Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF WASSERMAN v. RUSSIA (NO. 2)

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41, 13, 34, 35, 46, P1-1

NUMERO: 21071/05/2008
STATO: Russia
DATA: 10/04/2008
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

Conclusion Preliminary objection dismissed (ratione materiae) ; Violation of Art. 6-1 ; Violation of P1-1 ; Violation of Art. 13 ; Pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage - awards
FIRST SECTION
CASE OF WASSERMAN v. RUSSIA (NO. 2)
(Application no. 21071/05)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
10 April 2008
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Wasserman v. Russia (no. 2),
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Christos Rozakis, President,
Nina Vajic,
Anatoly Kovler,
Elisabeth Steiner,
Dean Spielmann,
Giorgio Malinverni,
George Nicolaou, judges,
and Søren Nielsen, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 20 March 2008,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 21071/05) against the Russian Federation lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Russian and Israeli national, Mr K. Y. W. (“the applicant”), on 8 June 2005.
2. The Russian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr P. Laptev, Representative of the Russian Federation at the European Court of Human Rights.
3. The applicant complained about continued non-enforcement of a judgment in his favour and the absence of an effective domestic remedy for this complaint.
4. On 13 March 2006 the Court decided to give notice of the application to the Government. Under the provisions of Article 29 § 3 of the Convention, it decided to examine the merits of the application at the same time as its admissibility.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicant was born in 1926 and lives in Ashdod, Israel.
A. Domestic judgment in the applicant's favour
6. On 9 January 1998 the applicant came to Russia. On crossing the border, he omitted to report a certain cash amount on his customs declaration and the customs office seized his money. The applicant appealed to a court.
7. On 30 July 1999 the Khostinskiy District Court of Sochi set aside the seizure order and ordered the Treasury to repay the applicant the Russian roubles' equivalent of the seized 1,600 US dollars (USD). On 9 September 1999 the Krasnodar Regional Court upheld that judgment on appeal.
8. Further to the applicant's request, on 15 February 2001 the District Court amended the operative part of the judgment and ordered the Treasury to pay USD 1,600 into the applicant's bank account in Israel.
9. On 10 April 2001 the District Court issued a writ of execution and sent it to the bailiffs' service in Moscow. On 30 October 2001 the Moscow bailiffs had sent the writ back to Sochi, for unclear reasons.
10. After the judgment in his favour had not been enforced for more than a year, the applicant complained to the Court (application no. 15021/02).
B. Judgment in the case of Wasserman v. Russia, no. 15021/02
11. On 18 November 2004 the Court delivered judgment in the above case. It noted the Government's acknowledgment that the writ of execution had been lost in the process of its transfer from the Moscow bailiffs to the Sochi office. However, in the Court's view, the logistical difficulties experienced by the State enforcement services could not serve as an excuse for not honouring a judgment debt, and the applicant's complaints about non-enforcement of the judgment should have prompted the competent authorities to investigate the matter and to ensure that the enforcement proceedings had been brought to successful completion. The Court found a violation of the applicant's “right to a court” under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and of his right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Wasserman v. Russia, no. 15021/02, §§ 38-40 and 43-45, 18 November 2004).
12. The Court granted the applicant's claim for the interest on the judgment debt. It rejected, however, the claim for the amount outstanding because “the Government's obligation to enforce the judgment at issue ha[d] not been yet extinguished and the applicant [was] still entitled to recover this amount in the domestic enforcement proceedings” (see Wasserman, cited above, § 49). It also awarded certain amounts in respect of non-pecuniary damage and costs and expenses (§§ 50-53).
C. Further developments relating to enforcement of the judgment
13. In the meantime, on 17 February 2004 a duplicate of the writ was issued and presented to the Ministry of Finance for enforcement.
14. In their observations on the applicant's claim (see below), the Ministry of Finance mentioned that on 21 June 2004 the payment of the amount outstanding to the applicant's account in Israel had been authorised.
15. By letter of 17 May 2005, the Ministry of Finance informed the applicant that it would not enforce the judgment because the District Court's decision of 15 February 2001 had misspelled one letter in his patronymic name and because the writ of execution had incorrectly designated the debtor as the “Main State Directorate of the Federal Treasury” (the correct name of the entity does not contain the word “State”).
16. By decision of 5 October 2005, the District Court corrected the spelling mistake in the decision of 15 February 2001.
17. On 3 October 2006 the amount of USD 1,569 was credited into the applicant's bank account in Israel. The amount of USD 31 was withheld by the State-owned bank Vneshtorgbank as commission for wire transfer.
D. Proceedings concerning compensation for an excessive length of enforcement
18. On 12 May 2003 the applicant brought a civil claim against the Moscow bailiffs, the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Finance. He sought compensation for pecuniary and non-pecuniary damages incurred through unlawful actions by the bailiffs and the continued failure to enforce the judgment.
19. On 25 August 2004 the Zamoskvoretskiy District Court of Moscow found that the Moscow bailiffs had acted unlawfully, in that they had never instituted enforcement proceedings and had had no legal grounds to send the writ back to Sochi. It refused, nevertheless, the claim for damages, finding that the applicant had not incurred any pecuniary damage through non-enforcement of the judgment of 30 July 1999. As to non-pecuniary damage, the Russian law did not provide for compensation in situations such as the applicant's.
20. On 30 March 2005 the Moscow City Court rejected the applicant's appeal, having reproduced verbatim the text of the District Court's judgment.
21. The applicant filed an application for supervisory review. On 1 June 2006 the Presidium of the Moscow City Court granted his application, quashed the judgments of 25 August and 30 March 2005 in part and remitted the claim for damages for a new examination by the District Court.
22. Between 25 September 2006 and 22 February 2007 the District Court listed nine hearings which were subsequently adjourned for various reasons.
23. On 22 February 2007 the Zamoskvoretskiy District Court issued a new judgment. It rejected the applicant's claim for pecuniary damages on the ground that no admissible evidence had been produced in support of it. It accepted the claim for non-pecuniary damages in part, finding as follows:
“...the court takes into account that, by the Zamoskvoretskiy District Court's judgment of 25 August 2004, the [Moscow] bailiffs' actions were found to have been unlawful; the enforcement of the judgment was protracted and the judgment was actually enforced only on 3 October 2006. This fact was not disputed by the parties.
The court therefore finds that there has been a violation of the claimant's right to a fair trial within a reasonable time on account of an unlawful delay in the enforcement of a judicial decision, which implies that a just compensation must be paid to the individual who sustained damages because of that violation.
Taking into account the specific circumstances of the case, the principle of reasonableness, physical and mental suffering caused to the claimant through belated enforcement of the judgment, and also the fact that the claimant is a pensioner and [has the title] 'Honoured Coach of Russia', the court considers it necessary to award the applicant 8,000 Russian roubles as compensation for non-pecuniary damage against the Ministry of Finance.
The court finds no grounds to award a larger amount of compensation because the claimant did not produce evidence showing that the defendants had caused him physical or mental suffering of an irreversible nature...”
The District Court further rejected the applicant's claim for legal costs and expenses.
24. On 7 August 2007 the Moscow City Court upheld that judgment on appeal, reproducing verbatim the District Court's reasoning.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
25. A court may hold the tortfeasor liable for non-pecuniary damage caused to an individual by actions impairing his or her personal non-property rights or affecting other intangible assets belonging to him or her (Articles 151 and 1099 § 1 of the Civil Code).
26. Compensation for non-pecuniary damage sustained through an impairment of an individual's property rights is only recoverable in cases provided for by law (Article 1099 § 2 of the Civil Code).
27. Compensation for non-pecuniary damage is payable irrespective of the tortfeasor's fault if damages were caused to an individual's life or limb, sustained through unlawful criminal prosecution, dissemination of untrue information and in other cases provided for by law (Article 1100 of the Civil Code).
28. By Ruling no. 1-P of 25 January 2001, the Constitutional Court found that Article 1070 § 2 of the Civil Code was compatible with the Constitution in so far as it provided for special conditions on the State liability for the damage caused by administration of justice. It clarified, nevertheless, that the term “administration of justice” did not cover the judicial proceedings in their entirety but only extended to judicial acts touching upon the merits of a case. Other judicial acts – mainly of a procedural nature – fell outside the scope of the notion “administration of justice”. State liability for the damage caused by such procedural acts or failures to act, such as a breach of the reasonable time of court proceedings, could arise even in the absence of a final criminal conviction of a judge if the fault of the judge has been established in civil proceedings. The Constitutional Court emphasised, however, that the constitutional right to compensation by the State for the damage should not be tied in with the individual fault of a judge. An individual should be able to obtain compensation for any damage incurred through a violation by a court of his or her right to a fair trial within the meaning of Article 6 of the Convention. The Constitutional Court held that Parliament should legislate on the grounds and procedure for compensation by the State for the damage caused by unlawful acts or failures to act of a court or a judge and determine territorial and subject-matter jurisdiction over such claims.
