Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF DACIA S.R.L. v. MOLDOVA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 29, P1-1

NUMERO: 3052/04/2008
STATO: Moldova
DATA: 18/03/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Just satisfaction reserved
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF DACIA S.R.L. v. MOLDOVA
(Application no. 3052/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
18 March 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of Dacia S.R.L. v. Moldova,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Stanislav Pavlovschi,
Ljiljana Mijovic,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 26 February 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 3052/04) against the Republic of Moldova lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by the “D.” hotel (“the applicant company”), a company registered in Chisinau, on 6 January 2004.
2. The applicant company was represented by Mr V. N., from “Lawyers for Human Rights”, a non-governmental organization based in Chisinau. The Moldovan Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent at the time, Mr V. Pârlog.
3. The applicant company alleged, in particular, that the annulment of the privatization of its hotel had violated its rights as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. It also complained about the unfairness of the proceedings, contrary to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
4. The application was allocated to the Fourth Section of the Court. On 11 April 2006 a Chamber of that Section decided to communicate the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
1. The privatisation of the hotel
6. In 1997 the Government of Moldova submitted to Parliament a bill “On the Privatisation Programme for 1997-1998”. Parliament adopted the Act in 1997. The annex to the Act listed the State property to be privatized, which included the four-star “D.” hotel. The Act established that the Department for the Privatization of State Property (“the Department”) would organize the privatization of the property listed in the annex.
7. The Department created an Auction Commission. In December 1998 the Auction Commission published an advertisement for privatization of the hotel and set a reserve price of 20 million Moldovan lei (MDL) (2,006,782 United American Dollars (EUR)). In order to be allowed to participate in the auction, each participant was required to deposit MDL 1 million in the Department’s account.
8. The applicant company’s predecessor, “S.-M.” (“S.”), participated in the auction and on 23 January 1999 was announced as the winner, having offered MDL 20,150,000. In order to be able to pay that amount, S. concluded a contract with an Austrian company, “K. O. Corp.”, for a loan of USD 2.2 million. According to the terms of the contract, S. was to repay the loan within one year and to pay 15% interest during that time. Failure to repay the loan would result in a penalty of 0.2% of the outstanding debt for each day of delay (subject to any eventual prolongation of the period of repayment), while a failure to pay the interest would result in a penalty of 0.1% of the outstanding debt for each day of delay.
9. At S.’s request, on 29 January 1999 the Auction Commission decided to extend the period for the payment of the auction price until 17 February 1999.
10. On 8 February 1999 S. obtained a certificate from the National Bank of Moldova confirming the credit agreement with “K. O. Corp.”. It transferred MDL 20,150,000 to the State budget within the new deadline established by the Auction Commission. On 18 February 1999 it concluded a contract with the Department for the purchase of the hotel.
11. In June 1999 S. was re-registered as “D. S.R.L.” (the applicant company). On 13 September 1999 the applicant company purchased from the Chisinau municipality the 0.21 hectares of land on which the hotel was situated, for MDL 50,840 (EUR 4,395).
12. According to the applicant company, in the years following the purchase of the hotel large sums of money were spent on its renovation and the purchase of new furnishings and equipment.
13. In 2000 the Prosecutor General’s Office initiated a criminal investigation into the alleged unlawfulness of the hotel’s privatisation. It established that no criminal act had been committed and closed the investigation on 30 August 2000.
14. On 31 January 2003 “K. O. Corp.” assigned its credit rights in respect of the loan to the applicant company to the Belgian company “V.NV” (V.). On 18 February 2003 the applicant company pledged the hotel and the land as a guarantee for the loan from V. In view of the applicant company’s failure to repay the loan, V. claimed in court the right to become the hotel’s owner.
15. On 23 June 2003 the Regional Economic Court in Chisinau accepted that claim and ordered the transfer of the hotel to V. The State Chancellery requested the annulment of that order. On 25 July 2003 the Chisinau Regional Economic Court annulled the order of 23 June 2003 in light of the judgments of the Economic Court of 6 June 2003 and the Supreme Court of Justice of 24 July 2003 (in the annulment proceedings described below).
2. Proceedings for the annulment of the privatisation
16. On 11 January 2003 the Prosecutor General’s Office initiated court proceedings in the interest of the State (namely, the State Chancellery, a subdivision of the Government which was the former administrator of the hotel) against S. and the Department, seeking the annulment of the hotel’s privatisation and repayment to the applicant company of the price paid.
17. On an unspecified date the Prosecutor General requested the court to designate the applicant company as respondent in the case, since the respondent it had previously designated in its claim (S.) had ceased to exist. On 31 March 2003 the Economic Court of Moldova accepted that request and ordered that the applicant company be summoned to its next hearing.
18. The Prosecutor General did not pay any court fees to initiate those proceedings, by virtue of an exemption provided for by law for court actions initiated by him in the interests of the State. In respect of the limitation period, he referred to Article 86 of the Civil Code (see paragraph 40 below).
19. On 6 June 2003 the Economic Court of Moldova accepted the Prosecutor General’s request and annulled the Auction Commission’s decision of 23 January 1999 and the contract of 18 February 1999 for the sale of the hotel. The applicant company was ordered to return the hotel to the State Chancellery and the Ministry of Finance was ordered to repay to the applicant company MDL 20,150,000 (EUR 1,219,055 at the time).
20. The reasons given by the Economic Court of Moldova for finding that the privatisation had been unlawful were: (a) the State Chancellery, as the former administrator of the hotel, had not given its agreement to the sale; (b) S. (the applicant company’s predecessor) had failed to pay the entire amount within seven days of winning the auction, as required by the auction regulation; and (c) the price paid was some MDL 5 million (EUR 511,996) lower than the hotel’s real value. The court found that the Auction Commission’s decision to extend the period during which S. could pay for the hotel had been taken ultra vires. However, the court did not annul the decision to extend the time-limit or the decision setting the reserve price at MDL 20 million, nor did any other authority. The court also noted that S. had been the only participant in the privatisation auction, but did not indicate whether this was contrary to any law.
The court ordered the Department to return to the applicant company the price paid for the hotel in 1999 (MDL 20,150,000).
21. The court finally ordered that each of the parties pay half of the court fees, that is, MDL 302,340 (EUR 18,291), finding that both the authorities and the applicant company had acted in bad faith because of the above-mentioned failure to follow the auction procedure correctly. In particular, the applicant company was accused of contributing to reducing the hotel’s privatisation price.
22. The applicant company appealed to the Supreme Court of Justice, arguing that it had been a good faith buyer and had complied with all the requirements set by the State authorities during the privatisation, and that the court action brought against it by the Prosecutor General’s Office was out of time since it had been lodged some four years after the relevant events.
23. On 8 July 2003 the Supreme Court of Justice noted that the applicant company had paid MDL 50,000 (EUR 3,114) in court fees out of the MDL 453,100 (EUR 28,227) required. The court requested payment of the full amount of fees. The applicant company asked for permission to pay in instalments over a three-month period, but was granted sixteen days. It submitted documents confirming its inability to pay and relied on the fact that all of its assets had been seized by the authorities. On 24 July 2003 the court refused to examine the appeal because of the failure to pay the entire amount of the court fees. That decision was final.
3. Proceedings regarding the plot of land on which the hotel is situated
24. The Prosecutor General initiated new proceedings “in the interests of the State” requesting the annulment of the contract concluded between the applicant company and the municipality for the purchase of the land on which the hotel was situated.
25. On 27 October 2003 the Appellate Chamber of the Economic Court of Moldova accepted that claim and annulled the contract for the purchase of the land because the land could not be separated from the hotel itself.
26. On 19 February 2004 the Supreme Court of Justice upheld that judgment.
4. Enforcement proceedings
27. On 25 July 2003 the Commission on Transferring the Assets of “D.” S.R.L. to the State began its activity in order to enforce the judgment of 6 June 2003. By 7 August 2003 the hotel was transferred to its new owner, the State Chancellery (see paragraph 19 above).
28. On 29 July 2003 the applicant company sent the warrant for the enforcement of the judgment of 6 June 2003 to the Decisions Enforcement Department. It continued to write to various authorities about the non-enforcement of the judgment.
29. The Department of Privatisation and Administration of State Property requested an interpretation of the text of the judgment of 6 June 2003. The applicant company also requested an interpretation and a re-evaluation of the amount it had been awarded by that judgment, in order to take account of the effects of inflation on the value of the award.
30. On 8 October 2003 the Appellate Chamber of the Economic Court gave an explanatory decision in which it identified the Ministry of Finance as responsible for repaying the applicant company the price of the hotel. It also rejected the applicant company’s claim for re-evaluation of the award since the hotel had been bought in Moldovan lei and not in any foreign currency and the law did not provide for compensation for the effects of inflation in cases such as that under consideration. The court informed the applicant company of its right to lodge a separate claim for any investments made for the repair and furnishing of the hotel.
31. On 13 November 2003 the Supreme Court of Justice upheld that judgment. However, it annulled, as exceeding the powers of interpretation of judgments, the lower court’s explanation that part of the judgment of 6 June 2003 could be enforced even if the applicant company had not been repaid any of the hotel’s price. The hotel remained in the possession of the State.
32. On 3 December 2003, in view of the apparent lack of resources in the State budget which was preventing enforcement of the judgment in its favour, the applicant company requested that the Decisions Enforcement Department enforce the judgment by selling the “D.” hotel and the underlying land.
