CASO: CASE OF VOD BAUR IMPEX S.R.L. v. ROMANIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF VOD BAUR IMPEX S.R.L. v. ROMANIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 17060/15
STATO: Romania
DATA: 26/04/2022
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION

CASE OF VOD BAUR IMPEX S.R.L. v. ROMANIA

(Application no. 17060/15)





JUDGMENT
(Merits)



Art 1 P1 • Positive obligations • Peaceful enjoyment of possessions • Failure to grant compensation after partial annulment of property sale contract with public authority that did not own the property • Domestic courts’ overly rigid adjudication of applicant company’s claims and failure to strike a fair balance between competing interests



STRASBOURG

26 April 2022



FINAL



26/07/2022





This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.




In the case of Vod Baur Impex S.R.L. v. Romania,

The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:

Yonko Grozev, President,
Tim Eicke,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Iulia Antoanella Motoc,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pere Pastor Vilanova,
Jolien Schukking, judges,

and Ilse Freiwirth, Deputy Section Registrar,

Having regard to:

the application (no. 17060/15) against Romania lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Romanian private limited company, Vod Baur Impex S.R.L. (“the applicant company”), on 24 June 2015;

the decision to give notice of the application to the Romanian Government (“the Government”);

the parties’ observations;

Having deliberated in private on 30 November 2021 and 15 March 2022,

Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

INTRODUCTION

1. The applicant company’s complaint, lodged under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, refers to the failure of the domestic authorities to grant it compensation after the partial annulment of a sale contract entered into with the City of Bucharest.

THE FACTS

2. The applicant company is a Romanian company whose registered office is in Bucharest. It was represented by Ms M. Voicu, a lawyer practising in Bucharest.

3. The Government were represented by their Agent, most recently Ms O. Ezer, of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

4. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.

CONTRACT OF SALE
5. On 26 September 2006 the applicant company bought from the City of Bucharest (“the seller”), represented by the Bucharest First District Town Hall, a property with a total floor surface of 283 sq. m, located in a multi?storey building with apartments for private use. The property itself comprised commercial premises arranged over two floors: the ground floor, measuring 151.58 sq. m, and used for retail purposes; and a basement area, measuring 131.62 sq. m, for storing merchandise. The sale also included the appurtenant land, measuring 23.47 sq. m. The price for the entire property was 600,788.56 Romanian lei (RON) (approximately 172,000 euros – EUR), which was principally paid for by means of monthly instalments over a period of three years.

6. On 14 February 2007 the applicant company entered into a ten?year lease with a private bank for the property. The rent was set at EUR 8,000 per month. Since the basement area was in a bad state of repair, the applicant company and the bank came to an arrangement whereby the latter had to carry out some necessary refurbishments in exchange for two months of rent.

PROCEEDINGS BROUGHT BY A THIRD PARTY FOR THE PARTIAL ANNULMENT OF THE CONTRACT OF SALE
7. On 5 November 2007 the association of landlords representing the owners of the private apartments in the building in issue brought an action before the civil courts, requesting them to annul the contract of sale in respect of the basement area of 131.62 sq. m (see paragraph 5 above). It was alleged that the property in question had always been owned by the association of landlords.

8. Both parties to the contract of sale were summoned as defendants in the proceedings.

9. In a final judgment of 25 October 2010 the Bucharest Court of Appeal upheld the first-instance court’s judgment of 18 February 2009 and partially annulled the contract of sale. It essentially held that the City of Bucharest had sold a property that it had not owned, because the basement area had always belonged to the association of landlords.

10. Consequently, the applicant company had to amend the lease entered into with the bank: as it could rent only the ground floor, the rent was reduced to EUR 6,000 per month.

11. The applicant company wrote to the Bucharest First District Town Hall, asking to be reimbursed for all costs (including the price) incurred in connection with the property it had lost as a result of the partial annulment of the contract of sale.

12. On 9 December 2011 the Bucharest First District Town Hall replied to the applicant company’s last request submitted on 14 November 2011; it stated that, in view of the fact that the sale price referred to the whole property, as established in a valuation report, it firstly had to order another valuation report which would establish the corresponding value of the basement. The town hall was at that time in the process of hiring a new valuation expert; nevertheless, as soon as it had obtained the new valuation report, it would reimburse the applicant company the amount corresponding to the part of the property of which it had been deprived.

PROCEEDINGS BROUGHT BY THE APPLICANT COMPANY SEEKING COMPENSATION FOR DEPRIVATION OF PROPERTY
First-instance court
13. On 13 February 2012 the applicant company brought proceedings against the City of Bucharest, seeking compensation for the damage it had sustained on account of the partial annulment of the contract of sale of 26 September 2006. At a later date the applicant company amended its request by also bringing proceedings against the Bucharest First District Town Hall.

14. The applicant company argued that it was entitled to compensation for the property of which it had been deprived, alleging that the defendants had to be held liable for the dispossession (evic?iune) it had suffered. It further estimated the damage it had suffered as follows: RON 279,420 (equivalent to approximately EUR 65,000), corresponding to the amount paid for the lost property; RON 34,400 (equivalent to approximately EUR 8,000) for costs incurred during the refurbishment works; other costs related to the lost property, namely RON 6,645.45 (equivalent to approximately EUR 1,546) for legal expenses incurred in the annulment proceedings; RON 17,032.32 (equivalent to approximately EUR 3,960) for costs incurred when entering into the contract of sale (including property tax, notary’s fees, valuation fees and land registration fees); and lastly RON 619,200 (the equivalent to approximately EUR 144,000) for loss of profit, corresponding to lost rental income as a consequence of the partial annulment of the contract of sale.

It relied on the provisions of Articles 1701-03 of the Civil Code (see paragraphs 32-33 below).

15. The City of Bucharest argued that it did not have locus standi in the proceedings, pointing out that the agreement had been entered into by the Bucharest First District Town Hall, which had also cashed in the price of the sold property; the latter argued that, on the contrary, it had been the City of Bucharest who had sold the property and thus had legal standing. Both entities argued that under the applicable law, namely the former Civil Code (see paragraph 33 below), a partially dispossessed buyer was entitled only to whatever the market value of the lost property was at the time of the dispossession, and not a proportionate part of the price, as had been requested.

16. On 14 March 2013 the court appointed an expert to produce two valuation reports: the first report, produced in October 2013, established that the market value of the lost property at the time of the dispossession was EUR 102,830; the second report, produced in December 2013, established that the costs incurred for refurbishing the property had been EUR 63,691.

17. On 3 April 2014 the Bucharest County Court partially allowed the applicant company’s claims.

18. It held that the City of Bucharest had legal standing in its capacity as the seller of the property. It further found that the applicant company was entitled to receive compensation as a consequence of the partial dispossession caused by the partial annulment of the contract of sale.

19. On the basis of Articles 1347-48 of the former Civil Code (see paragraphs 30?31 and 33 below), which was in force at the time of the dispossession and thus applicable to the case, and the evidence on file, including the two expert valuation reports (see paragraph 16 above), the court decided to grant the applicant company RON 279,420 (equivalent to approximately EUR 65,000 – the price of the lost property); an amount equivalent to EUR 17,464.50 (for the cost of refurbishment of the lost property); RON 7,027.87 (equivalent to approximately EUR 2,067 – notary’s fees and valuation fees); and, lastly, EUR 16,000 for loss of profit. The court dismissed as unsubstantiated or unfounded the remainder of the claims for damages.

Appellate court
20. The applicant company and the City of Bucharest appealed against the first-instance court’s judgment. While the former criticised the amount granted by the court in compensation, the latter reiterated its arguments that it did not have legal standing and that, in any event, the buyer had been entitled to receive whatever the market value of the lost property had been at the time of the dispossession.

21. On 24 November 2014 the Bucharest Court of Appeal allowed the seller’s appeal and consequently dismissed the applicant company’s claims.

22. The court found that the first-instance court had been wrong in applying the legal provisions regulating the seller’s liability for dispossession, in so far as those provisions were not applicable to the present case. The appellate court found that once the contract of sale had been annulled in part, that part was considered to have never existed, and the principle of restitutio in integrum applied; however, if no contract existed, liability for dispossession in connection thereto could not exist either.

High Court of Cassation and Justice
23. The applicant company appealed against that judgment. It argued that dispossession was defined as the loss of property on account of a third party’s act or deed; in that respect, the annulment of the contract of sale represented dispossession. Liability for the dispossession lay with the seller, which had sold a property it did not own. The applicant company further alleged that the appellate court’s interpretation of the legal provisions regulating liability for dispossession rendered it devoid of all meaning and prevented it from having any effect.

Furthermore, the defendants themselves accepted that the provisions on liability for dispossession were applicable and contested only the amount that was to be granted in compensation based on the relevant legislation. Therefore, the court had given an ultra petita judgment, by ruling on a matter that had not been raised by any of the parties to the proceedings. Such a decision was unlawful and an abuse of process.

24. On 4 March 2015 the High Court of Cassation and Justice dismissed the appeal and upheld the appellate court’s reasoning.

25. The court considered that the annulment of the contract of sale represented more than mere dispossession; the annulment implied that the contract was considered to have never existed; as a consequence thereof, the parties were entitled to benefit from restitutio in integrum, namely, to be placed in the positions in which they had been before the contract was signed. Therefore, the applicant company was entitled to obtain the reimbursement of the price paid and damages, not on the basis of liability for dispossession, but on the basis of the restitutio in integrum principle. The legal provisions regulating the annulment of contracts and liability for dispossession were mutually exclusive and could not be applied simultaneously.

26. Furthermore, by dismissing the applicant company’s claims, the appellate court had not proceeded ultra or plus petita, because it had given precedence to a matter of public order, namely the correct application of the law to the facts of the case.

PROCEEDINGS BROUGHT BY THE APPLICANT COMPANY BASED ON THE RESTITUTIO IN INTEGRUM PRINCIPLE (ACTION IN TORT)
27. According to the Government, on 7 March 2018 the applicant company brought an action in tort (see paragraph 35 below) in the Bucharest County Court against the City of Bucharest, asking for reimbursement of the price paid for the lost property and of the costs for the refurbishment.

