paragrafi 10 e 15 sopra) è prova del fatto che lui si era continuamente opposto all’uso non autorizzato del suo lavoro protetto. Segue che la mancanza del richiedente di richiedere la proibizione dell'uso non autorizzato del suo lavoro da parte del Ministero non avrebbe potuto e rendere legale simile uso siccome l’uso non autorizzato fu proibito espressamente dalla legge e il richiedente si oppose a questo.
40. Alla luce di ciò che vi è sopra, la Corte costata che c'è stata interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
(c) Se l'interferenza era “legale”
41. La Corte nota inoltre che l'Atto del 1994 non prevede la conclusione dei diritti di un autore in virtù della sua mancanza di chiedere alle corti di proibire l'uso del suo lavoro protetto. I soli mezzi per estinguere il diritto dell'autore è un contratto con l'autore o suo o i suoi successori (vedere sezioni 19 e 24 dell'Atto del 1994, citati nel paragrafo 19 sopra), mentre i “diritti morali” dell'autore non possono mai essere trasmessi ad una terza persona (vedere sezione 9 dell'Atto del 1994, citato nel paragrafo 19 sopra). Inoltre, spetta all'autore di un lavoro protetto di decidere quale delle sanzioni penali previste dalla legge vuole applicare in caso di una violazione di uno suo o dei suoi diritti sotto l'Atto del 1994 (vedere la sezione 38 dell'Atto del 1994, citata nel paragrafo 19 sopra).
42. La Corte nota che né i tribunali nazionali né il Governo, fece riferimento ad una qualsiasi specifica disposizione nell'Atto del 1994 che espressamente prevedesse la conclusione dei diritti di un autore riguardo la sua creazione in virtù della sua mancanza di proibire il suo uso non autorizzato. La Sezione 38 dell'Atto del 1994, citata sopra, si riferisce al diritto di chiedere la proibizione dell'uso illegale ma non lega qualsiasi conseguenza negative relativa ad una mancanza di fare così.
43. La Corte nota anche le discrepanze nel modo in cui le autorità nazionali interpretarono l'Atto del 1994 nei primi procedimenti (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra) ed i secondi procedimenti (vedere paragrafi 17 e 18 sopra), anche se decidevano essenzialmente in merito alla stessa situazione giuridica. Inoltre, il Governo considerò che l'Atto del 1994 non si applicava affatto nella causa del richiedente, contrariamente alla posizione dei tribunali nazionali. Questo suggerisce che l'Atto del 1994 non era stato sufficientemente prevedibile nella sua applicazione ed è probabile che questo sia di per sé una base sufficiente per la conclusione che l'interferenza non era “legale.” La Corte non considera infine comunque, necessario decidere su questa questione, avendo riguardo ad alle sue conclusioni esposte sotto.
(d) Il fine e la legalità dell'interferenza
44. Presumendo anche che l'Atto del 1994 fosse sufficientemente prevedibile nella sua applicazione, la Corte deve determinare se l'interferenza coi diritti del richiedente era proporzionata agli scopi perseguiti. La Corte nota l'argomento del richiedente secondo il quale non poteva impedire la violazione dei suoi diritti poiché lui non aveva sostenendo per impugnare in tribunale la decisione dello Stato che aveva abilitato l'uso illegale del suo lavoro protetto (vedere paragrafi 8, 20 e 30 sopra). Il Governo non fece commenti su questo. La Corte considera che non deve prendere una posizione definitiva su questo problema in prospettiva delle sue sentenze sotto.
45. La Corte accetta che l’ emissione di carte d’identità per la popolazione persegua un interesse pubblico indubbiamente importante. Comunque, è evidente che questo scopo socialmente importante avrebbe potuto essere raggiunto in una varietà di modi senza comportare una violazione dei diritti del richiedente. Per esempio, avrebbe potuto essere usata un'altra fotografia, o avrebbe potuto essere concluso un contratto col richiedente. La Corte è a conoscenza di nessuna ragione convincente per l'uso della particolare fotografia scattata dal richiedente o di qualsiasi impedimento all'uso di altri materiali per lo stesso scopo. In realtà, la fotografia scattata dal richiedente non fu più usata, come sfondo nelle carte d’ identità dopo il 1 maggio 2000 il che conferma che si sarebbe potuto perseguire l'interesse pubblico senza violare i diritti del richiedente.