33. On 4 February 2004 the warrant for the enforcement of the interpretative judgment of 8 October 2003 was sent to the Ministry of Finance.
34. The judgment of 6 June 2003 was fully enforced in instalments in the period between 13 April and 27 October 2004.
5. Proceedings for the recovery of damages caused to the applicant company
35. The applicant company initiated court proceedings against the Government (including the Ministry of Privatisation and the Ministry of Finance) claiming compensation for damage caused to it as a good faith buyer of the hotel. The damages sought MDL 16,157,774 (equivalent to EUR 979,259) included the value of repairs and new equipment, the penalties for the delay in repaying the loan to V., sums of money taken from the hotel when it was transferred to the State and interest for the use of MDL 20,150,000 over four years, as well as compensation for the effects of inflation on that amount. The above amount included a deduction of amounts corresponding to the applicant company’s profits from the hotel during the relevant period. It submitted that the State had committed the errors referred to in the judgment of 6 June 2003 and that the State should therefore bear the consequences of those mistakes.
36. On 10 March 2005 the Appellate Chamber of the Economic Court of Moldova rejected these claims. The court found that the applicant company could not claim to have been a good faith buyer, since it had failed to pay for the hotel within seven days as prescribed by the auction regulations. The court also found that the judgment of 6 June 2003 had established the applicant company’s complicity in “contributing to reducing the hotel’s price” (without giving any details), thus excluding the applicant company’s good faith as a basis for claiming compensation, and that this also applied in respect of the claim for interest on its money in the State’s possession.
37. The court rejected the argument that the State had obtained unjust enrichment since there was a legal basis for the increase in its assets – the contract with the applicant company for the purchase of the hotel. The argument that the State had offered for sale an object affected by hidden legal impediments was also rejected as unfounded, despite the authorities’ failure to observe certain rules during the privatisation of the hotel (such as obtaining the State Chancellery’s agreement). Since the applicant company had known from the hotel’s by-laws that the Chancellery was its founder and since the latter had not given its approval for the privatisation, the applicant company could not claim that it had not known of the legal impediment at issue.
38. The applicant company appealed but was unable to pay the court fees MDL 242,349 (approximately EUR 14,600). It requested a court fee waiver until after the judgment, in view of the fact that it had transferred to its creditor all the money received from the Ministry of Finance after the judgment of 6 June 2003 and that it had no alternative sources of income, as confirmed by relevant bank statements.
39. On 4 May 2005 the Supreme Court of Justice dismissed the applicant company’s request for a court fee waiver. It informed the applicant company that the appeal could not be examined on account of the failure to pay the court fees. The new time-limit for paying the court fees was 25 May 2005; the applicant company did not meet this deadline.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
40. The relevant provisions of the Civil Code, in force at the relevant time, provide:
“Article 74
The general limitation period for protection through a court action of the rights of a [natural] person is three years; it is one year for lawsuits between State organisations, collective farms and any other social organisations.
Article 78
The competent court ... shall apply the limitation period whether or not the parties request such application.
Article 83
Expiry of the limitation period prior to the initiation of the court proceedings constitutes a ground for rejecting the claim.
If the competent court ... finds that the action was not commenced within the limitation period for well-founded reasons, the right in question shall be protected.
Article 86
The limitation period does not apply:
...
(2) to claims by State organisations regarding the restitution of State property found in the unlawful possession of ... other organisations ... and of citizens;”.
THE LAW
41. The applicant company complained about the unfairness of the proceedings and the limitation of its access to a court, contrary to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which, in so far as relevant, provides:
“1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a fair hearing ... by a tribunal ....”
42. The applicant company also complained that its rights as guaranteed under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention had been violated as a result of the annulment of the privatisation of its hotel.
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
I. ADMISSIBILITY
43. The Court notes that, in its initial application, the applicant company referred to the belated enforcement of the judgment of 6 June 2003. However, in its observations on admissibility and merits it asked the Court not to proceed with the examination of this aspect of the complaint under Article 6 of the Convention. The Court finds no reason to examine it.
44. The Government submitted that, following the full enforcement of the judgment of 6 June 2003, the applicant company could no longer claim to be a victim of a violation of its Convention rights.
45. The applicant company disagreed and claimed that it had incurred substantial expenses in renovating and furnishing the hotel and that it had received no compensation for these expenses and other losses.
46. The Court notes that, following the enforcement of the judgment of 6 June 2003, the applicant company obtained the initial price paid for the hotel in Moldovan lei, but was not compensated for any of the additional expenses which it had incurred in the meantime. Indeed, the applicant company’s main complaint was not about a failure to enforce the judgment of 6 June 2003 within a reasonable time, but rather about losing its hotel and receiving insufficient compensation (see paragraphs 43 and 45 above).
47. In these circumstances, the Court considers that the applicant company has not lost its status as a victim of a violation of its Convention rights.
48. The Government also submitted that, in lodging its claims in 2005, the applicant company did not refer to the effects of inflation on the amount it had paid for the hotel. It therefore did not raise this specific complaint before the domestic courts and had, accordingly, failed to exhaust available domestic remedies in respect of this part of its claims. The applicant company disagreed.
49. The Court considers that this issue is more appropriately addressed under Article 41 of the Convention. In any event, it would observe that a domestic court examined this part of the applicant company’s claims in 2003 (see paragraph 30 above) and rejected it. That finding was upheld by the final judgment of the Supreme Court of Justice. It follows that the applicant company properly exhausted the domestic remedies at its disposal and this objection by the Government must be rejected.
50. The Court considers that the applicant company’s complaints under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention raise questions of law which are sufficiently serious that their determination should depend on an examination of the merits, and no other grounds for declaring them inadmissible have been established. The Court therefore declares these complaints admissible. In accordance with its decision to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention (see paragraph 4 above), the Court will immediately consider the merits of the complaints.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
A. Arguments of the parties
51. The applicant company complained about a violation of its right to property as a result of the annulment of the privatisation of its hotel without compelling reasons. It considered that it had been subjected to expropriation without proper compensation. The domestic courts had invoked purely formal reasons for the annulment of the privatisation and did not have any basis for declaring that the applicant company had acted in bad faith when it had fully complied with all the conditions established by the authorities.
52. The Government essentially argued that the non-enforcement of the judgment of 6 June 2003 was not an interference with the applicant company’s right.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Whether the applicant had a possession
53. It was undisputed between the parties that the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, based on the purchase contract (see paragraph 10 above). The Court subscribes to this view.
2. Whether there was interference
54. According to the Court’s case-law, “Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule” (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, judgment of 23 September 1982, Series A no. 52, § 61; James and Others v. the United Kingdom, judgment of 21 February 1986, Series A no. 98, § 37; and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 134, ECHR 2004-V.
55. The Court recalls that in determining whether there has been a deprivation of possessions within the second “rule”, it is necessary not only to consider whether there has been a formal taking or expropriation of property but to look behind the appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. Since the Convention is intended to guarantee rights that are “practical and effective”, it has to be ascertained whether the situation amounted to a de facto expropriation (see the Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, § 63, and Brumarescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 76, ECHR 1999-VII).
56. The Court observes that as a result of the various court judgments in the present case the applicant lost ownership of its hotel and the underlying land, as well as various related investments, and received in return only the initial price paid for the hotel. In those circumstances, there has been an interference with the applicant’s property rights, which must be considered deprivation of possessions to which, accordingly, the second rule of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention applies.
3. Whether the interference was justified
57. It remains to be ascertained whether or not the interference found by the Court violated Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. The Court recalls that “a taking of property within [the] second rule can only be justified if it is shown, inter alia, to be “in the public interest” and “subject to the conditions provided for by law”. Moreover, any interference with the right of property must also satisfy the requirement of proportionality. As the Court has repeatedly stated, a fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, the search for such a fair balance being inherent in the whole of the Convention. The Court further recalls that the requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden” (see the Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, §§ 69-74, and Brumarescu, cited above, § 78).
58. The Court refers to its finding below that the provisions of domestic law allowing the State to lodge a lawsuit against the applicant company despite the expiry of the general limitation period were contrary to Article 6 of the Convention, since they allowed the courts to proceed with the case even though any private entity’s claim would have been left without examination in identical circumstances (see paragraph 76 below).
59. Although, in such circumstances, an issue arises as to whether the expropriation of the applicant’s property had been carried out “subject to the conditions provided for by law” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the Court does not consider it necessary to decide on it in view of its findings below.
60. The Court recalls that three reasons were relied upon by the domestic courts when ordering the annulment of the privatisation of the applicant company’s hotel: the reduction in the hotel’s reserve price, the failure to obtain the agreement of the hotel’s administrator and the failure to pay the hotel’s price within seven days of winning the auction (see paragraph 20 above). It was also found that the Auction Commission’s decision to extend the period during which S. could pay for the hotel had been taken ultra vires and that the applicant had acted in bad faith.
