CASO: CASE OF FERHATOVIC v. SLOVENIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF FERHATOVIC v. SLOVENIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,P1-1,P1-2

NUMERO: 64725/19
STATO: Slovenia
DATA: 07/07/2022
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION

CASE OF FERHATOVIC v. SLOVENIA
(Application no. 64725/19)







JUDGMENT

Art 1 P1 • Control of the use of property • Seizure of copper wire bags from the applicant, charges against whom were eventually withdrawn, and handover to the company from which the wire had allegedly been stolen • Lack of legal procedure safeguarding the interests of those concerned against arbitrariness in returning seized items to alleged injured party • Domestic courts’ failure to rectify shortcomings • Fair balance between competing interests upset



STRASBOURG

7 July 2022



Request for referral to the Grand Chamber pending





This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.




In the case of Ferhatovic v. Slovenia,

The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:

Péter Paczolay, President,

Marko Bošnjak,

Krzysztof Wojtyczek,

Alena Polá?ková,

Lorraine Schembri Orland,

Ioannis Ktistakis,

Davor Deren?inovi?, Judges,
and Renata Degener, Section Registrar,

Having regard to:

the application (no. 64725/19) against the Republic of Slovenia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Slovenian national, Mr Sebastjan Ferhatovi? (“the applicant”), on 6 December 2019;

the decision to give notice to the Slovenian Government (“the Government”) of the application;

the parties’ observations;

Having deliberated in private on 14 June 2022,

Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

INTRODUCTION

1. The case concerns the seizure of three large bags of copper wire from the applicant – a defendant in criminal proceedings – and their handover to Company E., from which the wire had allegedly been stolen. The applicant complained that the police had handed the wire over to Company E. in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to Convention.

THE FACTS

2. The applicant was born in 1985 and lives in Ljubljana. He was represented by Mr B. Penko, a lawyer practising in Ljubljana.

3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Mrs V. Klemenc, Senior State Attorney.

4. The facts of the case may be summarised as follows.

SEIZURE OF THE COPPER WIRE AND RELATED CIRCUMSTANCES
5. On 7 February 2009, patrolling officers of one of the police stations in Ljubljana noticed three men pushing a white Mazda van bearing no licence plates and the applicant driving behind it in a car. Later that day, the patrolling police officers learned from other police officers that an identical Mazda vehicle had been spotted outside the site of two burglaries in Toba?na Street in Ljubljana, on 5 and 6 February 2009, during which a large quantity of cable containing copper had been stolen to the detriment of Company E. The officers then returned to the location of the sighting. Upon arrival, they saw several persons at the applicant’s address unloading into his garage what appeared to be copper products and wire from a Mazda van, which allegedly looked like the one appearing on the video footage recorded by the surveillance cameras at the scene of the burglary.

6. Further to obtaining an order from the investigating judge on 8 February 2009, a house search was carried out at the applicant’s address, during which eight large canvas bags containing mostly copper wire were found and seized. A certificate of seizure of items (potrdilo o zasegu predmetov) indicating that the wire had been seized from the applicant was handed to the latter. Subsequently, the police officers allegedly found that the dimensions of the wire in three of the seized bags corresponded to the dimensions of the cables stolen from Company E.

7. On 24 April 2009, the aforementioned three bags with copper wire were given to Company E. The remaining five bags were returned to the applicant on 11 May 2009.

8. On 13 April 2010, the police lodged a criminal complaint with the Ljubljana District State Prosecutor’s Office, accusing the applicant of committing the criminal offence of concealment under Section 217 (1) of the Criminal Code by accepting copper wire (peeled cables) and hiding them in his garage in the knowledge that they originated from a crime. The damage incurred by Company E. was valued at approximately 23,000 euros (EUR).

9. On 22 September 2010 a request for the initiation of a criminal investigation was made by the State Prosecutor’s Office. Charges were lodged against the applicant on 27 December 2011.

10. On 26 November 2012 the State Prosecutor’s Office withdrew the charges, and the criminal proceedings before Ljubljana District Court were consequently discontinued on 20 December 2012.

11. On 7 January 2013, the applicant lodged a request with the Ljubljana District Court for the three bags of copper wire that had been handed over to Company E. to be returned to him. He indicated that each bag weighed around 800 kg.

12. On 10 January 2013 the Ljubljana District Court sent a letter to the applicant informing him that the bags in question had been handed over to the injured party on 24 April 2009.

CIVIL PROCEEDINGS FOR COMPENSATION
13. On 8 April 2013, the applicant lodged with the Ljubljana Local Court a claim against the State. He sought compensation in the amount of EUR 13,750, corresponding to the value of the seized and never returned three bags of copper wire. He explained that he had been collecting waste metals and selling them. He had kept the bags containing the above?mentioned copper wire in his garage for over two years in order to sell it in large quantities at a higher price. He referred to, inter alia, section 224 of the Criminal Procedure Act, which stipulated that seized items should be returned to their owner if criminal proceedings in respect of them were discontinued, and if such items had not been confiscated by means of a special decision.

14. The defendant objected to the claim, both regarding the grounds and the amount of compensation sought. In his pleadings the applicant maintained that he was the owner of the copper wires that had been seized. When questioned at the hearing, he stated that his family had been collecting waste metal from construction sites and around different neighbourhoods, and that they had acquired such material either by paying money for it or providing certain services in return, or had acquired it for free. He denied receiving the bags in question on 7 February 2009 and said that he did not remember where and how exactly he had acquired the copper wire that had been in them. He stated that his family had been accumulating the wire that had been in the bags for over two years at different locations and had been planning to sell it. Company E’s representative, M.?., who had collected the three bags with the wire from the police, explained that they had later been sold “in Ko?evje, to some Roma” and that the money had been given directly to Company E’s director. When asked whether the copper wire had been stripped from the cables that had been stolen from Company E., M.?. said that this could not be determined, as the wire, which had been thick to different degrees, had been cleaned and cut, and had not been examined when it had been collected. The police officer who had worked on the case concerning the cables stolen from Company E. testified that the seized copper wire had certainly originated from the kind of cables that had been stolen, but that such cables were available practically everywhere. However, given the nature of the chain of events, the police had considered that they had belonged to Company E. He was not able to provide any details as to the quantity of the wire in question and said that the bags had not been weighed. He also confirmed that the bags had been handed over to Company E. without any court order to that effect.

15. On 9 June 2015 the Ljubljana Local Court rejected the applicant’s claim as time-barred. The court also held that the objection raised by the defendant regarding the applicant’s standing to lodge the claim was well?founded, as the applicant had himself stated that the copper wire belonged not only to him but also to five other members of his family.

16. The applicant appealed.

17. On 23 March 2016 the Ljubljana Higher Court set aside the judgment and remitted the case. It emphasised that the statutory limitation period had not begun to run until the conclusion of the criminal proceedings. It also found that the first-instance court’s opinion concerning the applicant’s standing had not been correct, noting that: the copper wire had been seized from the applicant; he had been the defendant in the criminal proceedings; and under section 224 of the Criminal Procedure Act, the seized items were to be returned to the person that had possessed them (imetnik) – but not necessarily owned them. It instructed the first-instance court to establish all the elements of the civil tort.

18. On 12 July 2016, following the re-examination of the case, the Ljubljana Local Court dismissed the applicant’s claim. Referring to the applicant’s testimony, the court noted that it “could not reach with a degree of certainty (s stopnjo gotovosti) the conclusion that the plaintiff had been in fact the owner of the [copper wire in question]”. The court went on to note as follows:

“The first-instance court had [previously] taken the position that damage, as one element of civil tort, could have been considered to exist only if the injured party had been the actual owner of the item. [...] The second instance court took in this connection a different position – notably that for the seized item to be returned it was sufficient under section 244 of the Criminal Procedure Act that the person was the “holder” (imetnik) and not the owner (lastnik) of the item. Having regard to the foregoing and taking into account that the copper was seized only from the plaintiff and that only the latter (and not the relatives – presumed co-owners) was accused in the criminal proceedings, the objection of the defendant concerning the lack of standing is also unfounded ...”

19. The court furthermore observed that while the copper wire that had been seized from the applicant had very likely originated from the electrical cables that had been stolen from Company E. it could not reliably establish that they had indeed belonged to Company E. In the court’s view “there [was therefore] an indication that in the present case the conditions for the return of the goods to Company E. on the basis of section 110 (1) of the Criminal Procedure Act had not been met.” However, in the domestic court’s view, this in itself did not mean that the State was liable for damages. The court found that the police officers, when deciding to hand the items over to Company E. under section 110 (1) of the Criminal Procedure Act, had acted with the care and diligence expected of them in such cases and had had reasonable grounds to believe that the copper wire kept in the three seized bags originated from the electrical cables that were taken from Company E. It concluded as follows:

“Because [the police officers’] actions were in line with the [... relevant] standards and therefore satisfied the required [degree of] diligence, their conduct could not be considered unlawful even if [they] wrongly determined that the conditions for the return of the items under section 110 (1) of the Criminal Procedure Act were fulfilled. Therefore, since one of the elements necessary for the civil liability has not been established, the claim of the plaintiff should be in its entirety dismissed.”

20. The applicant appealed. He argued that the police had acted unlawfully as they had not complied with section 110 of the Criminal Procedure Act, which clearly provided that only items that undoubtedly belonged to the injured party in question should be given to the latter before the end of the criminal proceedings.

