Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MEGADAT.COM SRL v. MOLDOVA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 1 (elevata)
ARTICOLI: 41, 29, P1-1

NUMERO: 21151/04/2008
STATO: Moldova
DATA: 08/04/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Violation of P1-1 ; Just satisfaction reserved
FOURTH SECTION
CASE OF MEGADAT.COM SRL v. MOLDOVA
(Application no. 21151/04)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
8 April 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Megadat.com SRL v. Moldova,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Nicolas Bratza, President,
Lech Garlicki,
Giovanni Bonello,
Ljiljana Mijovic,
David Thór Björgvinsson,
Ján Šikuta,
Päivi Hirvelä, judges,
and Lawrence Early, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 18 March 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 21151/04) against the Republic of Moldova lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by M..com SRL (“the applicant company”), a company incorporated in the Republic of Moldova, on 8 June 2004.
2. The applicant was represented by Ms J. H., a lawyer practising in Chisinau. The Moldovan Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr V. Grosu, their Agent.
3. The applicant alleged, in particular, that the closure of the company constituted a breach of its rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and that it had been discriminated against contrary to Article 14 of the Convention taken together with Article 1 of Protocol No.1.
4. On 5 December 2006 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
5. Judge Pavlovschi, the judge elected in respect of Moldova, withdrew from sitting in the case (Rule 28 of the Rules of Court) before it had been notified to the Government. On 8 February 2007, the Government, pursuant to Rule 29 § 1 (a), informed the Court that they were content to appoint in his stead another elected judge and left the choice of appointee to the President of the Chamber. On 18 September 2007, the President appointed Judge Šikuta to sit in the case.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The applicant, M..com SRL, is a company incorporated in the Republic of Moldova.
1. Background to the case
7. At the time of the events the applicant company was the largest internet provider in Moldova. According to it, it held approximately seventy percent of the market of internet services. While agreeing that the applicant company was the largest internet provider in the country, the Government disputed the ratio of its market share without, however, presenting any alternative figures.
8. The applicant company had two licences issued by the National Regulatory Agency for Telecommunications and Informatics (“ANRTI”) for providing internet and fixed telephony services. The licences were valid until 18 April 2007 and 16 May 2007 respectively and the address 55, Armeneasca Street was indicated in them as the applicant company’s official address.
9. The company had three offices in Chisinau. On 11 November 2002 its headquarters was moved from its Armeneasca street office to its Stefan cel Mare street office. The change of address of the headquarters was registered with the State Registration Chamber and the Tax Authority was informed. However, the applicant company failed to request ANRTI to modify the address in the text of its licences.
10. On 20 May 2003 the applicant company requested a third licence from ANRTI indicating in its request the new address of its headquarters. ANRTI issued the new licence citing the old address in it, without giving any reasons for not indicating the new address.
2. The invalidation of the applicant company’s licences
11. On 17 September 2003 ANRTI held a meeting. According to the minutes of the meeting, it found that ninety-one companies in the field of telecommunications, including the applicant company, had failed to pay a yearly regulatory fee and/or to present information about changes of address within the prescribed time-limits. ANRTI decided to invite those companies to eliminate the irregularities within ten days and to warn them that their licences might be suspended in case of non-compliance.
12. On unspecified dates the ninety-one companies, including the applicant company, were sent letters asking them to comply within ten days of the date of receipt of the letter. They were also warned that their licences might be suspended in case of non-compliance in accordance with section 3.4 of the ANRTI Regulations. The applicant company was sent such a letter on 24 September 2003.
13. Following ANRTI’s letters, only thirty-two companies, including the applicant company, complied with the request.
14. On 29 and 30 September 2003 the applicant company lodged documents with ANRTI indicating its new address, together with a request to modify its licences accordingly, and paid the regulatory fee.
15. On Friday 3 October 2003 ANRTI informed the applicant company that it had some questions concerning the documents submitted by it. In particular it had a question concerning the lease of the applicant company’s new headquarters and about the name of the applicant company. ANRTI informed the applicant company that the processing of its request concerning the amendment of the licences would be suspended until it had submitted the requested information.
16. On Monday 6 October 2003 ANRTI held a meeting at which it adopted a decision concerning the applicant company. In particular it reiterated the content of section 15 of the Law on Licensing and of section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI Regulations, according to which licences which had not been modified within ten days should be declared invalid. ANRTI found that those provisions were applicable to the applicant company’s case, and that its licences were therefore not valid.
17. On the same date ANRTI wrote to the Prosecutor General’s Office, the Tax Authority, the Centre for Fighting Economic Crime and Corruption and the Ministry of Internal Affairs that the applicant company had modified its address on 16 November 2002 but had failed to request ANRTI to make the corresponding change in its licences. In such conditions, the applicant company had traded for eleven months with an invalid licence. ANRTI requested the authorities to verify whether the applicant company should be sanctioned in accordance with the law.
18. On 9 October 2003 ANRTI amended the Regulations concerning the issuing of licences in order to provide that an entity whose licence was withdrawn could re-apply for a new licence only after six months.
19. On 21 October 2003 ANRTI held a meeting at which it found that fifty-nine of the ninety-one companies which it had warned, in accordance with its decision of 17 September 2003, had failed to comply with the warning. It decided to suspend their licences for three months and to warn them that in case of non-compliance during the period of suspension, their licences would be withdrawn. It appears from the documents submitted by the parties that the applicant company was the only one to have its licence invalidated.
3. The court proceedings between M.com and ANRTI
20. On 24 October 2003 the applicant company brought an administrative action against ANRTI arguing, inter alia, that the measure applied to it was illegal and disproportionate because the applicant company had always had three different offices in Chisinau of which ANRTI had always been aware. The change of address had only occurred because the applicant company’s headquarters had transferred from one of those offices to another. The tax authority had been informed promptly about that change and thus the change of address had not led to a failure to pay taxes or to a drop in the quality of services provided by the applicant company. Moreover, ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 had been adopted in breach of procedure, because the applicant company had not been invited to the meeting and ANRTI had disregarded its own instructions given to the applicant company on 3 October 2003.
21. On 25 November 2003 the Court of Appeal ordered a stay of the execution of ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003. It also set 16 December 2003 as the date of the first hearing in the case. Later, at the request of ANRTI, that date was changed to 2 December 2003.
22. On 1 December 2003 the representative of the applicant company lodged a request for adjournment of the hearing of 2 December on the ground that he was involved in a pre-arranged hearing at another court on the same date and at the same time.
23. On 2 December 2003 the Court of Appeal held a hearing in the absence of the representative of the applicant company and dismissed the latter’s action. The court considered, inter alia, that since the applicant company had failed to inform ANRTI about the change of address, the provisions of section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI Regulations were applicable.
24. The applicant company appealed against the decision arguing, inter alia, that it had not been given a chance to participate in the hearing before the first-instance court. It submitted that, according to the Code of Civil Procedure, the court had the right to strike the case out of the list of cases if it considered that the applicant had failed to appear without a plausible justification, but not to examine the case in its absence. It also submitted that by declaring the licences invalid, ANRTI had breached its own decision of 17 September 2003. It was ANRTI’s usual practice to request information concerning changes of address and to sanction companies which did not comply by suspending their licences. The applicant company drew attention to two other decisions of that kind dated 12 June 2003 and 17 July 2003. In this case, however, the applicant company had fully complied with ANRTI’s decision of 17 September 2003 by submitting information about the new address within the prescribed time-limit. Notwithstanding, ANRTI had asked for supplementary information on Friday 3 October 2003 and without waiting for it to be provided by the applicant company, had decided to declare the licences invalid on Monday 6 October 2003.
The applicant company also argued that ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 had been adopted in serious breach of procedure because the applicant company had not been informed three days in advance about the meeting of 6 October 2003 and had not been invited to it.
Lastly, the applicant company argued that ANRTI’s decision to declare its licences invalid was discriminatory since the other ninety companies listed in ANRTI’s decision of 17 September 2003 had not been subjected to such a severe measure.
25. On 3 March 2004 the Supreme Court of Justice dismissed the applicant company’s appeal and found, inter alia, that it had been summoned to the hearing of 2 December 2003 and that its request for adjournment could not create an obligation on the part of the Court of Appeal to adjourn the hearing. Moreover, the decision of 6 October 2003 was legal since the applicant company admitted to having changed its address, and according to section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI Regulations a failure to request a modification of an address in a licence led to its invalidity. The Supreme Court did not refer to the applicant company’s submissions about its discriminatory treatment, ANRTI’s usual practice of requesting information about changes of address and ANRTI’s breaching of its own decision of 17 September 2003.
26. One of the members of the panel of the Supreme Court, Judge D. Visterniceanu, disagreed with the opinion of the majority and wrote a dissenting opinion. He submitted, inter alia, that the first-instance court had failed to address all the submissions made by the applicant company and had illegally examined the case in its absence. Moreover, only one provision of the ANRTI Regulations had been applied, whereas it was necessary to examine the case in a broader light and to apply all the relevant legislation. Finally, ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 contravened its decision of 17 September 2003. Judge Visterniceanu considered that the Supreme Court should have quashed the judgment of the first-instance court and remitted the case for a fresh re-examination.