28. On 17 January 2019 the court dismissed the applicant company’s action in tort as time-barred. The court considered that such an action had to be brought within the generally applicable period of the statute of limitations, namely three years (see paragraph 35 below), calculated from the moment when the judgment annulling the contract of sale became final, namely on 25 October 2010 (see paragraph 9 above).

29. That judgment was not appealed against and it therefore became final on 9 July 2019.

RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK AND PRACTICE

CIVIL CODE
30. Articles 1695-1706 of the Civil Code reiterate, albeit with slight amendments, the content of Articles 1337-51 of the former Civil Code; they establish the seller’s liability for dispossession.

31. Under Articles 1336-37 of the former Civil Code, the seller is liable vis-à-vis the buyer for ensuring that the latter peacefully enjoys the purchased possession. Article 1695 of the current Civil Code provides that the seller is liable as of right for any dispossession that would entirely or partially prevent the buyer from peacefully enjoying the purchased possession. Such liability could be triggered by a third party’s claims, but only where such claims were based on a right of that third party which already existed before the contract of sale was signed, provided that the buyer had no knowledge of that right prior to the sale.

32. Articles 1701-02 of the current Civil Code (similar in content to Articles 1341-48 of the former Civil Code) provide that the dispossessed buyer may claim reimbursement of the price paid for the property and the payment of costs (including litigation costs, fees related to the conclusion of the contract of sale, and expenses incurred for the refurbishment of a property if those were necessary) and damages (including for loss of profit), regardless of whether the seller had been acting in good or bad faith.

33. Article 1703 provides that if the buyer is partially dispossessed and that the dispossession has not given rise to the termination of the contract (rezolu?iunea), the seller must return to the buyer the part of the price proportionate to the partial dispossession, and, if necessary, to pay damages, calculated in accordance with Article 1702. The corresponding Article 1348 of the former Civil Code provided that in that particular situation, if the sale was not abandoned (nu se stric? vânzarea), the seller had to return to the buyer whatever the market value of the lost property had been at the time of the dispossession.

34. Concerning the effects of the annulment of legal acts and the related rules on compensation, while the former Civil Code did not contain any provisions regulating such matters, the current Civil Code deals with them in Articles 1254-60 and lays down the conditions for restitutio in integrum (restituirea presta?iilor) in Articles 1639-47. The latter Articles provide that any compensation due to the buyer is calculated having regard to the value of the property, either at the time of signing the contract of sale or at the time when the property was lost, depending on various circumstances described in detail by the law.

35. The relevant provisions concerning tort actions and the general statute of limitations are described in Nicolae Virgiliu T?nase v. Romania ([GC], no. 41720/13, §§ 68-69, 25 June 2019).

RELEVANT DOMESTIC CASE-LAW
36. According to the information obtained proprio motu by the Court from public sources[1], in particular concerning the relevant domestic practice, it appears that between 2013 and 2016 the High Court of Cassation and Justice delivered several judgments in which it accepted that the seller’s liability for dispossession was relevant for the assessment of the case, whether in proceedings to annul the buyer’s title owing to the pre-existence of a third party’s title found to be valid by the court, or in proceedings where the third party’s title took precedence over that of the buyer in an action for recovery of possession (ac?iune in revendicare). Some examples illustrating the High Court’s approach that are of relevance to the present case are set out below.

37. In a judgment of 29 October 2013, while accepting that the seller was generally liable for the dispossession of the buyer once the sale contract had been annulled, since the buyer could no longer peacefully enjoy the purchased possession, the High Court found that in the case before it, which concerned property falling under the laws of restitution, the lex specialis was applicable, hence the price paid for the property was to be returned to the buyer on the basis of that law, not Article 1337 of the Civil Code. That conclusion was reiterated in several other judgments delivered at the relevant time by the highest Romanian court.

38. In a judgment of 4 November 2014, the High Court allowed the claims lodged by the buyer, who had relied on the seller’s liability for dispossession following the annulment of the sale contract. The court held as follows:

“Dispossession [evic?iune], starting from the etymology of the term ‘to evince’ (evinco) – to win in court – involves the total or partial loss of the property sold as a consequence of a court decision which recognises, in favour of a third party, the existence in respect of a property of a right in rem, which pre-existed that of the buyer.

Although the sale of another party’s property gives rise to the sanction of the annulment of the sale contract, the seller’s liability for dispossession in this case does not arise from the sale, but from the seller’s intentional or negligent fault [delict sau cvasi delict] in having sold a property that he or she did not own.

Thus, in the event of the sale of another party’s property, even if the sale is null and void, liability for dispossession arises from the act whose legal existence cannot be challenged, an act which the parties have treated as a sale; the sanction of annulment of the sale cannot alter the seller’s liability under Article 1337 of the Civil Code, in so far as the other conditions imposed by the provisions governing liability for dispossession are fulfilled, such liability being determined by the retroactive cancellation of the sale.”

39. In a judgment of 7 April 2016, the High Court disagreed with the lower court’s findings that once a sale contract was annulled, the buyer – in his claim for compensation – could no longer rely on the seller’s liability for dispossession in so far as the very source of that obligation had been extinguished, and hence it dismissed the buyer’s compensation claim as inadmissible. The High Court considered that in such a situation, the seller’s liability originated in his or her own fault, and was not based on the contract; moreover, the lower court should have made use of those legal provisions which supported the parties’ access to a court, and not of those provisions which automatically prevented the court from assessing the case owing to a formalistic approach concerning admissibility requirements.

40. In a judgment of 31 October 2016 the High Court considered that in so far as the sale contract had been annulled, the buyer could no longer rely on the seller’s liability for dispossession, because the very basis of such liability – the contract – was considered to have never existed. The buyer should have relied, in the claim for compensation, on the principles regulating unjust enrichment.

THE LAW

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1
41. The applicant company complained that the domestic courts had unfairly dismissed its claims relating to the reimbursement of the price paid and costs incurred for the property that it had been deprived of, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.

The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”

Admissibility
Compatibility ratione materiae – existence of possessions within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) The parties’ submissions

42. The Government argued that the applicant company did not have a possession, as its right of property had been annulled by the courts, and that it had not had any legitimate expectation to have its compensation claims allowed either, considering that it had based its claims on the wrong legal provisions. Indeed, instead of bringing an action for the reimbursement of the money paid relying on the restitutio in integrum principle, it had erroneously based its claims on liability for dispossession. The Government was therefore of the opinion that the application was incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention.

43. The applicant company did not submit any comments in that respect.

(b) The Court’s assessment

44. The Court reiterates that, according to its established case-law, “possessions” can be “existing possessions” or assets, including claims, in respect of which the applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right (see, among many other authorities, Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004?IX).

45. Where the proprietary interest takes the form of a claim, the Court has taken the view that it may be regarded as an “asset” only where it has a sufficient basis in domestic law, or where the applicants had “a claim which was sufficiently established to be enforceable”, or where the persons concerned were entitled to rely on the fact that a specific legal act would not be retrospectively invalidated to their detriment and where such legal acts could consist of a contract, for example (see Kurban v. Turkey, no. 75414/10, § 63, 24 November 2020, and the cases cited therein).

46. In the present case, the applicant company became the owner of two lots of property (the ground floor and a basement area) on the basis of a contract of sale entered into with a local authority (see paragraph 5 above). As a consequence of a domestic judgment, which became final on 25 October 2010, and which partially invalidated the contract of sale, the applicant company lost its title to the basement area. The domestic courts found at the time that a third party had been the rightful owner of that part of property, and that the local authority had sold it to the applicant company even though it had not owned it (see paragraph 9 above).

47. The Court notes that the parties do not disagree on the matter of the applicant company’s having been deprived of its property in the proceedings terminated by the judgment of 25 October 2010. Indeed, the applicant company’s complaint does not concern the deprivation of property, rather its claim for damages (see paragraph 41 above).

48. The parties’ point of divergence does not appear to concern the entitlement to compensation either (see paragraph 42 above), but rather lies in whether the applicant company pursued its claims for compensation in the domestic courts in an inappropriate manner.

49. In that connection, the Court observes that both the seller (see paragraphs 15 and 20 above) and the domestic courts (see paragraphs 18, 22 and 25 above) acknowledged at all times that the above-mentioned loss of property entailed the right of the applicant company to be compensated for that loss, as provided for by domestic law. However, while the first-instance court considered that the compensation could be paid on the basis of the seller’s liability for dispossession, and thus accepted the applicant company’s claims in part (see paragraphs 18-19 above), the Court of Appeal and the High Court disagreed, the latter also indicating expressly that the compensation in question could only be claimed by means of an action seeking reimbursement of the price paid following the annulment of the contract of sale (see paragraphs 22 and 25 above).

50. Therefore, in the Court’s view, the applicant company could be considered to have a “legitimate expectation” that its claim would be dealt with in accordance with the applicable laws and that it would be able to obtain reimbursement of the disputed sum (see, for instance and mutatis mutandis, Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. and Others v. Belgium, 20 November 1995, § 31, Series A no. 332, and S.A. Dangeville v. France, no. 36677/97, § 48, ECHR 2002?III).

51. Accordingly, the applicant company had a pecuniary interest which was recognised under domestic law and which was subject to protection under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

52. It is true that the existence of such a claim does not exempt the applicant company from pursuing that claim diligently by relying on the appropriate legal provisions capable of offering appropriate redress. This issue, however, goes to the merits of the case and shall be examined at that stage (see, mutatis mutandis, Plechanow v. Poland, no. 22279/04, § 86, 7 July 2009).

53. Accordingly, the Government’s objection in this regard must be dismissed.

Other grounds for inadmissibility
54. The Court further notes that this complaint is neither manifestly ill?founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
The parties’ submissions
55. The applicant company argued that the domestic courts had deprived it of its property which it had acquired from the State in good faith, and then refused to grant it any compensation.

56. The Government contended that the measure complained of by the applicant company was lawful; in particular, the application of the principles regulating the annulment of legal acts had been foreseeable and accessible. Moreover, the measure had been aimed at protecting the general interest, including that of the other owners of the property in question, as well as public order.