21. On 21 December 2016 the Ljubljana Higher Court dismissed the applicant’s appeal. It emphasised that one of the preconditions for the defendant’s civil liability was the occurrence of damage, whereby the burden of proof that such damage existed was borne by the alleged injured party. It pointed out that the applicant had alleged that his property had been reduced but that he had not disputed the firs-instance court’s finding that he had failed to prove his ownership of the copper products in question. In the appellate court’s view, since the applicant therefore could have not been considered as the owner of the seized items, he could not have suffered any damage, even if the items had been seized from him. The appellate court emphasised that this was the reason why the applicant would not be entitled to compensation, even in the event that the conduct of the police had been unlawful.

22. The applicant lodged an application for leave to appeal on points of law, arguing, inter alia, that it had not been disputed that the copper wire had been seized from him, that the wire had been given to Company E. (whose ownership of the wire had never been proved), that the police had not complied with the clear legal provision contained in section 110 of the Criminal Procedure Act, that the lower courts had disregarded the property law regarding the acquisition of a title to movable property without an owner (res derelictae), and that he had explained in enough detail how he had acquired the seized wire and that he simply could have not produced any more evidence to demonstrate his ownership of the wire in question. He also maintained that it had remained unexplained throughout the proceedings why he had been entitled to retrieve possession of five bags containing seized wire and not the remaining three, despite the discontinuation of the criminal proceedings against him.

23. On 6 April 2017 the Supreme Court dismissed the applicant’s application.

24. The applicant lodged a constitutional complaint citing, inter alia, the right to property under Article 33 of the Constitution and Article 1 of the Protocol No.1 to the Convention.

25. On 15 July 2019 the Constitutional Court decided not to accept the constitutional complaint for consideration.

RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK AND PRACTICE

26. Under the Criminal Procedure Act an object may be seized when it is considered to be a product or object of crime (corpus delicti) or to constitute an item of evidence. An object may be definitively confiscated only by means of a court decision or, in certain exceptional cases, by a decision of a public prosecutor. Any object may be seized, regardless of who owns it (a suspect or injured party, or possibly a third party). Provisions that are relevant in this respect read as follows:

Section 220

“(1) Objects that must be seized under the Criminal Code, or that may prove to [constitute] evidence in criminal proceedings, shall be seized and delivered to the court for safekeeping or secured in some other way.

(2) Custodians of such objects shall be bound to hand them over, upon the request of the police, state prosecutor or the court. ...

...

(4) Police officers shall be entitled to seize objects referred to in the first paragraph of this section when acting under sections 148 and 164 of this Act or when executing orders of a court.

...”

Section 224

“Objects seized during criminal proceedings shall be returned to the owner or the holder (imetnik) if the proceedings are discontinued and there are no grounds for them to be confiscated (se vzamejo) (section 498).”

Section 498

“(1) Objects ... shall be confiscated even when criminal proceedings do not end in a verdict of guilt if there is a danger that they might be used for a criminal act or where so required in the interests of public safety or for moral considerations.

(2) A special ruling thereon shall be issued by the body before which the proceedings were conducted ...

(3) A court shall render a ruling on the confiscation (odvzem) of objects referred to in the first paragraph of this section even where a provision to that effect is not contained in the judgement of conviction.

...

(5) The owner of the objects [in question] shall be entitled to appeal against the decision referred to in the second and third paragraphs of this section ... If a ruling [delivered] under paragraph two of this section was not rendered by a court, an appeal shall be heard by a court panel ...”

Section 498(a)

“(1) Unless a guilty verdict [is delivered], money or property of illegal origin, as referred to in section 245 of the Criminal Code [that is to say money laundering] or an unlawfully given and accepted bribe, as referred to in sections 151, 157, 241, 242, 261, 262, 263 and 264 of the Criminal Code, shall also be confiscated if

1) elements of a criminal offence, as referred to in section 245 of the Criminal Code, indicating that the money or property [in question] ... originated from crimes have been proved, or

2) elements of a criminal offence, as referred to in sections 151, 157, 241, 242, 261, 262, 263 and 264 of the Criminal Code, indicate that an award, gift, bribe or any other proceeds were given or accepted have been proved.

(3) A special decision on this shall be delivered by a [court] panel ... upon a reasoned proposal of the State Prosecutor; before that, the investigating judge must, at the panel’s request, gather information and investigate all the circumstances that are important for establishing the illegal origin of money or property, or of the bribe given or accepted unlawfully.

...

(4) The owner of the confiscated money, property or bribe shall be entitled to appeal against the decision referred to in the second paragraph of this section ...”

27. Items seized for the purposes of criminal proceedings may be returned to the injured party pending the outcome of such proceedings under the conditions set out in section 110 of the Criminal Procedure Act, which reads as follows:

“(1) If the items [in question] without doubt belong to the injured party and are not needed as evidence in criminal proceedings, they shall be delivered to the injured party before the end of the proceedings.

(2) If several injured parties claim title to the items, they shall be instructed to institute civil proceedings ...

(3) Objects needed as evidence shall be seized, and returned to the owner after the proceedings are concluded. If such objects are indispensable to the owner, they may be returned to him or her before the conclusion of the proceedings, against their commitment to produce the objects when so requested.”

28. According to a legal opinion given by a general session of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Slovenia on 19 December 1990, items seized by the police in pre-trial proceedings and not handed over to a court for safekeeping must be returned to the defendant by the police.

THE LAW

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 OF THE CONVENTION
29. The applicant complained that the handover of his copper wire to Company E. had been in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.

The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”

Admissibility
Compatibility ratione materiae and victim status
30. The Government first argued that the applicant had failed to prove that he had been the owner of the copper wire seized from him. His civil claim for compensation thus had no prospect of success and could have not given rise to any interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In this connection, they submitted a number of decisions adopted by the Supreme Court and the Ljubljana Higher Court concerning seized items returned to the injured party under section 110 of the Criminal Procedure Act. In those decisions the domestic courts – deciding on claims lodged by defendants from whom the items in question had been seized – found either that those items had been returned to the rightful owner or that the plaintiff had been found not to be the owner of the seized items. As regards the latter case, the Supreme Court noted in decision II Ips 442/2007 of 11 February 2010 that the plaintiff had obtained a seized car in bad faith from someone who had not been its owner and should thus not have been entitled to any compensation in relation to its seizure.

31. The Government moreover submitted that the applicant’s acknowledgment that the copper wire had belonged to the applicant’s entire family should be taken into consideration when determining his victim status.

32. The applicant cited decision II Cp 1028/2013 of the Ljubljana Higher Court of 22 May 2013, in which that court had found that, according to the settled jurisprudence, it had to be assumed that the person from whom items had been seized during the criminal proceedings had been their owner or holder (imetnik). The applicant also argued that at the hearing before the first?instance court he had explained in detail how he had acquired the seized copper wire – namely by collecting it at construction sites, around different neighbourhoods, from farms, and so on. He emphasised that it had been impossible for him to produce more evidence regarding the acquisition of discarded wire. He also pointed out that there had been no dispute as regards the remaining five bags, which had had a lower value and had been returned to him.

33. As regards the case-law submitted by the Government, the applicant argued that it concerned cases in which the domestic courts had found that the real owner of seized items had been the injured party, to whom those items had been returned. That case-law thus concerned situations that had been different from that which applied in his case.

34. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” referred to in the first part of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning that is not limited to ownership of physical goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law: certain other rights and interests constituting assets may also be regarded as “property rights”, and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision. The issue that needs to be examined in each case is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000?I, and Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 63, ECHR 2007?I).

35. The Court notes that the three bags of copper wire were indisputably seized from the applicant and given to Company E. It does not appear to have been proved in any proceedings that that wire had been stolen or obtained illegally in some other way before its seizure. The Court therefore understands that in the absence of a confiscation decision, that wire, had it not been given to Company E., would have had to be returned to the applicant (see section 224 of the Criminal Procedure Act, cited in paragraph 26; see also paragraph 28 above). The Court moreover notes that while it is for the domestic courts to assess the evidence before them, the applicant provided an explanation as to how he had acquired the wire in question (see paragraph 14 above). Although this explanation was vague and limited, it could not be considered to be without basis, especially having regard to the domestic authorities’ findings to the effect that it had not been reliably shown that the wire in question derived from Company E’s electrical cables (see paragraphs 14 and 19 above). This suffices to render Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 applicable in the instant case (compare Rummi v. Estonia, no. 63362/09, § 105, 15 January 2015). For the same reasons (and noting that only the applicant’s name was indicated on the certificate of seizure – see paragraph 6 above), the Court sees no reason to find that he could not claim to be the victim of the alleged violation. The Government’s related objection (see paragraphs 30 and 31 above) should thus be dismissed.

Exhaustion of domestic remedies
36. The Government also objected that the applicant had failed to exhaust the available domestic remedies, because in his appeal against the judgment of 12 July 2016 he had not challenged the Ljubljana Local Court’s “evidentiary” finding that he had not proved that he had been the owner of the seized items. The judgment had thus become final in that respect. This finding could not be disputed in the course of the appeal on points of law or the constitutional complaint. The Government further argued that the applicant had consequently also failed to comply with the six-month time-limit as regards the issue of the ownership of the seized copper wire.