46. Segue che i tribunali nazionali non riuscirono a prevedere un giusto equilibrio fra gli interessi della comunità e quelli del richiedente, mettendo su questo un carico individuale eccessivo. Là, di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
47. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconosce una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
48. Il richiedente chiese 20,267 euro (EUR) per danno materiale ed EUR 5,000 per danno morale. Lui si appellò al risarcimento di danni reso dalla Corte Regionale di Chisinau del 6 novembre 2001 (vedere paragrafo 16 sopra) ed il periodo (tre anni) durante il quale lui non era stato in grado usare quell'importo. Si riferì anche alla frustrazione causatagli dal l'uso del suo lavoro senza autorizzazione ed il rifiuto di compensarlo. Avendo visto la fotografia che lui aveva scattato usata ampiamente nei documenti emessi dal Governo, si aspettò il giusto risarcimento e fu deluso amaramente quando questo fu rifiutato.
49. Il Governo presentò che l'assegnazione resa il 6 novembre 2001 era irrilevante, poiché questa sentenza era stata annullata ed il richiedente non aveva avuto nessuna aspettativa di ottenere quell'importo. Inoltre, la sentenza del 24 marzo 1999 che era stato sostenuta a riguardo dell'assegnazione in favore del richiedente (vedere paragrafi 10 e 13 sopra), aveva costituito pieno risarcimento per qualsiasi danno causato al richiedente. Dibatté che nessun danno era stato causato al richiedente che non presentò qualsiasi prova del fatto che aveva tratto un qualsiasi profitto o avesse altrimenti beneficiato dalla sua paternità della fotografia da lui scattata.
50. La Corte considera che al richiedente si è provocato un danno come risultato della violazione dei suoi diritti riguardo alla fotografia che aveva scattato ed del rifiuto delle corti nazionali di assegnare il risarcimento per questa violazione, tanto più che vide che la fotografia era stata riprodotta su una grande scala (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra), nonostante la consapevolezza delle autorità del carattere illegale di simile uso. Inoltre, la Corte costata che l'assegnazione a favore del richiedente resa nel 1999 (vedere n paragrafi 10 e 13 sopra) lo compensò solamente per la violazione dei suoi diritti prima dell'inizio dei procedimenti del 1999 e non per l'uso susseguente della fotografia da lui scattata.
51. Alla luce di quello detto sopra e decidendo su una base equa, la Corte assegna EUR 5,000 al richiedente per danno materiale e morale.
B. Costi e spese
52. Il richiedente chiese EUR 2,872 per costi e spese di cui EUR 2,812 per rappresentanza giuridica di fronte alla Corte. L'avvocato del richiedente presentò un contratto col richiedente ed un foglio degli orari particolareggiato secondo il quale lui aveva speso 37.5 ore. Siccome la sua tariffa oraria era di EUR 75, l'avvocato dibatté, che era all'interno dei limiti dei tassi orari raccomandati dall’ Associazione dei Tribunali Moldavi che era di EUR 40-150.
53. Il Governo non fu d'accordo con l'importo chiesto per la rappresentanza. Lo considera eccessivo e dibatté che l'importo chiesto dall'avvocato non era davvero l'importo pagato a lui dal richiedente. Contestò il numero di ore lavorate dall'avvocato del richiedente ed la tariffa oraria che lui ha addebitato. Dibatté anche che le tariffe raccomandate dall’ Associazione dei Tribunali Moldavi erano troppo alte rispetto al salario mensile medio in Moldavia e si riferì alla natura senza scopo di lucro dell’ organizzazione Avvocati per Diritti umani.
54. Nella presente causa, avendo riguardo alla lista particolareggiata degli elementi presentati e la complessità della causa, la Corte assegna EUR 2,000 al richiedente per costi e spese.
C. Interesse moratorio
55. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse moratorio dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE ALL’UNANIMITA’
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare al richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità con l’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione gli importi seguenti da convertire nella valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data dell’ accordo:
(i) EUR 5,000 (cinque mila euro) riguardo al danno materiale e morale;
(ii) EUR 2,000 (due mila euro) riguardo a costi e spese;
(iii) qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile sugli importi sopra;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo l’ interesse semplice sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
4. Respinge il resto della richiesta del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificò per iscritto il 29 gennaio 2008, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.