57. The measure had also been proportionate; in dismissing the applicant company’s claims, the domestic courts had given reasoned judgments and had correctly applied the law. Moreover, the High Court had also indicated to the applicant company which avenue it should have chosen to have its claims allowed, namely by relying on the restitutio in integrum principle (see paragraph 25 above).

The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles

58. The Court reiterates that the effective exercise of the right protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not depend merely on the State’s duty not to interfere, but may require positive measures of protection, particularly where there is a direct link between the measures an applicant may legitimately expect from the authorities and his effective enjoyment of his possessions (see Önery?ld?z v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 134, ECHR 2004?XII). The nature and the scope of the positive obligations vary, depending on the circumstances (Kur?un v. Turkey, no. 22677/10, § 114, 30 October 2018). However, as a general rule, the State must ensure that property rights are sufficiently protected by law and that adequate remedies are provided whereby the victim of an interference can seek to vindicate his rights, including, where appropriate, by claiming damages in respect of any loss sustained (see Blumberga v. Latvia, no. 70930/01, § 67, 14 October 2008). The measures which the State can be required to take in such a context can therefore be preventive or remedial (see Kotov v. Russia [GC], no. 54522/00, § 113, 3 April 2012, and Kur?un, cited above, § 114).

59. This means, in particular, that States are under an obligation to provide a judicial mechanism for settling effectively property disputes and to ensure compliance of those mechanisms with the procedural and substantive safeguards enshrined in the Convention. This principle applies with all the more force when it is the State itself which is in dispute with an individual. Accordingly, serious deficiencies in the handling of such disputes may raise an issue under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Plechanow, cited above, § 100).

60. In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of (see, for instance, Kotov, cited above, § 115).

(b) Application of those principles to the present case

61. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that the applicant company’s claims failed because, in the view of the appellate court and of the High Court, it had relied on the wrong legal provisions to assert its rights (see paragraphs 22 and 25 above). More specifically, although none of the domestic courts denied the applicant company’s right to obtain compensation as a consequence of the partial annulment of the contract of sale, its claims for compensation were dismissed at the appeal and further appeal stage, because the courts interpreted the seller’s liability for dispossession in a manner which excluded its application from the outset. The Court notes, however, that the domestic law did not expressly support that interpretation (see paragraph 31 above regarding the former Civil Code), in so far as liability for dispossession was established in favour of a buyer who was prevented from peacefully enjoying the purchased possession, no specifications as to how this could arise in practice being given in the law.

62. In this context, the Court reiterates that, under its well?established case?law, its task is not to review domestic law in abstracto, but to determine whether the manner in which it was applied to, or affected, the applicant gave rise to a violation of the Convention (see, for instance, Kurban, cited above, § 83).

63. In that connection, the Court observes that in the present case, the domestic courts’ interpretation of the legal provisions relied on by the applicant company rendered its claims inadmissible, for failure to indicate the correct legal basis.

64. Furthermore, the High Court also indicated that in its view there was an alternative remedy which should have been pursued by the applicant company (see paragraph 25 above). However, the Court notes that at the time when the appellate and the High Court gave their judgments, including indications as to what was considered the correct legal avenue to be pursued, any new claims lodged by the applicant company seeking compensation following the annulment of its title to property lacked any prospect of success, because they were already time-barred. Indeed, as held by the Bucharest County Court, and not contested by the Government, the statute of limitation in respect of the tort law action brought by the applicant company had expired on 25 October 2013 (see paragraph 28 above), while the Bucharest Court of Appeal and the High Court gave their judgments on 24 November 2014 and 4 March 2015 respectively (see paragraphs 21 and 24 above).

65. It follows that by finding that the applicant company’s claims for compensation did not rely on the appropriate legal provisions, while any other legal remedies were already ineffective as time-barred, the domestic courts deprived the applicant company of any possibility of obtaining appropriate compensation for the property it had been deprived of (see, mutatis mutandis, Staibano and Others v. Italy, no. 29907/07, §§ 54-57, 4 February 2014, and Mottola and Others v. Italy, no. 29932/07, §§ 54-57, 4 February 2014).

66. Furthermore, turning to the question whether the domestic authorities engaged in the balancing of interests in the case as required by the Convention, the Court also notes that the defendants in the proceedings accepted that the compensation claimed was due, on the basis of the seller’s liability for dispossession (see paragraphs 15 and 20 above). Such an approach was not inconsistent with at least part of the existing domestic practice at the relevant time (see paragraphs 36-39 above). The courts, however, considered that in spite of those arguments, the correct interpretation of the law should prevail (see paragraph 26 above), meaning in their viewpoint that dispossession and annulment were mutually exclusive (see paragraph 25 above).

67. At the outset, the Court notes that the law itself did not make any distinction between these two situations – dispossession being defined generally as a breach of the buyer’s peaceful enjoyment of his possession, without any exclusive or inclusive reference to annulment (see paragraphs 31 and 61 above), as indicated by the High Court’s rulings in cases similar to the present one, in which liability for dispossession was found to be pertinent even when the sale contract had been annulled (see paragraphs 36-39 above). While it is primarily for the national authorities, notably the courts, to resolve problems of interpretation of the domestic law, the Court must however verify compatibility with the Convention of the effects of such an interpretation, and in particular whether that interpretation was made in a foreseeable and reasonable manner, without constituting a bar to the applicant company’s effective access to court (see, mutatis mutandis, Kur?un v. Turkey, no. 22677/10, § 95, 30 October 2018). Taking into account the above considerations, the Court finds that in the present case, the domestic courts’ interpretation of the applicable law does not appear to have had consistent precedential support at the material time and was therefore not foreseeable for the applicant company. In any event, it emptied a remedy offered by the domestic law of its practical aim, which was, as shown above, to protect the buyer in the event of a breach of its right to the peaceful enjoyment of its possession.

68. Furthermore, no assessment of proportionality as required by the Convention was carried out in the domestic proceedings, as the claims were dismissed in a straightforward manner as relying on an incorrect legal basis (see paragraphs 22 and 25 above). The Court will therefore assess for itself whether the result was disproportionate.

69. The Court reiterates that the proportionality test requires an overall examination of the various interests at stake, which may call for an analysis of such elements as the terms of compensation and the conduct of the parties to the dispute, including the means employed by the State and their implementation (see, mutatis mutandis, Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 114, ECHR 2000?I).

70. In this connection the Court would refer to the Government’s plea that the impugned measure was aimed at protecting the general interest, including that of the other owners (see paragraph 56 above). Having regard, however, to the particular circumstances of the present case, the Court fails to see in what manner the granting of compensation to the applicant company as a consequence of the partial annulment of its title to property would have impeded the other owners’ rights, noting that their rights had already been acknowledged by the courts in the annulment proceedings (see paragraph 9 above), and that matter had not been disputed by the applicant company, which amended its actions accordingly (see, for instance, paragraph 10 above).

71. Furthermore, as mentioned above, by dismissing the applicant company’s claims, the domestic courts left it without any other viable alternative to assert its rights (see paragraphs 64-65 above).

72. The Court reiterates in this context that the risk of any mistake by a State authority – such as, in the present case, the sale to the applicant company of a property which it did not own – must be borne by the State and that such errors should not be remedied at the expense of the individual concerned (see, mutatis mutandis, Dzirnis v. Latvia, no. 25082/05, § 80, 26 January 2017 and the cases cited therein).

73. Notwithstanding the margin of appreciation allowed to a State in choosing the most appropriate response in such cases, the Court finds, in view of all the foregoing elements (see paragraphs 65, 67, 70 and 71 above), that the domestic courts’ rigid manner of adjudicating the applicant company’s claims, which deprived it of any possibility of obtaining compensation for the damage it had suffered, reflects serious deficiencies in the handling of the dispute and, in any event, was disproportionate and failed to strike a fair balance between the public interest and the applicant company’s rights.

74. It follows that in the present case the State has not discharged its positive obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

75. Accordingly, there has been a violation of that Article.

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
76. Article 41 of the Convention provides:

“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”

Damage

77. The applicant company claimed 102,830 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage, representing the market value of the property of which it had been deprived. In support of its claim, the applicant company referred to an expert report produced in October 2013 during the relevant domestic proceedings, which concluded that the indicated amount had represented at the time the market value of the property in issue (see paragraph 16 above).

78. Under the head of costs and expenses, the applicant company further claimed EUR 63,691, representing the outlay incurred for the refurbishment of the property. This amount similarly relied on an expert report, namely the one completed in December 2013 (see paragraph 16 above).

The applicant company made no claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage.

79. The Government argued that there was no causal link between the compensation claimed as damage and the violation found.

80. In the circumstances of the present case, the Court finds that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. It is therefore necessary to reserve the matter, due regard being had to the possibility of an agreement between the respondent State and the applicant company (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT

Declares, by a majority, the application admissible;
Holds, by five votes to two, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
Holds, unanimously, that the question of the application of Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision and accordingly:
(a) reserves the said question in whole;

(b) invites the parties to submit, within six months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;

(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Chamber the power to fix the same if need be.

Done in English, and notified in writing on 26 April 2022, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.

Ilse Freiwirth Yonko Grozev
Deputy Registrar President

In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judges Eicke and Schukking is annexed to this judgment.

Y.G.
I.F.



DISSENTING OPINION OF
JUDGES EICKE AND SCHUKKING

Introduction

1. Unfortunately, for the reasons set out below, we were unable to agree with the majority that, in the circumstances of the present case, the applicant company had sufficiently established either that its claim was admissible or, even if admissible, that there has been a violation of its rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

Background

2. Having bought a property from the City of Bucharest on 26 September 2006 (§ 5), by a final judgment of the Bucharest Court of Appeal of 25 October 2010 (§ 9) the underlying contract of sale was partially annulled on the basis that the City of Bucharest had never, in fact, owned the basement part of the property.