37. The applicant argued that he had invoked his right of property throughout the proceedings. He pointed out that the Ljubljana Local Court had found that the copper wire had been seized from him and that he had had standing to pursue the proceedings. The first-instance court had not dismissed his claim on the grounds of a lack of proof of ownership but because it had considered the actions of the police officers to have been lawful. The applicant thus had no reason to complain in his appeal about the issue of ownership.

38. The Court reiterates that the purpose of the rule on exhaustion of domestic remedies is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court (see, among many other authorities, Scoppola v. Italy (no. 2) [GC], no. 10249/03, § 68, 17 September 2009, and Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia (preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, § 70, 25 March 2014). It must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism. At the same time, it normally requires that the complaints intended to be made subsequently at the international level should have been aired before the appropriate national courts, at least in substance and in compliance with the formal requirements and time-limits laid down in domestic law (Scoppola, cited above, § 69).

39. The Court observes that in the present case it has not been disputed that the applicant used all available legal avenues and that therein he complained that the police had disposed of his copper wire unlawfully. The Court takes note of the Government’s argument that in his appeal against the judgment of 12 July 2016 the applicant should have challenged the first?instance court’s finding that he had not proved that he had been the owner of the wire in question (see paragraph 36 above). However, the Court observes that the first-instance court dismissed the applicant’s claim not because it did not consider him to be the owner of the seized items but because it found that the police officers’ conduct could have not been considered unlawful (see paragraphs 18 and 19 above) – a finding which the applicant undoubtedly challenged in his appeal (see paragraph 20 above). The Court therefore cannot agree with the Government that the applicant failed to exhaust domestic remedies. The fact that in his appeal on points of law and his constitutional complaint he was no longer able to dispute the facts established by the lower courts (see paragraph 36 above) is related to the features of the domestic remedies in question and cannot not be held against the applicant. This objection, as well as the related objection concerning compliance with the six-month rule, should therefore be dismissed.

Conclusion
40. The Court notes that the application is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
The parties’ submissions
41. The applicant argued that the three bags of copper wire should have been returned to him since he had not been convicted of any offence in relation to them. There had been no grounds on which the police could justify giving the bags to Company E., as it had not been established that they undoubtedly belonged to that company. As noted in the judgment of 12 July 2016, the items had been returned to Company E. in breach of the requirements of section 110 of the Criminal Procedure Act.

42. The Government maintained that although section 224 of Criminal Procedure Act concerned items seized during criminal proceedings, items seized before the initiation of criminal proceedings should be treated the same way. They argued that in the present case the seizure of the copper wire had amounted to control of the use of property. They further submitted that the police had had reasonable basis to believe that the copper wire in question had originated from the electrical cables stolen from Company E. The Government pointed out that the legal and factual presumptions had not been incompatible with the Convention and argued that the applicant had been in a position to effectively challenge the measure that had allegedly interfered with his property rights. The domestic courts had properly assessed the evidence and had delivered well-reasoned decisions.

The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles

43. The Court reiterates that it has been its constant approach that confiscation, even though it does involve deprivation of possessions, nevertheless constitutes control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Sun v. Russia, no. 31004/02, § 25, 5 February 2009; Riela and Others v. Italy (dec.), no. 52439/99, 4 September 2001; and Gogitidze and Others v. Georgia, no. 36862/05, § 94, 12 May 2015). In such cases the Court must establish whether the measure was lawful and “in accordance with the general interest”, and whether there existed a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (see Džini? v. Croatia, no. 38359/13, §§ 61 and 62, 17 May 2016, and Gogitidze and Others, cited above, §§ 96 and 97). As regards the latter, the character of the interference, the aim pursued, the nature of the property rights interfered with, and the behaviour of the applicant and the interfering State authorities are among the principal factors material to an assessment of whether the contested measure respects the requisite fair balance and, notably, whether it imposes a disproportionate burden on the applicant (see Karahasano?lu v. Turkey, nos. 21392/08 and 2 others, § 149, 16 March 2021).

44. Furthermore, the Court has, on many occasions, noted that although Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains no explicit procedural requirements, domestic proceedings must afford the aggrieved individual a reasonable opportunity of putting his or her case to the responsible authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging measures interfering with the rights guaranteed by this provision (see Rummi v. Estonia, cited above, § 105, and G.I.E.M. S.R.L. and Others v. Italy [GC], nos. 1828/06 and 2 others, § 302, 28 June 2018).

(b) Application of the principles to the present case

45. The Court notes that the interference with the applicant’s right under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 relates to the police’s decision to hand the items seized from the applicant over to Company E., from which they had allegedly been stolen. Under Slovenian law, the “return” of items to an injured party, except in the event that they are needed for evidence (see paragraph 3 of section 110 of the Criminal Procedure Act, cited in paragraph 27 above) seems to be definite and unconditional, the injured party being free to dispose of such items. In the present case, it resulted in the irrevocable forfeiture of the seized items, which, from the perspective of its practical consequences, could be compared to a confiscation measure (see, for instance, Butler v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 41661/98, 27 June 2002; Gogitidze and Others, cited above; Riela and Others, cited above; Phillips v. the United Kingdom, no. 41087/98, ECHR 2001-VII; and Silickien? v. Lithuania, no. 20496/02, 10 April 2012). Therefore, despite its far reaching consequences, the interference in the present case falls to be classified as the control of the use of property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 43 above; compare Rummi, cited above, § 105; Gogitidze and Others, cited above, § 94; and Arcuri and Others v. Italy (dec.), no. 52024/99, 5 July 2001). It remains to be determined whether this interference complied with the conditions set out in that paragraph.

46. As regards the question of the lawfulness of the interference, the Court considers it appropriate to leave this open and to examine the case from the standpoint of proportionality. Within that context it will also address any relevant deficiencies in the applicable domestic regulatory framework (see, mutatis mutandis, Aktiva DOO v. Serbia, no. 23079/11, § 81, 19 January 2021).

47. The Court next observes that the decision of the police to give the wire to Company E. could in principle be considered to have operated in the general interest of combating criminal activities (see Denisova and Moiseyeva v. Russia, no. 16903/03, § 58, 1 April 2010, with further references). Moreover, it can be deemed to have been in line with the general interest of the community because it was meant to ensure that the injured parties in the criminal proceedings would promptly have restored their belongings to them.

48. As to the proportionality of the interference, it should first be noted that the criminal proceedings against the applicant relating to the seizure of the copper wire in question were discontinued because the charges against him had been withdrawn. He has thus not been found guilty of any criminal offence in this respect and, as noted in paragraph 35 above, would be in principle entitled to have the seized items returned to him had they not been handed over to Company E. The handover of the items to Company E. was based on section 110 (1) of the Criminal Procedure Act, which provided that items that had been seized by police could be given to an injured party before the end of criminal proceedings in the event that the injured party was undoubtedly their owner (see paragraph 27 above). Despite the serious character of the measure (see paragraph 45 above) the decision to “return” the items to the injured party seems to have lain entirely at the police’s discretion.

49. The Court reiterates in this connection that the requisite balance between the interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his or her possessions and the aim sought to be realised will not be achieved if the applicant has had to bear an individual and excessive burden (see Gogitidze and Others, cited above, § 97) or has not been provided with a reasonable opportunity of putting his case to the responsible authorities for the purpose of effectively challenging the measure in question (see Rummi, cited above, § 104, and AGOSI v. the United Kingdom, 24 October 1986, § 55, Series A no. 108). By way of comparison, it observes that under Slovenian law a permanent seizure in the form of confiscation could be ordered in the absence of a guilty verdict under section 498 of the Criminal Procedure Act only if there were a risk that a property could be used for a criminal activity or where it was so required in the interests of public safety or for moral considerations. Furthermore, under section 498(a) of the same Act, money or property of illegal origin used in money laundering and an unlawfully given and accepted bribe could be confiscated, in the event that their unlawful nature was proved. In such instances, a special procedure, including a possibility of appeal to a judicial body, was provided for (see paragraph 28 above). By contrast, under section 110 (1) of the Criminal Procedure Act the “return” of seized items to an alleged injured party was not accompanied by any safeguards against arbitrariness (see paragraphs 27 and 48 above).

50. The Court would point out that, understandably, there might be circumstances in which it is justified to give seized property to its presumed owner prior to the completion of the criminal proceedings against the person from whom that property was seized. However, in the present case it does not seem to have been reliably established that Company E. was the owner of the copper wire in question. Moreover, no consideration was given to the question of whether Company E. needed the wire to be handed over to it before the end of the criminal proceedings because it would be, for instance, indispensable for its operations, or would require particular storage conditions. In fact, the documents in the case file do not suggest that there was any urgency justifying handover of the wire to Company E. at that point in time. As can be seen from the evidence gathered in the domestic proceedings, E’s employees sold the wire soon after collecting it from the police (see paragraph 14 above). Be this as it may, the crux of the problem lies in the fact that the relevant domestic law authorised the police to hand the seized items over to the alleged injured party without there being in place any legal procedure aimed at safeguarding the interests of those concerned and ensuring that legitimate grounds for the “return” of the items had been met and a fair balance between the competing interests struck.

51. In consequence, the only possibility for the applicant to assert his property rights in respect of the seized wire was to have recourse to civil proceedings. However, in the present case, the applicant’s claim for compensation was dismissed. The Ljubljana Higher Court concluded that the applicant could have not been considered to be the owner of the seized items because he had not challenged the first-instance court’s finding to that effect (see paragraphs 18, 19 and 21 above). The Supreme Court and Constitutional Court dismissed his complaints (see paragraphs 23 and 25 above) without providing specific reasons underpinning their decisions. In view of the foregoing and taking account of its above-mentioned finding that the applicant had a possession eligible for protection under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 35 above) and that he gave the domestic authorities an opportunity to put right the violation (see paragraph 39 above), the Court considers that the domestic courts did not rectify the shortcomings relating to the forfeiture of the copper wire, which resulted in the applicant being deprived of procedural safeguards against an arbitrary or disproportionate interference.