4. The applicant company’s attempts to save its business and the repercussions of the invalidation of its licences
27. In the meantime, the applicant company has transferred all of its contracts with clients to a company which was part of the same group, M..com I., which had valid licences. However, the State-owned monopoly in telecommunications, M., refused to sign contracts with the latter company and made it impossible for it to continue working.
28. On 16 March 2004 ANRTI and M. informed the applicant company’s clients that on 17 March their internet connection would be shut down and offered them internet services from M. without any connection charge.
29. On 17 March 2004 Moldtelecom carried out the disconnection of the applicant company and of M..com I. from the internet and all of their equipment on the M. premises was disconnected from the power supply.
30. In July 2004 the licences of M..com I. were withdrawn by ANRTI.
31. As a result of the above, the applicant company and M..com International were forced to close down the business and sell all of their assets. One week later, the applicant company’s chairman, Mr E. M., was arrested for peacefully demonstrating against his company’s closure.
32. Following ANRTI’s letter of 6 October 2003 (see paragraph 17 above) the Tax Authorities imposed a fine on the applicant company for having operated for eleven months without a valid licence and the CFECC initiated an investigation as a result of which all the accounting documents of the applicant company were seized.
5. International reactions
33. On 18 March 2004 the Embassies of the United States of America, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Poland, Romania and Hungary, as well as the Council of Europe, the IMF and World Bank missions in Moldova issued a joint declaration expressing concern over the events surrounding the closure of the applicant company. The declaration stated, inter alia, the following: “Alleged contraventions of registration procedures do not appear to justify a decision to put a stop to the functioning of a commercial company. ... We urge M. and the relevant authorities to reconsider this question. This seems all the more important in view of the commitment of the public authorities of Moldova to European norms and values.”
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
34. Section 3.4 of the ANRTI Regulations provides that in the event of non-compliance by a licence beneficiary with the conditions set out in the licence, the licence can be suspended for a period of three months. When ANRTI finds such non-compliance, it warns the licence beneficiary and gives it a deadline for remedying the problem. If the problem is not remedied within that period, ANRTI may suspend the licence for a period of three months.
35. On 12 June 2003 ANRTI warned several companies about their failure to pay regulatory fees and/or to inform it about their changes of address. The companies were given ten days to remedy the breaches. Since some of them did not comply, on 17 July 2003, ANRTI decided to suspend their licences for three months.
36. The relevant provisions of the ANRTI Regulations concerning modification of licences at the time of the events were similar to the provisions of section 15 of the Law on Licensing and read as follows:
3.5.1 A licence should be modified when the name of the beneficiary company or other information contained in the licence has changed;
3.5.2 When reasons for modifying a licence become apparent, the beneficiary shall apply to ANRTI for its modification within ten days...
3.5.7 A licence which has not been modified within the prescribed time-limit is not valid.
37. On 9 October 2003 the following provision was added to the Regulations:
3.8.6 Former beneficiaries, whose licences were withdrawn... can re-apply for new licences only after a period of six months counted from the day of withdrawal.
38. On 24 September 2004 section 3.5.7 of the Regulations was amended in the following way:
3.5.7 In the event that a licence was not modified within the prescribed time-limit, the Commission has the right to apply administrative sanctions or to withdraw the licence partially or totally.
THE LAW
39. The applicant company argued that the invalidation of its licences had violated its right guaranteed under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
40. The applicant company further submitted that it had been the victim of discrimination on account of the authorities’ decision to invalidate its licences, since they had treated differently ninety other companies which were in a similar situation. It relied on Article 14 of the Convention, which provides:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”
I. ADMISSIBILITY OF THE COMPLAINTS
41. In its initial application, the applicant company also submitted a complaint under Article 6 of the Convention. However, in its observations on admissibility and merits it asked the Court not to proceed with the examination of this complaint. The Court finds no reason to examine it.
42. At the same time, the Court considers that the rest of the applicant company’s complaints raise questions of fact and law which are sufficiently serious that their determination should depend on an examination of the merits, and no other grounds for declaring them inadmissible have been established. The Court therefore declares this part of the application admissible. In accordance with its decision to apply Article 29 § 3 of the Convention (see paragraph 4 above), the Court will immediately consider the merits of these complaints.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
A. The submissions of the parties
43. The applicant company argued that the licences for running its business constituted a possession for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and that ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 amounted to an interference with its right to property.
44. According to the applicant company, the measure applied to it had not been lawful because ANRTI had breached its own decision of 17 September 2003. In particular, on 17 September 2003 ANRTI had decided to institute a ten-day time-limit for the ninety-one companies concerned in order to allow them, inter alia, to present information about the change of their addresses. However, even though the applicant company had complied with the time-limit and presented all the necessary information, ANRTI had decided to disregard its own decision and to invalidate its licences.
45. Referring to the general interest served by the interference, the applicant company submitted that it agreed that in general terms the State was justified in its intention to secure to its inhabitants rapid and efficient telecommunications services at a reasonable cost. Therefore, the applicant company agreed that it could be said that the interference served a general interest.
46. In the applicant company’s opinion, the measure had not been proportionate to the allegedly protected general interest. According to it, the invalidation of the licences had had extremely serious consequences which had finally resulted in the closure of its business. Moreover, the company had started to be persecuted by the Centre for Fighting Economic Crime and Corruption and the tax authorities. Due to the concerted efforts of the State authorities and M., all the companies from the M..com group had been prevented from taking over the business and all of the clients were abusively taken from it by M.. As a result of that, the goodwill and the value of the company had suffered serious repercussions.
47. The applicant company accepted that it had breached the regulations in so far as its obligation to inform ANRTI within ten days of its change of address was concerned. However, that had been a very minor breach which had not had any adverse consequences. In particular, the address had only been changed from one of its offices to another and the Registration Chamber and the Tax Authorities had been informed immediately. Accordingly, such a minor technical breach could not justify a sanction of such severity.
48. The fact that the sanction was disproportionate was also proved by the subsequent amendment of section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI regulations (see paragraph 38 above) which took place one year after the invalidation of the applicant company’s licences.
49. Moreover, the authorities had done everything they could in order to prevent the applicant company from obtaining new licences. In particular, they had modified the ANRTI Regulations so that it would not be able to apply for new licences sooner than after six months (see paragraph 37 above).
50. In reply to the Government’s submission that it was open to it to apply for a new licence (see paragraph 58 below), the applicant sent the Court minutes of the ANRTI meetings, according to which company S.’s licence to run an internet café had been invalidated on 8 December 2003 and its application for a new licence had been rejected by ANRTI on 26 December 2003 on the basis of section 3.8.6 of the Regulations. It was only on 8 June 2004 that company S.’s application for a new licence had been upheld.
51. In the light of the above, the applicant company expressed the view that the conduct of the authorities showed that they had not been motivated by any genuine policy considerations.
52. In its submissions concerning the alleged violation of Article 14, the applicant company also pointed to the fact that none of the ninety-one companies which had been warned by ANRTI on 24 September 2003 were treated in the same way.
53. The applicant disputed the Government’s submission that its situation was different from that of the other ninety companies (see paragraph 59 below) and argued that while ANRTI did not specify in the minutes of its meetings the precise irregularities committed by each company in the list of ninety-one companies, it was clear that at least two of those companies had their licences suspended on 21 October 2003 on account of their failure to present information about the change of their addresses. The applicant sent the Court a copy of a document originating from ANRTI which supported the above submission and the authenticity of which had not been contested by the Government.
54. Referring to the Government’s submissions concerning companies A. N. and S. (see paragraph 60 below), the applicant company disagreed, and, relying on official documents from ANRTI, argued that while being part of the group of ninety-one companies, contrary to its own situation company A. had not complied with ANRTI’s warning. Nevertheless, its licence had been invalidated on the basis of section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI regulations only on 13 August 2004.
As to company N. the applicant submitted that its licence had been suspended along with those of fifty-nine other companies on 21 October 2003 (see paragraph 19 above) for failure to comply with ANRTI’s warning. The three-month suspension had been lifted on 25 May 2004.
Referring to company S., the applicant company argued that it had not been in a similar situation to them either. In the first place, it had not been on the list of ninety-one companies warned by ANRTI. Secondly, the Government had not submitted any information to show whether it had been warned in the same manner as M..com and whether it had been given a ten-day time limit with which it had complied. Moreover, company S. had been running an internet café, which was not comparable to the business run by the applicant company.
55. The Government did not dispute the fact that the licences constituted a possession within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Nor did they expressly disagree with the applicant concerning the existence of an interference with its right to property. However, they expressed the view that nobody had withdrawn the applicant’s licences; rather the licences had become invalid by the effect of the law a long time before 6 October 2003. According to them, the licences would have become invalid without ANRTI’s involvement, at the moment when the ten-day time limit provided for by section 3.5.2 of the Regulations had expired, that is, some ten or eleven months before the decision of 6 October 2003.
At the same time, the Government argued that ANRTI had drawn the applicant company’s attention to this irregularity and asked it to remedy it by letters of 11 July 2003 and 22 August 2003. They did not submit, however, copies of those letters.
56. The Government argued that the measure had been in accordance with section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI Regulations, which stated in very clear terms that failure to apply for modification of the address in a licence within ten days of the date of such modification gave rise to the invalidation of the licence.