3. As a consequence, on 13 February 2012, the applicant company brought proceedings against the City of Bucharest, seeking compensation for the damage it had sustained on account of the partial annulment of the contract of sale. The applicant company argued that it was entitled to compensation on the basis that it had been “evicted” from part of the property it had purchased and was therefore entitled to compensation accordingly. While this claim was partially successful before the Bucharest County Court at first instance, both the Bucharest Court of Appeal and the High Court of Cassation and Justice rejected the applicant company’s claim. Both courts confirmed that, in fact, the legal provisions regulating a seller’s liability for eviction were not applicable to the applicant company’s situation but that, once the contract of sale had been annulled in part, it was to be considered to have never existed and a claim should, therefore, have been brought under the principle of restitutio in integrum (§§ 22 and 25).

4. However, it was then only by an action initiated on 7 March 2018, more than three years after either the Bucharest Court of Appeal first identified restitutio in integrum as the (only) appropriate cause of action (24 November 2014) or the High Court of Cassation and Justice finally rejected its claim on the basis of eviction on that basis (4 March 2015), that the applicant company brought an action on the basis of restitutio in integrum before the Bucharest County Court. That claim, however, was rejected at first instance as having been brought outside the three year limitation period (§ 28) and that decision was never appealed and became final on 9 July 2019.

Disagreement

5. It is in this context that, as the judgment records in § 41, the applicant company complains that “the domestic courts had unfairly dismissed its claims relating to the reimbursement of the price paid and costs incurred for the property that it had been deprived of, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1”. The claim was therefore, ultimately, one of access to court in order to obtain compensation and this Court’s assessment of that complaint inevitably depended heavily on the interpretation of domestic law. That is, however, where our difficulties, not being qualified to interpret Romanian domestic law, arose.

6. After all, while the judgment asserts (§ 28) that the limitation period in relation to any claim on the basis of restitutio in integrum expired after three years calculated from the moment when the judgment annulling the contract of sale became final, this seems to be contradicted both by the Government’s observations as well as by the summary of the relevant law referred to in the judgment (§ 35).

7. The Government, in its observations, notes that the rejection of the applicant company’s claim for restitutio in integrum was based on Article 3 of Legislative Decree no. 167/1958 and asserts that, in fact, the relevant limitation period fell to be calculated from the date of the judgment of the High Court of Cassation and Justice. Unfortunately for us the applicant company never engaged with or contradicted this statement of domestic law nor did it explain why it had failed even to mention the restitutio in integrum proceedings in the context of its application to this Court. As a result, the applicant company also failed to explain why it had waited more than three years after the judgment of the High Court of Cassation and Justice before bringing such proceedings rather than do so either as soon as the Bucharest Court of Appeal had identified this as the appropriate cause of action (even if advanced at that stage only as an alternative to the appeal to the High Court of Cassation and Justice) or at the latest immediately after the appeal to the High Court of Cassation and Justice had been unsuccessful.

8. This failure to engage with the Government’s submissions on the relevant domestic law is further exacerbated by the fact that it appears to us that the Government’s assertions are very much in line with the summary of the relevant law as set out in Nicolae Virgiliu T?nase v. Romania ([GC], no. 41720/13, §§ 68-70, 25 June 2019 and, at least partly, adopted by the judgment in this case (§ 35):

“68. The former Romanian Civil Code, in force until 1 October 2011, provided that any person who was responsible for causing damage to another would be liable to make reparation for it regardless of whether the damage was caused through his or her own actions, through his or her failure to act or through his or her negligence (Articles 998 and 999).

69. Legislative Decree no. 167/1958 on the statute of limitations, in force until 1 October 2011, provided that the right to lodge an action having a pecuniary scope was time-barred unless it was exercised within three years (Articles 1 and 3). The time-limit for lodging a claim for compensation for the damage suffered as a result of an unlawful act started to run from the moment the person became, or should have become, aware of the damage and knew who had caused it (Article 8). However, the time?limit was interrupted by the lodging of a court action (Article 16). A new term of the statute of limitations started to run after its interruption (Article 17).

70. The new Romanian Civil Code, in force since 1 October 2011, provides that a person with discernment is liable for all damage caused by his actions or inactions and is bound to make full reparation (Article 1349). ... The right to lodge an action, including one with a pecuniary scope, is time-barred if not exercised within three years, unless the law provides otherwise (Articles 2500, 2501 and 2517). The time-limit for lodging a claim for compensation for the damage suffered as a result of an unlawful act starts to run from the moment the person becomes, or should become, aware of the damage and knows who caused it (Article 2528). The time-limit can be interrupted by the lodging of a court action or of a civil?party claim during the criminal proceedings instituted, or before the court, up to the moment when the court starts the judicial examination of the case (Article 2537). If the time-bar is interrupted by the lodging of a civil?party claim, the interruption remains valid until the order to close or suspend the criminal proceedings or the decision of the court to suspend the proceedings is notified, or until the criminal court has delivered a final judgment (Article 2541).” (underlined emphasis added)”

9. Furthermore, there is no indication that the applicant company has at any time in any of the legal proceedings pursued before the domestic court advanced, either in substance or in form, any argument that to dismiss his claim for compensation would have amounted to a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

10. As a consequence, we were not satisfied that the applicant company, which had at all times been legally represented, had sufficiently established either that it had adequately or at all exhausted domestic remedies as required by Article 35 § 1 of the Convention or, in any event, that the domestic courts had, in fact, unfairly dismissed its claims relating to the reimbursement of the price paid and costs incurred for the property that it had been deprived of, in a manner amounting to a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE

CASO DI VOD BAUR IMPEX S.R.L. c. ROMANIA

(Ricorso n. 17060/15)





SENTENZA
(Merito)



Art. 1 P1 - Obblighi positivi - Godimento pacifico dei beni - Mancata concessione di un indennizzo dopo l'annullamento parziale di un contratto di vendita di un immobile con un'autorità pubblica che non ne era proprietaria - Giudizio eccessivamente rigido dei giudici nazionali sulle pretese della società ricorrente e mancato raggiungimento di un giusto equilibrio tra interessi concorrenti



STRASBURGO

26 aprile 2022



FINALE



26/07/2022





La presente sentenza è divenuta definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.




Nel caso Vod Baur Impex S.R.L. contro Romania,

La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Quarta Sezione), riunita in Camera composta da:

Yonko Grozev, Presidente,
Tim Eicke,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Iulia Antoanella Motoc,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pere Pastor Vilanova,
Jolien Schukking, giudici,

e Ilse Freiwirth, cancelliere aggiunto,

visto il ricorso

il ricorso (n. 17060/15) contro la Romania presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da una società a responsabilità limitata rumena, Vod Baur Impex S.R.L. ("la società ricorrente"), il 24 giugno 2015;

la decisione di notificare il ricorso al Governo rumeno ("il Governo");

le osservazioni delle parti;

Dopo aver deliberato in privato il 30 novembre 2021 e il 15 marzo 2022,

pronuncia la seguente sentenza, adottata in tale data:

INTRODUZIONE

1. Il reclamo della società ricorrente, presentato ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, si riferisce alla mancata concessione di un indennizzo da parte delle autorità nazionali dopo l'annullamento parziale di un contratto di vendita stipulato con la Città di Bucarest.

I FATTI

2. La società ricorrente è una società rumena con sede legale a Bucarest. È stata rappresentata dalla sig.ra M. Voicu, un avvocato che esercita a Bucarest.

3. Il Governo era rappresentato dal suo agente, da ultimo la sig.ra O. Ezer, del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.

4. I fatti del caso, così come presentati dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.

CONTRATTO DI VENDITA
5. Il 26 settembre 2006 la società ricorrente ha acquistato dal Comune di Bucarest ("il venditore"), rappresentato dal Municipio del Primo Distretto di Bucarest, un immobile con una superficie totale di 283 mq, situato in un edificio a più piani con appartamenti ad uso privato. L'immobile comprendeva locali commerciali disposti su due piani: il piano terra, di 151,58 metri quadrati, adibito alla vendita al dettaglio, e un'area seminterrata, di 131,62 metri quadrati, adibita a deposito merci. La vendita comprendeva anche il terreno pertinenziale, di 23,47 metri quadrati. Il prezzo per l'intera proprietà era di 600.788,56 lei rumeni (RON) (circa 172.000 euro), pagati principalmente con rate mensili per un periodo di tre anni.

6. Il 14 febbraio 2007 la società ricorrente ha stipulato un contratto di locazione decennale con una banca privata per l'immobile. L'affitto è stato fissato a 8.000 euro al mese. Poiché l'area del seminterrato era in cattivo stato di manutenzione, la società ricorrente e la banca hanno raggiunto un accordo in base al quale quest'ultima doveva effettuare alcuni lavori di ristrutturazione necessari in cambio di due mesi di affitto.

PROCEDIMENTO PROMOSSO DA UN TERZO PER L'ANNULLAMENTO PARZIALE DEL CONTRATTO DI VENDITA
7. Il 5 novembre 2007 l'associazione di proprietari che rappresenta i proprietari degli appartamenti privati dell'edificio in questione ha presentato un'azione dinanzi ai tribunali civili, chiedendo l'annullamento del contratto di vendita per quanto riguarda la superficie del seminterrato di 131,62 metri quadrati (cfr. paragrafo 5). Si sosteneva che l'immobile in questione era sempre stato di proprietà dell'associazione di proprietari.

8. Entrambe le parti del contratto di compravendita sono state citate in giudizio come convenute.

9. Con sentenza definitiva del 25 ottobre 2010, la Corte d'appello di Bucarest ha confermato la sentenza del tribunale di primo grado del 18 febbraio 2009 e ha annullato parzialmente il contratto di compravendita. In sostanza, ha ritenuto che il Comune di Bucarest avesse venduto un immobile di cui non era proprietario, poiché l'area del seminterrato era sempre appartenuta all'associazione dei proprietari.

10. Di conseguenza, la società ricorrente ha dovuto modificare il contratto di locazione stipulato con la banca: potendo affittare solo il piano terra, il canone è stato ridotto a 6.000 euro al mese.

11. La società ricorrente ha scritto al Municipio del Primo Distretto di Bucarest, chiedendo di essere rimborsata di tutte le spese (compreso il prezzo) sostenute in relazione all'immobile che aveva perso a causa dell'annullamento parziale del contratto di vendita.