52. Given these circumstances the Court is bound to conclude that the fair balance that should be struck between the protection of the right of property and the requirements of general interest was upset in the present case.

53. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention.

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
54. Article 41 of the Convention provides:

“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”

Damage
55. The applicant claimed 10,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non?pecuniary damage. He also claimed the following amounts in respect of pecuniary damage: EUR 13,750, plus interest (a total of EUR 22,794) as compensation for the seized copper wire, and EUR 108,000 on account of the loss of financial assets that he would have allegedly obtained had he been able to invest the money from the seized copper wire in a company.

56. The Government argued that the applicant’s claim relating to the income that he would have allegedly realised had he established a company was purely speculative.

57. As regards non-pecuniary damage, the Court considers that the finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction. As regards pecuniary damage, it finds wholly speculative and thus unsubstantiated the applicant’s claim based on an alleged loss of income relating to his being prevented from potentially investing in a company. On the other hand, the Court, having regard to the information in its possession and noting the fact that the Government did not provide any evidence to refute the applicant’s assessment of the value of the copper wire in question, finds it appropriate to award the applicant EUR 13,750 in respect of pecuniary damage. A one-off payment of twenty per cent interest should be added to that amount (see Vaskrsi? v. Slovenia, no. 31371/12, § 98, 25 April 2017). The applicant should thus receive EUR 16,500, plus any tax that may be chargeable.

Costs and expenses
58. The applicant also claimed EUR 6,964 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and for those incurred before the Court.

59. The Government argued that that claim was excessive.

60. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these were actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 5,000 covering costs under all heads, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant.

Default interest
61. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,

Declares the application admissible;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds that the finding of a violation constitutes in itself sufficient just satisfaction for the non-pecuniary damage sustained by the applicant;
Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:

(i) EUR 16,500 (sixteen thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;

(ii) EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;

(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period, plus three percentage points;

Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 7 July 2022, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.

Renata Degener Péter Paczolay
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE

CASE OF FERHATOVIC v. SLOVENIA
(Ricorso n. 64725/19)







SENTENZA

Art. 1 P1 - Controllo dell'uso dei beni - Sequestro di sacchi di filo di rame al ricorrente, le cui accuse sono state alla fine ritirate, e consegna alla società a cui il filo era stato presumibilmente rubato - Mancanza di una procedura legale che salvaguardi gli interessi degli interessati contro l'arbitrarietà nella restituzione degli oggetti sequestrati alla presunta parte lesa - Mancata correzione delle carenze da parte dei tribunali nazionali - Equo bilanciamento tra gli interessi contrapposti sconvolti



STRASBURGO

7 luglio 2022



Richiesta di rinvio alla Grande Camera pendente





La presente sentenza diventerà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.




Nel caso Ferhatovic c. Slovenia,

La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Prima Sezione), riunita in Camera composta da:

Péter Paczolay, Presidente,

Marko Bošnjak,

Krzysztof Wojtyczek,

Alena Polá?ková,

Lorena Schembri Orland,

Ioannis Ktistakis,

Davor Deren?inovi?, giudici,
e Renata Degener, cancelliere di sezione,

visto quanto segue:

il ricorso (n. 64725/19) contro la Repubblica di Slovenia presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da un cittadino sloveno, Sebastjan Ferhatovi? ("il ricorrente"), il 6 dicembre 2019;

la decisione di notificare il ricorso al Governo sloveno ("il Governo");

le osservazioni delle parti;

Dopo aver deliberato in privato il 14 giugno 2022,

pronuncia la seguente sentenza, adottata in tale data:

INTRODUZIONE

1. Il caso riguarda il sequestro di tre grossi sacchi di fili di rame al ricorrente - imputato in un procedimento penale - e la loro consegna alla società E., dalla quale i fili sarebbero stati rubati. Il ricorrente ha denunciato che la polizia aveva consegnato i fili alla società E. in violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.

I FATTI

2. Il ricorrente è nato nel 1985 e vive a Lubiana. È stato rappresentato dall'avvocato B. Penko, che esercita a Lubiana.

3. Il Governo era rappresentato dal suo agente, la sig.ra V. Klemenc, Procuratore Capo.

4. I fatti del caso possono essere riassunti come segue.

SEQUESTRO DEL FILO DI RAME E CIRCOSTANZE CONNESSE
5. Il 7 febbraio 2009, gli agenti di pattuglia di una stazione di polizia di Lubiana hanno notato tre uomini che spingevano un furgone Mazda bianco senza targa e il ricorrente che lo seguiva in auto. Più tardi, lo stesso giorno, gli agenti di polizia di pattuglia hanno appreso da altri agenti che un veicolo Mazda identico era stato avvistato davanti al luogo di due furti in via Toba?na a Lubiana, il 5 e 6 febbraio 2009, durante i quali era stata rubata una grande quantità di cavi contenenti rame a danno della società E. Gli agenti sono quindi tornati sul luogo dell'avvistamento. Al loro arrivo, hanno visto diverse persone all'indirizzo del ricorrente scaricare nel suo garage quelli che sembravano essere prodotti e fili di rame da un furgone Mazda, che sarebbe stato simile a quello che appare nei filmati registrati dalle telecamere di sorveglianza sul luogo del furto.

6. A seguito di un'ordinanza del giudice istruttore dell'8 febbraio 2009, è stata effettuata una perquisizione domiciliare presso l'indirizzo del ricorrente, durante la quale sono stati rinvenuti e sequestrati otto grandi sacchi di tela contenenti per lo più cavi di rame. A quest'ultimo è stato consegnato un certificato di sequestro di oggetti (potrdilo o zasegu predmetov) che indicava che i fili erano stati sequestrati al ricorrente. Successivamente, gli agenti di polizia avrebbero riscontrato che le dimensioni dei fili in tre dei sacchi sequestrati corrispondevano alle dimensioni dei cavi rubati alla Società E.

7. Il 24 aprile 2009, i suddetti tre sacchi con il filo di rame sono stati consegnati alla Società E. I restanti cinque sacchi sono stati restituiti al ricorrente l'11 maggio 2009.

8. Il 13 aprile 2010, la polizia ha presentato una denuncia penale presso la Procura distrettuale di Lubiana, accusando il ricorrente di aver commesso il reato di occultamento ai sensi dell'articolo 217 (1) del Codice penale, accettando fili di rame (cavi spellati) e nascondendoli nel suo garage sapendo che provenivano da un reato. Il danno subito dalla società E. è stato valutato in circa 23.000 euro (EUR).

9. Il 22 settembre 2010 la Procura di Stato ha presentato una richiesta di apertura di un'indagine penale. Le accuse sono state presentate contro il ricorrente il 27 dicembre 2011.

10. Il 26 novembre 2012 la Procura di Stato ha ritirato le accuse e il procedimento penale davanti al Tribunale distrettuale di Lubiana è stato conseguentemente interrotto il 20 dicembre 2012.
11. Il 7 gennaio 2013, il ricorrente ha presentato al Tribunale distrettuale di Lubiana una richiesta di restituzione dei tre sacchi di fili di rame che erano stati consegnati alla società E.. Ha indicato che ogni sacco pesava circa 800 kg.

12. Il 10 gennaio 2013 il Tribunale di Lubiana ha inviato una lettera al ricorrente informandolo che i sacchi in questione erano stati consegnati alla parte lesa il 24 aprile 2009.

PROCEDIMENTO CIVILE PER IL RISARCIMENTO
13. L'8 aprile 2013, il ricorrente ha presentato al Tribunale locale di Lubiana una richiesta di risarcimento contro lo Stato. Ha chiesto un risarcimento dell'importo di 13.750 euro, corrispondente al valore dei tre sacchi di fili di rame sequestrati e mai restituiti. Ha spiegato di aver raccolto e venduto metalli di scarto. Aveva conservato i sacchi contenenti il suddetto filo di rame nel suo garage per oltre due anni al fine di venderlo in grandi quantità a un prezzo più alto. Ha fatto riferimento, tra l'altro, all'articolo 224 della Legge sulla procedura penale, che stabilisce che gli oggetti sequestrati devono essere restituiti al proprietario se il procedimento penale nei loro confronti è stato interrotto e se tali oggetti non sono stati confiscati con una decisione speciale.