THE LAW
I. THE GOVERNMENT'S OBJECTION TO THE COURT'S COMPETENCE RATIONE MATERIAE TO EXAMINE THE PRESENT APPLICATION
29. The Government claimed that the Court was not competent to examine the present application under Article 46 § 2 of the Convention because the Committee of Ministers had not yet completed the proceedings for execution of the Court's judgment in case no. 15021/02. They submitted that the application must be declared inadmissible under Article 35 §§ 2 and 4 of the Convention as falling outside of jurisdiction of the Court.
30. The applicant pointed out that the judgment had not yet been enforced, notwithstanding the Court's judgment in case no. 15021/02.
31. Accordingly, the Court has to determine whether it is competent ratione materiae to examine the present application. It reiterates at the outset that under Article 46 of the Convention the Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgments of the Court in any case to which they are parties, execution being supervised by the Committee of Ministers. It follows, that a judgment in which the Court finds a breach of the Convention or the Protocols thereto imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation not just to pay those concerned the sums awarded by way of just satisfaction, but also to choose, subject to supervision by the Committee of Ministers, the general and/or, if appropriate, individual measures to be adopted in its domestic legal order to put an end to the violation found by the Court and to make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 192, ECHR 2004-V; Assanidze v. Georgia [GC], no. 71503/01, § 198, ECHR 2004-II; Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000-VIII, and Sejdovic v. Italy [GC], no. 56581/00, § 119, ECHR 2006-...). The Court does not have jurisdiction to verify whether a Contracting Party has complied with the obligations imposed on it by one of the Court's judgments (see Oberschlick v. Austria, nos. 19255/92 and 21655/93, Commission decision of 16 May 1995, Decisions and Reports 81-A, p. 5).
32. However, this does not mean that measures taken by a respondent State in the post-judgment phase to afford redress to an applicant for the violations found fall outside the jurisdiction of the Court (see Lyons and Others v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 15227/03, ECHR 2003-IX). In fact, there is nothing to prevent the Court from examining a subsequent application raising a new issue undecided by the original judgment (see Mehemi v. France (no. 2), no. 53470/99, § 43, ECHR 2003-IV; Pailot v. France, judgment of 22 April 1998, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-II, p. 802, § 57; Leterme v. France, judgment of 29 April 1998, Reports 1998-III, and Rando v. Italy, no. 38498/97, 15 February 2000).
33. In the specific context of a continuing violation of a Convention right following adoption of a judgment in which the Court found a violation of that right during a certain period of time, it is not unusual for the Court to examine a second application concerning a violation of that right in the subsequent period (see Mehemi (no. 2), cited above, and Rongoni v. Italy, no. 44531/98, § 13, 25 October 2001).
34. The Court observes that case no. 15021/02 concerned the Russian authorities' failure to enforce the Sochi court's judgment of 30 July 1999, as amended on 15 February 2001. At the time the Court issued its judgment on 18 November 2004, the Sochi court's judgment had not yet been executed and the Court found a violation of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and made an award in respect of the preceding period.
35. The present application which the applicant lodged on 8 June 2005, concerns the respondent State's failure to execute the Sochi court's judgment in the period posterior to the Court's judgment of 18 November 2004. The applicant also complained about the absence of an effective remedy at national level, an issue which had not been raised in case no. 15021/02.
36. The Court acknowledges that it has no jurisdiction to review the measures adopted in the domestic legal order to put an end to the violations found in its judgment in case no. 15021/02. It may, nevertheless, take stock of subsequent factual developments. The Court observes that, although the Sochi court's judgment of 30 July 1999, as amended on 15 February 2001, was eventually enforced in 2006, this happened almost two years after the judgment in case no. 15021/02 had been issued.
37. It follows that, in so far as the applicant's complaint concerns a further period during which the judgment in his favour remained unenforced, it has not been previously examined by the Court. The same holds true in respect of his new complaint about the absence of an effective domestic remedy against delays in enforcement. These matters did not form part of measures adopted in pursuance of the Court's initial judgment and thus fall outside the supervision exercised by the Committee of Ministers. The Court has therefore competence ratione materiae to entertain these complaints.
II. ORDER OF EXAMINATION OF THE COMPLAINTS
38. The Court observes that in the proceedings for compensation instituted by the applicant, the domestic authorities acknowledged that there had been a violation of his right to a hearing within a reasonable time and made an award in respect of non-pecuniary damage. In these circumstances a question arises whether the applicant may still claim to be a “victim” as regards his complaint about a further delay in enforcement of the judgment.
39. The Court reiterates that a decision or measure favourable to the applicant is not in principle sufficient to deprive him of his status as a “victim” unless the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded redress for, the breach of the Convention (see Amuur v. France, judgment of 25 June 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996-III, p. 846, § 36; and Dalban v. Romania [GC], no. 28114/95, § 44, ECHR 1999-VI). As the Court has found, in the length-of-proceedings type of cases the applicant's ability to claim to be a “victim” depends on the redress which the domestic remedy has given him or her. Furthermore, in that type of cases, the issue of victim status is linked to the more general question of effectiveness of a remedy (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 182, ECHR 2006-...).
40. Given that the applicant's other complaint concerned the absence of an effective domestic remedy against delays in enforcement, the Court finds it appropriate to examine first the applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention, before embarking on the analysis of his complaint about delays in enforcement of the judgment.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
41. The applicant complained under Article 13 of the Convention that he did not have an effective remedy in the Russian legal system against delays in the enforcement of the judgment. Article 13 provides as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. Admissibility
42. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. Submissions by the parties
43. The Government submitted that the applicant did have an effective domestic remedy because he had instituted the proceedings for compensation before Moscow courts. The outcome of these proceedings was irrelevant for determining whether Article 13 was complied with, because Article 13 does not guarantee a favourable outcome of the proceedings.
44. The applicant argued that the notion of an “effective domestic remedy” encompassed not only the possibility of instituting judicial proceedings but also prompt enforcement of a judgment. An excessive length of the enforcement proceedings should be considered as a violation of the applicant's right to an effective domestic remedy.
2. Principles established in the Court's case-law
45. As the Court has held on many occasions, Article 13 of the Convention guarantees the availability at national level of a remedy to enforce the substance of the Convention rights and freedoms in whatever form they may happen to be secured in the domestic legal order. The scope of the Contracting States' obligations under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant's complaint; the “effectiveness” of a “remedy” within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant. However, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law in the sense either of preventing the alleged violation or remedying the impugned state of affairs, or of providing adequate redress for any violation that had already occurred (see Balogh v. Hungary, no. 47940/99, § 30, 20 July 2004, and Kudla v. Poland [GC], no. 30210/96, §§ 157-158, ECHR 2000-XI).
46. In a series of recent judgments the Court addressed the general question of effectiveness of the remedy in length-of-proceedings cases and gave certain indications as to the characteristics which such a domestic remedy should have in order to be considered “effective” (see Scordino, cited above, § 182 et seq.; and Cocchiarella v. Italy [GC], no. 64886/01, § 73, ECHR 2006-...).
47. As in many spheres, in the length-of-proceedings cases the best solution in absolute terms is indisputably prevention. The Court recalls that it has stated on many occasions that Article 6 § 1 imposes on the Contracting States the duty to organise their judicial systems in such a way that their courts can meet each of its requirements, including the obligation to hear cases within a reasonable time (see, among many other authorities, Süßmann v. Germany, judgment of 16 September 1996, Reports 1996-IV, p. 1174, § 55). Where the judicial system is deficient in this respect, a remedy designed to expedite the proceedings in order to prevent them from becoming excessively lengthy is the most effective solution (see Scordino, cited above, § 183).