12. Il 9 dicembre 2011 il Municipio del Primo Distretto di Bucarest ha risposto all'ultima richiesta presentata dalla società ricorrente il 14 novembre 2011; ha dichiarato che, in considerazione del fatto che il prezzo di vendita si riferiva all'intero immobile, come stabilito in una perizia di stima, doveva innanzitutto ordinare un'altra perizia di stima che avrebbe stabilito il valore corrispondente del seminterrato. Il Comune stava allora assumendo un nuovo perito estimatore; tuttavia, non appena ottenuta la nuova perizia, avrebbe rimborsato alla società ricorrente l'importo corrispondente alla parte di immobile di cui era stata privata.

PROCEDIMENTO PROMOSSO DALLA SOCIETÀ RICORRENTE PER OTTENERE IL RISARCIMENTO DEL DANNO PATRIMONIALE
Tribunale di primo grado
13. Il 13 febbraio 2012 la società ricorrente ha avviato un procedimento contro la Città di Bucarest per ottenere il risarcimento del danno subito a causa dell'annullamento parziale del contratto di compravendita del 26 settembre 2006. In un secondo momento, la società ricorrente ha modificato la propria domanda intentando anche un'azione contro il Municipio del primo distretto di Bucarest.

14. La società ricorrente ha sostenuto di avere diritto a un risarcimento per i beni di cui era stata privata, sostenendo che i convenuti dovevano essere ritenuti responsabili dello spossessamento (evic?iune) che aveva subito. Ha inoltre stimato il danno subito come segue: 279.420 RON (pari a circa 65.000 euro), corrispondenti all'importo pagato per l'immobile perduto; 34.400 RON (pari a circa 8.000 euro) per i costi sostenuti durante i lavori di ristrutturazione; altri costi relativi all'immobile perduto, ossia 6.645,45 RON (pari a circa 1.546 euro) per le spese legali sostenute nel procedimento di annullamento; 17.032 RON. 32 RON (equivalenti a circa 3.960 euro) per le spese sostenute per la stipula del contratto di compravendita (tra cui l'imposta sulla proprietà, le spese notarili, le spese di perizia e le spese di registrazione del terreno); e infine 619.200 RON (equivalenti a circa 144.000 euro) per il mancato guadagno, corrispondente al mancato reddito da locazione come conseguenza dell'annullamento parziale del contratto di compravendita.

Il Tribunale ha invocato le disposizioni degli articoli 1701-03 del Codice civile (cfr. paragrafi 32-33).

15. La Città di Bucarest ha sostenuto di non avere locus standi nel procedimento, sottolineando che il contratto era stato stipulato dal Municipio del Primo Distretto di Bucarest, che aveva anche incassato il prezzo dell'immobile venduto; quest'ultimo ha sostenuto che, al contrario, era stata la Città di Bucarest a vendere l'immobile e quindi era legittimata ad agire. Entrambi gli enti hanno sostenuto che, in base alla legge applicabile, ossia il vecchio Codice Civile (si veda il successivo paragrafo 33), un acquirente parzialmente spossessato aveva diritto solo a qualsiasi valore di mercato dell'immobile perduto al momento dello spossessamento, e non a una parte proporzionale del prezzo, come era stato richiesto.

16. Il 14 marzo 2013 il tribunale ha nominato un perito per produrre due relazioni di valutazione: la prima relazione, prodotta nell'ottobre 2013, ha stabilito che il valore di mercato dell'immobile perduto al momento dello spossessamento era di 102.830 euro; la seconda relazione, prodotta nel dicembre 2013, ha stabilito che i costi sostenuti per la ristrutturazione dell'immobile erano stati di 63.691 euro.

17. Il 3 aprile 2014 il Tribunale di contea di Bucarest ha accolto parzialmente le richieste della società ricorrente.

18. Ha ritenuto che la Città di Bucarest fosse legittimata ad agire in qualità di venditore dell'immobile. Ha inoltre stabilito che la società ricorrente aveva diritto a ricevere un risarcimento come conseguenza dello spossessamento parziale causato dall'annullamento parziale del contratto di vendita.

19. Sulla base degli articoli 1347-48 dell'ex Codice civile (si vedano i paragrafi 30-31 e 33 qui di seguito), in vigore al momento dello spossessamento e quindi applicabili al caso, e degli elementi di prova presenti nel fascicolo, comprese le due perizie di stima (si veda il paragrafo 16 qui sopra), il tribunale ha deciso di concedere alla società ricorrente 279.420 RON (equivalenti a circa 65.000 euro - il prezzo dell'immobile perduto); un importo equivalente a 17.464 euro. 50 (per i costi di ristrutturazione dell'immobile perduto); 7.027,87 RON (pari a circa 2.067 euro - spese notarili e di valutazione); e, infine, 16.000 euro per il mancato guadagno. Il tribunale ha respinto come non provate o infondate le restanti richieste di risarcimento danni.

Corte d'appello
20. La società ricorrente e la Città di Bucarest hanno presentato appello contro la sentenza del tribunale di primo grado. Mentre la prima ha criticato l'importo concesso dal tribunale a titolo di risarcimento, la seconda ha ribadito le proprie argomentazioni sul fatto che non aveva la legittimazione ad agire e che, in ogni caso, l'acquirente aveva diritto a ricevere il valore di mercato dell'immobile perduto al momento dell'esproprio.


32. Gli articoli 1701-02 dell'attuale Codice civile (simili nel contenuto agli articoli 1341-48 del precedente Codice civile) prevedono che l'acquirente spossessato possa chiedere il rimborso del prezzo pagato per l'immobile e il pagamento delle spese (comprese le spese di lite, le spese relative alla conclusione del contratto di vendita e le spese sostenute per la ristrutturazione di un immobile, se necessarie) e dei danni (compreso il mancato guadagno), indipendentemente dal fatto che il venditore abbia agito in buona o cattiva fede.

33. L'articolo 1703 stabilisce che se l'acquirente viene parzialmente spossessato e lo spossessamento non ha dato luogo alla risoluzione del contratto (rezolu?iunea), il venditore deve restituire all'acquirente la parte del prezzo proporzionale allo spossessamento parziale e, se necessario, pagare i danni, calcolati in conformità all'articolo 1702. Il corrispondente articolo 1348 del precedente Codice civile prevedeva che in questa particolare situazione, se la vendita non era stata abbandonata (nu se stric? vânzarea), il venditore doveva restituire all'acquirente qualunque fosse il valore di mercato dell'immobile perduto al momento dello spossessamento.

34. Per quanto riguarda gli effetti dell'annullamento degli atti giuridici e le relative norme sul risarcimento, mentre il precedente Codice civile non conteneva alcuna disposizione che regolasse tali questioni, l'attuale Codice civile le tratta negli articoli 1254-60 e stabilisce le condizioni per la restitutio in integrum (restituirea presta?iilor) negli articoli 1639-47. Questi ultimi articoli prevedono che l'eventuale risarcimento dovuto all'acquirente sia calcolato tenendo conto del valore dell'immobile, al momento della stipula del contratto di compravendita o al momento della perdita dell'immobile, a seconda delle varie circostanze descritte dettagliatamente dalla legge.

35. Le disposizioni pertinenti in materia di azioni per illecito civile e la prescrizione generale sono descritte in Nicolae Virgiliu T?nase c. Romania ([GC], n. 41720/13, §§ 68-69, 25 giugno 2019).

GIURISPRUDENZA NAZIONALE PERTINENTE
36. Secondo le informazioni ottenute d'ufficio dalla Corte da fonti pubbliche[1], in particolare per quanto riguarda la prassi interna pertinente, risulta che tra il 2013 e il 2016 l'Alta Corte di cassazione e di giustizia ha emesso diverse sentenze in cui ammetteva che la responsabilità del venditore per l'espropriazione fosse rilevante per la valutazione del caso, sia in un procedimento di annullamento del titolo dell'acquirente a causa della preesistenza di un titolo di un terzo ritenuto valido dal tribunale, sia in un procedimento in cui il titolo del terzo prevaleva su quello dell'acquirente in un'azione di recupero del possesso (ac?iune in revendicare). Di seguito sono riportati alcuni esempi che illustrano l'approccio della High Court e che sono rilevanti per il caso in esame.

37. In una sentenza del 29 ottobre 2013, pur ammettendo che il venditore è generalmente responsabile dello spossessamento dell'acquirente una volta che il contratto di vendita è stato annullato, poiché l'acquirente non può più godere pacificamente del possesso acquistato, l'Alta Corte ha ritenuto che nel caso in esame, che riguardava un bene che rientrava nel diritto di restituzione, fosse applicabile la lex specialis, per cui il prezzo pagato per il bene doveva essere restituito all'acquirente sulla base di tale legge e non dell'articolo 1337 del codice civile. Questa conclusione è stata ribadita in diverse altre sentenze emesse all'epoca dalla più alta corte rumena.

38. In una sentenza del 4 novembre 2014, l'Alta Corte ha accolto le richieste presentate dall'acquirente, che aveva invocato la responsabilità del venditore per lo spossessamento a seguito dell'annullamento del contratto di vendita. La corte ha dichiarato quanto segue:

"Lo spossessamento [evic?iune], partendo dall'etimologia del termine 'to evince' (evinco) - vincere in tribunale - comporta la perdita totale o parziale della proprietà venduta come conseguenza di una decisione giudiziaria che riconosce, a favore di un terzo, l'esistenza su una proprietà di un diritto reale, che preesisteva a quello dell'acquirente.

Sebbene la vendita di un bene altrui dia luogo alla sanzione dell'annullamento del contratto di compravendita, la responsabilità del venditore per lo spossessamento in questo caso non deriva dalla vendita, ma dal dolo o dalla colpa del venditore [delict sau cvasi delict] nell'aver venduto un bene di cui non era proprietario.