61. The Court is unable to see any element of bad faith in the applicant’s conduct during the privatisation. In respect of the first ground for annulling the privatisation, the Court notes that the authorities set the hotel’s reserve price at MDL 20 million and the applicant paid an additional MDL 150,000. Although the courts referred to another decision evaluating the hotel at MDL 25 million, the Government did not submit to the Court a copy of any such decision. Moreover, while diminishing the price of State property to be sold amounted to an accusation of a serious crime, the prosecution service had already found that no unlawful acts had been committed during the hotel’s privatisation (see paragraph 13 above). It follows that the applicant company was not shown to have played any part in the alleged reduction in the reserve price, which was within the exclusive power of the authorities. There is no evidence that the applicant company knew about the “real price”, nor does the price paid by it appear so unreasonably small in the circumstances as to raise legitimate doubts of unjust enrichment. Finally, the Court notes, in this respect, that the authorities never attempted to claim the difference between the privatisation price and the alleged real price in order to redress any alleged damage to the public interest, but rather sought the annulment of the privatisation as a whole.
62. As to the second ground for annulling the privatisation, it is true that the State Chancellery had not given its formal agreement thereto. However, the State Chancellery was part of the Government which had offered the hotel for sale, a sale provided for in a law published in the Official Gazette. As the hotel’s administrator, it should also have realised that someone else was running the hotel since 1999. Nonetheless, it did not complain to a court until 2003.
63. As to the last ground for annulling the privatisation, it is to be noted that, despite considering that the Auction Commission had acted ultra vires in extending the time-limit for the applicant’s payment of the auction price (see paragraph 9 above), none of the courts annulled that decision. Even assuming that the Auction Commission did in fact act beyond its authority, the Court needs to consider whether the doctrine of ultra vires, which “provides an important safeguard against abuse of power by local or statutory authorities acting beyond the competence given to them under domestic law” (see Stretch v. the United Kingdom, no. 44277/98, § 38, 24 June 2003), was applied in a manner proportionate to the circumstances of the case.
64. The Court notes that the hotel remained in State possession pending full payment, which excluded any abusive action in respect of that property. Moreover, the applicant company had deposited MDL 1 million in the Department’s account (see paragraph 7 above), which sum could be used as compensation had the full price not been paid within the extended time-limit set by the Commission. In addition, had the Auction Commission annulled the results of the auction instead of extending the time-limit for the applicant company’s full payment of the price, an even longer delay would have occurred before the next auction could be held and the State would have incurred additional expenses in organising it. The Court also notes that the domestic courts did not identify any harm or risk of harm caused by the applicant company’s delay in paying the price of the hotel. At the same time, it cannot be disputed that the applicant company needed time to obtain the necessary financial resources, as illustrated by the Government’s own difficulties in fully paying the same amount, which it did only 16 months after this was ordered by a court (see paragraph 34 above).
65. The Court finally observes that the hotel was proposed for sale by the State authorities, which set out the rules, determined the reserve price and carried out the auction proceedings. The applicant company was in a position of inequality, having to accept all the conditions established by the State, which it did. However, four years after the privatisation, the authorities considered the sale incorrect and the price undervalued, and initiated proceedings for the annulment of the transaction. It appears from the facts of the case that the authorities had an unfettered discretion to reconsider and annul transactions which they had initiated and concluded years earlier. The authorities did not therefore “act in good time, in an appropriate manner and with utmost consistency” (see, in this connection, Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 120, ECHR 2000-I). These factors must also weigh heavily in the balance when considering whether the domestic courts’ decisions struck a fair balance in the applicant’s case.
66. In these circumstances, considering in particular that the irregularities in the privatisation of the hotel were formal in character or unsubstantiated and were not attributable to the applicant company, and even assuming that the taking of its property could be shown to serve some public interest, the Court finds that a fair balance was upset and that the applicant bore and continues to bear an individual and excessive burden. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
1. Submissions by the parties
67. The applicant company submitted that its right to a fair hearing, as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, had been violated. It referred, firstly, to the insufficient reasons given by the courts, which were in contradiction with the legal and factual circumstances of the case.
68. The applicant company also claimed that the principle of “equality of arms” had been breached by two separate aspects of the proceedings. First, when lodging the claim against the applicant company, the Prosecutor General did not have to pay any court fees, unlike the applicant company in its appeal in cassation and its request for compensation. Second, the Prosecutor General lodged the request after the expiry of the general limitation period established in the old Civil Code (see paragraph 40 above). This was possible under Article 86 of the Code, which gave an unwarranted advantage to the State and contravened the principle of legal certainty. The new Civil Code of Moldova did not contain any similar provision.
69. Finally, the applicant company complained about a violation of its right of access to court, in view of the refusal by the Supreme Court of Justice to examine its appeal on account of the failure to pay court fees.
70. The Government considered that the requirements of Article 6 of the Convention had been complied with in the present case. The case had been examined by independent and impartial courts, which had given fully reasoned judgments in accordance with the law. The Government considered that the proceedings had not been time-barred, as was clear from the formulation of Article 86 of the Civil Code, relied on by the Prosecutor General when lodging his request.
71. The Government submitted that the right of access to court was not absolute and that Article 6 of the Convention did not prohibit the establishing of restrictions, including court fees. The courts had given the applicant company time to comply with the obligation to pay the court fees, but had had to refuse to consider the appeal when the applicant company failed to pay.
2. The Court’s assessment
72. The Court recalls that the principle of equality of arms “requires that each party must be afforded a reasonable opportunity to present his case under conditions that do not place him at a substantial disadvantage vis-à-vis his opponent” (see De Haes and Gijsels v. Belgium, judgment of 24 February 1997, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997-I, § 53).
73. In the present case, the Court notes that State entities, including the State Chancellery, were allowed by law to lodge claims for restitution of State property without limit in time, since the limitation period did not apply (see paragraph 40 above).
74. The Court observes that the authorities were fully aware of all the circumstances of the privatisation of the applicant company’s hotel, having moreover verified its lawfulness in a criminal investigation (see paragraph 13 above). The Prosecutor General lodged the claim in the State Chancellery’s interest in January 2003, almost four years after the privatisation. This claim would have been time-barred had the general limitation period applied (see paragraph 40 above).
75. The Court considers that the observance of admissibility requirements for carrying out procedural acts is an important aspect of the right to a fair trial. The role played by limitation periods is of major importance when interpreted in the light of the Preamble to the Convention, which, in its relevant part, declares the rule of law to be part of the common heritage of the Contracting States (see Brumarescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999-VII, and Rosca v. Moldova, no. 6267/02, § 24, 22 March 2005).
76. The Court does not call into question the power of the legislator to establish different limitation periods for different types of lawsuits. However, no reasons were given in the present case for exempting State organisations, when claiming restitution of State property, from the obligation to observe established limitation periods which would bar the examination of such claims brought by any private person or company. This has the potential of unsettling numerous legal relations relying on the established situation and gives a discriminatory advantage to the State without any compelling reason. Therefore, the Court finds that Article 86 (2) of the old Civil Code (see paragraph 40 above) exempting State entities from the general limitation period was itself contrary to Article 6 of the Convention (see, mutatis mutandis, Platakou v. Greece, no. 38460/97, § 48, ECHR 2001-I).
77. In the event, the domestic courts allowed the Prosecutor General, acting on behalf of the State Chancellery, to file his action against the applicant company notwithstanding the expiry of the general limitation period. The domestic courts examined the lawsuit, which resulted in the applicant company’s loss of its hotel. Moreover, the Court considers that the altering of a legal situation which has become final due to the application of a limitation period, or which – as in the present case – should have become final had the limitation period applied without discrimination in favour of the State, is incompatible with the principle of legal certainty (see, mutatis mutandis, Popov v. Moldova (no. 2), no. 19960/04, § 53, 6 December 2005).
78. There has, therefore, been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in the present case.
79. The Court considers that, in view of its findings above, it is not necessary to examine separately the other complaint raised under Article 6 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
80. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
81. The applicant company claimed EUR 2,263,951 in respect of pecuniary damage, EUR 50,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage and EUR 3,255 for costs and expenses.
82. The Government submitted that the domestic law did not provide for compensation claimed by the applicant company, which, moreover, had acted in bad faith.
83. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the further procedure fixed with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Moldovan Government and the applicant company.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares unanimously the application admissible;
2. Holds unanimously that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds by five votes to two that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention on account of the breach of the principles of equality of arms and legal certainty;
4. Holds unanimously that it is not necessary to examine the applicant’s other complaint under Article 6 of the Convention;
5. Holds unanimously that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(a) reserves the said question;
(b) invites the Moldovan Government and the applicant to submit, within the forthcoming three months, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 18 March 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rules 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the following partly dissenting opinion of Judge Bratza, joined by Judge Pavlovschi, is annexed to this judgment.
N.B.
T.L.E.
PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE BRATZA, JOINED BY JUDGE PAVLOVSCHI
1. At the heart of this case is the applicant company’s complaint that, having in 1999 purchased the “D.” hotel in a public auction for a sum in excess of the reserve price set by the Auction Commission and having paid in full the purchase price within the extended period set by the Commission and thereafter invested substantial sums in renovating and refurnishing the property, it was, some 4 years later, deprived of its title to the hotel when the sale contract was annulled by the Economic Court of Moldova. Not only was the company required to return the hotel to the State Chancellery, its former administrator, but it recovered only the original purchase price, a sum which was in the event only fully repaid some 16 months after the contract had been annulled.
2. For the reasons stated in the judgment, I consider that the applicant company’s rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 have been violated. Even assuming that the annulment and consequent deprivation of the applicant’s property may be said to have served the public interest, the applicant company was required to bear an individual and excessive burden, such that a fair balance was not preserved.