48. However, States can also choose to introduce only a compensatory remedy, without that remedy being regarded as ineffective (see Scordino, cited above, § 187). Where such a compensatory remedy is available in the domestic legal system, the Court must leave a wider margin of appreciation to the State to allow it to organise the remedy in a manner consistent with its own legal system and traditions and consonant with the standard of living in the country concerned. It will, in particular, be easier for the domestic courts to refer to the amounts awarded at domestic level for other types of damage – personal injury, damage relating to a relative's death or damage in defamation cases for example – and rely on their innermost conviction, even if that results in awards of amounts that are somewhat lower than those fixed by the Court in similar cases (see Scordino, cited above, § 189).
49. Further, if a remedy is “effective” in the sense that it allows for the pending proceedings to be expedited or for the aggrieved party to be given adequate compensation for the delays that have already occurred, that conclusion applies only on condition that an application for compensation remains itself an effective, adequate and accessible remedy in respect of the excessive length of judicial proceedings (see Scordino, cited above, § 195, with further references). The Court has identified the following criteria which may affect the effectiveness, adequacy or accessibility of such remedy:
•??????an action for compensation must be heard within a reasonable time (see Scordino, cited above, § 195 in fine);
•??????the compensation must be paid promptly and generally no later than six months from the date on which the decision awarding compensation becomes enforceable (§ 198);
•??????the procedural rules governing an action for compensation must conform to the principle of fairness guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention (§ 200);
•??????the rules regarding legal costs must not place an excessive burden on litigants where their action is justified (§ 201);
•??????the level of compensation must not be unreasonable in comparison with the awards made by the Court in similar cases (§§ 202-206 and 213).
50. On the latter criterion, the Court indicated that, with regard to pecuniary damage, the domestic courts are clearly in a better position to determine the existence and quantum. The situation is, however, different with regarding to non-pecuniary damage. There exists a strong but rebuttable presumption that excessively long proceedings will occasion non-pecuniary damage. The Court accepts that, in some cases, the length of proceedings may result in only minimal non-pecuniary damage or no non-pecuniary damage at all. In such cases the domestic courts will have to justify their decision by giving sufficient reasons (see Scordino, cited above, §§ 203-204).
3. Application of the principles to the present case
51. In the present case the applicant complained that he did not have an effective domestic remedy for the delays that plagued the enforcement of the judgment in his favour. The Court reiterates that enforcement proceedings must be regarded as an integral part of the “trial” for the purposes of Article 6 of the Convention (see Kanayev v. Russia, no. 43726/02, § 19, 27 July 2006). It follows that the above principles developed in the context of length-of-proceedings cases are also applicable in the situation where the complaint concerns the availability of a remedy for protracted enforcement.
52. As the Court has already found, there is no preventive remedy in the Russian legal system which could have expedited the enforcement of a judgment against a State authority because bailiffs do not have power to compel the State to repay the judgment debt (see Lositskiy v. Russia, no. 24395/02, § 29, 14 December 2006).
53. It remains to be seen whether an action for compensation which the applicant instituted was an effective, adequate and accessible remedy capable of satisfying the requirements of Article 13 in the light of the criteria outlined above.
54. The Court notes at the outset that Russian law does not have a special compensatory remedy for complaints stemming from an excessive length of enforcement proceedings. Although the Constitutional Court – already in 2001 – called on the legislature to determine the procedural rules governing actions for compensation for a violation of the right to a fair trial within the meaning of Article 6 of the Convention (see paragraph 28 above), the state of the Russian law has not evolved since. This situation, viewed in the context of the absence of sufficiently established and consistent case-law in cases similar to the applicant's, leads the Court to the conclusion that the possibility of obtaining redress in respect of non-pecuniary damage by making use of the remedy in question was not sufficiently certain in practice as required by the Convention case-law.
55. The Court further notes that the proceedings on the applicant's claim for compensation lasted from 12 May 2003 to 30 March 2005 and then, following their re-opening on supervisory review, from 1 June 2006 to 22 February 2007. Their global duration thus exceeded two and a half years, notwithstanding the explicit requirement of the Code of Civil Procedure that civil cases be heard within two months upon receipt of a statement of claim (Article 154). In the Court's view, such a long period obviously fell foul of the requirement of speediness necessary for a remedy to be “effective” (see, by contrast, Scordino, cited above, § 208).
56. Moreover, the Court observes that the domestic courts awarded the applicant RUB 8,000, that is less than EUR 250, as compensation in respect of non-pecuniary damage incurred through belated enforcement. It is not apparent from the domestic judgments what period of non-enforcement the courts took into account or what method of calculation they employed for determining that amount (see paragraph 23 above). What is certain, however, is that the award of less than 50 euros per year of non-enforcement is manifestly unreasonable in the light of the Court's case-law in similar cases against Russia (see the case-law cited in paragraph 65 below, and also compare Scordino, cited above, § 214).
57. In conclusion, and having regard to the fact that various requirements for a remedy to be “effective” have not been satisfied, the Court finds that the applicant did not have an effective remedy for his complaint arising out of the belated enforcement of the judgment in his favour.
58. There has therefore been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
59. The applicant complained that the judgment of 30 July 1999, as amended on 15 February 2001, had remained unenforced in the period following the Court's judgment of 18 November 2004. He relied on Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which read in the relevant parts as follows:
Article 6 § 1
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing within a reasonable time... by [a]... tribunal...”
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law...”
A. Admissibility
60. As the Court has found above, the redress awarded to the applicant in the domestic proceedings for compensation was manifestly insufficient (see paragraph 56 above). Accordingly, the Court finds that the applicant may still claim to be a “victim” of the alleged violation.
61. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
62. The Government submitted that delays in the enforcement of the judgment had been accounted for by complexity of the procedure for transferring money to bank accounts outside Russia.
63. The applicant pointed out that in June 2004 the Ministry of Finance had not found any defects in the enforcement papers. However, some fourteen months later it had determined that the same documents had contained some trivial errors and refused to effect the payment. The judgment debt had been paid in 2006 but only in part.
64. The Court recalls that in the first Wasserman case it found a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 on account of the Russian authorities' failure to enforce the judgment of 30 July 1999, as amended on 15 February 2001, in the period preceding the Court's judgment (see Wasserman, cited above, § 35 et seq.). As regards the period following the Court's judgment of 18 November 2004 which is at issue in the present application, the Court observes that a major part of the judgment debt was only paid in October 2006, that is almost two years later. The Government did not explain why the alleged defects of the enforcement papers had not been uncovered by the Ministry of Finance already in 2004 when it had issued authorisation of the payment. In any event, the responsibility for the delays lies with the authorities because the alleged defects were found in the official documents issued by a Russian court. Even after the typing errors had been corrected, it took the Ministry of Finance one year to effect the payment. Finally, the Court observes that the entire amount of the judgment debt has not yet been paid to the applicant, despite the fact that the supplementary judgment of 15 February 2001 provided for payment of the entire amount to the applicant's account in Israel (see paragraph 8 above). This was due to the fact that the Ministry of Finance did not make a provision for covering the commission of the State-owned bank through which it carried out the wire transfer. As a result, the applicant, through no fault of his, received a lesser amount than the one awarded to him in the judgment of 30 July 1999, as amended on 15 February 2001.
65. The Court has frequently found violations of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in cases raising issues similar to the ones in the present case (see Reynbakh v. Russia, no. 23405/03, § 23 et seq., 29 September 2005; Gizzatova v. Russia, no. 5124/03, § 19 et seq., 13 January 2005; Petrushko v. Russia, no. 36494/02, § 23 et seq., 24 February 2005; Gorokhov and Rusyayev v. Russia, no. 38305/02, § 30 et seq., 17 March 2005; Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 34 et seq., ECHR 2002-III).
66. Having examined the material submitted to it, the Court notes that the Government have not put forward any fact or argument capable of persuading it to reach a different conclusion in the present case. Having regard to its case-law on the subject, the Court finds that by failing – for almost two years in the period subsequent to the Court's judgment in case no. 15021/02 – to comply with the enforceable judgment in the applicant's favour the domestic authorities violated his right to a hearing within a reasonable time and prevented him – during the same two-year period – from receiving the money he could reasonably have expected to receive.
67. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
68. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
69. The applicant claimed USD 501 in respect of pecuniary damage, representing the amount outstanding under the judgment (USD 31) plus interest on the judgment debt for the period from December 2004 to November 2006 at the Russian Central Bank's marginal lending rate. He claimed USD 10,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
70. The Government submitted that it would be premature to make an award in respect of pecuniary damage because that claim had not yet been examined by domestic courts. They considered that the claim for non-pecuniary damage was excessive, unsubstantiated and unreasonable.