Pertanto, in caso di vendita di un bene altrui, anche se la vendita è nulla, la responsabilità per lo spossessamento deriva dall'atto la cui esistenza giuridica non può essere messa in discussione, un atto che le parti hanno trattato come una vendita; la sanzione dell'annullamento della vendita non può modificare la responsabilità del venditore ai sensi dell'articolo 1337 del Codice civile, nella misura in cui sono soddisfatte le altre condizioni imposte dalle disposizioni che regolano la responsabilità per lo spossessamento, essendo tale responsabilità determinata dall'annullamento retroattivo della vendita".



39. In una sentenza del 7 aprile 2016, l'Alta Corte non ha condiviso le conclusioni del tribunale di primo grado secondo cui, una volta annullato un contratto di vendita, l'acquirente - nella sua richiesta di risarcimento - non poteva più fare affidamento sulla responsabilità del venditore per lo spossessamento, in quanto la fonte stessa di tale obbligazione era stata estinta, e ha quindi respinto la richiesta di risarcimento dell'acquirente in quanto inammissibile. L'Alta Corte ha ritenuto che, in una situazione del genere, la responsabilità del venditore fosse dovuta alla sua stessa colpa e non si basasse sul contratto; inoltre, il tribunale di primo grado avrebbe dovuto avvalersi delle disposizioni di legge che sostenevano l'accesso delle parti a un tribunale e non di quelle che impedivano automaticamente al tribunale di valutare il caso a causa di un approccio formalistico sui requisiti di ammissibilità.

40. In una sentenza del 31 ottobre 2016 la High Court ha ritenuto che, nella misura in cui il contratto di vendita era stato annullato, l'acquirente non poteva più invocare la responsabilità del venditore per lo spossessamento, in quanto la base stessa di tale responsabilità - il contratto - si riteneva non fosse mai esistita. L'acquirente avrebbe dovuto fare affidamento, nella richiesta di risarcimento, sui principi che regolano l'arricchimento senza causa.

LA LEGGE

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
41. La società ricorrente lamentava che i tribunali nazionali avevano ingiustamente respinto le sue richieste relative al rimborso del prezzo pagato e delle spese sostenute per la proprietà di cui era stata privata, in violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, che recita come segue:

"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Tuttavia, le disposizioni precedenti non pregiudicano in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di applicare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità all'interesse generale o per assicurare il pagamento di imposte o di altri contributi o sanzioni."

Ammissibilità
Compatibilità ratione materiae - esistenza di possedimenti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1
(a) Le osservazioni delle parti

42. Il Governo ha sostenuto che la società ricorrente non aveva un possesso, in quanto il suo diritto di proprietà era stato annullato dai tribunali, e che non aveva nemmeno una legittima aspettativa di veder accolte le sue richieste di risarcimento, considerando che aveva basato le sue richieste su disposizioni giuridiche errate. Infatti, invece di intentare un'azione per il rimborso delle somme versate, basandosi sul principio della restitutio in integrum, aveva erroneamente fondato le sue richieste sulla responsabilità per spossessamento. Il Governo ha pertanto ritenuto che il ricorso fosse incompatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione.

43. La società ricorrente non ha presentato osservazioni al riguardo.

(b) La valutazione della Corte

44. La Corte ribadisce che, secondo la sua giurisprudenza consolidata, i "beni" possono essere "beni esistenti" o beni, compresi i crediti, rispetto ai quali il richiedente può sostenere di avere almeno una "legittima aspettativa" di ottenere l'effettivo godimento di un diritto di proprietà (si veda, tra le molte altre autorità, Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004-IX).

45. Quando l'interesse proprietario assume la forma di una pretesa, la Corte ha ritenuto che possa essere considerato un "bene" solo se ha una base sufficiente nel diritto interno, o se i richiedenti avevano "una pretesa sufficientemente stabilita per essere esecutiva", o se le persone interessate avevano il diritto di fare affidamento sul fatto che uno specifico atto giuridico non sarebbe stato invalidato retroattivamente a loro danno e se tali atti giuridici potevano consistere in un contratto, ad esempio (si veda Kurban c. Turchia, no. 75414/10, § 35, ECH 2004-ix). Turchia, n. 75414/10, § 63, 24 novembre 2020, e i casi ivi citati).

46. Nel caso di specie, la società ricorrente è diventata proprietaria di due lotti di proprietà (il piano terra e un'area seminterrata) sulla base di un contratto di vendita stipulato con un'autorità locale (si veda il paragrafo 5 sopra). A seguito di una sentenza nazionale, passata in giudicato il 25 ottobre 2010, che ha invalidato parzialmente il contratto di compravendita, la società ricorrente ha perso il titolo di proprietà dell'area seminterrata. All'epoca i tribunali nazionali avevano stabilito che un terzo era il legittimo proprietario di quella parte di proprietà e che l'ente locale l'aveva venduta alla società ricorrente pur non essendone proprietario (si veda il paragrafo 9 supra).

47. La Corte osserva che le parti non sono in disaccordo sul fatto che la società ricorrente sia stata privata dei suoi beni nel procedimento concluso con la sentenza del 25 ottobre 2010. Infatti, il reclamo della società ricorrente non riguarda la privazione della proprietà, ma piuttosto la sua richiesta di risarcimento danni (si veda il paragrafo 41 supra).


48. Il punto di divergenza tra le parti non sembra riguardare nemmeno il diritto al risarcimento (si veda il precedente paragrafo 42), ma piuttosto il fatto che la società ricorrente abbia perseguito le sue richieste di risarcimento nei tribunali nazionali in modo inappropriato.

49. A questo proposito, la Corte osserva che sia il venditore (si vedano i paragrafi 15 e 20 supra) che i tribunali nazionali (si vedano i paragrafi 18, 22 e 25 supra) hanno sempre riconosciuto che la suddetta perdita di proprietà comportava il diritto della società ricorrente ad essere risarcita per tale perdita, come previsto dal diritto nazionale. Tuttavia, mentre il giudice di primo grado ha ritenuto che l'indennizzo potesse essere corrisposto sulla base della responsabilità del venditore per spossessamento, accogliendo quindi in parte le richieste della società ricorrente (si vedano i paragrafi 18-19 supra), la Corte d'Appello e la Corte Suprema hanno dissentito, indicando inoltre espressamente che l'indennizzo in questione poteva essere richiesto solo attraverso un'azione di rimborso del prezzo pagato a seguito dell'annullamento del contratto di vendita (si vedano i paragrafi 22 e 25 supra).

50. Pertanto, a parere della Corte, si può ritenere che la società ricorrente avesse una "legittima aspettativa" che la sua richiesta sarebbe stata trattata in conformità alle leggi applicabili e che sarebbe stata in grado di ottenere il rimborso della somma contestata (si veda, ad esempio e mutatis mutandis, Pressos Compania Naviera S.A. e altri c. Belgio, 20 novembre 1995, § 31, Serie A n. 332, e S.A. Dangeville c. Francia, no. 36677/97, § 48, ECHR 2002-III).

51. Di conseguenza, la società ricorrente aveva un interesse pecuniario riconosciuto dal diritto interno e soggetto a tutela ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.

52. È vero che l'esistenza di un tale diritto non esime la società ricorrente dal perseguire diligentemente tale diritto facendo affidamento sulle disposizioni giuridiche appropriate in grado di offrire un adeguato risarcimento. Tale questione, tuttavia, entra nel merito della causa e sarà esaminata in quella fase (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Plechanow c. Polonia, n. 22279/04, § 86, 7 luglio 2009).

53. Di conseguenza, l'obiezione del Governo al riguardo deve essere respinta.

Altri motivi di irricevibilità
54. La Corte osserva inoltre che il ricorso non è manifestamente infondato né irricevibile per gli altri motivi elencati nell'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ricevibile.

Il merito
Le osservazioni delle parti
55. La società ricorrente ha sostenuto che i tribunali nazionali l'avevano privata dei beni che aveva acquistato dallo Stato in buona fede, rifiutandosi poi di concederle un risarcimento.

56. Il Governo ha sostenuto che la misura lamentata dalla società ricorrente era legittima; in particolare, l'applicazione dei principi che regolano l'annullamento degli atti giuridici era prevedibile e accessibile. Inoltre, la misura era finalizzata alla tutela dell'interesse generale, compreso quello degli altri proprietari del bene in questione, nonché dell'ordine pubblico.

57. La misura era anche proporzionata; nel respingere le richieste della società ricorrente, i tribunali nazionali avevano emesso sentenze motivate e avevano applicato correttamente il diritto. Inoltre, l'Alta Corte aveva anche indicato alla società ricorrente la strada che avrebbe dovuto percorrere per ottenere l'accoglimento delle sue richieste, ovvero il principio della restitutio in integrum (si veda il precedente paragrafo 25).

La valutazione della Corte
(a) Principi generali

58. La Corte ribadisce che l'esercizio effettivo del diritto tutelato dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 non dipende semplicemente dal dovere dello Stato di non interferire, ma può richiedere misure positive di protezione, in particolare quando esiste un legame diretto tra le misure che un richiedente può legittimamente aspettarsi dalle autorità e l'effettivo godimento dei suoi beni (si veda Önery?ld?z c. Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 134, CEDU 2004-XII). La natura e la portata degli obblighi positivi variano a seconda delle circostanze (Kur?un c. Turchia, n. 22677/10, § 114, 30 ottobre 2018). Tuttavia, come regola generale, lo Stato deve garantire che i diritti di proprietà siano sufficientemente tutelati dalla legge e che siano previsti rimedi adeguati con cui la vittima di un'interferenza possa cercare di far valere i propri diritti, anche, se del caso, chiedendo il risarcimento dei danni subiti (si veda Blumberga c. Lettonia, n. 70930/01, § 67, 14 ottobre 2008). Le misure che lo Stato può essere tenuto a prendere in un simile contesto possono quindi essere preventive o correttive (cfr. Kotov v. Russia [GC], no. 54522/00, § 113, 3 aprile 2012, e Kur?un, sopra citata, § 114).


59. Ciò significa, in particolare, che gli Stati hanno l'obbligo di fornire un meccanismo giudiziario per risolvere efficacemente le controversie in materia di proprietà e di garantire la conformità di tali meccanismi alle garanzie procedurali e sostanziali sancite dalla Convenzione. Questo principio si applica a maggior ragione quando è lo Stato stesso a essere in lite con un individuo. Di conseguenza, gravi carenze nella gestione di tali controversie possono sollevare una questione ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda Plechanow, sopra citato, § 100).