57. They further argued that the company had been providing internet services to a large number of users and that its clients had to enjoy a good quality service. The lack of provision of adequate and timely information to clients gave reason to suspect the existence of illegal acts. Section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI Regulations was designed in the general interest to contribute to the reduction and elimination of violations of the law by companies operating in the field of internet services. The measure applied by ANRTI was in the general interest because ANRTI had to know where to contact the applicant company if a client lodged a complaint against it.
58. The Government argued that it was open to the applicant company to apply for a new licence. According to them the new section 3.8.6 only referred to situations where a licence had been withdrawn but not invalidated. They submitted the example of company S., which, according to them, being in exactly the same situation as the applicant company, had obtained a new licence within one month.
59. According to the Government, the situation of the applicant company had been different from that of the other ninety companies which had been warned by ANRTI on 24 September 2003. According to the Government, the other companies had been warned on account of other irregularities, namely failure to present to ANRTI annual reports and failure to pay regulatory taxes.
60. In support of their submission that the applicant company had not been discriminated against, the Government relied on the example of companies A., N. and S., which, according to them, were in a similar situation, and whose licences had also been invalidated by ANRTI.
61. The Government invoked for the first time before the Court new reasons to explain why the applicant company’s licence had been invalidated. In particular, they argued that one of the reasons for the invalidation was the fact that the applicant company had failed to inform ANRTI in due time why it had changed its name by adding the letters I.M. in front of it.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Whether the applicant company had “possessions” for the purpose of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention
62. It is undisputed between the parties that the applicant company’s licences constituted a possession for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
63. The Court notes that, according to its case-law, the termination of a licence to run a business amounts to an interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Tre Traktörer AB v. Sweden, judgment of 7 July 1989, Series A no. 159, § 53, and Bimer S.A. v. Moldova, no. 15084/03, § 49, 10 July 2007). The Court must therefore determine whether the measure applied to the applicant company by ANRTI amounted to an interference with its property rights.
2. Whether there has been an interference with the applicant company’s possessions and determination of the relevant rule under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
64. The Government did not expressly argue that there was no interference with the applicant company’s possessions; however, they submitted that ANRTI’s decision was a mere finding of a fact which had come into existence long before and emphasised the distinction between withdrawal and invalidation of licences (see paragraph 55 above). Insofar as these submissions are to be interpreted as meaning that ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 did not interfere with the possessions of the applicant company for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court is unable to accept this view. The Court notes in the first place that before 6 October 2003 the applicant company had been operating unhindered. Moreover, it is clear from the parties’ submissions that ANRTI was well aware long before 6 October 2003 of the applicant company’s failure to request a modification of the address in the text of its licences. ANRTI was informed by the applicant company about the change of address in May 2003 (see paragraph 10 above) and the latter even requested a new licence with the new address in it. For unknown reasons, ANRTI did not consider it necessary to invalidate the applicant company’s existing licences at that time and even issued it with a new one. Moreover, the Government implicitly admitted that ANRTI was well aware of the situation by submitting that in July 2003 it had drawn the applicant company’s attention to the irregularity and urged it to remedy it (see paragraph 55 above). In such circumstances, the Court cannot but note that ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 had the immediate and intended effect of preventing the applicant company from continuing to operate its business and of terminating its existing licences. The fact that the domestic authorities decided to attribute retroactive effect to ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 does not change that. Accordingly, the Court considers that ANRTI’s decision of 6 October 2003 had an effect identical to a termination of valid licences and thus constituted an interference with the applicant company’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of its possessions for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
65. Although the applicant company could not carry on its business, it retained economic rights in the form of its premises and its property assets. In these circumstances, as in the Bimer case, the termination of the licences is to be seen not as a deprivation of possessions for the purposes of the second sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 but as a measure of control of use of property which falls to be examined under the second paragraph of that Article.
66. In order to comply with the requirements of the second paragraph, it must be shown that the measure constituting the control of use was lawful, that it was “in accordance with the general interest”, and that there existed a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see Bimer, cited above, § 52).
3. Lawfulness and aim of the interference
67. In so far as the lawfulness of the measure is concerned, the Court notes that this issue is disputed between the parties. While apparently agreeing that section 3.5.7 of the ANRTI Regulations was accessible and foreseeable, the applicant argued that the measure had been contrary to ANRTI’s decision of 17 September 2003, by which it had been given a ten-day time-limit to remedy the situation. In the Court’s view, this is a factor which is relevant to the assessment of the proportionality of the measure. Therefore, it will leave the question of lawfulness open and focus on the proportionality of the measure.
As regards the legitimate aim served by the interference, in the light of the findings below, the Court has doubts as to whether the measures taken against the applicant company by the Moldovan authorities pursued any public interest aim. However, for the purposes of the present case, the Court will leave this question open too and will proceed to examine the question of proportionality.
4. Proportionality of the interference
68. The Court will consider at the outset the nature and the seriousness of the breach committed by the applicant company. Without underestimating the importance of State control in the field of internet communications, the Court cannot but note that the Government were only able to cite theoretical and abstract negative consequences of the applicant company’s failure to comply with the procedural requirement. They could not indicate any concrete detriment caused by the applicant company’s omission to have its address modified in the text of its licences. Indeed, it is common ground that ANRTI was well aware of the applicant company’s change of address and it had no difficulty in contacting M..com on 24 September 2003 (see paragraph 12 above). Moreover, it is similarly undisputed that the applicant company kept its old address and any attempt to contact it at that address would have certainly been successful. Immediately after changing address, the applicant company informed the State Registration Chamber and the Tax Authorities (see paragraph 9 above). Accordingly, the company could not be suspected of any intention to evade taxation in connection with its failure to notify its change of address to ANRTI. Nor had it been shown that any of the company’s clients had problems in contacting the company due to the change of address. It is also important to note that the applicant company did in fact inform ANRTI about its change of address in May 2003 and even requested a third licence using its new address. For reasons which ANRTI did not spell out at the time, the new licence was issued with the old address on it.
69. Against this background, the Court notes that the measure applied to the applicant company was of such severity that the company, which used to be the largest in Moldova in the field of internet communications, had to wind up its business and sell all of its assets within months. Not only did the measure have consequences for the future, but it was also applied retrospectively, thus prompting sanctions and investigations by various State authorities, such as the Tax Authorities and the Centre for Fighting Economic Crime and Corruption (see paragraph 32 above).
70. The Court must also have regard to the conduct of ANRTI in its dealings with the applicant company. It notes in this connection that the applicant company had operated at all times, notwithstanding the technical flaw in its licences, with the acquiescence of ANRTI. It recalls that ANRTI had been apprised of the change of address in May 2003, at the time of the applicant company’s application for a third licence. Without giving reasons, ANRTI failed to take note of the change of address and issued the applicant company with a new licence indicating the old address in it. Had ANRTI considered that the defect in the licence was a matter of public concern, it could have intervened at that stage. However, it failed to do so.
71. The Court further notes that in ANRTI’s letter of 17 September 2003 the applicant company was clearly led to believe that it could continue to operate provided it complied with the instructions contained therein within ten days. In these circumstances it can only be concluded that the applicant company, by submitting an application for the amendment of its licences within the time-limit, could reasonably expect that it would not incur any prejudice. Despite the encouragement given by it to the applicant company, ANRTI invalidated its licences on 6 October 2003 (see, mutatis mutandis, Pine Valley Developments Ltd and Others v. Ireland, judgment of 29 November 1991, Series A no. 222, § 51 and Stretch v. the United Kingdom, no. 44277/98, § 34, 24 June 2003).
72. The Court recalls in this connection that where an issue in the general interest is at stake it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, in an appropriate manner and with utmost consistency (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 120, ECHR 2000-I). It cannot be said that the conduct of ANRTI complied with these principles.
73. The Court has also given due consideration to the procedural safeguards available to the applicant company to defend its interests. It notes in the first place that the applicant company was not given an opportunity to appear and explain its position before ANRTI. Procedural safeguards also appear to have failed at the stage of the court proceedings. While the case was not one which required special expediency under the domestic law, the Court of Appeal appears to have acted with particular diligence in that respect. After setting the date of the first hearing, the Court of Appeal acceded to ANRTI’s request to speed up the proceedings and advanced the hearing by two weeks (see paragraph 21 above). Not only did the Court of Appeal decide the case in the applicant company’s absence, but it failed to provide reasons for dismissing the latter’s request for adjournment. The Court recalls in this connection that the matter to be examined by the Court of Appeal affected the applicant company’s economic survival (see paragraph 69 above).
74. Moreover, the domestic courts did not give due consideration to some of the major arguments raised by the applicant company in its defence, such as the lack of procedural safeguards before the ANRTI and the alleged discriminatory treatment. The examination carried out by the courts appears to have been very formalistic and limited to ascertaining whether the applicant company had failed to inform ANRTI about the change of its address. No balancing exercise appears to have been carried out between the general issue at stake and the sanction applied to the applicant company.
75. The Court further notes the applicant company’s allegation that it was the only one from the list of ninety-one companies to which such a severe measure was applied. The Government disputed this allegation and made two conflicting submissions. Firstly, they argued that the other ninety companies concerned had committed other, less serious irregularities, such as, inter alia, failure to present to ANRTI annual reports (see paragraph 59 above). Secondly, they argued that at least three other companies were in a similar position and were treated in a similar manner to the applicant company.