71. The Court notes that in the present case it found a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in that the judgment debt had been paid to the applicant after a substantial delay and only in part. The Court reiterates that the adequacy of compensation would be diminished if it were to be paid without reference to various circumstances liable to reduce its value, such as an extended delay in enforcement (see Gizzatova, cited above, § 28, and Metaxas v. Greece, no. 8415/02, § 36, 27 May 2004). Accordingly, the Court awards the applicant the outstanding part of the judgment debt, that is EUR 23, and the interest accrued during the period in respect of which the violation was found in the amount of EUR 350, plus any tax that may be chargeable on those amounts.
72. The Court further considers that the applicant must have suffered distress and frustration resulting from the State authorities' failure to enforce the judgment for a further period of approximately two years and the absence of an effective domestic remedy. The particular amount claimed is, however, excessive. The Court takes into account the relevant aspects, such as the length of the enforcement proceedings, the nature of the award (reimbursement of unlawfully confiscated money) and the fact that it is the second application concerning non-enforcement of the same judgment, and making its assessment on an equitable basis, awards the applicant EUR 4,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount.
B. Costs and expenses
73. The applicant also claimed USD 2,340 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and the Court. He produced documents showing the amounts of copying, translation, printing and postal expenses, copies of air tickets to Moscow, and fees for his representation before the Moscow courts.
74. The Government accepted the applicant's claim in so far as it concerned postal, copying and printing expenses in the amount of USD 130. They claimed that the legal services agreement was void under Russian law. They maintained concurrently that there had been no need for the applicant to come to Moscow because he had had a representative there. Finally, they rejected the remainder of the claim as irrelevant to the subject matter of the application.
75. According to the Court's case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 1,200 covering costs under all heads, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant on that amount.
C. Default interest
76. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY
1. Rejects the Government's objection as to the Court's competence ratione materiae;
2. Declares the application admissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention;
5. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 373 (three hundred and seventy-three euros) in respect of pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable;
(ii) EUR 4,000 (four thousand euros) in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable;
(iii) EUR 1,200 (one thousand two hundred euros) in respect of costs and expenses, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
6. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant's claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 10 April 2008, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Registrar President


TESTO TRADOTTO

Conclusione Obiezione preliminare respinta (ratione materiae); Violazione dell’ Art. 6-1; violazione di P1-1; Violazione dell’ Art. 13; danno materiale e morale - risarcimenti
PRIMA SEZIONE
CAUSA WASSERMAN C. LA RUSSIA (N. 2)
(Richiesta n. 21071/05)
SENTENZA
STRASBOURG
10 aprile 2008
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze esposte nell’ Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Wasserman c. la Russia (n. 2),
La Corte europea dei Diritti umani (Prima Sezione), riunendosi in una Camera, composta da:
Christos Rozakis, Presidente, Nina Vajic, Anatoly Kovler, Elisabeth Steiner, Dean Spielmann, Giorgio Malinverni, Giorgio Nicolaou, giudici,
e Søren Nielsen, Cancelliere di Sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 20 marzo 2008,
consegna la seguente sentenza che fu adottata in questa data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa nacque da una richiesta (n. 21071/05) contro la Federazione russa depositata per la Corte sotto l’Articolo 34 della Convenzione per la Protezione dei Diritti umani e le Libertà Fondamentali (“la Convenzione”) da un cittadino russo ed israeliano, il Sig. K. Y. W. (“il richiedente”), l’8 giugno 2005.
2. Il Governo russo (“il Governo”) fu rappresentato dal Sig. P. Laptev, Rappresentante della Federazione russa alla Corte europea di Diritti umani.
3. Il richiedente si lamentò della non-esecuzione continuata di una sentenza a suo favore e l'assenza di una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva per questa lagnanza.
4. Il 13 marzo 2006 la Corte decise di dare avviso della richiesta al Governo. Sotto le disposizioni dell’ Articolo 29 § 3 della Convenzione, decise di esaminare i meriti della richiesta come la sua ammissibilità allo stesso tempo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DELLA CAUSA
5. Il richiedente nacque nel 1926 e vive in Ashdod, Israele.
A. sentenza Nazionale a favore del richiedente
6. Il 9 gennaio 1998 il richiedente venne in Russia. Attraversando il confine, omise di dichiarare un certo importo in contanti sulla sua dichiarazione doganale e l'ufficio doganale prese i suoi soldi. Il richiedente fece appello ad una corte.
7. Il 30 luglio 1999 la Corte distrettuale di Khostinskiy di Sochi accantonò il mandato di confisca ed ordinò la Tesoreria di rimborsare al richiedente i rubli russi sequestrati equivalenti a 1,600 dollari degli Stati Uniti (USD). Il 9 settembre 1999 La Corte Regionale di Krasnodar ha sostenuto questa sentenza in appello.
8. Il 15 febbraio 2001 la Corte distrettuale corresse ulteriormente su richiesta del richiedente, la parte operativa della sentenza ed ordinò la Tesoreria di pagare USD 1,600 sul conto bancario del richiedente in Israele.
9. Il 10 aprile 2001 la Corte distrettuale istruì un ordine di esecuzione della sentenza e lo spedì al servizio degli ufficiali giudiziari a Mosca. Il 30 ottobre 2001 gli ufficiali giudiziari a Mosca avevano rispedito il documento a Sochi, per ragioni poco chiare.
10. Dopo che la sentenza in favore suo non veniva eseguita da più di un anno, il richiedente si lamentò alla Corte (richiesta n. 15021/02).
B. Sentenza nella causa Wasserman c. la Russia, n. 15021/02
11. Il 18 novembre 2004 la Corte consegnò la sentenza nella causa sopra. Notò il riconoscimento del Governo del fatto che l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza era stato perso nel processo del suo trasferimento dagli ufficiali giudiziari a Mosca all'ufficio di Sochi. Nella prospettiva della Corte, le difficoltà di logistica sperimentate dai servizi di esecuzione Statali non potevano essere considerate comunque, come una scusa per non onorare un debito della sentenza, e le lagnanze del richiedente in merito alla non-esecuzione della sentenza avrebbero dovuto incitare le autorità competenti ad indagare sulla questione ed assicurarsi che i procedimenti di esecuzione fossero portati a completamento con successo. La Corte trovò una violazione del diritto richiedente “ ad una corte” sotto l’Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e del suo diritto al godimento tranquillo della proprietà sotto l’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 (vedere Wasserman c. la Russia, n. 15021/02, §§ 38-40 e 43-45, 18 novembre 2004).
12. La Corte ammise il ricorso del richiedente per l'interesse sul debito della sentenza. Comunque, respinse la richiesta per l'importo insoluto perché “l'obbligo del Governo di eseguire la sentenza in questione non [è] stato estinto ancora ed il richiedente [era] ancora abilitato a recuperare questo importo nei procedimenti delle esecuzione nazionali” (vedere Wasserman, citata sopra, § 49). Assegnò anche certi importi riguardo il danno morale e i costi e spese (§§ 50-53).
C. Ulteriori sviluppi relativi all’ esecuzione della sentenza
13. Il 17 febbraio 2004 un duplicato del documento fu istruito nel frattempo, e presentato al Ministero delle Finanze per l’esecuzione.
14. Nelle sue osservazioni sulla richiesta del richiedente (vedere sotto), il Ministero della Finanza menzionò che il 21 giugno 2004 il pagamento dell'importo insoluto sul conto del richiedente in Israele era stato autorizzato.
15. Con lettera del 17 maggio 2005, il Ministero delle Finanze informò il richiedente che non avrebbe eseguito la sentenza perché la decisione della Corte distrettuale del 15 febbraio 2001 aveva sbagliato l'ortografia di una lettera nel suo nome patronimico e perché l'ordine di esecuzione della sentenza aveva designato erroneamente il debitore come il “Consiglio Principale d'amministrazione di Stato della Tesoreria Federale” (il nome corretto dell'entità non contiene la parola “di Stato”).
16. Con decisione del 5 ottobre 2005, la Corte distrettuale corresse l'errore di compitazione nella decisione del 15 febbraio 2001.
17. Il 3 ottobre 2006 l'importo di USD 1,569 fu accreditato sul conto bancario del richiedente in Israele. L'importo di USD 31 fu trattenuto dalla banca Statale Vneshtorgbank come commissione per trasferimento telegrafico.