60. Nel valutare l'osservanza dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la Corte deve effettuare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in gioco, tenendo presente che la Convenzione mira a salvaguardare diritti che siano "concreti ed effettivi". Essa deve guardare dietro le apparenze e indagare la realtà della situazione denunciata (si veda, ad esempio, Kotov, sopra citato, § 115).

(b) Applicazione di tali principi al caso di specie

61. Passando alle circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte osserva che le richieste della società ricorrente sono fallite perché, secondo la corte d'appello e l'Alta Corte, essa si è basata sulle disposizioni giuridiche sbagliate per far valere i propri diritti (si vedano i paragrafi 22 e 25 supra). In particolare, sebbene nessuno dei tribunali nazionali abbia negato il diritto della società ricorrente a ottenere un risarcimento come conseguenza dell'annullamento parziale del contratto di compravendita, le sue richieste di risarcimento sono state respinte in fase di appello e di ulteriore ricorso, perché i tribunali hanno interpretato la responsabilità del venditore per lo spossessamento in modo tale da escluderne l'applicazione fin dall'inizio. La Corte osserva, tuttavia, che il diritto interno non sosteneva espressamente tale interpretazione (si veda il precedente paragrafo 31 relativo al codice civile), in quanto la responsabilità per spossessamento era stabilita a favore di un acquirente a cui era stato impedito di godere pacificamente del possesso acquistato, senza che la legge fornisse alcuna indicazione su come ciò potesse verificarsi in pratica.

62. In questo contesto, la Corte ribadisce che, in base alla sua consolidata giurisprudenza, il suo compito non è quello di riesaminare il diritto interno in astratto, ma di determinare se il modo in cui esso è stato applicato al ricorrente, o lo ha interessato, abbia dato luogo a una violazione della Convenzione (si veda, ad esempio, Kurban, sopra citata, § 83).

63. A questo proposito, la Corte osserva che, nel caso di specie, l'interpretazione delle disposizioni giuridiche invocate dalla società ricorrente da parte dei giudici interni ha reso le sue richieste irricevibili, per mancata indicazione della corretta base giuridica.

64. Inoltre, l'Alta Corte ha anche indicato che a suo avviso esisteva un rimedio alternativo che avrebbe dovuto essere perseguito dalla società ricorrente (si veda il paragrafo 25 supra). Tuttavia, la Corte osserva che all'epoca in cui la Corte d'appello e l'Alta Corte hanno emesso le loro sentenze, comprese le indicazioni su quale fosse considerata la corretta via legale da percorrere, qualsiasi nuova domanda presentata dalla società ricorrente per ottenere un risarcimento a seguito dell'annullamento del suo titolo di proprietà non aveva alcuna prospettiva di successo, perché era già prescritta. Infatti, come ritenuto dalla Corte di Contea di Bucarest, e non contestato dal Governo, il termine di prescrizione per quanto riguarda l'azione per illecito civile intentata dalla società ricorrente era scaduto il 25 ottobre 2013 (si veda il paragrafo 28 supra), mentre la Corte d'Appello di Bucarest e l'Alta Corte hanno emesso le loro sentenze rispettivamente il 24 novembre 2014 e il 4 marzo 2015 (si vedano i paragrafi 21 e 24 supra).

65. Ne consegue che, ritenendo che le richieste di risarcimento della società ricorrente non si basassero sulle disposizioni di legge appropriate, mentre qualsiasi altro rimedio giuridico era già inefficace in quanto prescritto, i tribunali interni hanno privato la società ricorrente di qualsiasi possibilità di ottenere un risarcimento adeguato per la proprietà di cui era stata privata (si vedano, mutatis mutandis, Staibano e altri c. Italia, n. 29907/07, §§ 54-57, 4 febbraio 2014, e Mottola e altri c. Italia, n. 29932/07, §§ 54-57, 4 febbraio 2014).

66. Inoltre, per quanto riguarda la questione se le autorità nazionali abbiano effettuato la ponderazione degli interessi nel caso come richiesto dalla Convenzione, la Corte osserva anche che i convenuti nel procedimento hanno accettato che il risarcimento richiesto fosse dovuto, sulla base della responsabilità del venditore per lo spossessamento (si vedano i paragrafi 15 e 20 supra). Tale approccio non era in contrasto con almeno una parte della prassi nazionale esistente all'epoca (cfr. paragrafi 36-39). I giudici, tuttavia, hanno ritenuto che, nonostante tali argomentazioni, dovesse prevalere la corretta interpretazione della legge (si veda il paragrafo 26 supra), il che significa, dal loro punto di vista, che lo spossessamento e l'annullamento si escludono a vicenda (si veda il paragrafo 25 supra).

67 In primo luogo, la Corte osserva che la legge stessa non opera alcuna distinzione tra queste due situazioni - lo spossessamento è definito in generale come una violazione del pacifico godimento del possesso da parte dell'acquirente, senza alcun riferimento esclusivo o inclusivo all'annullamento (cfr. paragrafi 31 e 61 supra), come indicato dalle sentenze della High Court in casi simili al presente, in cui la responsabilità per lo spossessamento è stata ritenuta pertinente anche quando il contratto di vendita era stato annullato (cfr. paragrafi 36-39 supra). Sebbene spetti in primo luogo alle autorità nazionali, in particolare ai tribunali, risolvere i problemi di interpretazione del diritto interno, la Corte deve tuttavia verificare la compatibilità con la Convenzione degli effetti di tale interpretazione e, in particolare, se tale interpretazione sia stata effettuata in modo prevedibile e ragionevole, senza costituire un ostacolo all'effettivo accesso della società ricorrente al tribunale (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Kur?un c. Turchia, n. 22677/10, § 95, 30 ottobre 2018). Tenendo conto delle considerazioni di cui sopra, la Corte ritiene che, nel caso di specie, l'interpretazione del diritto applicabile da parte dei tribunali nazionali non sembra aver avuto un supporto precedente coerente all'epoca dei fatti e non era quindi prevedibile per la società ricorrente. In ogni caso, ha svuotato un rimedio offerto dal diritto interno del suo scopo pratico, che era, come mostrato sopra, quello di proteggere l'acquirente in caso di violazione del suo diritto al pacifico godimento del suo possesso.

68. Inoltre, nel procedimento interno non è stata effettuata alcuna valutazione della proporzionalità, come richiesto dalla Convenzione, in quanto le richieste sono state respinte in modo diretto in quanto basate su una base giuridica errata (si vedano i paragrafi 22 e 25 supra). La Corte valuterà pertanto autonomamente se il risultato sia stato sproporzionato.

69. La Corte ribadisce che il test di proporzionalità richiede un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in gioco, che può richiedere un'analisi di elementi quali le condizioni di risarcimento e il comportamento delle parti in causa, compresi i mezzi impiegati dallo Stato e la loro attuazione (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Beyeler c. Italia [GC], no. 33202/96, § 114, ECHR 2000-I).

70. A questo proposito, la Corte fa riferimento all'argomentazione del Governo secondo cui la misura impugnata mirava a tutelare l'interesse generale, compreso quello degli altri proprietari (si veda il paragrafo 56 supra). Tenuto conto, tuttavia, delle particolari circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte non vede in che modo la concessione di un indennizzo alla società ricorrente in conseguenza dell'annullamento parziale del suo titolo di proprietà avrebbe ostacolato i diritti degli altri proprietari, osservando che i loro diritti erano già stati riconosciuti dai tribunali nel procedimento di annullamento (si veda il paragrafo 9 supra), e tale questione non era stata contestata dalla società ricorrente, che ha modificato le sue azioni di conseguenza (si veda, ad esempio, il paragrafo 10 supra).

71. Inoltre, come già detto, respingendo le richieste della società ricorrente, i giudici nazionali l'hanno lasciata senza altre alternative valide per far valere i suoi diritti (si vedano i paragrafi 64-65 supra).

72. La Corte ribadisce in questo contesto che il rischio di qualsiasi errore da parte di un'autorità statale - come, nel caso di specie, la vendita alla società ricorrente di un immobile di cui non era proprietaria - deve essere sopportato dallo Stato e che a tali errori non si deve porre rimedio a spese del singolo interessato (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Dzirnis c. Lettonia, n. 25082/05, § 80, 26 gennaio 2017 e i casi ivi citati).

73. Nonostante il margine di apprezzamento concesso a uno Stato nella scelta della risposta più appropriata in tali casi, la Corte ritiene, alla luce di tutti gli elementi che precedono (si vedano i paragrafi 65, 67, 70 e 71 supra), che il modo rigido con cui i tribunali nazionali hanno giudicato le richieste della società ricorrente, che l'ha privata di qualsiasi possibilità di ottenere il risarcimento dei danni subiti, riflette gravi carenze nella gestione della controversia e, in ogni caso, è stato sproporzionato e non ha raggiunto un giusto equilibrio tra l'interesse pubblico e i diritti della società ricorrente.

74. Ne consegue che nel caso di specie lo Stato non ha adempiuto ai suoi obblighi positivi ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.

75. Di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione di tale articolo.

APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
76. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:

"Se la Corte constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente una riparazione solo parziale, la Corte accorda, se necessario, una giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".


Danno

77. La società ricorrente ha chiesto 102.830 euro (EUR) a titolo di danno patrimoniale, che rappresentano il valore di mercato dell'immobile di cui era stata privata. A sostegno della sua richiesta, la società ricorrente ha fatto riferimento a una perizia prodotta nell'ottobre 2013 durante il relativo procedimento interno, che concludeva che l'importo indicato aveva rappresentato all'epoca il valore di mercato dell'immobile in questione (si veda il paragrafo 16 supra).

78. Sotto la voce costi e spese, la società ricorrente ha inoltre richiesto 63.691 euro, che rappresentano l'esborso sostenuto per la ristrutturazione dell'immobile. Anche questo importo si basava su una perizia, vale a dire quella completata nel dicembre 2013 (cfr. paragrafo 16 supra).