14. Il convenuto si è opposto alla richiesta, sia per quanto riguarda i motivi che l'importo del risarcimento richiesto. Nelle sue memorie il ricorrente ha sostenuto di essere il proprietario dei fili di rame sequestrati. Interrogato in udienza, ha dichiarato che la sua famiglia raccoglieva rifiuti metallici dai cantieri edili e da diversi quartieri e che aveva acquisito tale materiale pagandolo in denaro o fornendo determinati servizi in cambio, oppure acquistandolo gratuitamente. Ha negato di aver ricevuto i sacchi in questione il 7 febbraio 2009 e ha detto di non ricordare dove e come avesse acquistato il filo di rame che vi era contenuto. Ha dichiarato che la sua famiglia aveva accumulato il filo di rame contenuto nei sacchi per oltre due anni in luoghi diversi e aveva intenzione di venderlo. Il rappresentante della società E, M.?., che aveva ritirato i tre sacchi con i fili dalla polizia, ha spiegato che in seguito erano stati venduti "a Ko?evje, a dei rom" e che il denaro era stato consegnato direttamente al direttore della società E. Alla domanda se il filo di rame fosse stato spellato dai cavi rubati alla ditta E., M.?. ha risposto che non era possibile stabilirlo, in quanto il filo, di spessore diverso, era stato pulito e tagliato e non era stato esaminato al momento del ritiro. L'ufficiale di polizia che aveva lavorato al caso dei cavi rubati alla Compagnia E. ha testimoniato che il filo di rame sequestrato proveniva certamente dal tipo di cavi rubati, ma che tali cavi erano disponibili praticamente ovunque. Tuttavia, data la natura della catena di eventi, la polizia aveva ritenuto che appartenessero alla Società E. Non è stato in grado di fornire alcun dettaglio sulla quantità di filo in questione e ha detto che i sacchi non erano stati pesati. Ha inoltre confermato che le borse erano state consegnate alla Società E. senza alcun ordine del tribunale in tal senso.

15. Il 9 giugno 2015 il Tribunale locale di Lubiana ha respinto la richiesta del ricorrente in quanto prescritta. Il tribunale ha inoltre ritenuto che l'obiezione sollevata dalla convenuta in merito alla legittimazione del ricorrente a presentare la richiesta di risarcimento fosse fondata, in quanto il ricorrente stesso aveva dichiarato che il filo di rame non apparteneva solo a lui ma anche ad altri cinque membri della sua famiglia.

16. Il ricorrente ha presentato ricorso.

17. Il 23 marzo 2016 il Tribunale superiore di Lubiana ha annullato la sentenza e rinviato il caso. Ha sottolineato che il termine di prescrizione legale non era iniziato a decorrere fino alla conclusione del procedimento penale. Ha inoltre ritenuto che il parere del tribunale di primo grado sulla legittimazione del ricorrente non fosse corretto, osservando che: il filo di rame era stato sequestrato al ricorrente; egli era stato imputato nel procedimento penale; e ai sensi dell'articolo 224 della legge sulla procedura penale, gli oggetti sequestrati dovevano essere restituiti alla persona che li aveva posseduti (imetnik) - ma non necessariamente di proprietà. Ha incaricato il tribunale di primo grado di accertare tutti gli elementi dell'illecito civile.

18. Il 12 luglio 2016, a seguito del riesame del caso, il Tribunale locale di Lubiana ha respinto la richiesta del ricorrente. Riferendosi alla testimonianza del ricorrente, il tribunale ha osservato che "non poteva raggiungere con un certo grado di certezza (s stopnjo gotovosti) la conclusione che il ricorrente fosse stato effettivamente il proprietario del [filo di rame in questione]". Il tribunale ha poi osservato quanto segue:
"Il tribunale di prima istanza aveva [precedentemente] assunto la posizione che il danno, come elemento dell'illecito civile, poteva essere considerato esistente solo se la parte lesa fosse stata l'effettivo proprietario dell'oggetto. [...] Il tribunale di seconda istanza ha assunto a questo proposito una posizione diversa, in particolare che per la restituzione dell'oggetto sequestrato era sufficiente, ai sensi dell'articolo 244 della legge di procedura penale, che la persona fosse il "detentore" (imetnik) e non il proprietario (lastnik) dell'oggetto. Alla luce di quanto sopra e tenendo conto del fatto che il rame è stato sequestrato solo al ricorrente e che solo quest'ultimo (e non i parenti - presunti comproprietari) è stato accusato nel procedimento penale, anche l'obiezione del convenuto relativa alla mancanza di legittimazione è infondata ...".

19. Il tribunale ha inoltre osservato che, sebbene i fili di rame sequestrati al richiedente provenissero molto probabilmente dai cavi elettrici rubati alla Società E., non poteva stabilire con certezza che appartenessero effettivamente alla Società E. Secondo il tribunale "c'era [quindi] un'indicazione che nel caso in questione non erano state soddisfatte le condizioni per la restituzione dei beni alla Società E. sulla base dell'articolo 110 (1) della legge sulla procedura penale". Tuttavia, secondo il tribunale nazionale, questo non significava di per sé che lo Stato fosse responsabile dei danni. Il tribunale ha ritenuto che gli agenti di polizia, nel decidere di consegnare gli oggetti alla società E. ai sensi dell'articolo 110 (1) della legge sulla procedura penale, avessero agito con la cura e la diligenza che ci si aspetta da loro in questi casi e avessero ragionevoli motivi per credere che il filo di rame conservato nelle tre borse sequestrate provenisse dai cavi elettrici sottratti alla società E. Ha concluso come segue:

"Poiché le azioni [degli agenti di polizia] erano in linea con gli standard [... pertinenti] e quindi soddisfacevano il [grado di] diligenza richiesto, la loro condotta non poteva essere considerata illegale anche se [avessero] erroneamente stabilito che le condizioni per la restituzione degli articoli ai sensi dell'articolo 110 (1) della legge sulla procedura penale erano soddisfatte". Pertanto, poiché uno degli elementi necessari per la responsabilità civile non è stato stabilito, la richiesta del querelante dovrebbe essere interamente respinta."

20. Il ricorrente ha presentato appello. Egli sosteneva che la polizia aveva agito illegalmente in quanto non aveva rispettato l'articolo 110 della Legge di procedura penale, che prevedeva chiaramente che solo gli oggetti che appartenevano senza dubbio alla parte lesa in questione dovessero essere consegnati a quest'ultima prima della fine del procedimento penale.

21. Il 21 dicembre 2016 il Tribunale superiore di Lubiana ha respinto il ricorso del ricorrente. Ha sottolineato che uno dei presupposti per la responsabilità civile dell'imputato era il verificarsi di un danno, per cui l'onere della prova dell'esistenza di tale danno era a carico della presunta parte lesa. Ha sottolineato che il ricorrente aveva affermato che la sua proprietà era stata ridotta, ma che non aveva contestato la conclusione del tribunale di primo grado secondo cui non aveva provato la sua proprietà dei prodotti di rame in questione. Secondo la corte d'appello, poiché il ricorrente non poteva essere considerato il proprietario degli articoli sequestrati, non avrebbe potuto subire alcun danno, anche se gli articoli gli fossero stati sequestrati. La corte d'appello ha sottolineato che questo era il motivo per cui il ricorrente non avrebbe avuto diritto a un risarcimento, anche nel caso in cui il comportamento della polizia fosse stato illegittimo.

22. Il ricorrente ha presentato una richiesta di autorizzazione all'appello per motivi di diritto, sostenendo, tra l'altro, che non era stato contestato il fatto che il filo di rame gli fosse stato sequestrato, che il filo fosse stato consegnato alla Società E. (la cui proprietà non era mai stata provata), che la polizia non aveva rispettato la chiara disposizione legale contenuta nell'articolo 110 della legge sulla procedura penale, che i tribunali di grado inferiore avevano ignorato il diritto di proprietà relativo all'acquisizione di un titolo di proprietà su beni mobili senza un proprietario (res derelictae), e che aveva spiegato in modo sufficientemente dettagliato come aveva acquisito il filo sequestrato e che semplicemente non avrebbe potuto produrre altre prove per dimostrare la sua proprietà del filo in questione. Ha inoltre sostenuto che per tutta la durata del procedimento non è stato spiegato perché avesse il diritto di recuperare il possesso di cinque sacchi contenenti fili sequestrati e non i restanti tre, nonostante l'interruzione del procedimento penale a suo carico.

23. Il 6 aprile 2017 la Corte di Cassazione ha respinto il ricorso del ricorrente.

24. Il ricorrente ha presentato un reclamo costituzionale citando, tra l'altro, il diritto di proprietà ai sensi dell'articolo 33 della Costituzione e dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n.1 della Convenzione.

25. Il 15 luglio 2019 la Corte costituzionale ha deciso di non accettare il ricorso costituzionale per l'esame.

QUADRO GIURIDICO E PRASSI PERTINENTI
26. Ai sensi della Legge sulla procedura penale, un oggetto può essere sequestrato quando si ritiene che sia un prodotto o un oggetto di reato (corpus delicti) o che costituisca un elemento di prova. Un oggetto può essere definitivamente confiscato solo con una decisione del tribunale o, in alcuni casi eccezionali, con una decisione del pubblico ministero. Qualsiasi oggetto può essere sequestrato, indipendentemente da chi lo possiede (un indagato o una parte lesa, o eventualmente un terzo). Le disposizioni rilevanti a questo proposito sono le seguenti:

Sezione 220

"(1) Gli oggetti che devono essere sequestrati ai sensi del Codice Penale, o che possono risultare [costituire] una prova in un procedimento penale, devono essere sequestrati e consegnati al tribunale per essere custoditi o assicurati in altro modo.

(2) I custodi di tali oggetti sono tenuti a consegnarli su richiesta della polizia, del pubblico ministero o del tribunale. ...

...

(4) Gli agenti di polizia sono autorizzati a sequestrare gli oggetti di cui al primo paragrafo della presente sezione quando agiscono ai sensi degli articoli 148 e 164 della presente legge o quando eseguono gli ordini di un tribunale.

..."