3. An important part of the Court’s reasoning in reaching this conclusion relates to the fact that it was the State authorities which in 1999 prepared the hotel for sale, which set the rules for the auction, which determined the reserve price and which carried out the auction proceedings (paragraph 65). However, it was not until 2003 that the same State authorities, acting through the Prosecutor General’s Office, sought to annul the sale contract on the grounds that the formal requirements for the sale had not been satisfied, that the purchase price was less than the hotel’s real value and that the price had not been paid within 7 days of the date of the auction. Although the authorities must have been aware of each of these alleged grounds for annulling the contract from the outset, or at latest by 30 August 2000 when the criminal investigation into the alleged unlawfulness of the privatisation of the hotel was closed, no explanation has been offered as to why 4 years were allowed to elapse before the annulment proceedings were commenced. As in the Beyeler case (Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 120, ECHR 2000-I), this failure on the part of the authorities to act “in good time, in an appropriate manner and with utmost consistency” was, in my view, a factor of central importance in assessing the reasonableness and proportionality of the interference with the applicant company’s property rights.
4. Having concluded that the applicant’s rights under the Protocol were violated, the majority of the Court have gone on to find an additional violation of Article 6 § 1 on the grounds that it was contrary to the principle of equality of arms that the State authorities should have been permitted by
Article 86 of the Civil Code to lodge claims beyond the 3-year limitation period applicable to private individuals. It is said that no reasons have been given for exempting certain litigants, such as State authorities, from the obligation to observe established limitation periods and that this exemption gave a discriminatory advantage to the State (paragraph 76). It is further said (paragraph 77), drawing on the Court’s Popov judgment (Popov v. Moldova (No. 2), no. 19860/04, § 53, 6 December 2005), that the altering of a legal situation which should have become final had the limitation period applied without such discrimination was incompatible with the principle of legal certainty.
5. I regret that I am unable to support this conclusion of the majority. The applicant company has not made any claim of discriminatory treatment under Article 14 of the Convention. While it has certainly alleged a breach of the principle of equality of arms, I have considerable doubt as to the applicability of that principle to the present case in which the company complains not that it was denied an opportunity in the proceedings to present its case under conditions that did not place it at a substantial disadvantage vis-à-vis the State authorities, but that domestic law permitted the State authorities to bring the proceedings in the first place. I am similarly unpersuaded that the fact that the 3-year limitation period did not apply to bar the proceedings was necessarily incompatible with Article 6 on the grounds that it violated the principle of legal certainty, a principle which has been developed (as in the Popov case) in the context of the quashing of a final court judgment.
6. In the end, however, I would prefer to leave these questions undecided since I consider that the applicant’s complaint under Article 6 of the Convention is effectively absorbed in the Court’s finding of a violation of Article 1 of the Protocol. As stated above, the essential problem raised by the case is not the fact that domestic law permitted the State authorities to bring the annulment proceedings more than 3 years after the contract was concluded but the fact that those authorities unreasonably delayed before commencing those proceedings. The Court having already taken this factor into account in finding a violation of the Protocol, it was in my view unnecessary to go on to examine separately the issues raised under Article 6 of the Convention.


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; soddisfazione Equa riservata
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA DACIA S.R.L. C. MOLDAVIA
(Richiesta n. 3052/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
18 marzo 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nella causa Dacia S.R.L. c. Moldavia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Stanislav Pavlovschi, Ljiljana Mijovic, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 26 febbraio 2008,
Consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 3052/04) contro la Repubblica della Moldavia depositata con la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione di Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da parte dell’hotel “D.” (“la società richiedente”), una società registrata a Chisinau, il 6 gennaio 2004.
2. La società richiedente fu rappresentata dal Sig. V. N., degli “Avvocati per i Diritti umani”, un'organizzazione non-governativa con sede a Chisinau. Il Governo Moldavo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal suo Agente al tempo, il Sig. V. Pârlog.
3. La società richiedente addusse, in particolare, che l'annullamento della privatizzazione del suo albergo aveva violato i suoi diritti come garantiti dall’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Si lamentò anche sull'iniquità dei procedimenti, contrari all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
4. La richiesta fu assegnata alla quarta Sezione della Corte. L’11 aprile 2006 una Sezione di questa Camera decise di comunicare la richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. I fatti della causa, come presentate dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.
1. La privatizzazione dell'albergo
6. Nel 1997 il Governo della Moldavia presentò al Parlamento un resoconto “Sul Programma di Privatizzazione per il1997-1998.” Il Parlamento adottò l'Atto nel 1997. L'annesso all'Atto elencava la proprietà Statale che doveva essere privatizzata che includeva l'albergo a quattro stelle “D.”. L'Atto stabilì che il Settore per la Privatizzazione della Proprietà Statale (“il Settore”) avrebbe organizzato la privatizzazione della proprietà elencata nell'annesso.
7. Il Settore creò una Commissione d’Asta. Nel dicembre 1998 la Commissione d’Asta pubblicò un annuncio pubblicitario per la privatizzazione dell'albergo ed espose un prezzo di riserva di 20 milioni di lei della Moldavi (MDL) (2,006,782 Dollari Americani (EUR)). Per poter partecipare nella vendita all'asta ogni partecipante fu costretto a depositare MDL 1 milione sul conto del Settore.
8. Il predecessore della società richiedente, “la S.-m.” (“S.”), partecipò alla vendita all'asta e il 23 gennaio 1999 fu annunciato come il vincitore, dopo aver offerto MDL 20,150,000. Per essere in grado pagare quell’ importo, S. concluse un contratto con una società austriaca, “K. O. Corp.”, per un prestito di USD 2.2 milioni. Secondo i termini del contratto, S. doveva rimborsare il prestito entro un anno e pagare 15% di interessi durante quel periodo. La mancanza di rimborso del prestito avrebbe dato luogo ad una sanzione penale di 0.2% della pendenza debitoria per ogni giorno di ritardo (soggetto a qualsiasi eventuale prolungamento del periodo di rimborso), mentre una mancanza nel pagamento dell'interesse avrebbe dato luogo ad una sanzione penale dello 0.1% della pendenza debitoria per ogni giorno di ritardo.
9. Su richiesta si S., il 29 gennaio 1999 la Commissione d’Asta ha deciso di prolungare il periodo per il pagamento del prezzo di vendita all'asta sino al 17 febbraio 1999.
10. L’ 8 febbraio 1999 S. ottenne un certificato dalla Banca Nazionale di Moldavia che confermava l'accordo di credito con “K. O. Corp..” Trasferì MDL 20,150,000 al bilancio Statale all'interno del nuovo termine massimo stabilito dalla Commissione d’Asta. Il 18 febbraio 1999 concluse un contratto con il Settore per l'acquisto dell'albergo.
11. Nel giugno 1999 S. fu re-registrata come “D. S.R.L.” (la società richiedente). Il 13 settembre 1999 la società richiedente acquistò dal municipio di Chisinau i 0.21 ettari di terra sui quali l'albergo era situato, per MDL 50,840 (EUR 4,395).
12. Secondo la società richiedente, negli anni successivi all’acquisto delle grandi furono spese per il rinnovamento dell'albergo e per l'acquisto di mobili ed attrezzature nuovi.
13. Nel 2000 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale iniziò un'indagine penale sull'illegalità addotta della privatizzazione dell'albergo. Stabilì che nessun atto penale era stato commesso e chiuse l'indagine il 30 agosto 2000.
14. Il 31 gennaio 2003 “K. O. Corp.” concesse i suoi diritti di credito riguardo al prestito della società richiedente alla società belga “V. NV” (V.). Il 18 febbraio 2003 la società richiedente impegnò l'albergo e la terra come garanzia per il prestito da parte di V. In vista di una mancanza della società richiedente di rimborsare il prestito, V. chiese in tribunale il diritto di divenire il proprietario dell'albergo.
15.Il 23 giugno 2003 la Corte Economica e Regionale in Chisinau accettò questa richiesta ed ordinò il trasferimento dell'albergo a V. La Cancelleria Statale richiese l'annullamento di quell'ordine. Il 25 luglio 2003 la Corte Economica e Regionale di Chisinau annullò l'ordine del 23 giugno 2003 in luce delle sentenze della Corte Economica del 6 giugno 2003 e della Corte di giustizia Suprema del 24 luglio 2003 (nei procedimenti di annullamento descritti sotto).
2. Procedimenti per l'annullamento della privatizzazione
16. L’11 gennaio 2003 l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale iniziò degli atti nell'interesse dello Stato (vale a dire, la Cancelleria Statale, una suddivisione del Governo che era l'amministratore precedente dell'albergo) contro S. ed il Settore, chiedendo l'annullamento della privatizzazione dell'albergo e il rimborso alla società richiedente del prezzo pagato.
17. In una data non specificata l'Accusatore Generale richiese alla corte di designare la società richiedente come convenuto nella causa, dal momento che il convenuto che prima aveva designato nella sua richiesta (S.) aveva cessato di esistere. Il 31 marzo 2003 la Corte Economica della Moldavia accettò questa richiesta ed ordinò che la società richiedente fosse chiamata in causa nella sua udienza successiva.
18. L'Accusatore Generale non pagò alcuna tassa di corte per iniziare quei procedimenti, in virtù di un'esenzione prevista dalla legge per azioni di corte iniziate da lui negli interessi dello Stato. Riguardo al termine di prescrizione, si riferì all’ Articolo 86 del Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 40 sotto).