76. Having examined both submissions made by the Government, the Court cannot accept them. As regards the first one, it finds it inconsistent with the minutes of ANRTI’s meeting of 17 September 2003, in which it was clearly stated that the companies concerned had failed to pay a yearly regulatory fee and/or to present information about changes of address within the prescribed time-limits (see paragraph 11 above). The minutes do not contain reference to irregularities such as failure to present annual reports. Moreover, this submission was made for the first time by the Government in the proceedings before the Court, and must therefore be treated with caution especially in the absence of any form of substantiation (see, mutatis mutandis, Sarban v. Moldova, no. 3456/05, § 82, 4 October 2005). No such submissions appear to have been made by ANRTI during the domestic proceedings despite the applicant company’s clear and explicit contention about alleged discriminatory treatment (see paragraph 24 above). Regrettably, the Supreme Court of Justice disregarded the applicant company’s complaints about discrimination, apparently treating them as irrelevant.
77. As regards the Government’s second submission, the Court has examined the parties’ statements (see paragraphs 54 and 60 above) and the evidence adduced by them, and finds that the Government have failed to show that there were other companies in an analogous situation which were treated in the same manner as the applicant company.
78. The Court also notes that the above findings do not appear to be inconsistent with the previous practice of ANRTI as it appears from the minutes of its meetings of 12 June and 17 July 2003, when several companies had their licences suspended for failure to comply with section 3.5.2 of its Regulations (see paragraph 35 above). The Government did not contest the existence of such a practice.
79. The arbitrariness of the proceedings, the discriminatory treatment of the applicant company and the disproportionately harsh measure applied to it lead the Court to conclude that it has not been shown that the authorities followed any genuine and consistent policy considerations when invalidating the applicant company’s licences. Notwithstanding the margin of appreciation afforded to the State, a fair balance was not preserved in the present case and the applicant company was required to bear an individual and excessive burden, in violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
80. The applicant company also complained that by invalidating its licences the authorities had subjected it to discrimination in comparison to other companies in an analogous situation. As this complaint relates to the same matters as those considered under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court does not consider it necessary to examine it separately.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
81. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
82. The applicant company submitted that since its documents were seized by the Centre for Fighting Economic Crime and Corruption, it was unable to present any observations concerning the pecuniary damage sustained. Accordingly, it asked the Court to reserve the question of just satisfaction.
83. The Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. The question must accordingly be reserved and the further procedure fixed with due regard to the possibility of agreement being reached between the Moldovan Government and the applicant.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Declares the application admissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds that it is not necessary to examine separately the applicant’s complaint under Article 14 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
4. Holds
(a) that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision;
accordingly,
(b) reserves the said question;
(c) invites the Moldovan Government and the applicant company to submit, within the forthcoming three months, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement they may reach;
(d) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English and notified in writing on 8 April 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Lawrence Early Nicolas Bratza
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Violazione di P1-1; soddisfazione Equa riservata
QUARTA SEZIONE
CAUSA MEGADAT.COM SRL C. MOLDAVIA
(Richiesta n. 21151/04)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
8 aprile 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Megadat.com SRL c. Moldavia,
La Corte europea di Diritti umani (quarta Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Nicolas Bratza, Presidente, Lech Garlicki il Giovanni Bonello, Ljiljana Mijovic, David Thór Björgvinsson, Ján Šikuta, Päivi Hirvelä, giudici,
e Lorenzo Early, Cancelliere di Sezione ,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 18 marzo 2008,
consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in quella data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da in una richiesta (n. 21151/04) contro la Repubblica della Moldavia depositata per la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da M. .com SRL (“la società di richiedente”), una società registrata nella Repubblica della Moldavia, l’8 giugno 2004.
2. Il richiedente fu rappresentato dalla Sig.ra J. H., un avvocato che pratica in Chisinau. Il Governo della Moldavia (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal Sig. V. Grosu, il suo Agente.
3. Il richiedente addusse, in particolare, che la chiusura della società costituì una violazione dei suoi diritti sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione e che era stato discriminata contrariamente all’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso insieme con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo No.1.
4. Il 5 dicembre 2006 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta allo stesso tempo della sua ammissibilità.
5. Il giudice Pavlovschi, il giudice eletto a riguardo della Moldavia, si astenne dal riunirsi nella causa (Articolo 28 degli Articoli della Corte) prima che fosse notificato al Governo. L’8 febbraio 2007, il Governo, facendo seguito all’Articolo 29 § 1 (a), informò la Corte che era lieto di nominare al suo posto un altro giudice eletto e lasciò la scelta dell’ incaricato al Presidente della Camera. Il 18 settembre 2007, il Presidente nominò il Giudice Šikuta per riunirsi nella causa.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
6. Il richiedente, M. com SRL, è una società registrata nella Repubblica della Moldavia.
1. Sfondo alla causa
7. Al tempo degli eventi la società richiedente era il più grande provider di internet della Moldavia. Secondo lui, deteneva approssimativamente il settanta percento del mercato dei servizi di internet. Convenendo che la società richiedente era il più grande provider di internet del paese, il Governo contestò il rapporto della sua quota di mercato senza, comunque, presentare alcuna cifra alternativa.
8. La società richiedente aveva due licenze rilasciate dall'AGENZIA Regolatrice Nazionale per le Telecomunicazioni e l’ Informatica (“ANRTI”) per offrire internet e servizi di telefonia fissa. Le licenze erano rispettivamente valide sino al18 aprile 2007 e al 16 maggio 2007 e l'indirizzo 55, Strada Armeneasca era indicato in queste come l'indirizzo ufficiale della società richiedente.
9. La società aveva tre uffici in Chisinau. L’11 novembre 2002 la sua sede centrale fu trasferita dal suo ufficio sulla strada Armeneasca al suo ufficio sulla strada Stefan cel Mar. Il cambio di indirizzo della sede centrale fu registrato dalla Camera Statale di Registrazione e l’Autorità Fiscale fu informata. Comunque, la società richiedente non richiese all’ANRTI di cambiare l'indirizzo nel testo delle sue licenze.
10. Il 20 maggio 2003 la società richiedente richiese una terza licenza dall’ ANRTI indicando nella sua richiesta l'indirizzo nuovo della sua sede centrale. L’ANRTI rilasciò la nuova licenza nella quale veniva citato il vecchio indirizzo, senza dare qualsiasi ragioni per non aver indicato l'indirizzo nuovo.
2. L'invalidazione delle licenze della società richiedente
11. Il 17 settembre 2003 l’ANRTI tenne una riunione. Secondo i verbali dell'assemblea, trovò, che novantun società nel campo delle telecomunicazioni, incluso la società richiedente non erano riuscite a pagare una tassa annuale regolatrice e/o presentare informazioni sui cambi di indirizzo all'interno dei tempi-limiti prescritti. L’ANRTI decise di invitare quelle società ad eliminare le irregolarità entro dieci giorni ed li avvertì che era probabile che le loro licenze fossero sospese a causa di inadempienza.
12. In date non specificate alle novantun società, incluso la società di richiedente furono spedite lettere che richiedevano loro di conformarsi entro dieci giorni dalla data di ricevimento della lettera. Furono anche avvertite che era probabile che le loro licenze fossero sospese a causa di inadempienza in conformità alla sezione 3.4 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI. Alla società richiedente fu spedita tale lettera il 24 settembre 2003.
13. In seguito alle lettere dell’ ANRTI, solamente trenta-due società, incluso la società di richiedente si attennero alla richiesta.
14. Il 29 e il 30 settembre 2003 la società richiedente depositò dei documenti all’ ANRTI che indicavano il suo nuovo indirizzo, insieme con una richiesta di cambiare di conseguenza le sue licenze, e pagò la parcella regolatrice.
15. Venerdì 3 ottobre 2003 l’ANRTI informò la società richiedente che aveva delle domande riguardo ai documenti presentati. In particolare aveva una domanda riguardo al contratto d'affitto della nuova sede centrale della società richiedente e sul nome della società richiedente. L’ANRTI informò la società richiedente che l’elaborazione della sua richiesta riguardo alla correzione delle licenze sarebbe stata sospesa finché non avesse presentato le informazioni richieste.
16. Lunedì 6 ottobre 2003 l’ANRTI tenne una riunione in cui adottò una decisione riguardo alla società richiedente. In particolare reiterò il contenuto della sezione 15 della Legge sull’ Autorizzazione e della sezione 3.5.7 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI secondo le quali le licenze che non erano state cambiate entro dieci giorni avrebbero dovuto essere dichiarate nulle. L’ANRTI trovò che quelle disposizioni erano applicabili alla causa della società richiedente, e che le sue licenze non erano perciò più valide.
17. Nella stessa data l’ANRTI scrisse all'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale, al l’Autorità Fiscale al Centro per la Lotta contro il Crimine Economico e la Corruzione ed al Ministero degli Affari Interni che la società richiedente aveva cambiato il suo indirizzo il 16 novembre 2002 ma che non era riuscita a richiedere all’ANRTI di provvedere al corrispondente cambio nelle sue licenze. In simili condizioni, la società richiedente commerciava da undici mesi con una licenza nulla. L’ANRTI richiese alle autorità di verificare se la società richiedente avrebbe dovuto essere sanzionata in conformità con la legge.