Articolo 224

"Gli oggetti sequestrati nel corso di un procedimento penale sono restituiti al proprietario o al detentore (imetnik) se il procedimento è interrotto e non vi sono motivi per confiscarli (se vzamejo) (sezione 498)."

Sezione 498

"(1) Gli oggetti ... sono confiscati anche quando il procedimento penale non si conclude con un verdetto di colpevolezza se vi è il pericolo che possano essere utilizzati per un atto criminale o se ciò è richiesto nell'interesse della sicurezza pubblica o per considerazioni morali.

(2) L'organo davanti al quale si è svolto il procedimento emetterà una sentenza speciale in merito...

(3) Un tribunale emette una sentenza sulla confisca (odvzem) degli oggetti di cui al primo paragrafo della presente sezione anche se una disposizione in tal senso non è contenuta nella sentenza di condanna.

...

(5) Il proprietario degli oggetti [in questione] ha il diritto di appellarsi contro la decisione di cui al secondo e terzo paragrafo della presente sezione... Se la sentenza [emessa] ai sensi del secondo comma della presente sezione non è stata pronunciata da un tribunale, l'appello sarà esaminato da un collegio giudicante...".

Sezione 498(a)

"(1) A meno che non venga emesso un verdetto di colpevolezza, il denaro o i beni di origine illecita di cui all'articolo 245 del Codice Penale [cioè il riciclaggio di denaro] o una tangente data e accettata illegalmente di cui agli articoli 151, 157, 241, 242, 261, 262, 263 e 264 del Codice Penale, saranno confiscati anche se

1) sono stati dimostrati gli elementi di un reato, di cui all'articolo 245 del Codice penale, che indicano che il denaro o i beni [in questione] ... provengono da reati, oppure

2) sono stati dimostrati gli elementi di un reato penale di cui agli articoli 151, 157, 241, 242, 261, 262, 263 e 264 del Codice penale, che indicano che sono stati dati o accettati premi, doni, tangenti o altri proventi.

(3) Una decisione speciale in merito sarà emessa da un collegio [giudiziario] ... su proposta motivata del Procuratore di Stato; prima di ciò, il giudice istruttore deve, su richiesta del collegio, raccogliere informazioni e indagare su tutte le circostanze importanti per stabilire l'origine illegale del denaro o dei beni, o della tangente data o accettata illegalmente.

...

(4) Il proprietario del denaro, dei beni o della tangente confiscati ha il diritto di presentare ricorso contro la decisione di cui al secondo paragrafo della presente sezione..."

27. Gli oggetti sequestrati ai fini di un procedimento penale possono essere restituiti alla parte lesa in attesa dell'esito di tale procedimento alle condizioni stabilite nella sezione 110 della Legge sulla procedura penale, che recita come segue:

"(1) Se gli oggetti [in questione] appartengono senza dubbio alla parte lesa e non sono necessari come prova nel procedimento penale, devono essere consegnati alla parte lesa prima della fine del procedimento.

(2) Se più parti lese rivendicano il diritto di proprietà sugli oggetti, esse sono invitate a intentare un'azione civile...

(3) Gli oggetti necessari come prova devono essere sequestrati e restituiti al proprietario dopo la conclusione del procedimento. Se tali oggetti sono indispensabili al proprietario, possono essergli restituiti prima della conclusione del procedimento, a fronte dell'impegno a produrli quando richiesto."

28. Secondo un parere legale emesso da una sessione generale della Corte Suprema della Repubblica di Slovenia il 19 dicembre 1990, gli oggetti sequestrati dalla polizia in un procedimento preliminare e non consegnati a un tribunale per la custodia devono essere restituiti all'imputato dalla polizia.

LA LEGGE

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
29. Il ricorrente ha lamentato che la consegna del suo filo di rame alla società E. era avvenuta in violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, che recita quanto segue:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Tuttavia, le disposizioni precedenti non pregiudicano in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di applicare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità all'interesse generale o per assicurare il pagamento di imposte o di altri contributi o sanzioni."

Ammissibilità
Compatibilità ratione materiae e status di vittima
30. Il Governo ha innanzitutto sostenuto che il ricorrente non aveva provato di essere il proprietario del filo di rame sequestratogli. La sua richiesta di risarcimento in sede civile non aveva quindi alcuna prospettiva di successo e non avrebbe potuto far sorgere alcun interesse tutelato dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. Il Governo ha quindi affermato che il ricorrente non aveva dimostrato di essere il proprietario del filo di rame sequestrato. A questo proposito, hanno presentato una serie di decisioni adottate dalla Corte Suprema e dalla Corte Superiore di Lubiana riguardanti oggetti sequestrati restituiti alla parte lesa ai sensi dell'articolo 110 della legge sulla procedura penale. In tali decisioni i tribunali nazionali - decidendo su richieste di risarcimento presentate da imputati a cui erano stati sequestrati gli oggetti in questione - hanno riscontrato o che tali oggetti erano stati restituiti al legittimo proprietario o che il querelante non era risultato essere il proprietario degli oggetti sequestrati. Per quanto riguarda quest'ultimo caso, la Corte Suprema ha osservato nella decisione II Ips 442/2007 dell'11 febbraio 2010 che il ricorrente aveva ottenuto un'auto sequestrata in malafede da qualcuno che non ne era il proprietario e non avrebbe quindi dovuto avere diritto ad alcun risarcimento in relazione al suo sequestro.

31. Il Governo ha inoltre sostenuto che il riconoscimento da parte del ricorrente che il filo di rame era appartenuto all'intera famiglia del ricorrente doveva essere preso in considerazione per determinare il suo status di vittima.

32. Il ricorrente ha citato la decisione II Cp 1028/2013 del Tribunale superiore di Lubiana del 22 maggio 2013, in cui tale tribunale aveva stabilito che, secondo la giurisprudenza consolidata, si doveva presumere che la persona a cui erano stati sequestrati gli oggetti durante il procedimento penale fosse il loro proprietario o detentore (imetnik). Il ricorrente ha anche sostenuto che nell'udienza davanti al tribunale di primo grado aveva spiegato dettagliatamente come aveva acquisito il filo di rame sequestrato, ovvero raccogliendolo nei cantieri, nei vari quartieri, nelle fattorie e così via. Ha sottolineato che gli era stato impossibile produrre altre prove sull'acquisizione di fili di rame abbandonati. Ha anche sottolineato che non c'era stata alcuna contestazione per quanto riguarda i cinque sacchi rimanenti, che avevano un valore inferiore e gli erano stati restituiti.

33. Per quanto riguarda la giurisprudenza presentata dal Governo, il ricorrente ha sostenuto che si trattava di casi in cui i tribunali nazionali avevano stabilito che il vero proprietario degli oggetti sequestrati era la parte lesa, alla quale tali oggetti erano stati restituiti. Tale giurisprudenza riguardava quindi situazioni diverse da quella che ricorreva nel suo caso.

34. La Corte ribadisce che il concetto di "beni" di cui alla prima parte dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 ha un significato autonomo che non si limita alla proprietà di beni fisici ed è indipendente dalla classificazione formale nel diritto interno: anche alcuni altri diritti e interessi che costituiscono beni possono essere considerati come "diritti di proprietà", e quindi come "beni" ai fini di questa disposizione. La questione da esaminare in ciascun caso è se le circostanze del caso, considerate nel loro insieme, conferiscano al richiedente la titolarità di un interesse sostanziale protetto dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda Beyeler c. Italia [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, CEDU 2000-I, e Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], no. 73049/01, § 63, CEDU 2007-I).
35. La Corte osserva che i tre sacchi di filo di rame sono stati indiscutibilmente sequestrati al ricorrente e consegnati alla Società E. Non sembra essere stato dimostrato in alcun procedimento che quel filo fosse stato rubato o ottenuto illegalmente in altro modo prima del suo sequestro. La Corte ritiene pertanto che, in assenza di una decisione di confisca, tale filo, se non fosse stato consegnato alla società E., avrebbe dovuto essere restituito al ricorrente (si veda l'articolo 224 della legge sulla procedura penale, citata al paragrafo 26; si veda anche il paragrafo 28 supra). La Corte osserva inoltre che, sebbene spetti ai tribunali nazionali valutare gli elementi di prova di cui dispongono, il ricorrente ha fornito una spiegazione su come aveva acquisito il filo in questione (cfr. paragrafo 14 supra). Sebbene tale spiegazione fosse vaga e limitata, non poteva essere considerata priva di fondamento, soprattutto alla luce delle conclusioni delle autorità nazionali secondo cui non era stato dimostrato in modo affidabile che il filo in questione provenisse dai cavi elettrici della società E (cfr. paragrafi 14 e 19). Ciò è sufficiente a rendere applicabile l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 nel caso di specie (cfr. Rummi c. Estonia, n. 63362/09, § 105, 15 gennaio 2015). Per le stesse ragioni (e notando che solo il nome del ricorrente è stato indicato sul certificato di sequestro - si veda il paragrafo 6 sopra), la Corte non vede alcuna ragione per ritenere che egli non possa affermare di essere la vittima della presunta violazione. La relativa obiezione del Governo (si vedano i paragrafi 30 e 31) deve quindi essere respinta.

Esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne
36. Il Governo ha anche obiettato che il ricorrente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso interne disponibili, perché nel suo ricorso contro la sentenza del 12 luglio 2016 non aveva contestato la constatazione "probatoria" del Tribunale locale di Lubiana secondo cui non aveva dimostrato di essere il proprietario degli oggetti sequestrati. La sentenza era quindi diventata definitiva sotto questo aspetto. Questa constatazione non poteva essere contestata nel corso del ricorso per motivi di diritto o di reclamo costituzionale. Il Governo ha inoltre sostenuto che il ricorrente non aveva di conseguenza rispettato il termine di sei mesi anche per quanto riguarda la questione della proprietà del filo di rame sequestrato.

37. Il ricorrente ha sostenuto di aver invocato il suo diritto di proprietà durante tutto il procedimento. Ha sottolineato che il Tribunale locale di Lubiana aveva stabilito che il filo di rame gli era stato sequestrato e che era legittimato a proseguire il procedimento. Il tribunale di primo grado non aveva respinto la sua richiesta di risarcimento per mancanza di prove di proprietà, ma perché aveva ritenuto che le azioni degli agenti di polizia fossero legittime. Il ricorrente non aveva quindi motivo di lamentarsi nel suo ricorso sulla questione della proprietà.

38. La Corte ribadisce che lo scopo della norma sull'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne è quello di offrire agli Stati contraenti l'opportunità di prevenire o porre rimedio alle violazioni dei diritti addebitate loro prima che tali accuse siano sottoposte alla Corte (si vedano, tra le molte altre autorità, Scoppola c. Italia (n. 2) [GC], n. 10249/03, § 68, 17 settembre 2009, e Vu?kovi? e altri c. Serbia (obiezione preliminare) [GC], nn. 17153/11 e 29 altri, § 70, 25 marzo 2014). Deve essere applicata con un certo grado di flessibilità e senza eccessivo formalismo. Allo stesso tempo, essa richiede normalmente che le doglianze che si intendono presentare successivamente a livello internazionale siano state ventilate davanti ai tribunali nazionali competenti, almeno nella sostanza e nel rispetto dei requisiti formali e dei termini previsti dal diritto interno (Scoppola, sopra citata, § 69).
39. La Corte osserva che nel caso di specie non è stato contestato il fatto che il ricorrente abbia utilizzato tutte le vie legali disponibili e che in esse abbia denunciato che la polizia si era disfatta del suo filo di rame in modo illegittimo. La Corte prende atto dell'argomentazione del Governo secondo cui nel suo ricorso contro la sentenza del 12 luglio 2016 il ricorrente avrebbe dovuto contestare la conclusione del giudice di primo grado secondo cui non aveva dimostrato di essere il proprietario del filo in questione (si veda il paragrafo 36 sopra). Tuttavia, la Corte osserva che il giudice di primo grado ha respinto la richiesta del ricorrente non perché non lo ritenesse proprietario degli oggetti sequestrati, ma perché ha ritenuto che il comportamento degli agenti di polizia non potesse essere considerato illegittimo (si vedano i paragrafi 18 e 19 supra) - una conclusione che il ricorrente ha indubbiamente contestato nel suo ricorso (si veda il paragrafo 20 supra). La Corte non può quindi concordare con il Governo sul fatto che il ricorrente non abbia esaurito le vie di ricorso interne. Il fatto che nel suo ricorso per motivi di diritto e nel suo reclamo costituzionale non sia stato più in grado di contestare i fatti accertati dai tribunali di grado inferiore (si veda il paragrafo 36 supra) è legato alle caratteristiche delle vie di ricorso interne in questione e non può essere imputato al ricorrente. Questa obiezione, così come quella relativa al rispetto della regola dei sei mesi, deve pertanto essere respinta.

Conclusione
40. La Corte osserva che il ricorso non è manifestamente infondato né irricevibile per altri motivi elencati nell'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ricevibile.

Merito
Le osservazioni delle parti
41. Il ricorrente ha sostenuto che i tre sacchi di filo di rame avrebbero dovuto essergli restituiti poiché non era stato condannato per alcun reato in relazione ad essi. Non c'erano motivi per cui la polizia potesse giustificare la consegna dei sacchi alla società E., poiché non era stato stabilito che appartenessero senza dubbio a tale società. Come osservato nella sentenza del 12 luglio 2016, gli oggetti erano stati restituiti alla società E. in violazione delle prescrizioni dell'articolo 110 della legge sulla procedura penale.

42. Il Governo ha sostenuto che, sebbene l'articolo 224 della Legge sulla procedura penale riguardi gli oggetti sequestrati durante il procedimento penale, gli oggetti sequestrati prima dell'inizio del procedimento penale dovrebbero essere trattati allo stesso modo. Hanno sostenuto che nel caso in questione il sequestro del filo di rame era equivalso al controllo dell'uso della proprietà. Hanno inoltre sostenuto che la polizia aveva avuto una base ragionevole per credere che il filo di rame in questione provenisse dai cavi elettrici rubati alla società E. Il Governo ha sottolineato che le presunzioni giuridiche e fattuali non erano incompatibili con la Convenzione e ha sostenuto che il ricorrente era stato in grado di contestare efficacemente la misura che aveva presumibilmente interferito con i suoi diritti di proprietà. I tribunali nazionali avevano valutato correttamente le prove e avevano emesso decisioni ben motivate.

La valutazione della Corte
(a) Principi generali

43. La Corte ribadisce che, secondo il suo costante approccio, la confisca, anche se comporta la privazione dei beni, costituisce comunque un controllo dell'uso della proprietà ai sensi del secondo paragrafo dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda Sun c. Russia, no. 31004/02, § 25, 5 febbraio 2009; Riela e altri c. Italia (dec.), no. 52439/99, 4 settembre 2001; e Gogitidze e altri c. Georgia, no. 36862/05, § 94, 12 maggio 2015). In questi casi, la Corte deve stabilire se la misura era legittima e "conforme all'interesse generale", e se esisteva un ragionevole rapporto di proporzionalità tra i mezzi impiegati e lo scopo che si voleva raggiungere (si veda Džini? c. Croazia, no. 38359/13, §§ 61 e 62, 17 maggio 2016, e Gogitidze e altri, sopra citata, §§ 96 e 97). Per quanto riguarda quest'ultimo aspetto, il carattere dell'ingerenza, lo scopo perseguito, la natura dei diritti di proprietà interferiti e il comportamento del richiedente e delle autorità statali interferenti sono tra i principali fattori rilevanti per valutare se la misura contestata rispetta l'equo bilanciamento richiesto e, in particolare, se impone un onere sproporzionato al richiedente (si veda Karahasano?lu c. Turchia, nn. 21392/08 e altri 2, § 149, 16 marzo 2021).

44. Inoltre, la Corte ha, in molte occasioni, osservato che, sebbene l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 non contenga requisiti procedurali espliciti, i procedimenti interni devono offrire all'individuo danneggiato una ragionevole opportunità di far valere le proprie ragioni presso le autorità responsabili al fine di contestare efficacemente le misure che interferiscono con i diritti garantiti da tale disposizione (si vedano Rummi c. Estonia, sopra citata, § 105, e G.I.E.M. S.R.L. e altri c. Italia [GC], nn. 1828/06 e altri 2, § 302, 28 giugno 2018).
(b) Applicazione dei principi al caso di specie

45. La Corte osserva che l'ingerenza nel diritto del ricorrente ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 riguarda la decisione della polizia di consegnare gli oggetti sequestrati al ricorrente alla società E., dalla quale erano stati presumibilmente rubati. Secondo la legge slovena, la "restituzione" degli oggetti a una parte lesa, tranne nel caso in cui siano necessari per le prove (si veda il paragrafo 3 dell'articolo 110 della legge sulla procedura penale, citata al paragrafo 27) sembra essere definitiva e incondizionata, essendo la parte lesa libera di disporre di tali oggetti. Nel caso di specie, essa ha comportato la confisca irrevocabile degli oggetti sequestrati, che, dal punto di vista delle sue conseguenze pratiche, potrebbe essere paragonata a una misura di confisca (si veda, ad esempio, Butler v. the United Kingdom (dec.), no. 41661/98, 27 giugno 2002; Gogitidze e altri, citata sopra; Riela e altri, citata sopra; Phillips c. Regno Unito, no. 41087/98, CEDU 2001-VII; e Silickien? c. Lituania, n. 20496/02, 10 aprile 2012). Pertanto, nonostante le sue conseguenze di vasta portata, l'ingerenza nel presente caso non può essere classificata come controllo dell'uso della proprietà ai sensi del secondo paragrafo dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda il paragrafo 43 supra; si confrontino Rummi, sopra citato, § 105; Gogitidze e altri, sopra citato, § 94; e Arcuri e altri c. Italia (dec.), no. 52024/99, 5 luglio 2001). Resta da stabilire se questa interferenza soddisfacesse le condizioni stabilite in tale paragrafo.

46. Per quanto riguarda la questione della legittimità dell'ingerenza, la Corte ritiene opportuno lasciare aperta la questione ed esaminare il caso dal punto di vista della proporzionalità. In tale contesto, esaminerà anche eventuali carenze rilevanti del quadro normativo nazionale applicabile (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Aktiva DOO c. Serbia, n. 23079/11, § 81, 19 gennaio 2021).

47. La Corte osserva poi che la decisione della polizia di consegnare la cimice alla Società E. potrebbe in linea di principio essere considerata come operata nell'interesse generale della lotta alle attività criminali (si veda Denisova e Moiseyeva c. Russia, n. 16903/03, § 58, 1° aprile 2010, con ulteriori riferimenti). Inoltre, si può ritenere che sia stato in linea con l'interesse generale della collettività, in quanto mirava a garantire che le parti lese nel procedimento penale avrebbero prontamente restituito loro i propri beni.