19. Il 6 giugno 2003 la Corte Economica della Moldavia accettò la richiesta dell'Accusatore Generale ed annullò la decisione della Commissione d'asta del 23 gennaio 1999 ed il contratto del 18 febbraio 1999 per la vendita dell'albergo. Alla società richiedente fu ordinato di restituire l'albergo alla Cancelleria Statale ed al Ministero delle Finanze fu ordinato di rimborsare alla società richiedente MDL 20,150,000 (EUR 1,219,055 in quel momento).
20. Le ragioni date dalla Corte Economica della Moldavia per trovare che la privatizzazione era stata illegale erano: (a) la Cancelleria Statale, come l'amministratore precedente dell'albergo non avevano dato il suo accordo alla vendita; (b) S. (il predecessore della società richiedente) non era riuscito a pagare l'importo intero entro sette giorni dalla vincita della vendita all'asta, come richiesto dalla regolamentazione della vendita all'asta; e (c) il prezzo pagato era circa MDL 5 milioni (EUR 511,996) inferiore al vero valore dell'albergo. La corte trovò che la decisione della Commissione d’asta di prolungare il periodo durante il quale S. avrebbe potuto pagare l'albergo era stata presa ultra vires. Comunque, la corte non annullò la decisione di prolungare il tempo-limite o la decisione che stabiliva il prezzo di riserva a MDL 20 milioni, né lo fece qualsiasi altra autorità. La corte notò anche che S. era stato il solo partecipante nella vendita all'asta di privatizzazione, ma non indicò se questo era contrario ad una qualunque legge.
La corte ordinò al Settore di restituire alla società di richiedente il prezzo pagò per l'albergo nel 1999 (MDL 20,150,000).
21. La corte infine ordinò che ognuno delle parti pagasse la metà delle tasse del tribunale pari a MDL 302,340 (EUR 18,291), trovando che sia le autorità che la società richiedente avevano agito in mala fede a causa dell'inosservanza summenzionata di seguire correttamente la procedura di vendita all'asta. In particolare, la società richiedente fu accusata di contribuire alla riduzione sul prezzo di privatizzazione dell'albergo.
22. La società richiedente fece appello alla Corte di giustizia Suprema, dibattendo che era stata un buon acquirente di fiducia e si era attenuta a tutti i requisiti stabiliti dalle autorità Statali durante la privatizzazione, e che l'azione di corte intentata contro lei da parte dell'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale era fuori termini poiché era stata depositata circa quattro anni dopo gli eventi attinenti.
23. L’ 8 luglio 2003 la Corte di giustizia Suprema notò che la società richiedente aveva pagato MDL 50,000 (EUR 3,114) si tasse del tribunale dei MDL 453,100 (EUR 28,227) richiesti. La corte richiese pagamento del pieno importo delle tasse. La società richiedente chiese permesso di pagare a rate in un periodo di tre mesi, ma le furono accordati sedici giorni. Presentò documenti che confermavano la sua incapacità a pagare e si appellò al fatto che tutti i suoi beni erano stati sequestrati dalle autorità. Il 24 luglio 2003 la corte rifiutò di esaminare l'appello a causa del mancato pagamento dell'importo intero delle tasse del tribunale. Questa decisione era definitiva.
3. Procedimenti riguardo all’area di terra sulla quale l'albergo è situato
24. L'Accusatore Generale iniziò nuovi procedimenti “negli interessi dello Stato” richiedendo l'annullamento del contratto concluso fra la società richiedente ed il municipio per l'acquisto della terra sul quale l'albergo era situato.
25. Il 27 ottobre 2003 la Camera D’ appello della Corte Economica della Moldavia accettò che richiesta ed annullò il contratto per l'acquisto della terra perché la terra non poteva essere separata dall'albergo stesso.
26. Il 19 febbraio 2004 la Corte di giustizia Suprema sostenne quella sentenza.
4. Procedimenti di esecuzione
27. Il 25 luglio 2003 la Commissione sui Trasferimenti dei Beni di “D.” S.R.L. allo Stato la sua attività cominciò per eseguire la sentenza del 6 giugno 2003. Il 7 agosto 2003 l'albergo fu trasferito al suo nuovo proprietario, la Cancelleria Statale (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra).
28. Il 29 luglio 2003 la società richiedente spedì la garanzia per l'esecuzione della sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 al Settore dell'Esecuzione delle Decisioni. Continuò a scrivere alle varie autorità sulla non-esecuzione della sentenza.
29. Il Settore di Privatizzazione ed Amministrazione di Proprietà Statali richiese un'interpretazione del testo della sentenza del 6 giugno 2003. Anche la società richiedente richiese un'interpretazione ed una rivalutazione dell'importo che le era stato assegnato dalla sentenza per prendere atto degli effetti dell'inflazione sul valore dell'assegnazione.
30. L’8 ottobre 2003 la Camera D’ appello della Corte Economica diede una decisione esplicativa nella quale identificò il Ministero delle Finanze come responsabile del rimborso della società richiedente del prezzo dell'albergo. Respinse anche la richiesta della società richiedente per una rivalutazione dell'assegnazione poiché l'albergo era stato comprato in lei di moldavi e non in una qualsiasi altra valuta estera e la legge non prevedeva il risarcimento per gli effetti dell'inflazione in cause come quella in considerazione. La corte informò la società richiedente del suo diritto a depositare una richiesta separata qualsiasi investimento fatto per la riparazione e le attrezzature dell'albergo.
31. il 13 novembre 2003 la Corte di giustizia Suprema sostenne quella sentenza. Comunque, annullò, eccedendo i poteri di interpretazione delle sentenze, il chiarimento della corte più bassa per il quale parte della sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 potrebbe essere eseguita anche se alla società richiedente non fosse stata rimborsata un qualsiasi prezzo dell'albergo. L'albergo rimase di proprietà dello Stato.
32. Il 3 dicembre 2003, la società richiedente richiese alla luce della mancanza di risorse evidente nel bilancio Statale che stava ostacolando l’esecuzione della sentenza a suo favore, che il Settore dell'Esecuzione delle Decisioni eseguisse la sentenza vendendo l’albergo “D.” e la terra sul quale sorgeva.
33. Il 4 febbraio 2004 la garanzia per l'esecuzione della sentenza interpretativa dell’8 ottobre 2003 fu spedita al Ministero delle Finanze.
34. La sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 fu eseguita pienamente in rate nel periodo fra il 13 aprile e il 27 ottobre 2004.
5. Procedimenti per il ricupero dei danni causati alla società di richiedente
35. La società richiedente iniziò atti contro il Governo (incluso il Ministero della Privatizzazione ed il Ministero delle Finanze) chiedendo il risarcimento per danno causatole come un buon acquirente di fiducia dell'albergo. Chiese danni pari a MDL 16,157,774 (equivalente ad EUR 979,259) incluso il valore delle riparazioni e dell’ attrezzatura nuova, le sanzioni penali per il ritardo nel rimborsare il prestito a V., somme di soldi prese dall'albergo quando fu trasferito allo Stato ed interessi per l'uso di MDL 20,150,000 per più di quattro anni, così come il risarcimento per gli effetti dell'inflazione su quell'importo. L'importo sopra includeva una deduzione degli importi corrispondenti ai profitti della società richiedente dall'albergo durante il periodo attinente. Presentò che lo Stato aveva commesso gli errori assegnatigli nella sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 e che lo Stato avrebbe dovuto sopportare perciò le conseguenze di quegli errori.
36. Il 10 marzo 2005 la Camera Di appello della Corte Economica della Moldavia respinse queste richieste. La corte trovò che la società richiedente non potesse pretendere di essere stata un buon acquirente di fiducia, poiché non era riuscito a pagare l'albergo entro sette giorni come prescritto dalle regolamentazioni di vendita all'asta. La corte trovò anche che la sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 aveva stabilito la complicità della società richiedente “contribuendo a ridurre il prezzo dell'albergo” (senza fornire alcun dettaglio), escludendo così la buon fede della società richiedente come base per chiedere il risarcimento, e che questo facesse domanda anche in merito alla richiesta per interesse sui suoi soldi in possesso dello Stato.
37. La corte respinse l'argomento che lo Stato aveva ottenuto un arricchimento ingiusto poiché c'era una base giuridica per l'aumento nei suoi beni- il contratto con la società richiedente per l'acquisto dell'albergo. Anche l'argomento che lo Stato aveva offerto in vendita un oggetto colpito da impedimenti giuridici ed ignoti fu respinto come infondato, nonostante l'inosservanza delle autorità di osservare certi articoli durante la privatizzazione dell'albergo (ottenendo l'accordo della Cancelleria Statale). Poiché la società richiedente aveva saputo dalle regole interne dell'albergo che la Cancelleria era la sua fondatrice e poiché questa non aveva dato la sua approvazione per la privatizzazione, la società richiedente non poteva affermare che non era a conoscenza dell'impedimento giuridico in questione.
38. La società richiedente si appellò al fatto che non era capace di pagare le tasse di corte MDL 242,349 (verso EUR 14,600). Richiese una rinuncia delle tasse di corte sino a dopo la sentenza, in prospettiva del fatto che aveva trasferito al suo creditore tutti i soldi ricevuti dal Ministero delle Finanze dopo la sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 e che non aveva fonti di reddito alternative, come confermato da dichiarazioni bancarie attinenti.