18. Il 9 ottobre 2003 l’ANRTI corresse le Regolamentazioni riguardo all'uscita di licenze per prevedere che un'entità la cui licenza è stata ritirata potesse richiedere una nuova licenza solamente dopo sei mesi.
19. Il 21 ottobre 2003 l’ANRTI tenne una riunione durante la quale trovò che cinquanta-nove delle novantun società che aveva avvertito, in conformità con la sua decisione del 17 settembre 2003 non si erano attenute all'avvertimento. Decise di sospendere le loro licenze per tre mesi e di avvertirli che in caso di inadempienza durante il periodo di sospensione, le loro licenze sarebbero state ritirate. Appare dai documenti presentati dalle parti che la società richiedente era l’unica ad avere la sua licenza invalidata.
3. Gli atti fra M.com ed ANRTI
20. Il 24 ottobre 2003 la società richiedente intentò un'azione amministrativa contro l’ANRTI dibattendo, inter alia che la misura che gli era stata richiesta era illegale e sproporzionata perché la società richiedente aveva avuto tre uffici diversi in Chisinau dei quali l’ANRTI era stato sempre consapevole. Erano avvenuto solamente il cambio di indirizzo perché la sede centrale della società richiedente si trasferiva dall'uno di quegli uffici ad un altro. L'autorità fiscale era stata informata prontamente circa il cambio e così i cambi di indirizzo non avevano condotto ad una mancanza nel pagamento delle tasse o ad un calo nella qualità di servizi previsti dalla società richiedente. Inoltre, la decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 era stata adottata in violazione della procedura, perché la società richiedente non era stata invitata alla riunione e l’ANRTI aveva trascurato le sue proprie istruzioni date alla società richiedente il 3 ottobre 2003.
21. Il 25 novembre 2003 la Corte d'appello ordinò una sospensione dell'esecuzione della decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003. Stabilì anche il 16 dicembre 2003 come data della prima udienza nella causa. Più tardi, su richiesta dell’ANRTI la data è stata cambiata al 2 dicembre 2003.
22. Il 1 dicembre 2003 il rappresentante della società richiedente depositò una richiesta per aggiornamento dell'udienza del 2 dicembre per il fatto che era coinvolto una udienza precedentemente fissata da un'altra corte nella stessa data ed alla stesso ora.
23. Il 2 dicembre 2003 la Corte d'appello tenne un'udienza in assenza del rappresentante della società richiedente e respinse la seconda azione. La corte considerò, inter l'alia che poiché la società i richiedente non aveva informato l’ ANRTI del cambio di indirizzo, le disposizioni della sezione 3.5.7 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ANRTI erano applicabili.
24. La società richiedente fece ricorso contro la decisione dibattendo, inter alia, che non era gli stata regalata un'opportunità di partecipare all'udienza di fronte alla corte di prima- istanza. Presentò che, secondo il Codice di Procedura Civile, la corte aveva diritto a cancellare la causa dal ruolo delle cause se avesse considerato che il richiedente non era riuscito a comparire senza una giustificazione plausibile, ma non ad esaminare la causa in sua assenza. Presentò anche che dichiarando le licenze invalide, l’ANRTI aveva violato la sua propria decisione del 17 settembre 2003. Era la pratica usuale dell’ ANRTI richiedere informazioni riguardo a cambi di indirizzo e sanzionare società che non si attenevano sospendendo le loro licenze. La società richiedente attrasse l’attenzione su due altre decisioni dello stesso genere datate 12 giugno 2003 e 17 luglio 2003. In questa causa, comunque la società richiedente si era attenuta pienamente alla decisione dell’ ANRTI del 17 settembre 2003 presentando informazioni sul i nuovo indirizzo all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto. Ciononostante, l’ANRTI aveva chiesto informazioni supplementari venerdì 3 ottobre 2003 e senza aspettare che la società richiedente provvedesse, aveva deciso di dichiarare le licenze invalide il lunedì 6 ottobre 2003.
La società richiedente dibatté anche che la decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 era stata adottata in violazione seria della procedura perché la società richiedente non era stata informata tre giorni in anticipo della riunione del 6 ottobre 2003 e non vi era stata invitata.
Infine, la società richiedente dibatté che la decisione dell’ANRTI di dichiarare le sue licenze invalide era discriminatoria poiché le altre novanta società elencate nella decisione dell’ ANRTI del 17 settembre 2003 non erano state sottoposte a tale severa misura.
25. Il 3 marzo 2004 la Corte di giustizia Suprema respinse l'appello della società richiedente e trovò, inter alia che era stata chiamata in causa all'udienza del 2 dicembre 2003 e che la sua richiesta per aggiornamento non poteva creare un obbligo da parte della Corte d'appello per aggiornare l'udienza. Inoltre, la decisione del 6 ottobre 2003 era legale poiché la società richiedente ammise di aver cambiato il suo indirizzo, e secondo la sezione 3.5.7 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI una mancanza nel richiedere una modifica di un indirizzo in una licenza conduceva al suo invalidamento. La Corte Suprema non si riferì alle osservazioni della società richiedente sul suo trattamento discriminatorio, sulla pratica usuale dell’ ANRTI di richiedere informazioni sui cambi di indirizzo e sulla violazione da parte dell’ ANRTI della sua propria decisione del 17 settembre 2003.
26. Uno dei membri del pannello della Corte Suprema, il Giudice D. Visterniceanu non fu d'accordo con l'opinione della maggioranza e scrisse un'opinione dissidente. Presentò, inter alia che la corte di prima -istanza non si era rivolta a tutte le osservazioni rese dalla società richiedente ed aveva esaminato illegalmente la causa in sua assenza. Inoltre, solamente un provvediemnto delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI era stato applicato, mentre era necessario esaminare la causa in una luce più ampia e applicare tutta la legislazione attinente. Infine, la decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 contravvenne alla sua decisione del 17 settembre 2003. Il giudice Visterniceanu considerò che la Corte Suprema avrebbe dovuto annullare la sentenza della corte di prima -istanza ed avrebbe dovuto rinviare la causa per un nuovo riesame.
4. I tentativi della società i richiedente di salvare i suoi affari e le ripercussioni dell'invalidazione delle sue licenze
27. Nel frattempo, la società richiedente ha trasferito tutti i suoi contratti con i clienti ad una società che faceva parte dello stesso gruppo, M.. com I. che aveva licenze valide. Comunque, il monopolio Statale nelle telecomunicazioni, M., rifiutò di firmare i contratti con la seconda società e le rese impossibile continuare a lavorare.
28. Il 16 marzo 2004 ANRTI e M. informarono i clienti della società richiedente che il 17 marzo il loro collegamento internet sarebbe stato interrotto e che avrebbero offerto loro dei servizi internet da parte di M. senza qualsiasi onere di collegamento.
29. Il 17 marzo 2004 M. eseguì la disconnessione della società richiedente e di M. .com I. da internet e tutti le loro apparecchiature nei locali di M. furono disconnesse dall'alimentazione elettrica.
30. A luglio 2004 le licenze di M.. com I. fu ritirata dall’ ANRTI.
31. Come risultato di ciò che precede, la società richiedente e M.. com I. furono costrette a chiudere l’attività e a vendere tutti i loro beni. Uno settimana più tardi, il presidente della società richiedente, il Sig. E. M. fu arrestato per aver manifestato pacificamente contro la chiusura della sua società.
32. A seguito della lettera dell’ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra) l’ Autorità Fiscale impose un multa alla società richiedente per aver operato da undici mesi senza una licenza valida ed il CFECC iniziò un'indagine in seguito della quale come risultato tutta la contabilità documentata della società richiedente fu sequestrato.
5. Reazioni internazionali
33. Il 18 marzo 2004 le Ambasciate degli Stati Uniti d’ America, il Regno Unito, Francia, Germania, Polonia, Romania e l'Ungheria, così come il Consiglio d’ Europa, la Fmi e missioni della Banca Mondiale in Moldavia emisero una dichiarazione unita esprimendo preoccupazione sugli eventi che circondano la chiusura della società richiedente. La dichiarazione affermò, inter alia, ciò che segue: “Le addotte violazioni delle procedure di registrazione non sembrano giustificare una decisione di fermare il funzionamento di una società commerciale. ... Noi esortiamo M. e le autorità attinenti a riconsiderare questa questione. Questo sembra più importante nella prospettiva dell'impegno delle autorità pubbliche della Moldavia alle norme europee e ai valori.”
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE E PRATICA
34. La Sezione 3.4 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI prevede che nel caso di inadempienza da parte di un beneficiario di licenza delle condizioni esposte nella licenza, la licenza può essere sospesa per un periodo di tre mesi. Quando l’ANRTI trova simile inadempienza, avverte il beneficiario della licenza e gli dà un termine massimo per rimediare al problema. Se il problema non viene rimediato entro quel periodo, l’ANRTI può sospendere la licenza per un periodo di tre mesi.
35. Il 12 giugno 2003 l’ANRTI avvertì molte società del loro mancato pagamento e/o delle tasse regolatrici per informarlo in merito loro cambi di indirizzo. Alle società furono dati dieci giorni per rimediare alle violazioni. Poiché alcuni di loro non conformarono, il 17 luglio 2003,l’ANRTI decise di sospendere le loro licenze per tre mesi.