48. Per quanto riguarda la proporzionalità dell'ingerenza, occorre innanzitutto notare che il procedimento penale contro il ricorrente relativo al sequestro del filo di rame in questione è stato interrotto perché le accuse contro di lui sono state ritirate. Egli non è stato quindi giudicato colpevole di alcun reato a tale riguardo e, come osservato nel paragrafo 35, avrebbe in linea di principio diritto alla restituzione degli oggetti sequestrati se non fossero stati consegnati alla società E. La consegna degli oggetti alla società E. si basava sull'articolo 110 (1) della legge sulla procedura penale, che prevedeva che gli oggetti sequestrati dalla polizia potessero essere consegnati a una parte lesa prima della fine del procedimento penale nel caso in cui la parte lesa ne fosse senza dubbio il proprietario (si veda il paragrafo 27). Nonostante il carattere grave della misura (si veda il paragrafo 45 supra), la decisione di "restituire" gli oggetti alla parte lesa sembra essere stata interamente a discrezione della polizia.


49. La Corte ribadisce a questo proposito che il necessario equilibrio tra l'ingerenza nel diritto del richiedente al pacifico godimento dei propri beni e lo scopo che si vuole raggiungere non sarà raggiunto se il richiedente ha dovuto sopportare un onere individuale ed eccessivo (si veda Gogitidze e altri, sopra citata, § 97) o se non gli è stata fornita una ragionevole possibilità di esporre il proprio caso alle autorità competenti al fine di contestare efficacemente la misura in questione (si veda Rummi, sopra citata, § 104, e AGOSI v. Regno Unito, 24 ottobre 1986, § 55, Serie A n. 108). A titolo di paragone, osserva che secondo la legge slovena un sequestro permanente sotto forma di confisca può essere ordinato in assenza di un verdetto di colpevolezza ai sensi dell'articolo 498 della legge di procedura penale solo se vi è il rischio che un bene possa essere utilizzato per un'attività criminale o se ciò è richiesto nell'interesse della sicurezza pubblica o per considerazioni morali. Inoltre, ai sensi dell'articolo 498(a) della stessa legge, il denaro o i beni di origine illegale utilizzati per il riciclaggio di denaro e una tangente data e accettata illegalmente potrebbero essere confiscati, nel caso in cui la loro natura illegale fosse provata. In questi casi, è prevista una procedura speciale, che include la possibilità di ricorrere a un organo giudiziario (si veda il paragrafo 28). Al contrario, ai sensi dell'articolo 110 (1) della Legge sulla procedura penale, la "restituzione" degli oggetti sequestrati a una presunta parte lesa non era accompagnata da alcuna garanzia contro l'arbitrarietà (si vedano i paragrafi 27 e 48).

50. La Corte sottolinea che, comprensibilmente, potrebbero esserci circostanze in cui è giustificato restituire i beni sequestrati al loro presunto proprietario prima della conclusione del procedimento penale contro la persona a cui tali beni sono stati sequestrati. Tuttavia, nel caso in questione non sembra essere stato accertato in modo affidabile che la società E. fosse il proprietario del filo di rame in questione. Inoltre, non è stata presa in considerazione la questione se la società E. avesse bisogno che il filo le fosse consegnato prima della fine del procedimento penale perché, ad esempio, sarebbe stato indispensabile per le sue operazioni o avrebbe richiesto particolari condizioni di conservazione. In realtà, i documenti del fascicolo non suggeriscono che ci fosse un'urgenza che giustificasse la consegna del filo alla società E. in quel momento. Come si evince dalle prove raccolte nel procedimento nazionale, i dipendenti della società E. hanno venduto il cavo subito dopo averlo ritirato dalla polizia (cfr. paragrafo 14). Comunque sia, il nocciolo del problema risiede nel fatto che la legge nazionale pertinente autorizzava la polizia a consegnare gli oggetti sequestrati alla presunta parte lesa senza che vi fosse alcuna procedura legale volta a salvaguardare gli interessi degli interessati e a garantire che i motivi legittimi per la "restituzione" degli oggetti fossero stati soddisfatti e che fosse stato raggiunto un giusto equilibrio tra gli interessi in competizione.

51. Di conseguenza, l'unica possibilità per il ricorrente di far valere i suoi diritti di proprietà in relazione ai fili sequestrati era quella di ricorrere a un procedimento civile. Tuttavia, nel caso di specie, la richiesta di risarcimento del ricorrente è stata respinta. Il Tribunale superiore di Lubiana ha concluso che il ricorrente non poteva essere considerato il proprietario degli oggetti sequestrati perché non aveva contestato le conclusioni del tribunale di primo grado in tal senso (cfr. paragrafi 18, 19 e 21). La Corte di Cassazione e la Corte Costituzionale hanno respinto i suoi reclami (si vedano i paragrafi 23 e 25) senza fornire ragioni specifiche a sostegno delle loro decisioni. Alla luce di quanto sopra e tenendo conto della sua summenzionata constatazione che il ricorrente aveva un possesso tutelabile ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda il paragrafo 35 supra) e che ha dato alle autorità nazionali l'opportunità di porre rimedio alla violazione (si veda il paragrafo 39 supra), la Corte ritiene che i tribunali nazionali non abbiano posto rimedio alle carenze relative alla confisca del filo di rame, che hanno fatto sì che il ricorrente fosse privato delle garanzie procedurali contro un'ingerenza arbitraria o sproporzionata.

52. Date queste circostanze, la Corte è tenuta a concludere che il giusto equilibrio che dovrebbe essere raggiunto tra la tutela del diritto di proprietà e le esigenze di interesse generale è stato sconvolto nel caso di specie.

53. Vi è stata pertanto una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.

APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
54. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:

"Se la Corte constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente una riparazione solo parziale, la Corte accorda, se necessario, una giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".
Danno
55. Il ricorrente ha preteso 10.000 euro (EUR) per danno morale. Ha inoltre chiesto i seguenti importi per danni pecuniari: 13.750 EUR, più interessi (per un totale di 22.794 EUR) a titolo di risarcimento per il filo di rame sequestrato, e 108.000 EUR a causa della perdita di attività finanziaria che avrebbe presumibilmente ottenuto se fosse stato in grado di investire il denaro del filo di rame sequestrato in una società.

56. Il governo ha sostenuto che il credito del ricorrente relativo al reddito che avrebbe presumibilmente realizzato se avesse costituito una società era puramente speculativo.

57. Per quanto riguarda il danno morale, la Corte ritiene che la constatazione di una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 costituisca di per sé una giusta soddisfazione sufficiente. Per quanto riguarda i danni pecuniari, essa ritiene che la pretesa del ricorrente basata su una presunta perdita di reddito relativa alla sua impossibilità di investire potenzialmente in una società sia del tutto speculativa e quindi priva di fondamento. Per contro, tenuto conto delle informazioni in suo possesso e del fatto che il governo non ha fornito alcun elemento di prova per confutare la valutazione della ricorrente sul valore del filo di rame in questione, il Tribunale ritiene opportuno concedere alla ricorrente 13 EUR,750 per danno pecuniario. A tale importo va aggiunto un pagamento una tantum del venti per cento di interessi (cfr. Vaskrsi? v. Slovenia, n. 31371/12, § 98, 25 aprile 2017). Il richiedente dovrebbe quindi ricevere 16.500 EUR, oltre a qualsiasi imposta che possa essere esigibile.

Costi e spese
58. La ricorrente ha inoltre chiesto 6.964 EUR per le spese sostenute dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e per quelle sostenute dinanzi alla Corte.

59. Il governo ha sostenuto che tale affermazione era eccessiva.
60. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un ricorrente ha diritto al rimborso delle spese e delle spese solo nella misura in cui è stato dimostrato che queste erano effettivamente e necessariamente sostenute e sono ragionevoli per quanto riguarda il quantum. Nel caso di specie, tenuto conto dei documenti in suo possesso e dei criteri di cui sopra, il Tribunale ritiene ragionevole attribuire alla ricorrente la somma di 5000 EUR a copertura delle spese sotto ogni punto di vista, maggiorata di qualsiasi imposta imputabile alla ricorrente.

Interessi di mora
61. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di default sia basato sul tasso di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuali.

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE ALL'UNANIMITÀ,

dichiara il ricorso ricevibile;
ritiene che vi sia stata violazione dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
ritiene che la constatazione di una violazione costituisca di per sé una giusta soddisfazione sufficiente per il danno morale subito dalla ricorrente;
Detiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare al ricorrente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva, ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, i seguenti importi:

(i) 16.500 EUR (sedicimila cinquecento euro), più l'imposta eventualmente esigibile, per danni pecuniari;

(ii) 5.000 EUR (cinquemila euro), più qualsiasi imposta che possa essere a carico del richiedente, per spese e costi;

(b) che, a decorrere dalla scadenza dei tre mesi sopra menzionati, fino al regolamento, gli interessi semplici sono dovuti sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca centrale europea durante il periodo di default, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;

Respinge il resto della domanda dei ricorrenti per giusta soddisfazione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 7 luglio 2022, ai sensi della regola 77 §§ 2 e 3 del regolamento della Corte.

Renata Degener Péter Paczolay
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 20/02/2024.