CASO: CASE OF SAFAROV v. AZERBAIJAN

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF SAFAROV v. AZERBAIJAN

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,P1-1

NUMERO: 885/12
STATO: Azerbaijan
DATA: 01/09/2022
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIFTH SECTION

CASE OF SAFAROV v. AZERBAIJAN

(Application no. 885/12)









JUDGMENT

Art 1 P1 • Peaceful enjoyment of possessions • Positive obligations • Domestic courts’ failure to provide reasons for dismissing copyright infringement claim against a private party, who published a digital version of the applicant’s book online, without authorisation or paying royalties



STRASBOURG

1 September 2022



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Safarov v. Azerbaijan,

The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:

Síofra O’Leary, President,
M?rti?š Mits,
L?tif Hüseynov,
Lado Chanturia,
Ivana Jeli?,
Arnfinn Bårdsen,
Kate?ina Šimá?ková, judges,
and Victor Soloveytchik, Section Registrar,

Having regard to:

the application (no. 885/12) against the Republic of Azerbaijan lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by an Azerbaijani national, Mr Rafig Firuz oglu Safarov (Rafiq Firuz o?lu S?f?rov – “the applicant”), on 22 December 2011;

the decision to give notice to the Azerbaijani Government (“the Government”) of the complaints concerning Article 6 § 1 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and to declare inadmissible the remainder of the application;

the parties’ observations;

Having deliberated in private on 28 June 2022,

Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

INTRODUCTION

1. The present case concerns the applicant’s complaint about the State’s failure to protect his intellectual property interests in relation to the infringement of his copyright on account of unauthorised reproduction of his book and its online publication. It raises issues mainly under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

THE FACTS

2. The applicant was born in 1959 and lives in Baku. He was represented by Mr F. Agayev, a lawyer based in Azerbaijan.

3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Mr Ç. ?sg?rov.

4. The facts of the case may be summarised as follows.

5. The applicant is the author of a book entitled “Changes in the ethnic composition of the people of Irevan Governorate in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries” which was published in 2009.

6. On an unspecified date in 2010 the Irali Public Union (hereafter Irali), a youth NGO, published an electronic version of the book on the website of one of their projects www.history.az.

7. On an unspecified date in 2010 the applicant became aware of the publication of his book on the above-mentioned website. The information on the website stated that the book had been downloaded 417 times.

8. On an unspecified date in 2010 Irali removed the book from the website at the applicant’s request.

9. On 3 August 2010 the applicant lodged a civil claim with the Sabail District Court against Irali. Relying on, inter alia, Articles 14, 15, 30, 31 and 45 of the Law on Copyright and Related Rights (hereafter “Law on Copyright”) (see paragraphs 14-15 and 18-20 below), the applicant complained that Irali had reproduced a digital version of his book and published it on its website without his authorisation or paying him any royalties. He claimed 50,067 Azerbaijani manats (AZN) (approximately 47,460 euros (EUR) at the material time) in respect of pecuniary damage and AZN 28,800 (approximately EUR 27,300 at the material time) in respect of non-pecuniary damage.

10. On 13 October 2010 the Sabail District Court, while holding that the applicant’s book had been published by Irali on its website, dismissed his claims relying mainly on the introductory paragraph of Article 18.1 of the Law on Copyright (see paragraph 17 below). The court further held that the book had been removed from the website at the applicant’s request and that the applicant had failed to prove that he had suffered pecuniary or non?pecuniary damage.

11. On 22 November 2010 the applicant lodged an appeal with the Baku Court of Appeal. In addition to his previous submissions (see paragraph 9 above), he argued that (i) the first-instance court had failed to mention any of the purposes listed exhaustively in the sub-paragraphs of Article 18 of the Law on Copyright and (ii) that Article concerned solely libraries, archives and educational institutions.

12. On 24 January 2011 the Baku Court of Appeal upheld the first?instance court’s judgment, reiterating its reasoning. It relied additionally on Article 17.1 of the Law on Copyright (see paragraph 16 below).