36. Le disposizioni attinenti delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI riguardo la modifica di licenze al tempo dei fatti erano simili alle disposizioni della sezione 15 della Legge sull’ Autorizzazione e si leggono come segue:
3.5.1 che una licenza dovrebbe essere cambiata quando il nome della società del beneficiario o altra informazioni contenute nella licenza sono cambiate;
3.5.2 quando le ragioni per cambiare una licenza sono divenute evidenti, il beneficiario farà domanda all’ ANRTI per la sua modifica entro dieci giorni...
3.5.7 una licenza che non è stata cambiata all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto non è valida.
37. Il 9 ottobre 2003 la seguente disposizione fu aggiunta alle Regolamentazioni:
3.8.6 i precedenti beneficiari le cui licenze furono ritirate... possono rifare domanda per le licenze nuove solamente dopo un periodo di sei mesi contando dal giorno del ritiro.
38. Il 24 settembre 2004 la sezione 3.5.7 delle Regolamentazioni fu corretta nel modo seguente:
3.5.7 nel caso in cui una licenza non è stata cambiata all'interno del tempo-limite prescritto, la Commissione ha diritto a applicare sanzioni amministrative o ritirare parzialmente o totalmente la licenza.
LA LEGGE
39. La società richiedente dibatté che l'invalidazione delle sue licenze aveva violato il suo diritto garantito sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione che prevede:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto che nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale.
Comunque, le disposizioni precedenti non possono in qualsiasi modo danneggiare il diritto di un Stato di eseguire simili leggi come ritiene necessario per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o assicurare il pagamento di tasse o gli altri contributi o sanzioni penali.”
40. La società richiedente presentò inoltre che era stata vittima della discriminazione a seguito della decisione delle autorità di invalidare le sue licenze, poiché avevano trattato differentemente novanta altre società che erano in una situazione simile. Si appellò all’ Articolo 14 della Convenzione che prevede:
“Il godimento dei diritti e le libertà riconosciute [dalla] Convenzione saranno assicurati senza discriminazione qualsiasi basata sul sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o altro, nazionalità od origine sociale, appartenenza a una minoranza nazionale, possedimenti, nascita o altro status.”
I. L'AMMISSIBILITÀ DELLE LAGNANZE
41. Nella sua richiesta iniziale, la società richiedente presentò anche una lagnanza sotto l’Articolo 6 della Convenzione. Nelle sue osservazioni sull'ammissibilità e meriti chiese comunque, alla Corte di non procedere all'esame di questa lagnanza. La Corte non trova nessuna ragione per esaminarla.
42. Allo stesso tempo, la Corte considera, che il resto delle lagnanze della società richiedente ponga questioni di fatto e diritto sufficientemente serie la cui determinazione dovrebbe dipendere da un esame dei meriti, e nessun altro motivo per dichiararle inammissibili è stato stabilito. La Corte dichiara perciò questa parte della richiesta ammissibile. In conformità con la sua decisione di applicare l’Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 4 sopra), la Corte considererà immediatamente i meriti di queste lagnanze.
II. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
A. Le osservazioni delle parti
43. La società richiedente dibatté che le licenze per gestire i suoi affari costituiscono una proprietà ai fini di Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 e che la decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 corrispose ad un'interferenza col suo diritto alla proprietà.
44. Secondo la società richiedente, la misura applicata non era stata legale perché l’ANRTI aveva violato la sua propria decisione del 17 settembre 2003. In particolare, il 17 settembre 2003 l’ANRTI stabilì un tempo-limite di dieci giorni per le novantun società riguardate per permettere loro , inter alia, di presentare informazioni sul cambio dei loro indirizzi. Comunque, anche se la società richiedente si era attenuta al tempo-limite ed aveva presentato tutte le informazioni necessarie, l’ANRTI aveva deciso di trascurare la sua propria decisione ed invalidare le sue licenze.
45. Riferendosi all'interesse generale che giustifica l'interferenza, la società richiedente presentò si è convenuto che in termini generali lo Stato fu giustificato nella sua intenzione di assicurare ai suoi abitanti servizi di telecomunicazioni rapidi ed efficienti ad un costo ragionevole. Perciò, la società richiedente concordò sul fatto che si potesse dire l'interferenza servì un interesse generale.
46. Nell'opinione della società richiedente, la misura non era stata proporzionata al presunto interesse generale protetto. Secondo lei, l'invalidazione delle licenze aveva avuto conseguenze estremamente serie che alla fine avevano dato luogo alla chiusura dei suoi affari. Inoltre, la società aveva iniziato ad essere perseguitata dal Centro per la Lotta contro il Crimine Economico e la Corruzione e dalle autorità fiscali. A causa degli sforzi concertati le autorità Statali e M., a tutte le società del gruppo M.. com era stato impedito di portare avanti gli affari e tutti i clienti furono assorbiti abusivamente da M.. Come un risultato di questo, l'avviamento ed il valore della società avevano sofferto ripercussioni serie.
47. La società richiedente accettò che aveva violato e regolamentazioni riguardo al suo obbligo d’informare l’ANRTI entro dieci giorni dal suo cambio di indirizzo riguardato. Comunque, questa era stata una violazione minore che non aveva avuto alcuna conseguenza avversa. In particolare, l'indirizzo era cambiato solamente da uno dei suoi uffici ad un altro e la Camera di Registrazione e le Autorità Fiscali erano state immediatamente informate. Di conseguenza, tale violazione tecnica e minore non poteva giustificare una sanzione di simile gravità.
48. Il fatto che la sanzione fosse sproporzionata era provato anche dal successivo emendamento della sezione 3.5.7 delle regolamentazioni dell’ANRTI (vedere paragrafo 38 sopra) avvenuto un anno dopo l'invalidazione delle licenze della società di richiedente.
49. Inoltre, le autorità avevano fatto tutto quello che potevano per impedire alla società richiedente di ottenere licenze nuove. In particolare, loro avevano cambiato le Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI così che non sarebbe stata in grado di fare domanda per nuove licenze prima di sei mesi (vedere paragrafo 37 sopra).
50. In replica all'osservazione del Governo che era disposto a fare domanda per una nuova licenza (vedere paragrafo 58 sotto), il richiedente spedì alla Corte i verbali delle assemblee dell’ ANRTI secondo i quali la licenza della società S. per gestire un di internet caffè era stata invalidata l’ 8 dicembre 2003 e la sua richiesta per una nuova licenza era stata respinta dall’ ANRTI il 26 dicembre 2003 sulla base della sezione 3.8.6 delle Regolamentazioni. Solamente il 8 giugno 2004 la richiesta della società S. per una nuova licenza era stata sostenuta.
51. Alla luce di ciò che precede, la società richiedente espresse la prospettiva che la condotta delle autorità ha mostrato che non erano state motivate da una qualsiasi considerazione politica genuina.
52. Nelle sue osservazioni riguardo alla violazione addotta dell’ Articolo 14, la società richiedente sottolineò anche al fatto che nessuna delle novantun società che erano state avvertite dall’ ANRTI il 24 settembre 2003 fu trattata allo stesso modo.
53. Il richiedente discusse l'osservazione del Governo secondo la quale la sua situazione era diversa da quella delle altre novanta società (vedere paragrafo 59 sotto) e dibatté che mentre l’ANRTI non specificò nei verbali delle sue riunioni le irregolarità precise commesse da ogni società delle novantun società, era chiaro che almeno due di quelle società avevano avuto le loro licenze sospese il 21 ottobre 2003 a causa della loro mancanza nel presentare informazioni sul cambio dei loro indirizzi. Il richiedente spedì alla Corte una copia di un documento attribuibile all’ ANRTI che sosteneva l'osservazione precedente e la cui autenticità non era stata contestato dal Governo.
54. Riferendosi alle osservazioni del Governo riguardo alla società A. N. e S. (vedere paragrafo 60 sotto), la società di richiedente non fu d'accordo, e, appellandosi a documenti ufficiali dell’ ANRTI, dibatté che benché facesse parte del gruppo di novantun società, al contrario della sua situazione della sua propria società A. non si era attenuto all’avvertimento dell’ ANRTI. La sua licenza era stata invalidata ciononostante, sulla base della sezione 3.5.7 delle regolamentazioni dell’ANRTI solamente il 13 agosto 2004.
Riguardo alla società N. il richiedente ha presentato che la sua licenza era stata sospesa insieme a quella di cinquanta-nove altre società il 21 ottobre 2003 (vedere paragrafo 19 sopra) per inosservanza dell’avvertimento dell’ ANRTI. La sospensione di tre mesi era stata tolta il 25 maggio 2004.
Riferendosi alla società S., la società richiedente dibatté che non era stata in una situazione simile alla loro neanche lei. In primo luogo, non era nella lista delle novantun società avvertite dall’ANRTI. In secondo luogo, il Governo non aveva presentato alcuna informazione per mostrare se fosse stata avvertita alla stessa maniera di M.. com e se le era stato dato un termine di decadenza di dieci giorni che aveva osservato. Inoltre, la società S. stava gestendo un internet caffè che non era comparabile agli affari amministrati dalla società richiedente.