D. Procedimenti riguardo al risarcimento per una lunghezza eccessiva dell’ esecuzione
18. Il 12 maggio 2003 il richiedente intentò una richiesta civile contro gli ufficiali giudiziari di Mosca, il Ministero della Giustizia ed il Ministero delle Finanze. Chiese il risarcimento per danni materiali e morali incorsi per azioni illegali da arte degli ufficiali giudiziari ed il fallimento continuato nell’ esecuzione della sentenza.
19. Il 25 agosto 2004 la Corte distrettuale di Zamoskvoretskiy di Mosca trovò che gli ufficiali giudiziari di Mosca avevano agito illegalmente, per il fatto che non avevano mai istituito i procedimenti di esecuzione e non avevano avuto nessuna base legale per rispedire il documento a Sochi. Rifiutò, ciononostante, la richiesta per danni, trovando che il richiedente non era incorso in alcun danno materiale per non-esecuzione della sentenza del 30 luglio 1999. In quanto al danno morale, la legge russa non prevedeva risarcimento in situazioni come quella del richiedente.
20. Il 30 marzo 2005 la Corte della Città Mosca respinse l'appello del richiedente, avendo riprodotto alla lettera il testo della sentenza della Corte distrettuale.
21. Il richiedente registrò una richiesta per revisione direttiva. Il 1 giugno 2006 il Presidium di Corte della Città di Mosca accordò la sua richiesta, annullò in parte le sentenze del 25 agosto e 30 marzo 2005 e rimise la richiesta per danni per un nuovo esame da parte della Corte distrettuale.
22. Fra il 25 settembre 2006 e il 22 febbraio 2007 la Corte distrettuale fissò nove udienze che furono aggiornate successivamente per varie ragioni.
23. Il 22 febbraio 2007 la Corte distrettuale di Zamoskvoretskiy istruì una nuova sentenza. Respinse la richiesta del richiedente per danni materiali per fatto che nessuna prova ammissibile era stata prodotta in suo appoggio. Accettò in parte la richiesta per danni morali, trovando ciò che segue:
“... la corte prende in considerazione che, con la sentenza della Corte distrettuale di Zamoskvoretskiy del 25 agosto 2004, le azioni degli ufficiali giudiziari[ di Mosca] furono giudicate illegali; l'esecuzione della sentenza fu protratta e la sentenza fu davvero eseguita solamente il 3 ottobre 2006. Questo fatto non fu discusso dalle parti.
La corte trova perciò che c'è stata una violazione del diritto del rivendicatore ad un processo equo all'interno di un termine ragionevole per conto di un ritardo illegale nell'esecuzione di una decisione giudiziale che implica che un risarcimento equo deve essere pagato all'individuo che sostenne dei danni a causa di quella violazione.
Prendendo in considerazione le specifiche circostanze della causa, il principio della ragionevolezza, la sofferenza fisica e mentale causata al rivendicatore per la tardiva esecuzione della sentenza, ed anche il fatto che il rivendicatore è un pensionato e [ha il titolo] di 'Honoured Coach della Russia', la corte lo considera necessario assegnare 8,000 rubli russi al richiedente come risarcimento per danno morale contro il Ministero delle Finanze.
La corte non trova nessuno motivo per assegnare un importo maggiore del risarcimento perché il rivendicatore non produsse prova che mostrasse che gli imputati gli avevano provocato sofferenza fisica o mentale di natura irreversibile...”
La Corte distrettuale respinse ulteriormente la richiesta del richiedente per spese processuali e spese.
24. Il 7 agosto 2007 la Corte di Mosca che ha sostenuto questa sentenza in appello, riproducendo alla lettera il ragionamento della Corte distrettuale.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE ATTINENTE
25. Una corte può sostenere il soggetto responsabile per danno morale causato ad un individuo con azioni che danneggiano il suo o i suoi diritti di non-proprietà personale o colpire altri beni intangibili che appartengono a lui o a lei (gli Articoli 151 e 1099 § 1 del Codice civile).
26. Il risarcimento per danno morale sostenuto per un danneggiamento dei diritti di proprietà di un individuo è solamente recuperabile in cause previste dalla legge (Articolo 1099 § 2 del Codice civile).
27. La compensazione per danno morale è pagabile a prescindere dalla colpa del disonesto se danni furono causati alla vita di un individuo o membro, subiti per azione penale illegale, disseminazione di informazioni false e negli altri casi previsti dalla legge (Articolo 1100 del Codice civile).
28. Con Decreto n. 1-P del 25 gennaio 2001, la Corte Costituzionale trovò che l’Articolo 1070 § 2 del Codice civile era finora compatibile con la Costituzione in quanto prevedeva dalle condizioni speciali sulla responsabilità Statale per il danno causato dall’ amministrazione della giustizia. Chiarificò, ciononostante, che il termine “amministrazione della giustizia” non copriva i procedimenti giudiziali nella loro interezza ma solamente si estendeva ad atti giudiziali riguardanti i meriti di una causa. Altri atti giudiziali -principalmente di natura procedurale -ricadono fuori dalla sfera della nozione “amministrazione della giustizia.” La responsabilità statale per il danno causato con atti procedurali od omissioni di atto, come una violazione del termine ragionevole dei procedimenti della corte potrebbe sorgere anche in assenza di una condanna penale definitiva di un giudice se la colpa del giudice è stata stabilita dai procedimento civili. Comunque, la Corte Costituzionale enfatizzò che il diritto costituzionale al risarcimento dello Stato per il danno non dovrebbe essere legato alla colpa individuale di un giudice. Un individuo dovrebbe essere in grado ottenere risarcimento per qualsiasi danno incorso per una violazione da parte di una corte di un suo diritto ad un processo equo secondo il significato dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione. La Corte Costituzionale sostenne che il Parlamento dovrebbe legiferare sul campo e sulle procedure per il risarcimento dello Stato per il danno causato con atti illegali od omissioni ad agire di una corte o di un giudice e determinare la giurisdizione territoriale e della materia-questione su simile richieste.
LA LEGGE
I. L'OBIEZIONE DEL GOVERNO ALLA COMPETENZA DELLA CORTE RATIONE MATERIAE PER ESAMINARE LA PRESENTE RICHIESTA
29. Il Governo affermò che la Corte non era competente per esaminare la presente richiesta sotto l’Articolo 46 § 2 della Convenzione perché il Comitato dei Ministri non aveva completato ancora i procedimenti per l’esecuzione della sentenza della Corte nella causa n. 15021/02. Sostiene che la richiesta deve essere dichiarata inammissibile sotto l’Articolo 35 §§ 2 e 4 della Convenzione in quanto esce dalla giurisdizione della Corte.
30. Il richiedente indicò che la sentenza non era stata ancora eseguita, nonostante la sentenza della Corte nella causa n. 15021/02.
31. La Corte deve di conseguenza, determinare se è competente ratione materiae per esaminare la presente richiesta. Reitera all'inizio che sotto l’Articolo 46 della Convenzione le Parti Contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alle sentenze finali della Corte in qualsiasi causa nella quale sono parti, esecuzione che è supervisionata dal Comitato dei Ministri. Segue, che una sentenza nella quale la Corte trova una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli impone allo Stato convenuto un obbligo legale non solo di non pagare agli interessati le somme assegnate per soddisfazione equa, ma anche scegliere, soggetto a supervisione da parte del Comitato dei Ministri le misure generali e/o , se necessario, individuali da adottare nel suo ordine giuridico nazionale per porre fine alla violazione trovata dalla Corte e costituire riparazione alle sue conseguenze in modo tale da ripristinare il più possibile la situazione esistente prima della violazione (vedere Broniowski c. la Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 192 il 2004-V di ECHR; Assanidze c. la Georgia [GC], n. 71503/01, § 198 ECHR 2004-II; Scozzari e Giunta c. l'Italia [GC], N. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000-VIII, e Sejdovic c. l'Italia [GC], n. 56581/00, § 119 ECHR 2006 -...). La Corte non ha giurisdizione per verificare se una Parte Contraente ha assolto agli obblighi imposti da una delle sentenze della Corte (vedere Oberschlick c. l'Austria, N. 19255/92 e 21655/93, decisione della Commissione del 16 maggio 1995, Decisioni e Relazioni 81-a, p. 5).