39. Il 4 maggio 2005 la Corte di giustizia Suprema respinse la richiesta della società richiedente per una rinuncia delle tasse di corte. Informò la società richiedente che l'appello non poteva essere esaminato a causa dell'inosservanza di pagare le tasse di corte. Il nuovo tempo-limite per pagare le tasse di corte era il 25 maggio 2005; la società richiedente non rispetto questo termine massimo.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
40. Le disposizioni attinenti del Codice civile, in vigore al tempo attinente prevedono:
“Articolo 74
Il termine di prescrizione generale di protezione per un'azione di corte dei diritti di una persona[fisica] è di tre anni; è un anno per processi fra organizzazioni Statali, fattorie collettive e qualsiasi le altre organizzazioni sociali.
Articolo 78
La corte competente... applicherà il termine di prescrizione sia che le parti richiedano o meno questa applicazione.
Articolo 83
La scadenza del termine di prescrizione prima dell'iniziazione degli atti costituisce un fatto per respingere la richiesta.
Se la corte competente... costata che l'azione non è stata cominciata all'interno del termine di prescrizione per ragioni fondate, il diritto in oggetto verrà protetto.
Articolo 86
Il termine di prescrizione non si applica:
...
(2) a richieste da parte di organizzazioni Statali riguardo alla restituzione di proprietà Statale trovata in possesso illegale di... altre organizzazioni... e di cittadini;.”
LA LEGGE
41. La società richiedente si lamentò sull'iniquità dei procedimenti e la limitazione del suo accesso ad una corte, contrari all’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che, nella parte attinente, prevede:
“1. Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi... ognuno è abilitato ad un'udienza corretta... da parte di un tribunale....”
42. La società richiedente si lamentò anche che i suoi diritti come garantiti sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione erano stati violati come risultato dell'annullamento della privatizzazione del suo albergo.
L’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di uno Stato ad eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso di proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
I. AMMISSIBILITÀ
43. La Corte nota che, nella sua richiesta iniziale, la società richiedente si riferì alla tarda esecuzione della sentenza del 6 giugno 2003. Nelle sue osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e meriti chiese comunque, alla Corte di non procedere all'esame di questo aspetto della lagnanza sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione. La Corte non trova nessuna ragione di esaminarlo.
44. Il Governo presentò che, seguendo la piena esecuzione della sentenza del 6 giugno 2003, la società richiedente non potrebbe più chiedere di essere una vittima di una violazione dei suoi diritti della Convenzione.
45. La società richiedente non era d'accordo ed affermò che era incorsa in spese sostanziali per rinnovare e arredare l'albergo e che non aveva ricevuto alcun risarcimento per queste spese e le altre perdite.
46. La Corte nota che, seguendo l'esecuzione della sentenza di 6 giugno 2003, la società richiedente ottenne il prezzo iniziale pagato per l'albergo in lei di Moldavi, ma non fu compensata per i costi addizionali che era incorsi in nel frattempo. Effettivamente, la lagnanza principale della società richiedente non era su una mancata esecuzione della sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 all'interno di un termine ragionevole, ma piuttosto circa il fatto che le era stato tolto il suo albergo senza ricevere risarcimento sufficiente (vedere paragrafi 43 e 45 sopra).
47. In queste circostanze, la Corte considera, che la società richiedente non ha perso il suo status come una vittima di una violazione dei suoi diritti della Convenzione.
48. Il Governo presentò anche che, nel depositare le sue richieste nel 2005, la società richiedente non si riferì agli effetti dell'inflazione sull'importo che aveva pagato per l'albergo. Non sollevò perciò questa specifica lagnanza di fronte alle corti nazionali e, di conseguenza, non era riuscita ad esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali e disponibili riguardo a questa parte delle sue richieste. La società richiedente non era d'accordo.
49. La Corte considera che questo problema sia rivolto più propriamente sotto l’Articolo 41 della Convenzione. In qualsiasi caso, avendo osservato che una corte nazionale esaminò questa parte delle richieste della società richiedente nel 2003 (vedere paragrafo 30 sopra) lo respinse. Questa costatazione fu sostenuta dalla sentenza finale della Corte di giustizia Suprema. Segue che la società richiedente esaurì in modo appropriato le vie di ricorso nazionali a sua disposizione e questa obiezione da parte del Governo deve essere respinta.
50. La Corte considera che le lagnanze della società richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione pongano questioni legislative sufficientemente serie la cui determinazione dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei meriti, e nessuno altro motivo per dichiararle inammissibile è stato stabilito. La Corte dichiara perciò queste lagnanze ammissibili. In conformità con la sua decisione di applicare l’Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 4 sopra), la Corte considererà immediatamente i meriti delle lagnanze.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
A. Argomenti delle parti
51. La società richiedente si lamentò su una violazione del suo diritto alla proprietà come risultato dell'annullamento della privatizzazione del suo albergo senza ragioni convincenti. Considerò che era stata sottoposta all'espropriazione senza il corretto risarcimento. Le corti nazionali avevano invocato ragioni puramente formali per l'annullamento della privatizzazione e non avevano una qualsiasi base per dichiarare che la società richiedente aveva agito in mala fede quando si era attenuta pienamente a tutte le condizioni stabilite dalle autorità.
52. Il Governo essenzialmente dibatté che la non-esecuzione della sentenza del 6 giugno 2003 non era un'interferenza col diritto della società richiedente.
B. la valutazione della Corte
1. Se il richiedente aveva una proprietà
53. Non è contestato dalle parti che il richiedente aveva una “proprietà” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, basato sul contratto di acquisto (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra). La Corte sottoscrive questa prospettiva.
2. Se c'era interferenza
54. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, “l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 comprende tre articoli distinti: il primo articolo, esposto nella prima frase del primo paragrafo è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento tranquillo di proprietà; il secondo articolo, contenuto nella seconda frase del primo paragrafo copre la privazione della proprietà e la sottopone a certe condizioni; il terzo articolo, determinato nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati Contraenti sono abilitati, inter alia, a controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Comunque, i tre articoli non sono distinti nel senso di non essere collegati. Il secondo e il terzo articolo riguardano particolari esempi di interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà e dovrebbero essere costruiti perciò alla luce del principio generale enunciato nel primo articolo” (vedere, fra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, sentenza del 23 settembre 1982 Serie A n. 52, § 61; James ed Altri c. il Regno Unito, sentenza del 21 febbraio 1986 Serie A n. 98, § 37; e Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 134, 2004-V di ECHR).
55. La Corte richiama che nel determinare se c'è stata una privazione di proprietà all’interno del secondo “articolo”, non solo è necessario considerare se c'è stata una presa formale o un’espropriazione di proprietà ma guardare dietro alle apparenze ed investigare la realtà della situazione di cui si lamentano. Poiché la Convenzione è intesa a garantisce diritti che sono, “pratici ed effettivi”, si doveva accertare se la situazione corrispondeva ad un'espropriazione de facto (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth, citata sopra, § 63, e Brumarescu c. la Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 76 ECHR 1999-VII).
56. La Corte osserva che come risultato delle varie sentenze della corte nella presente causa il richiedente perse la proprietà del suo albergo e la terra su cui era costruito, così come i vari investimenti relativi, e ricevette in ritorno solamente il prezzo iniziale che aveva pagato per l'albergo. In quelle circostanze, vi è stata un'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà del richiedente il che deve essere considerato come privazione di proprietà al quale, di conseguenza, il secondo articolo dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione si applica.
3. Se l'interferenza era giustificata
57. Rimane da accertare se l'interferenza trovata dalla Corte ha violato o meno l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. La Corte riciama che “una presa di proprietà entro [il] secondo articolo si può giustificare solamente se viene dimostrato, inter l'alia, di essere “nell'interesse pubblico” e “soggetta alle condizioni previste dalla legge.” Inoltre qualsiasi interferenza col diritto di proprietà deve soddisfare anche il requisito della proporzionalità. Come ha affermato ripetutamente la Corte, un giusto equilibrio deve essere previsto fra le richieste dell'interesse generale della comunità ed i requisiti della protezione dei diritti essenziali dell'individuo, essendo la ricerca per tale giusto equilibrio inerente all’intera Convenzione. La Corte richiami inoltre che l'equilibrio richiesto non sarà previsto nel caso in cui la persona riguardata sopporti un carico individuale ed eccessivo” (vedere Sporrong e Lönnroth, citata sopra, §§ 69-74, e Brumarescu, citata sopra, § 78).
58. La Corte si riferisce alla sua costatazione per cui le disposizioni di diritto nazionale che permisero allo Stato di depositare un processo contro la società richiedente nonostante la scadenza del termine di prescrizione generale erano contrarie all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione, poiché permisero alle corti di procedere con la causa anche se qualche richiesta di entità privata fosse stata lasciata senza esame in circostanze identiche (vedere paragrafo 76 sotto).
59. Benché, in simili circostanze, sorge un problema riguardo al fatto se l'espropriazione della proprietà del richiedente fosse stata eseguita “in base alle condizioni previste dalla legge” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, la Corte non considera necessario decidere in prospettiva delle sue costatazioni sotto.