55. Il Governo non discusse il fatto che le licenze costituiscono una proprietà all'interno del significato di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1. Né fu espressamente in disaccordo col richiedente riguardo all'esistenza di un'interferenza col suo diritto alla proprietà. Comunque, espresse la prospettiva che nessuno aveva ritirato le licenze del richiedente; piuttosto le licenze erano divenute nulle per effetto della legge molto tempo prima del 6 ottobre 2003. Secondo loro, le licenze sarebbero divenute nulle senza il coinvolgimento dell’ ANRTI, dal momento che il termine di decadenza di dieci giorni previsto dalla sezione 3.5.2 delle Regolamentazioni era scaduto, e cioè, dai dieci agli undici mesi prima della decisione del 6 ottobre 2003.
Allo stesso tempo, il Governo dibatté, che l’ANRTI aveva attratto l'attenzione della società i richiedente sulle irregolarità ed aveva chiesto di rimediarle con lettere del di 11 luglio 2003 e del 22 agosto 2003. Comunque, non presentò copie di quelle lettere.
56. Il Governo dibatté che la misura era stata in conformità con la sezione 3.5.7 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI che affermavano in termini molto chiari l’inosservanza di fare domanda per modifica dell'indirizzo in una licenza entro dieci giorni dalla data di simile modifica generava l'invalidazione della licenza.
57. Dibatté inoltre che la società stava offrendo servizi di internet ad un gran numero di utenti e che i suoi clienti dovevano godere un buon servizio di qualità. La mancanza di disponibilità di informazioni adeguate ed opportune ai clienti diede ragione di sospettare l'esistenza di atti illegali. La sezione 3.5.7 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI fu progettata nell'interesse generale per contribuire alla riduzione e all'eliminazione di violazioni della legge da parte di società che operano nel campo di servizi di internet. La misura applicata dall’ ANRTI era nell'interesse generale perché l’ANRTI doveva sapere dove contattare la società richiedente se un cliente avesse presentato un reclamo contro questa.
58. Il Governo dibatté che era aperta alla società richiedente la possibilità di fare domanda per una nuova licenza. Secondo lui la nuova sezione 3.8.6 si riferiva solamente a situazioni in cui una licenza era stata ritirata ma non era stata invalidata. Presentò l'esempio della società S. che, secondo lui, precisamente nella stessa situazione della società richiedente, aveva ottenuto una licenza nuova entro un mese.
59. Secondo il Governo, la situazione della società richiedente era stata diversa da che delle altre novanta società che erano state avvertite dall’ ANRTI il 24 settembre 2003. Secondo il Governo, le altre società erano state avvertite riguardo ad altre irregolarità, vale a dire inosservanza nel presentare alle relazioni annuali all’ ANRTI e inosservanza del pagamento di tasse regolatrici.
60. In appoggio della sua osservazione per la quale la società richiedente non era stata discriminata, il Governo si appellò all'esempio della società A., N. e S. che, secondo lui, erano in una situazione simile, e le cui licenze erano state invalidate allo stesso modo dall’ ANRTI.
61. Il Governo invocò per la prima volta di fronte alla Corte nuove ragioni per spiegare perché la licenza della società richiedente era stata invalidata. In particolare, dibatté che una delle ragioni per l'invalidazione era il fatto che la società richiedente non aveva informato l’ ANRTI in tempo dovuto del perché aveva cambiato il suo nome aggiungendo prima di questo le lettere I.M..
B. la valutazione della Corte
1. Se la società richiedente aveva “la proprietà” ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione
62. È incontrastato fra le parti che le licenze della società richiedente costituivano una proprietà ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
63. La Corte nota che, secondo la sua giurisprudenza, la conclusione di una licenza per gestire un’attività commerciale corrisponde ad un'interferenza col diritto al godimento tranquillo di proprietà garantito dall’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedere Tre Traktörer Ab c. Svezia, sentenza del 7 luglio 1989 Serie A n. 159, § 53, e Bimer S.A. c. Moldavia, n. 15084/03, § 49 10 luglio 2007). La Corte deve determinare perciò se la misura applicata alla società richiedente dall’ ANRTI corrispose ad un'interferenza coi suoi diritti di proprietà.
2. Se c'è stata un'interferenza con la proprietà della società richiedente e determinazione dell'articolo attinente sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
64. Il Governo non dibatté espressamente che non c'era interferenza con la proprietà della società richiedente; comunque, presentò che la decisione dell’ ANRTI era la sola costatazione di un fatto che era entrato in esistenza molto tempo prima ed enfatizzò la distinzione fra ritiro ed invalidazione di licenze (veda paragrafo 55 sopra). Pertanto se queste osservazioni dovranno essere interpretate nel senso che la decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 non interferì con la proprietà della società richiedente ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte non è capace di accettare questa prospettiva. La Corte nota in primo luogo che prima del 6 ottobre 2003 la società richiedente stava operando senza ostacoli. Inoltre, è chiaro dalle osservazioni delle parti che l’ANRTI era ben consapevole ben prima del 6 ottobre 2003 dell’inosservanza della società richiedente nel richiedere una modifica dell'indirizzo nel testo delle sue licenze. L’ANRTI fu informato dalla società richiedente del cambio di indirizzo nel maggio 2003 (vedere paragrafo 10 sopra) e questa richiese anche una nuova licenza con l'indirizzo nuovo. Per ragioni ignote, l’ANRTI non considerò necessario invalidare le licenze esistenti della società richiedente a quel tempo ed ne emise anche una nuova. Il Governo ammise implicitamente inoltre, che l’ANRTI era ben consapevole della situazione presentando che nel luglio 2003 aveva attratto l'attenzione della società richiedente sull'irregolarità e l'aveva esortata a rimediarla (vedere paragrafo 55 sopra). In simile circostanze, la Corte può prendere solo nota che la decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 aveva l'effetto immediato e intenzionale di impedire alla società di richiedente di continuare portare avanti i suoi affari e di terminare le sue licenze esistenti. Il fatto che le autorità nazionali decisero di attribuire un effetto retroattivo alla decisione dell’ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 non cambia questo aspetto. Di conseguenza, la Corte considera che la decisione dell’ ANRTI del 6 ottobre 2003 aveva un effetto identico ad una chiusura di licenze valide e così costituì un'interferenza col diritto della società richiedente al godimento tranquillo della sua proprietà ai fini di Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
65. Benché la società richiedente non potesse continuare i suoi affari, mantenne dei diritti economici nella forma dei suoi locali ed i suoi beni di proprietà. In queste circostanze, come nella causa Bimer, la chiusura delle licenze non sarà considerata una privazione di proprietà ai fini della seconda frase dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 ma come una misura di controllo dell’ uso di proprietà che deve essere esaminata sotto il secondo paragrafo di quell'Articolo.
66. Per attenersi ai requisiti del secondo paragrafo deve essere mostrato che la misura che costituisce il controllo dell’ uso era legale, che era “in conformità con l'interesse generale”, e che esisteva una relazione ragionevole di proporzionalità fra i mezzi utilizzati e lo scopo che si cercava di realizzare (vedere Bimer, citata sopra, § 52).
3. La legalità e lo scopo dell'interferenza
67. In quanto alla legalità della misura riguardata, la Corte nota che questo problema è discusso fra le parti. Mentre apparentemente convenne sul fatto che la sezione 3.5.7 delle Regolamentazioni dell’ ANRTI era accessibile e prevedibile, il richiedente dibatté che la misura era stata contraria alla decisione dell’ ANRTI del 17 settembre 2003 con la quale era stato dato un tempo-limite di dieci giorni per rimediare alla situazione. Nella prospettiva della Corte, questo è un fattore che è attinente alla valutazione della proporzionalità della misura. Perciò, lascerà la questione della legalità aperta e si concentrerà sulla proporzionalità della misura.
Riguardo allo scopo legittimo perseguito dall'interferenza, alla luce delle sentenze sotto, la Corte ha dubbi in merito al fatto se le misure prese contro la società di richiedente dalle autorità di Moldove abbiano perseguito un qualunque scopo di interesse pubblico. Ai fini della presente causa, la Corte lascerà comunque, anche questa questione aperta e procederà ad esaminare la questione della proporzionalità.
4. La proporzionalità dell'interferenza
68. La Corte considererà all'inizio la natura e la serietà della violazione commessa dalla società richiedente. Senza sottovalutare l'importanza del controllo Statale nel campo delle comunicazioni di internet, la Corte non può che notare che il Governo sia in grado solamente di citare conseguenze negative e teoretiche ed astratte dell'inosservanza della società richiedente del requisito procedurale. Non è riuscito ad indicare un qualsiasi danno concreto causato dall'omissione della società richiedente per avere cambiato il suo indirizzo nel testo delle sue licenze. Effettivamente, è fatto comune che l’ANRTI era bene consapevole del cambio di indirizzo della società i richiedente e non aveva avuto difficoltà nel contattare M .. com il 24 settembre 2003 (vedere paragrafo 12 sopra). È inoltre allo stesso modo incontrastato che la società richiedente mantenne il suo vecchio indirizzo e qualsiasi tentativo di contattarla a quel indirizzo avrebbe avuto successo. Immediatamente dopo avere cambiato indirizzo, la società richiedente informò la Camera di Registrazione Statale e le Autorità Fiscali (vedere paragrafo 9 sopra). Di conseguenza, la società non poteva essere sospettata di qualsiasi intenzione di evadere il fisco in collegamento con la sua inosservanza nella notifica del suo cambio di indirizzo all’ ANRTI. Né era stato mostrato che qualsiasi dei clienti della società avevano avuto problemi nel contattare la società a causa del cambio di indirizzo. È anche importante notare che la società richiedente aveva informato l’ ANRTI sul suo cambio di indirizzo nel maggio 2003 ed anche aveva richiesto una terza licenza utilizzando il suo indirizzo nuovo. Per ragioni che l’ANRTI non spiegò a quel tempo, la licenza nuova fu emessa col vecchio indirizzo.