32. Comunque, questo non vuole dire che le misure prese da un Stato convenuto nella fase post-sentenza per riconoscere il risarcimento ad un richiedente per le violazioni trovate ricadano fuori dalla giurisdizione della Corte (vedere Lyons ed Altri c. il Regno Unito ( dec.), n. 15227/03, ECHR 2003-IX). Infatti, non c'è nulla che impedisce alla Corte di esaminare una richiesta successiva che solleva un nuovo problema non deciso dalla sentenza originale (vedere Mehemi c. la Francia (n. 2), n. 53470/99, § 43 ECHR 2003-IV; Pailot c. Francia, sentenza del 22 aprile 1998, Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1998-II, p. 802, § 57; Leterme c. la Francia, sentenza deli 29 aprile 1998, Relazioni 1998-III, e Rando c. l'Italia, n. 38498/97, 15 febbraio 2000).
33. Nel contesto specifico di una violazione continua di un diritto della Convenzione in seguito all'adozione di una sentenza nella quale la Corte ha trovato una violazione di quel diritto nel corso di un certo periodo di tempo, non è insolito per la Corte di esaminare una seconda richiesta riguardo ad una violazione di quel diritto nel periodo successivo (vedere Mehemi (n. 2), citata sopra, e Rongoni c. l'Italia, n. 44531/98, § 13 25 ottobre 2001).
34. La Corte osserva che la causa n. 15021/02 riguardava il fallimento delle autorità russe nell’ eseguire la sentenza della corte di Sochi del 30 luglio 1999, corretta il 15 febbraio 2001. Al tempo la Corte istruì la sua sentenza il 18 novembre 2004, non essendo ancora stata eseguita la sentenza della corte di Sochi e la Corte trovò una violazione dell’Articolo 6 ed dell’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 e fece un risarcimento riguardo il periodo precedente.
35. La presente richiesta che il richiedente depositò l’8 giugno 2005, concerne il fallimento dello Stato convenuto nell’ eseguire la sentenza della corte di Sochi nel periodo posteriore alla sentenza della Corte del 18 novembre 2004. Il richiedente si lamentò anche dell'assenza di una via di ricorso effettiva a livello nazionale, un problema che non era stato sollevato nella causa n. 15021/02.
36. La Corte ammette che non ha nessuna giurisdizione per fare una rassegna delle misure adottate nell’ordine giuridico e nazionale per porre fine alle violazioni trovate nella sua sentenza nella causa n. 15021/02. Può, ciononostante, prendere atto dei successivi sviluppi dei fatti. La Corte osserva che, benché la sentenza della corte di Sochi del 30 luglio 1999, corretta il 15 febbraio 2001, fu infine eseguita nel 2006, questo succedette pressoché due anni dopo che la sentenza nella causa n. 15021/02 era stata istruita.
37. Segue che, dal momento che la lagnanza del richiedente concerne un ulteriore periodo durante il quale la sentenza a suo favore rimase ineseguita che prima non era stato esaminato dalla Corte. Lo stesso risulta vero in merito alla sua nuova lagnanza sull'assenza di una via di ricorso nazionale ed effettiva contro i ritardi in esecuzione. Queste questioni non formano parte delle misure adottate nell'adempimento della sentenza iniziale della Corte e così ricadono fuori dalla supervisione esercitata da parte del Comitato di Ministri. La Corte ha perciò competenza rationae materiae per considerare queste lagnanze.
II. ORDINE D’ ESAME DELLE LAGNANZE
38. La Corte osserva che nei procedimenti per risarcimento istituiti dal richiedente, le autorità nazionali ammisero, che c'era stata una violazione del suo diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole e fecero un risarcimento in merito al danno morale. In queste circostanze sorge la questione se il richiedente può chiedere ancora di essere una “vittima” in merito alla sua lagnanza riguardo ad un ulteriore ritardo in esecuzione della sentenza.
39. La Corte reitera che una decisione o una misura favorevoli al richiedente non sono in principio sufficienti per spogliarlo del suo status di “ vittima” a meno che le autorità nazionali abbiano ammesso, o espressamente o in sostanza, e poi riconosciuto risarcimento per, la violazione della Convenzione (veda Amuur c. Francia, sentenza di 25 giugno 1996, Relazioni di Sentenze e Decisioni 1996-III, p. 846, § 36; e Dalban c. la Romania [GC], n. 28114/95, § 44 ECHR 1999-VI). Siccome la Corte ha trovato, nel tipo di cause riguardanti la lunghezza del procedimento che la capacità del richiedente di chiedere di essere “ vittima” dipende dal risarcimento che la via di ricorso nazionale gli ha concesso. Inoltre, in questi tipi di cause, il problema dello status di vittima è collegato alla questione più generale dell'efficacia di una via di ricorso (vedere Scordino c. l'Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 182 ECHR 2006 -...).
40. Dato che l'altra lagnanza del richiedente era concernente l'assenza di una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva contro ritardi in esecuzione, la Corte trova appropriato prima esaminare la lagnanza del richiedente sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione, prima di imbarcarsi sull'analisi della sua lagnanza in merito ai ritardi in esecuzione della sentenza.
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
41. Il richiedente si lamentò sotto l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione che non aveva una via di ricorso effettiva nell'ordinamento giuridico russo contro i ritardi nell'esecuzione della sentenza. L’Articolo 13 prevede ciò che segue:
“Ognuno i cui diritti e le libertà stabiliti [nella] Convenzione sono violati avrà una via di ricorso effettiva di fronte ad un'autorità nazionale nonostante la violazione sia stata commessa da persone che agiscono in una veste ufficiale.”
A. Ammissibilità
42. La Corte nota che la lagnanza non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota ulteriormente che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivi. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Osservazioni delle parti
43. Il Governo sostenne che il richiedente aveva una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva perché aveva istituito i procedimenti per il risarcimento davanti alle corti di Mosca. Il risultato di questi procedimenti era irrilevante per determinare se l’Articolo 13 fosse stato soddisfatto, perché l’Articolo 13 non garantisce un risultato favorevole dei procedimenti.
44. Il richiedente dibatté che la nozione di una “via di ricorso nazionale effettiva” non solo includeva la possibilità di istituire procedimenti giudiziali ma anche una pronta esecuzione di una sentenza. Una lunghezza eccessiva dei procedimenti di esecuzione dovrebbe essere considerata come una violazione del diritto del richiedente ad una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva.
2. Principi stabiliti nella giurisprudenza della Corte
45. Come la Corte ha sostenuto in molte occasioni, l’Articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce la disponibilità a livello nazionale di una via di ricorso per applicare la sostanza dei diritti e le libertà della Convenzione in qualsiasi forma possa capitare in modo da assicurare l’ordine giuridico nazionale. Lo scopo degli obblighi degli Stati Contraenti sotto l’Articolo 13 varia dipendendo dalla natura della lagnanza del richiedente; “l'efficacia” di una“ via di ricorso” all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 13 non dipende dalla certezza di una conseguenza favorevole per il richiedente. Comunque, la via di ricorso richiesta dall’ Articolo 13 deve essere “effettiva” in pratica così come in legge nel senso sia di ostacolare la violazione addotta sia di rimediare allo stato contestato degli affari, o di offrire un risarcimento adeguato per una qualsiasi violazione che già era accaduta (vedere Balogh c. l'Ungheria, n. 47940/99, § 30, 20 luglio 2004, e Kudla c. la Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, §§ 157-158 ECHR 2000-XI).
46. In una serie di recenti sentenze la Corte si rivolse alla questione generale dell'efficacia della via di ricorso in cause riguardanti la lunghezza del procedimento e diede certe indicazioni riguardo alle caratteristiche che tale via di ricorso nazionale dovrebbe avere per essere considerata “effettiva” (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 182 et seq.; e Cocchiarella c. l'Italia [GC], n. 64886/01, § 73 ECHR 2006 -...).
47. Come in molte sfere, nelle cause riguardanti la lunghezza del procedimento la migliore soluzione in termini assoluti è indiscutibilmente la prevenzione. La Corte richiama che ha affermato in molte occasioni che l’Articolo 6 § 1 impone agli Stati Contraenti il dovere di organizzare i loro sistemi giudiziali in modo tale che le loro corti possano soddisfare tutti i suoi requisiti, incluso l'obbligo di ascoltare le cause all'interno di un termine ragionevole (vedere, fra molte altre autorità, Süßmann c. Germania, sentenza del 16 settembre 1996, Relazioni 1996-IV, p. 1174, § 55). In caso di mancanza a questo riguardo del sistema giudiziale, una via di ricorso progettata per accelerare i procedimenti per impedire loro dal divenire smodatamente lunghi è la soluzione più effettiva (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 183).