La società ricorrente non ha avanzato alcuna richiesta di risarcimento del danno non patrimoniale.

79. Il Governo ha sostenuto che non vi era alcun nesso causale tra il risarcimento richiesto come danno e la violazione riscontrata.

80. Nelle circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte ritiene che la questione dell'applicazione dell'articolo 41 non sia pronta per la decisione. È pertanto necessario riservare la questione, tenendo conto della possibilità di un accordo tra lo Stato convenuto e la società ricorrente (articolo 75, paragrafi 1 e 4, del Regolamento della Corte).

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE

Dichiara, a maggioranza, il ricorso ammissibile;
Dichiara, con cinque voti contro due, che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1;
Dichiara, all'unanimità, che la questione dell'applicazione dell'articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per la decisione e di conseguenza:
(a) si riserva la questione nel suo complesso;

(b) invita le parti a presentare, entro sei mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventerà definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, le loro osservazioni scritte al riguardo e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo che possano raggiungere;

(c) si riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Camera il potere di fissarla se necessario.

Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto il 26 aprile 2022, ai sensi dell'articolo 77, paragrafi 2 e 3, del Regolamento della Corte.

Ilse Freiwirth Yonko Grozev
Cancelliere aggiunto Presidente

Ai sensi dell'articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e dell'articolo 74 § 2 del Regolamento della Corte, il parere separato dei giudici Eicke e Schukking è allegato alla presente sentenza.

Y.G.
I.F.



PARERE DISSENZIENTE DEI
GIUDICI EICKE E SCHUKKING

Introduzione

1. Purtroppo, per le ragioni esposte di seguito, non siamo stati in grado di concordare con la maggioranza sul fatto che, nelle circostanze del caso in esame, la società ricorrente abbia sufficientemente dimostrato che la sua richiesta è ammissibile o, anche se ammissibile, che vi sia stata una violazione dei suoi diritti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.

Contesto

2. Dopo aver acquistato un immobile dalla Città di Bucarest il 26 settembre 2006 (§ 5), con una sentenza definitiva della Corte d'appello di Bucarest del 25 ottobre 2010 (§ 9) il contratto di vendita sottostante è stato parzialmente annullato sulla base del fatto che la Città di Bucarest non era mai stata, in realtà, proprietaria della parte seminterrata dell'immobile.

3. Di conseguenza, il 13 febbraio 2012, la società ricorrente ha intentato un'azione legale contro la Città di Bucarest, chiedendo il risarcimento dei danni subiti a causa dell'annullamento parziale del contratto di vendita. La società ricorrente ha sostenuto di avere diritto al risarcimento sulla base del fatto che era stata "sfrattata" da una parte dell'immobile che aveva acquistato e aveva quindi diritto a un risarcimento di conseguenza. Sebbene questa richiesta sia stata parzialmente accolta in primo grado dal Tribunale di Bucarest, sia la Corte d'Appello di Bucarest che l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e Giustizia hanno respinto la richiesta della società richiedente. Entrambi i tribunali hanno confermato che, in realtà, le disposizioni di legge che regolano la responsabilità del venditore per lo sfratto non erano applicabili alla situazione della società ricorrente, ma che, una volta annullato in parte il contratto di vendita, esso doveva essere considerato come mai esistito e, pertanto, si sarebbe dovuto presentare un reclamo in base al principio della restitutio in integrum (§§ 22 e 25).

4. Tuttavia, solo con un ricorso avviato il 7 marzo 2018, più di tre anni dopo che la Corte d'Appello di Bucarest aveva individuato per la prima volta la restitutio in integrum come (unica) causa appropriata (24 novembre 2014) o l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e Giustizia aveva infine respinto la sua domanda di sfratto su tale base (4 marzo 2015), la società ricorrente ha presentato un ricorso sulla base della restitutio in integrum dinanzi al Tribunale di Bucarest. Tale richiesta, tuttavia, è stata respinta in primo grado in quanto presentata al di fuori del periodo di prescrizione di tre anni (§ 28) e tale decisione non è mai stata impugnata ed è diventata definitiva il 9 luglio 2019.

Disaccordo


5. È in questo contesto che, come si legge nella sentenza al § 41, la società ricorrente lamenta che "i tribunali nazionali avevano ingiustamente respinto le sue richieste relative al rimborso del prezzo pagato e delle spese sostenute per la proprietà di cui era stata privata, in violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1". Si trattava quindi, in ultima analisi, di una richiesta di accesso al tribunale per ottenere un risarcimento e la valutazione di questo reclamo da parte della Corte dipendeva inevitabilmente in larga misura dall'interpretazione del diritto interno. È qui, tuttavia, che sono sorte le nostre difficoltà, non essendo qualificati per interpretare il diritto interno rumeno.

6. Dopo tutto, mentre la sentenza afferma (§ 28) che il termine di prescrizione in relazione a qualsiasi richiesta sulla base della restitutio in integrum è scaduto dopo tre anni calcolati dal momento in cui la sentenza di annullamento del contratto di vendita è passata in giudicato, ciò sembra essere contraddetto sia dalle osservazioni del Governo sia dalla sintesi della legge pertinente citata nella sentenza (§ 35).

7. Il Governo, nelle sue osservazioni, osserva che il rigetto della domanda di restitutio in integrum della società ricorrente si basava sull'articolo 3 del Decreto Legislativo n. 167/1958 e afferma che il rigetto della domanda di restitutio in integrum della società ricorrente si basava sull'articolo 3 del Decreto Legislativo n. 167/1958. 167/1958 e afferma che, in realtà, il relativo termine di prescrizione doveva essere calcolato a partire dalla data della sentenza dell'Alta Corte di Cassazione e Giustizia. Purtroppo per noi, la società ricorrente non ha mai affrontato o contraddetto questa affermazione di diritto interno né ha spiegato perché non ha nemmeno menzionato il procedimento di restitutio in integrum nel contesto del suo ricorso a questa Corte. Di conseguenza, la società ricorrente non ha nemmeno spiegato perché abbia aspettato più di tre anni dopo la sentenza dell'Alta Corte di Cassazione e Giustizia prima di avviare tale procedimento, anziché farlo non appena la Corte d'Appello di Bucarest lo avesse individuato come causa appropriata (anche se avanzata in quella fase solo come alternativa al ricorso all'Alta Corte di Cassazione e Giustizia) o al più tardi subito dopo che il ricorso all'Alta Corte di Cassazione e Giustizia fosse stato infruttuoso.

8. Questa mancanza di dialogo con le argomentazioni del Governo sul diritto interno pertinente è ulteriormente aggravata dal fatto che ci sembra che le affermazioni del Governo siano molto in linea con la sintesi del diritto pertinente esposta in Nicolae Virgiliu T?nase c. Romania ([GC], no. 41720/13, §§ 68-70, 25 giugno 2019 e, almeno in parte, adottata dalla sentenza nel presente caso (§ 35):

"68. Il precedente Codice civile rumeno, in vigore fino al 1° ottobre 2011, prevedeva che chiunque fosse responsabile di aver causato un danno a un altro sarebbe stato tenuto a risarcirlo a prescindere dal fatto che il danno fosse stato causato da azioni proprie, da omissioni o da negligenza (articoli 998 e 999).

69. Il Decreto Legislativo n. 167/1958 sulla prescrizione, in vigore fino al 1° ottobre 2011, prevedeva che il diritto di proporre un'azione a titolo oneroso si prescrivesse se non veniva esercitato entro tre anni (articoli 1 e 3). Il termine per la presentazione di una richiesta di risarcimento per il danno subito a causa di un atto illecito iniziava a decorrere dal momento in cui la persona era, o avrebbe dovuto essere, a conoscenza del danno e sapeva chi lo aveva causato (articolo 8). Tuttavia, il termine era interrotto dalla presentazione di un'azione giudiziaria (articolo 16). Un nuovo termine di prescrizione iniziava a decorrere dopo la sua interruzione (articolo 17).

70. Il nuovo Codice civile rumeno, in vigore dal 1° ottobre 2011, prevede che una persona dotata di discernimento sia responsabile di tutti i danni causati dalle sue azioni o inazioni e sia tenuta alla piena riparazione (articolo 1349). ... Il diritto di proporre un'azione, anche di natura patrimoniale, si prescrive se non viene esercitato entro tre anni, a meno che la legge non disponga diversamente (articoli 2500, 2501 e 2517). Il termine per la presentazione di una richiesta di risarcimento per il danno subito a causa di un atto illecito inizia a decorrere dal momento in cui la persona viene o dovrebbe venire a conoscenza del danno e sa chi lo ha causato (articolo 2528). Il termine può essere interrotto dalla presentazione di un'azione giudiziaria o di una costituzione di parte civile durante il procedimento penale avviato, o prima del tribunale, fino al momento in cui il tribunale inizia l'esame giudiziario del caso (articolo 2537). Se la prescrizione è interrotta dalla presentazione di una costituzione di parte civile, l'interruzione rimane valida fino alla notifica dell'ordinanza di archiviazione o sospensione del procedimento penale o della decisione del tribunale di sospendere il procedimento, oppure fino alla sentenza definitiva del tribunale penale (articolo 2541)." (sottolineatura aggiunta)"
9. Inoltre, non vi è alcuna indicazione che la società ricorrente abbia mai avanzato, in uno qualsiasi dei procedimenti giudiziari portati avanti dinanzi al tribunale nazionale, un'argomentazione sostanziale o formale secondo la quale il rigetto della sua richiesta di risarcimento avrebbe comportato una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.

10. Di conseguenza, non abbiamo ritenuto che la società ricorrente, che era sempre stata legalmente rappresentata, avesse sufficientemente dimostrato di aver adeguatamente o affatto esaurito le vie di ricorso interne come richiesto dall'articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione o, in ogni caso, che i tribunali nazionali avessero, di fatto, ingiustamente respinto le sue richieste relative al rimborso del prezzo pagato e delle spese sostenute per la proprietà di cui era stata privata, in modo tale da costituire una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è venerdì 05/04/2024.