60. La Corte richiama le corti nazionali hanno fatto affidamento su tre ragioni quando hanno ordinato l'annullamento della privatizzazione dell'albergo della società richiedente: la riduzione nel prezzo di riserva dell'albergo, la mancanza di ottenimento dell'accordo dell'amministratore dell'albergo e il mancato pagamento del prezzo dell'albergo entro sette giorni dalla vincita della vendita all'asta (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). Si trovò anche che la decisione della Commissione d’asta di prolungare il periodo durante il quale S. potrebbe avrebbe potuto pagare l'albergo era stata presa ultra vires e che il richiedente aveva agito in mala fede.
61. La Corte è incapace divedere qualsiasi elemento di mala fede nella condotta del richiedente durante la privatizzazione. In riguardo del primo fatto per l’annullamento la privatizzazione, la Corte nota, che le autorità esposero il prezzo di riserva dell'albergo a MDL 20 milioni ed il richiedente pagò MDL 150,000 supplementari. Benché le corti si riferissero ad un'altra decisione che valutava l'albergo a MDL 25 milioni, il Governo non presentò alla Corte una copia qualsiasi di simile decisione. Inoltre, mentre la diminuzione del prezzo della proprietà Statale per la vendita corrispondeva ad un'accusa di un crimine seria, il servizio di accusa aveva già trovato che nessuno atto illegale era stato commesso durante la privatizzazione dell'albergo (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). Segue che non fu mostrato che la società richiedente avesse giocato una qualsiasi parte nella riduzione addotta del prezzo di riserva che era all'interno del potere esclusivo delle autorità. Non c'è nessuna prova che la società richiedente avesse conosciuto il “ vero prezzo”, né che il prezzo pagato da lei sembrasse così irragionevolmente piccolo nelle circostanze tanto da sollevare dubbi legittimi di arricchimento ingiusto. Infine, la Corte nota, a questo riguardo che le autorità non hanno mai tentato di chiedere la differenza fra il prezzo di privatizzazione ed il vero prezzo addotto per compensare un qualsiasi danno addotto all'interesse pubblico, ma piuttosto chiese l'annullamento della privatizzazione nell'insieme.
62. In quanto al fatto di annullare la privatizzazione, è vero inoltre che la Cancelleria Statale non aveva dato il suo accordo formale. Comunque, la Cancelleria Statale era parte del Governo che aveva offerto l'albergo per la vendita, una vendita prevista in una legge pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale. Come amministratore dell'albergo, avrebbe dovuto comprendere anche, che qualcuno altro stava gestendo l'albergo fin dal 1999. Nondimeno, non si lamentò ad presso un tribunale sino al 2003.
63. Riguardo all'ultimo fatto per annullare la privatizzazione, si sarà notato, che, nonostante la considerazione che la Commissione d’Asta aveva agito ultra vires nel prolungare il tempo-limite per il pagamento del richiedente del prezzo della vendita all'asta (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra), nessun tribunale annullò quella decisione. Presumendo anche che la Commissione d’Asta abbia agito infatti oltre la sua autorità, la Corte ha bisogno di considerare se la dottrina dell’ ultra vires che “offre un'importante salvaguardia contro l'abuso di potere da parte delle autorità locali o legali che agiscono oltre la competenza data a loro sotto il diritto nazionale” (vedere Stiramento c. Regno Unito, n. 44277/98, § 38 24 giugno 2003), fu applicata in una maniera proporzionata alle circostanze della causa.
64. La Corte nota che l'albergo rimase in pendenza in proprietà Statale fino al pieno pagamento che escluse qualsiasi azione abusiva riguardo a quella proprietà. Inoltre, la società richiedente aveva depositato MDL 1 milione sul conto del Settore (vedere paragrafo 7 sopra) la qual somma avrebbe potuto essere usata come risarcimento nel caso il pieno prezzo non fosse pagato all'interno del tempo-limite prolungato stabilito dalla Commissione. Inoltre, se la Commissione d’Asta avesse annullato i risultati della vendita all'asta invece di prolungare il tempo-limite per il pieno pagamento del prezzo da parte della società richiedente, un ritardo persino più lungo si sarebbe verificato prima che la successiva vendita all'asta si fosse potuta tenere e lo Stato sarebbe incorso in costi addizionali organizzativi. La Corte nota anche che i tribunali nazionali non identificarono alcun danno o rischio di danno causato dal ritardo della società richiedente nel pagare il prezzo dell'albergo. Allo stesso tempo, non può essere contestato, che la società richiedente ebbe bisogno di tempo per ottenere le risorse finanziarie necessarie, come illustrato dalle stesse difficoltà del Governo nel pagare pienamente lo stesso importo che riuscì a fare solamente 16 mesi dopo che ciò fu ordinato da un tribunale (vedere paragrafo 34 sopra).
65. La Corte infine osserva che l'albergo fu proposto per la vendita dalle autorità Statali che fissarono le regole decisero il prezzo di riserva ed eseguirono i procedimenti di vendita all'asta. La società richiedente era in una posizione d'ineguaglianza, dovendo accettare tutte le condizioni stabilite dallo Stato che aveva posto. Comunque, quattro anni dopo la privatizzazione, le autorità considerarono la vendita incorretta ed il prezzo svalutato, ed iniziò dei procedimenti per l'annullamento dell'operazione. Appare dai fatti della causa che le autorità avevano una discrezione senza impedimenti per riconsiderare ed annullare le operazioni che loro avevano iniziato ed avevano concluso anni prima. Le autorità non hanno perciò “agito a tempo debito, in una maniera appropriata e con la massima consistenza” (vedere, in questo contesto Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 120 ECHR 2000-i). Anche questi fattori devono pesare pesantemente sull'equilibrio quando si sta considerando se le decisioni dei tribunali nazionali le decisioni prevedono un giusto equilibrio nella causa del richiedente.
66. In queste circostanze, considerando in particolare che le irregolarità nella privatizzazione dell'albergo erano formali in carattere o non comprovate e non erano attribuibili alla società richiedente, e presumendo anche che si potrebbe mostrare che la presa della sua proprietà serva l'interesse pubblico, la Corte costata che il giusto equilibrio è stato sconvolto e che il richiedente sopportò e continua a sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
1. Osservazioni delle parti
67. La società richiedente presentò che il suo diritto ad un'udienza corretta, come garantito dall’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, era stato violato. Si riferì, in primo luogo, alle ragioni insufficienti date dai tribunali che erano in contraddizione con le circostanze giuridiche e relative ai fatti e della causa.
68. La società richiedente chiese anche che il principio dell’ “uguaglianza dei mezzi” era stato violato sotto due aspetti separati dei procedimenti. Prima, quando depositando la richiesta contro la società richiedente, l'Accusatore Generale non dovette pagare alcuna tassa di corte, diversamente dalla società richiedente nel suo appello in cassazione e per la sua richiesta per il risarcimento. Secondo, l'Accusatore Generale depositò la richiesta dopo la scadenza del termine di prescrizione generale stabilito nel vecchio Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra). Questo era possibile sotto l’Articolo 86 del Codice che diede un vantaggio non garantito allo Stato e contravvenne al principio della certezza giuridica. Il nuovo Codice civile della Moldavia non conteneva alcuna disposizione simile.
69. Infine, la società richiedente si lamentò di una violazione del suo diritto di accesso ad un tribunale, in prospettiva del rifiuto della Corte di giustizia Suprema di esaminare il suo appello a causa del mancato pagamento delle tasse di corte.
70. Il Governo considerò che i requisiti dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione erano stati rispettati nella causa presente. La causa era stata esaminata da tribunali indipendenti ed imparziali che avevano dato sentenze completamente ragionate in conformità con la legge. Il Governo considerò che i procedimenti non erano decaduti, come era chiaro dalla formulazione dell’ Articolo 86 del Codice civile, sul quale si basò l'Accusatore Generale quando depositò la sua richiesta.
71. Il Governo presentò che il diritto di accesso ad un tribunale non era assoluto e che l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione non proibiva di stabilire delle restrizioni, incluso le tasse della corte. Le corti avevano dato il tempo alla società richiedente di attenersi all'obbligo di pagare le tasse di corte, ma aveva dovuto rifiutare di considerare l'appello quando la società richiedente non effettuò il pagamento.
2. La valutazione della Corte
72. La Corte richiama che il principio dell'uguaglianza dei mezzi “richiede che a ciascuna parte deve essere riconosciuta un'opportunità ragionevole di presentare la sua causa sotto condizioni che non la mettano di fronte al suo oppositore in condizioni di svantaggio sostanziali” (vedere De Haes e Gijsels c. Belgio, sentenza del 24 febbraio 1997 Relazioni delle Sentenze e Decisioni 1997-i, § 53).
73. Nella presente causa, la Corte nota che alle entità Statali, incluso la Cancelleria Statale fu permesso per legge di depositare richieste per la restituzione della proprietà Statale senza limite di tempo, poiché il termine di prescrizione non fu applicato (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra).
74. La Corte osserva che le autorità erano completamente consapevoli di tutte le circostanze della privatizzazione dell'albergo della società richiedente, dopo aver verificato inoltre la sua legalità con un'indagine penale (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). L'Accusatore Generale depositò la richiesta nell'interesse della Cancelleria Statale nel gennaio 2003, pressoché quattro anni dopo la privatizzazione. Questa richiesta sarebbe stata decaduta se il termine di prescrizione generale fosse stato applicato (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra).