48. Gli Stati possono scegliere anche comunque, di presentare solamente una via di ricorso compensativa, senza che lai via di ricorso sia considerata come inefficace (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 187). Dove è disponibile nell'ordinamento giuridico nazionale tale via di ricorso compensativa, la Corte deve lasciare allo Stato un margine più ampio di valutazione per concedergli di organizzare la via di ricorso in modo coerente con il suo proprio ordinamento giuridico e le sue tradizioni e consone allo standard di vita nel paese riguardato. Sarà, in particolare, più facile per le corti nazionali fa riferimento agli importi assegnati a livello nazionale per altri tipi di danno -danno personale, danno relativo alla morte di un parente o danno in cause di diffamazione per esempio-e fa affidamento alla loro convinzione più profonda, anche se può dar luogo a risarcimenti di importi che sono in qualche modo più bassi di quelli fissati dalla Corte in cause simili (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 189).
49. Ulteriormente, se una via di ricorso è “effettiva” nel senso che lascia spazio ai procedimenti pendenti affinché vengano accelerati e affinché alla parte lesa venga concesso un risarcimento adeguato per i ritardi che già si sono verificati, quella conclusione si applica solamente a condizione che una richiesta per risarcimento rimanga una via di ricorso effettiva, adeguata ed accessibile riguardo alla lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti giudiziali (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 195, con gli ulteriori riferimenti). La Corte ha identificato il seguente criterio che può colpire l'efficacia, l'adeguatezza o l'accessibilità di una simile via di ricorso:
•?un'azione in risarcimento deve essere ascoltata all'interno di un termine ragionevole (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, § 195 in fine);
•?il risarcimento deve essere pagato prontamente e generalmente non più tardi dei sei mesi dalla data in cui la decisione che assegna il risarcimento diviene esecutiva (§ 198);
•?gli articoli procedurali che governano un'azione in risarcimento si devono adattare al principio dell’equità garantito dall’Articolo 6 della Convenzione (§ 200);
•?gli articoli riguardanti le spese processuali non devono mettere un carico eccessivo su contendenti nel caso in cui la loro azione sia giustificata (§ 201);
•?il livello del risarcimento non deve essere irragionevole rispetto ai risarcimenti resi dalla Corte in cause simili (§§ 202-206 e 213).
50. In quanto al secondo criterio, la Corte indicò, che, riguardo al danno materiale, le corti nazionali sono chiaramente in una posizione migliore per determinare l'esistenza e il quantum. Comunque, la situazione è diversa nei confronti del danno morale. Là esiste un forte ma respingibile presunzione che i procedimenti smodatamente lunghi causeranno un danno morale. La Corte accetta che, in alcune cause, la lunghezza di procedimenti può dare affatto luogo nessun danno morale o può dare luogo solamente a un minimo danno morale. In simili cause le corti nazionali dovranno giustificare la loro decisione dando ragioni sufficienti (vedere Scordino, citata sopra, §§ 203-204).
3. Applicazione dei principi alla presente causa
51. Nella presente causa il richiedente si è lamentato del fatto che non aveva una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva per i ritardi che hanno afflitto l'esecuzione della sentenza a suo favore. La Corte reitera che i procedimenti di esecuzione devono essere considerati una parte integrante della“ prova” ai fini dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere Kanayev c. la Russia, n. 43726/02, § 19 27 luglio 2006). Segue che i principi sopra sviluppati nel contesto di cause concernenti la lunghezza di procedimento sono anche applicabili alla situazione in cui la lagnanza concerne la disponibilità di una via di ricorso per esecuzione prolungata.
52. Come ha già trovato la Corte, non c'è via di ricorso preventiva nell'ordinamento giuridico russo che avrebbe potuto accelerare l'esecuzione di una sentenza contro un'autorità Statale perché gli ufficiali giudiziari non hanno il potere di costringere lo Stato a rimborsare il debito della sentenza (vedere Lositskiy c. la Russia, n. 24395/02, § 29 14 dicembre 2006).
53. Rimane da vedere se un'azione in risarcimento istituita dal richiedente era una via di ricorso effettiva, adeguata ed accessibile capace di soddisfare le esigenze dell’Articolo 13 alla luce del criterio delineato sopra.
54. La Corte nota all'inizio che la legge russa non ha una via di ricorso compensativa e speciale per lagnanze che scaturiscono da una lunghezza eccessiva di procedimenti di esecuzione. Benché la Corte Costituzionale -già nel 2001-chiamò la legislatura a determinare gli articoli procedurali che governano azioni in risarcimento per una violazione del diritto ad un processo equo all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 28 sopra), lo stato della legge russa non si evoluto da allora. Questa situazione, vista nel contesto dell'assenza di una giurisprudenza sufficientemente stabile e coerente in cause simili a quella del richiedente, porta la Corte alla conclusione che la possibilità di ottenere un risarcimento riguardo al danno morale avvalendosi della via di ricorso in oggetto non era sufficientemente sicura in pratica come richiesto dalla giurisprudenza della Convenzione.
55. La Corte nota ulteriormente che i procedimenti sulla richiesta di risarcimento del richiedente durarono dal12 maggio 2003 al 30 marzo 2005 e poi, seguendo la loro re-apertura su revisione direttiva, dal 1 giugno 2006 al 22 febbraio 2007. La loro durata globale superò così i due anni e mezzo, nonostante l'esigenza esplicita del Codice di Procedura Civile che giudizi civili siano ascoltati entro due mesi dal ricevimento di una dichiarazione di richiesta (Articolo 154). Nella prospettiva della Corte, simile lungo periodo evidentemente si scontra con l'esigenza di velocità necessaria affinché una via di ricorso sia “effettiva” (veda, per contrasto, Scordino, citata sopra, § 208).
56. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che le corti nazionali assegnarono al richiedente RUB 8,000, che sono meno di EUR 250, come risarcimento riguardo al danno morale incorso per tardiva esecuzione. Non è evidente nelle sentenze nazionali che periodo di non-esecuzione le corti abbiano preso in conto o che metodo di calcolo abbiano utilizzato per determinare il tipo d’ importo (vedere paragrafo 23 sopra). Comunque ciò che è certo è che il risarcimento pari a meno di 50 euro per anno di non-esecuzione è manifestamente irragionevole alla luce della giurisprudenza della Corte in cause simili contro la Russia (vedere la giurisprudenza citata nel paragrafo 65 sotto, ed anche confronta Scordino, citata sopra, § 214).
57. In conclusione, ed avendo riguardo del fatto che i vari requisiti perché una via di ricorso sia “effettiva” non sono stati soddisfatti, la Corte trova che il richiedente non aveva una via di ricorso effettiva per la sua lagnanza che scaturisce dall'esecuzione tardiva della sentenza a suo favore.
58. C'è stata perciò una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL’ ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL’ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N.RO 1
59. Il richiedente si lamentò che la sentenza del 30 luglio 1999, corretta il 15 febbraio 2001, era rimasta non eseguita nel periodo seguente la sentenza della Corte del 18 novembre 2004. Fece riferimento all’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed all’Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 che nelle parti attinenti si leggono come segue:
Articolo 6 § 1
“Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti civili ed obblighi..., ognuno è abilitato ad una giusto.. ascolto all'interno di un termine ragionevole... da [un]... tribunale...”
Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica è abilitata al godimento tranquillo delle sue proprietà. Nessuno sarà privato delle sue proprietà eccetto nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali di diritto internazionale...”
A. Ammissibilità
60. Come la Corte ha trovato sopra, il risarcimento assegnato al richiedente nei procedimenti nazionali in risarcimento era manifestamente insufficiente (vedere paragrafo 56 sopra). Di conseguenza, la Corte trova che il richiedente può chiedere ancora di essere “ vittima” della violazione addotta.
61. La Corte nota che la lagnanza non manifestamente è mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell’ Articolo 35 § 3 della Convenzione. Nota ulteriormente che non è inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo. Deve essere dichiarata perciò ammissibile.