69. In questo scenario, la Corte nota, che la misura applicata alla società richiedente era di simile gravità che la società che era la più grande nel campo di comunicazioni di internet della Moldavia dovette abbandonare i suoi affari e vendere tutti i suoi beni in pochi mesi. Non solo la misura aveva conseguenze per il futuro, ma fu applicata anche retrospettivamente, sollecitando così sanzioni ed indagini dalle varie autorità Statali, come le Autorità Fiscali ed il Centro per la Lotta contro il Crimine Economico e la Corruzione (vedere paragrafo 32 sopra).
70. La Corte deve avere anche riguardo alla condotta dell’ ANRTI nelle sue rapporti con la società i richiedente. Nota in questa connessione che la società richiedente aveva sempre operato, nonostante il difetto tecnico nelle sue licenze, con il benestare dell’ ANRTI. Ricorda che l’ANRTI era stato informato del cambio di indirizzo nel maggio 2003, al tempo della richiesta della società richiedente di una terza licenza. Senza dare ragioni, l’ANRTI non prese nota del cambio di indirizzo ed emise alla società richiedente una nuova licenza che indicava il vecchio indirizzo. Se l’ANRTI avesse considerato che il difetto nella licenza era una questione di preoccupazione pubblica, avrebbe potuto intervenire a quello stadio. Comunque, non riuscì a fare così.
71. La Corte nota ulteriormente che nella lettera dell’ANRTI del 17 settembre 2003 la società richiedente fu chiaramente condotta a credere che potesse continuare ad operare purché si era attenuta alle istruzioni contenute entro dieci giorni. In queste circostanze può essere concluso solamente che la società richiedente, presentando una richiesta per la correzione delle sue licenze all'interno del tempo-limite potesse aspettarsi ragionevolmente che non sarebbe incorsa in alcun pregiudizio. Nonostante l'incoraggiamento dato alla società richiedente, l’ANRTI invalidò le sue licenze il 6 ottobre 2003 (vedere, mutatis mutandis,Pine Valley Development Ltd ed Altri c. Irlanda, sentenza di 29 novembre 1991 la Serie A n. 222, § 51 e Stretch c. il Regno Unito, n. 44277/98, § 34 24 giugno 2003).
72. La Corte richiama in questo contesto che dove è in pericolo un problema nell'interesse generale spetta alle autorità pubbliche agire a tempo debito, in una maniera appropriata e con la massima consistenza (vedere Beyeler c. l'Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 120 ECHR 2000-io). Non si può dire che la condotta dell’ ANRTI si attenne a questi principi.
73. La Corte ha dato anche la dovuta considerazione alle salvaguardie procedurali disponibili alla società richiedente per difendere i suoi interessi. Nota in primo luogo che alla società richiedente non fu data un'opportunità di apparire e di spiegare la sua posizione di fronte all’ ANRTI. Le salvaguardie procedurali sembrano anche avere fallito allo stadio degli atti. Mentre la causa non era di quelle che richiedevano un interesse speciale sotto il diritto nazionale, la Corte d'appello sembra avere agito con particolare diligenza a quel il riguardo. Dopo avere stabilito la data della prima udienza, la Corte d'appello acconsentì alla richiesta dell’ ANRTI ad accelerare i procedimenti ed anticipare l'udienza di due settimane (vedere paragrafo 21 sopra). Non solo la Corte d'appello decise la causa in assenza della società richiedente, ma non riuscì ad offrire ragioni per respingere la seconda richiesta per aggiornamento. La Corte richiama in questo contesto che l’argomento che doveva essere esaminato dalla Corte d'appello colpì la sopravvivenza economica della società di richiedente (vedere paragrafo 69 sopra).
74. Inoltre, le corti nazionali non diedero la dovuta considerazione ad alcuni dei notevoli argomenti sollevati dalla società richiedente in sua difesa, come la mancanza delle salvaguardie procedurali di fronte all'ANRTI ed il trattamento discriminatorio addotto. L'esame eseguito dalle corti sembra essere stato molto formalistico e limitato ad accertare se la società richiedente non avesse informato l’ ANRTI del cambio del suo indirizzo. Nessun esercizio di equilibrio sembra essere stato eseguito fra il problema generale in gioco e la sanzione applicata alla società di richiedente.
75. La Corte nota inoltre la dichiarazione della società richiedente secondo la quale era la sola delle novantun società della lista al quale tale misura severa fu applicata. Il Governo discusse questa dichiarazione e fece due osservazioni contraddittorie. In primo luogo, dibatté che le altre novanta società riguardate avevano commesso altre irregolarità meno serie, come, inter l'alia, la mancata presentazioni di relazioni annuali all’ ANRTI (vedere paragrafo 59 sopra). In secondo luogo, dibatté che almeno tre altre società erano in una posizione simile e furono trattate in una maniera simile alla società di richiedente.
76. Avendo esaminato entrambe le osservazioni rese dal Governo, la Corte non può accettarle. Riguardo alla prima, trova incoerente con i verbali dell’assembla dell’ ANRTI del 17 settembre 2003 nei quali chiaramente fu affermato che le società riguardate non avevano pagato una tassa regolatrice e/o presentato informazioni annuali sui cambi di indirizzo all'interno del tempo limite prescritto (vedere paragrafo 11 sopra). I verbali d’assemblea non contengono riferimento alle irregolarità come mancanza di presentazione di relazioni annuali. Questa osservazione fu resa per la prima volta inoltre, dal Governo nei procedimenti di fronte alla Corte, e deve essere trattata perciò con speciale cautela in assenza di qualsiasi forma di prova (vedere, mutatis mutandis, Sarban c. Moldavia, n. 3456/05, § 82 4 ottobre 2005). Nessuna simile osservazione sembra essere stata resa dall’ ANRTI durante i procedimenti nazionali nonostante la contesa chiara ed esplicita della società i richiedente sul trattamento discriminatorio addotto (vedere paragrafo 24 sopra). Spiacevolmente, la Corte di giustizia Suprema trascurò le lagnanze della società richiedente sulla discriminazione, mentre apparentemente le trattò come irrilevanti.
77. Riguardo alla seconda osservazione del Governo, la Corte ha esaminato le dichiarazioni delle le parti (vedere paragrafi 54 e 60 sopra) e la prova addotta da loro, e trova che il Governo non sia riuscito a mostrare che c'erano altre società in una situazione analoga che fu trattata nella stessa maniera della società richiedente.
78. La Corte nota anche che le costatazioni sopra non sembrano essere incoerenti con la pratica precedente dell’ ANRTI come appare dai verbali delle sue riunioni del 12 giugno e del 17 luglio 2003, quando a molte società furono sospese le loro licenze per inosservanza della sezione 3.5.2 delle sue Regolamentazioni (vedere paragrafo 35 sopra). Il Governo non contestò l'esistenza di tale pratica.
79. L'arbitrarietà dei procedimenti, il trattamento discriminatorio della società richiedente e la misura sproporzionatamente dura applicata conducono la Corte a concludere che non è stato mostrato che le autorità seguirono una qualsiasi considerazione politica genuina e coerente invalidando le licenze della società richiedente. Nonostante il margine della valutazione riconosciuto allo Stato, un giusto equilibrio non fu preservato nella presente causa e la società richiedente fu costretta a sopportare un carico individuale eccessivo, in violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO IN CONGIUNZIONE CON L’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
80. La società richiedente si lamentò anche che invalidando le sue licenze le autorità l'avevano sottoposta a discriminazione rispetto alle altre società in una situazione analoga. Siccome questa lagnanza si riferisce alle stesse questioni considerate sotto l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte non considera necessario esaminarla separatamente.
IV. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
81. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte trova che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli inoltre, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardata di rendere solo una riparazione parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
82. La società richiedente presentò che poiché i suoi documenti furono sequestrati dal Centro per la Lotta contro il Crimine Economico e la Corruzione, non era capace di presentare nessuna osservazione riguardo al danno materiale sostenuto. Di conseguenza, chiese alla Corte di riservare la questione della soddisfazione equa.
83. La Corte considera che la questione della richiesta dell’ Articolo 41 non sia pronta per una decisione. La questione deve essere riservata di conseguenza e l'ulteriore procedura fissata con dovuto riguardo della possibilità di un accordo al quale potrebbero giungere il Governo Moldavo ed il richiedente.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
2. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Sostiene che non è necessario esaminare separatamente la lagnanza del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 14 della Convenzione preso in congiunzione con l’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;
4. Sostiene
(a) che la questione dell’applicazione dell’Articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per una decisione;
di conseguenza,
(b) riserva la suddetta questione;
(c) invita il Governo Moldavo e la società richiedente a presentare, entro i tre mesi disponibili le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo al quale potrebbero giungere;
(d) riserve l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissare la stessa in caso di bisogno.
Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto l’8 aprile 2008, facendo seguito all’articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli della Corte.
Lorenzo Early Nicolas Bratza
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 14/09/2020.