75. La Corte considera che l'osservanza dei requisiti di ammissibilità per eseguire atti procedurali è un importante aspetto del diritto ad un processo equo. Il ruolo giocato dai termini di prescrizione è d'importanza notevole quando viene interpretato alla luce del Preambolo alla Convenzione che, nella sua parte attinente, dichiara che l'articolo della legge fa parte dell'eredità comune degli Stati Contraenti (vedere Brumarescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 61, ECHR 1999-VII, e Rosca c. Moldavia, n. 6267/02, § 24 22 marzo 2005).
76. La Corte non chiama in questione il potere del legislatore per stabilire i termini di prescrizione diversi per tipi diversi di processi. Comunque, nessuna ragione fu data nella presente causa per esentare le organizzazioni Statali, richiedendo la restituzione della proprietà Statale, dall'obbligo di osservare i termini di prescrizione stabiliti che farebbero decadere l'esame di simile richieste intentate da una qualsiasi persona privata o società. Questo ha il potenziale di sconvolgere numerose relazioni giuridiche basate sulla situazione stabilita e dà un vantaggio discriminatorio allo Stato senza una qualsiasi ragione convincente. Perciò, la Corte costata che l’Articolo 86 (2) del vecchio Codice civile (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra) esentando le entità Statali dal termine di prescrizione generale era contrario all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Platakou c. Grecia, n. 38460/97, § 48 ECHR 2001-i).
77. Nel presente caso, le corti nazionali concedettero all'Accusatore Generale, agendo a favore della Cancelleria Statale, di registrare la sua azione contro la società richiedente nonostante la scadenza del termine di prescrizione generale. I tribunali nazionali esaminarono il processo che diede luogo alla perdita della società richiedente del suo albergo. Inoltre, la Corte considera che l'alterazione di una situazione giuridica che è divenuta definitiva a causa dell’applicazione di un termine di prescrizione, o che -come nella presente causa -sarebbe dovuta divenire definitiva applicando il termine di prescrizione senza discriminazione a favore dello Stato, è incompatibile col principio della certezza giuridica (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Popov c. Moldavia (n. 2), n. 19960/04, § 53 6 dicembre 2005).
78. Vi è stata perciò una violazione dell’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione nella presente. causa
79. La Corte considera che, in prospettiva delle sue costatazioni sopra, non è necessario esaminare separatamente l'altra lagnanza sollevata sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
80. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte costata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata permette una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere una soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. danno Materiale
81. La società richiedente chiese EUR 2,263,951 riguardo il danno materiale, EUR 50,000 riguardo il danno morale ed EUR 3,255 per costi e spese.
82. Il Governo presentò che il diritto nazionale non prevedeva il risarcimento chiesto dalla società richiedente che, inoltre, aveva agito in mala fede.
83. La Corte considera che la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per una decisione. La questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e l'ulteriore procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo alla possibilità di un accordo al quale sono giunti il Governo moldavo e la società richiedente.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara all’unanimità la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene all’unanimità che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene per cinque voti a due che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione a causa della violazione dei principi di uguaglianza dei mezzi e la certezza giuridica;
4. Sostiene all’unanimità che non è necessario esaminare l'altra lagnanza del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene all’unanimità che la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(a) riserve la detta questione;
(b) invita il Governo moldavo ed il richiedente a presentare, entro i tre mesi disponibili le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare la Corte di qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(c) riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissare la stessa all’occorrenza.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l 18 marzo 2008, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità con l’Articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e l’articolo 74 § 2 degli Articoli di Corte,la seguente opinione in parte dissente del Giudice Bratza, condivisa con il Giudice Pavlovschi è annessa a questa sentenza.
N.B.
T.L.E.

OPINIONE IN PARTE DISSENTENDO DEL GIUDICE BRATZA, CONDIVISA DAL GIUDICE PAVLOVSCHI
1. Al cuore di questa causa la lagnanza della società richiedente vi è il fatto che, avendo nel 1999, acquistato il “D.” albergo ad un'asta pubblica per una somma in eccesso del prezzo di riserva esposto dalla Commissione d’Asta ed avendo pagato in pieno il prezzo di acquisto all'interno del periodo prolungato stabilito dalla Commissione e da allora in poi investito somme sostanziali nel rinnovamento e nell’arredamento della proprietà, era stata, circa 4 anni più tardi, privata del suo titolo rispetto all’hotel quando il contratto di vendita fu annullato dalla Corte Economica della Moldavia. Non solo la società fu costretta a restituire l'albergo alla Cancelleria Statale, il suo amministratore precedente, ma recuperò solamente il prezzo di acquisto originale, una somma che in questo caso fu rimborsata pienamente solamente circa 16 mesi dopo che il contratto era stato annullato.
2. Per le ragioni affermate nella sentenza, io considero, che i diritti della società richiedente sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 erano stati violati. Presumendo anche che si può dire che l'annullamento e la conseguente privazione della proprietà del richiedente avessero servito l'interesse pubblico, la società richiedente fu costretta a sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo, tanto che il giusto equilibrio non fu preservato.
3. Un'importante parte dei ragionamenti della Corte nel giungere a questa conclusione si riferisce al fatto furono le autorità Statali che nel 1999 prepararono l'albergo per la vendita, che stabilirono le regole per la vendita all'asta che determinarono il prezzo di riserva e che eseguirono i procedimenti di vendita all'asta (paragrafo 65). Comunque, fu solo nel 2003 che le stesse autorità Statali, agendo per l'Ufficio dell'Accusatore Generale, cercarono di annullare il contratto di vendita per motivi che i requisiti formali per la vendita non erano stati soddisfatti, che il prezzo di acquisto era inferiore al vero valore dell'albergo e che il prezzo non era stato pagato entro 7 giorni dalla data della vendita all'asta. Benché le autorità avrebbero dovuto essere consapevoli di ciascuno di questi motivi addotti per annullare il contratto dall'inizio, o almeno dal 30 agosto 2000 quando l'indagine penale sull'illegalità addotta della privatizzazione dell'albergo fu chiusa, nessun chiarimento è stato offerto in merito al perché dopo fu permesso che 4 anni passassero prima che i procedimenti di annullamento fossero cominciati. Come nella causa Beyeler (Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 120 ECHR 2000-i), questa inosservanza da parte delle autorità di agire “a tempo debito, in una maniera appropriata e con la massima consistenza” era, nella mia prospettiva, un fattore d'importanza centrale nel valutare la ragionevolezza e la proporzionalità dell'interferenza coi diritti di proprietà della società richiedente.
4. Avendo concluso che i diritti del richiedente sotto il Protocollo furono violati, la maggioranza della Corte ha proseguito a trovare una violazione supplementare dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 per motivi che erano contrari al principio dell'uguaglianza dei mezzi che alle autorità Statali avrebbe dovuto essere permesso dall’Articolo 86 del Codice civile di depositare richieste oltre il termine di prescrizione di 3 anni applicabile ad individui privati. Si dice che nessuno ragione è stato data per esentare certi contendenti, come le autorità Statali dall'obbligo di osservare i termini di prescrizione stabiliti e che questa esenzione diede un vantaggio discriminatorio allo Stato (paragrafo 76). È detto inoltre (paragrafo 77), basandosi sulla sentenza di Popov della Corte (Popov c. Moldavia (N.ro 2), n. 19860/04, § 53 del 6 dicembre 2005), che l’alterazione di una situazione giuridica che sarebbe dovuta divenire definitiva se fosse stato applicato il termine di prescrizione senza simile discriminazione era incompatibile col principio della certezza giuridica.
5. Mi dispiace di non essere in grado di sostenere questa conclusione della maggioranza. La società richiedente non ha reso qualsiasi richiesta di trattamento discriminatorio sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione. Mentre certamente ha addotto una violazione del principio dell'uguaglianza dei mezzi, io dubito considerevolmente riguardo all'applicabilità di quel principio alla presente causa nella quale la società non si lamenta del fatto che le fu negata un'opportunità nei procedimenti di presentare la sua causa sotto condizioni che non la mettessero di fronte alle autorità Statali in uno svantaggio sostanziale, ma che diritto nazionale permise alle autorità Statali di intentare procedimenti in primo luogo. Io sono allo stesso modo poco persuaso del fatto che il termine di prescrizione di 3anni non fu applicato per far decadere i procedimenti necessariamente era incompatibile con l’Articolo 6 per motivi che violò il principio della certezza giuridica, un principio che è stato sviluppato (come nella causa Popov) nel contesto dell'annullamento di una sentenza di corte definitiva.
6. Infine, comunque io preferirei lasciare queste questioni indecise poiché io considero che la lagnanza del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione è assorbita efficacemente nella costatazione della corte di una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo. Come affermato sopra, il problema essenziale sollevato dalla causa non è il fatto che diritto nazionale permise alle autorità Statali di intentare i procedimenti di annullamento dopo più di 3 anni che il contratto fu concluso ma il fatto che quelle autorità ritardarono irragionevolmente prima di cominciare quei procedimenti. La Corte che già ha preso in considerazione questo fattore nel trovare una violazione del Protocollo, non era secondo me necessario procedere ad esaminare separatamente i problemi sollevati sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione.




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è mercoledì 07/10/2020.