B. Meriti
62. Il Governo presentò che ritardi nell'esecuzione della sentenza erano dovuti alla complessità della procedura per il trasferimento di soldi a conti bancari fuori dalla Russia.
63. Il richiedente indicò che a giugno 2004 il Ministero delle Finanze non aveva trovato alcun difetto nei documenti d’ esecuzione. Comunque, circa quattordici mesi più tardi aveva determinato che gli stessi documenti contenevano degli errori banali ed avevano rifiutato di effettuare il pagamento. Il debito di sentenza è stato pagato nel 2006 ma solamente in parte.
64. La Corte richiama che nella prima causa Wasserman trovò una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed dell’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 a causa del fallimento delle autorità russe nell’ eseguire la sentenza del 30 luglio 1999, corretta il 15 febbraio 2001, nel periodo che precede la sentenza della Corte (vedere Wasserman, citata sopra, § 35 et seq.). Riguardo al periodo successivo alla sentenza della Corte del 18 novembre 2004 che è in questione nella presente richiesta, la Corte osserva che una parte notevole del debito della sentenza fu pagato solamente nell’ ottobre 2006, e cioè quasi due anni più tardi. Il Governo non spiegò perché i difetti addotti dei documenti di esecuzione non fossero già stati scoperti dal Ministero delle Finanze nel 2004 quando aveva istruito l’autorizzazione del pagamento. In qualsiasi caso, la responsabilità per i ritardi è imputabile alle autorità perché i difetti addotti furono trovati nei documenti ufficiali istruiti da una corte russa. Anche dopo che gli errori di dattilografia erano stati corretti, occorse al Ministero delle Finanze un anno per effettuare il pagamento. Da ultimo, la Corte osserva che l'importo intero del debito della sentenza non è stato ancora pagato al richiedente, nonostante il fatto che la sentenza supplementare de 15 febbraio 2001 ha disposto il pagamento dell’ intero importo sul conto del richiedente in Israele (vedere paragrafo 8 sopra). Questo era dovuto al fatto che il Ministero delle Finanze non costituì un provvedimento per coprire la commissione della banca Statale per la quale eseguì il trasferimento telegrafico. Di conseguenza, il richiedente, senza nessuna colpa da parte sua ricevette un importo minore di quello assegnatoli nella sentenza del 30 luglio 1999, corretta il 15 febbraio 2001.
65. La Corte ha frequentemente trovato violazioni dell’i Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed dell’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in cause che sollevavano problemi simili a quelli nella presente causa (vedere Reynbakh c. Russia, n. 23405/03, § 23 et seq., 29 settembre 2005; Gizzatova c. Russia, n. 5124/03, § 19 et seq., 13 gennaio 2005; Petrushko c. Russia, n. 36494/02, § 23 et seq., 24 febbraio 2005; Gorokhov e Rusyayev c. Russia, n. 38305/02, § 30 et seq., 17 marzo 2005; Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 34 et seq., ECHR 2002-III).
66. Avendo esaminato il materiale a lei presentato, la Corte nota che il Governo non ha fissato qualsiasi fatto o argomento capace di persuaderla a giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella presente causa. Avendo riguardo della sua giurisprudenza in materia, la Corte trova, che fallendo -per quasi due anni nel periodo susseguente alla sentenza in causa della Corte n. 15021/02-nell’attenersi alla sentenza esecutiva a favore del richiedente le autorità nazionali violarono il suo diritto ad un'udienza all'interno di un termine ragionevole e gli impedirono -durante lo stesso periodo di due anni -di ricevere i soldi che si sarebbe potuto ragionevolmente aspettare di ricevere.
67. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione di Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1.
C. L’APPLICAZIONE DELL’ ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
68. Articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte trova che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli, e se la legge interna dell’Alta Parte Contraente riguardate permette di rendere una riparazione solamente parziale, la Corte può, se necessario, riconoscere soddisfazione equa alla vittima.”
A. Danno
69. Il richiedente chiese USD 501 per danno materiale, che rappresentava l'importo insoluto sotto la sentenza (USD 31) più interesse sul debito di sentenza per il periodo da dicembre 2004 a novembre 2006 al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale russa. Lui chiese USD 10,000 riguardo al danno morale.
70. Il Governo presentò che sarebbe stato prematuro fare un risarcimento riguardo il danno materiale perché la richiesta non era stata ancora esaminata dalle corti nazionali. Loro considerarono che la richiesta per danno non-materiale era eccessiva, non confermata ed irragionevole.
71. La Corte nota che nella causa presente trovò una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione ed dell’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1 in che il debito di sentenza era stato pagato al richiedente dopo un ritardo sostanziale e solamente in parte. La Corte reitera che l'adeguatezza del risarcimento sarebbe sminuita se fosse stato pagato senza riferimento alle varie circostanze responsabili di ridurre il suo valore, come un ritardo prolungato nell’esecuzione (vedere Gizzatova, citata sopra, § 28, e Metaxas c. Grecia, n. 8415/02, § 36 27 maggio 2004). Di conseguenza, la Corte assegna la parte insoluta del debito di sentenza che è di EUR 23al richiedente e l'interesse accumulato durante il periodo rispetto al quale la violazione è stata trovata pari all'importo di EUR 350, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quegli importi.
72. La Corte considera ulteriormente che il richiedente ha dovuto soffrire dell'angoscia e della frustrazione che sono il risultato del fallimento delle autorità Statali nell’i eseguire la sentenza per un ulteriore periodo di approssimativamente due anni e l'assenza di una via di ricorso nazionale effettiva. Comunque, il particolare importo chiesto è eccessivo. La Corte prende in considerazione gli aspetti attinenti, come la lunghezza dei procedimenti di esecuzione la natura del risarcimento (rimborso di soldi illegalmente confiscati) ed il fatto che è la seconda richiesta riguardo alla non-esecuzione della stessa sentenza, e facendo la sua valutazione su una base equa, risarcisce al richiedente EUR 4,000 riguardo al danno morale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile su quell'importo.
B. Costi e spese
73. Il richiedente chiese anche USD 2,340 per costi e spese incorsi di fronte alle corti nazionali e la Corte. Produsse un’esposizione di documenti che mostravano gli importi di trascrizione, traduzione, stampa e spese postali, copie di biglietti aerei per Mosca, e parcelle per la sua rappresentanza di fronte alle corti di Mosca.
74. Il Governo accettò la richiesta del richiedente per quanto concerne le spese postali, di trascrizione e di stampa per l'importo di USD 130. Disse che l'accordo di servizi legali era nullo per la legge russa. Sostenne alo stesso tempo che non c'era stato bisogno per il richiedente di venire a Mosca perché lui aveva avuto un rappresentante là. Infine, respinse il resto della richiesta come irrilevante all'argomento della richiesta.
75. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente è abilitato al rimborso di costi e spese solo dal momento che si dimostra che questi sono incorsi davvero e necessariamente e sono stati ragionevoli relativamente al quantum. Nella presente causa, in base alla documentazione in suo possesso ed al criterio sopra, la Corte considera ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 1,200 come costi di copertura sotto tutti i capi, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente su quell'importo.
C. Interesse moratorio
76. La Corte considera appropriato che l'interesse moratorio dovrebbe essere basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuale.
PER QUESTE RAGIONI, LA CORTE UNANIMAMENTE
1. Rifiuta l'obiezione del Governo in merito alla ratione materiae della competenza Corte;
2. Dichiara la richiesta ammissibile;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 6 della Convenzione ed dell’Articolo 1 di Protocollo N.ro 1;
4. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell’ Articolo 13 della Convenzione;
5. Sostiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare il richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diviene definitiva in conformità all’Articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione i seguenti importi:
(i) EUR 373 (trecento e settanta-tre euro) riguardo al danno materiale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile;
(l'ii) EUR 4,000 (quattro mila euro) riguardo al danno morale, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere addebitabile;
(l'iii) EUR 1,200 (mille duecento euro) riguardo a costi e spese, più qualsiasi tassa che può essere a carico del richiedente;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati sino ad accordo il semplice interesse sarà pagabile sugli importi sopra ad un tasso uguale al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca Centrale europea durante il periodo predefinito più tre punti percentuale;
6. Respinge il resto della richiesta del richiedente per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 10 aprile 2008, facendo seguito all’Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 degli Articoli di Corte.
Søren Nielsen Christos Rozakis
Cancelliere Presidente




DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è sabato 14/11/2020.