13. On 14 June 2011 the Supreme Court dismissed the applicant’s cassation appeal. In addition to the reasoning provided by the lower courts, it also referred to Articles 14. 1 (q) and 15.3 of the Law on Copyright (see paragraphs 14-15 below). The court noted that by publishing his book and by making its copies available by way of sale, the applicant had made use of his right to communicate his work. It further noted that the aim of publishing the book by the defendant under the library section of its website had been to provide information on the history of Azerbaijan.

RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK

RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
Law on Copyright and Related Rights of 5 June 1996

14. Article 14.1 of the Law provided:

Moral (non-property) rights

“1. The author of a work has the following moral (non-property) rights:

a) the right to be recognised as the author of the work (copyright);

...

q) the right to communicate or allow to communicate his or her work in any form... (right to communicate).”

15. Article 15 of the Law provided as follows:

Property (economic) rights

“1. The author or another owner of copyright has an exclusive right to use his or her work in any form and by any means, except in cases provided for by the Law.

2. The author’s exclusive right to use his or her work shall mean the right to perform, authorise or prohibit to perform the following acts:

direct or indirect reproduction of the work (right of reproduction);

distribution of copies of the work by any means, including sale, rental and other means (right of distribution);

...

Royalties must be paid for the use of work except where the author himself or herself refuses to accept royalties, or with the restrictions provided for by the Law.

3. If lawfully published copies of a work had been put into circulation by way of sale, the subsequent distribution of those copies without the author’s consent and payment of royalties to the author (except in the case provided under Article 16 of the Law) is allowed.

However, the right to distribute the original or copies of the work by renting those copies, regardless of the right of ownership, remains with the author or the other owner of the copyright.

4. The author has the right to receive royalties for each type of use of the work (right to receive royalties). The amount and the method for calculating royalties shall be determined by a contract concluded between authors (right holders) and users...”

Article 16 of the Law concerned works of art and right to an interest in resales.

16. Article 17 of the Law, as in force at the material time, provided as follows:

Personal use of works and phonograms

“1. Reproduction, in one copy, of a lawfully published work by a physical person for exclusively personal purposes, without any gainful intent, is allowed without the consent of the author or another owner of the copyright or payment of royalties, except in cases provided for by under paragraph 3 of this Article.

2. Paragraph 1 of this Article is not applicable in the following cases:

...

reprographic reproduction of the originals of books (in their entirety)...”

Article 17.3 concerned the reproduction of audio-visual work and phonogram.

Reprographic reproduction, as defined under Article 4 of the Law, was facsimile reproduction in any size of the original or a copy of the work (written and other graphic work) by photocopying or using technical means other than publishing.

17. Article 18 of the Law provided as follows:

Reprographic reproduction of works by libraries, archives and educational institutions

“1. It shall be permissible to make a reprographic reproduction of a work to a certain volume necessary for a specific purpose, without the author’s consent or payment of royalties, provided that the name of the author whose work is used and the source are mentioned, and that there is no gainful intent:

a) issuing copies of works to libraries and archives, by other libraries and archives, for reproduction of lawfully published works with the purpose of replacing lost, destroyed or unusable copies, if it is impossible to acquire such copies under normal conditions by any other means;

b) reproduction in a single copy by libraries of a lawfully published separate article and other small works or a short excerpt of a work or short parts of written works (except for computer programmes) for educational, scientific or personal purposes at the request of physical persons;

...

v) reproduction of lawfully published articles and other small works or short excerpts from written works (except for computer programmes) for training courses in general educational institutions.”

18. Article 30.1 of the Law provided that the author’s property rights could be transferred to others on the basis of a contract.

19. Under Article 31 of the Law, the above-mentioned contract had to specify, inter alia, the mode of use of the work and the amount of royalties to be paid.

20. Under Article 45 of the Law, when examining disputes on copyright, the courts, at the claimant’s request, could, inter alia, award compensation between AZN 110 and AZN 55,000. The author could also claim, from the person who infringed his rights, the payment of the royalties which he could normally have earned.

RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL LAW
Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works of 9 September 1886
21. Article 9 of the Convention, to which Azerbaijan is a party since 1999, provides:

Right of Reproduction:
1. Generally; 2. Possible exceptions; 3. Sound and visual recordings

“(1) Authors of literary and artistic works protected by this Convention shall have the exclusive right of authori[s]ing the reproduction of these works, in any manner or form.

(2) It shall be a matter for legislation in the countries of the Union to permit the reproduction of such works in certain special cases, provided that such reproduction does not conflict with a normal exploitation of the work and does not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the author...’

WIPO Copyright Treaty of 20 December 1996
22. Article 1 of the Treaty, to which Azerbaijan is a party since 2006, provides:

Relation to the Berne Convention

“(1) This Treaty is a special agreement within the meaning of Article 20 of the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works...

...

(4) Contracting Parties shall comply with Articles 1 to 21 and the Appendix of the Berne Convention.”

Agreed Statements concerning the Treaty, adopted on the same date as the Treaty, provide that:

“The reproduction right, as set out in Article 9 of the Berne Convention, and the exceptions permitted thereunder, fully apply in the digital environment, in particular to the use of works in digital form. It is understood that the storage of a protected work in digital form in an electronic medium constitutes a reproduction within the meaning of Article 9 of the Berne Convention.”

23. Article 6 of the Treaty provides:

Right of Distribution

“(1) Authors of literary and artistic works shall enjoy the exclusive right of authori[s]ing the making available to the public of the original and copies of their works through sale or other transfer of ownership.

(2) Nothing in this Treaty shall affect the freedom of Contracting Parties to determine the conditions, if any, under which the exhaustion of the right in paragraph (1) applies after the first sale or other transfer of ownership of the original or a copy of the work with the authori[s]ation of the author.”

Agreed statement concerning Articles 6 and 7 [Right of rental] provides:

“As used in these Articles, the expressions "copies" and "original and copies", being subject to the right of distribution and the right of rental under the said Articles, refer exclusively to fixed copies that can be put into circulation as tangible objects.”

24. Article 8 of the Treaty provides:

“...authors of literary and artistic works shall enjoy the exclusive right of authori[s]ing any communication to the public of their works, by wire or wireless means, including the making available to the public of their works in such a way that members of the public may access these works from a place and at a time individually chosen by them.”

25. Article 10 of the Treaty provides:

Limitations and Exceptions

“(1) Contracting Parties may, in their national legislation, provide for limitations of or exceptions to the rights granted to authors of literary and artistic works under this Treaty in certain special cases that do not conflict with a normal exploitation of the work and do not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the author.

(2) Contracting Parties shall, when applying the Berne Convention, confine any limitations of or exceptions to rights provided for therein to certain special cases that do not conflict with a normal exploitation of the work and do not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the author.”

Agreed statement concerning Article 10 provides that:

“It is understood that the provisions of Article 10 permit Contracting Parties to carry forward and appropriately extend into the digital environment limitations and exceptions in their national laws which have been considered acceptable under the Berne Convention. Similarly, these provisions should be understood to permit Contracting Parties to devise new exceptions and limitations that are appropriate in the digital network environment.

It is also understood that Article 10(2) neither reduces nor extends the scope of applicability of the limitations and exceptions permitted by the Berne Convention.”

THE LAW

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
26. The applicant complained of the State’s failure to protect his intellectual property interests in relation to the infringement of his copyright on account of the unlawful reproduction and online publication of his book. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.

The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”

Admissibility
27. The Court notes that this complaint is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
The parties’ submissions
28. The applicant argued that by publishing his book online, Irali allowed it to be downloaded by unlimited number of persons. In reply to the Government’s submission (see paragraph 29 below), he submitted that even if the defendant did not have any commercial interest, its actions had violated his copyright. He further argued that the domestic decisions had lacked adequate reasoning and were not in accordance with domestic law.

29. The Government submitted that the defendant had placed the applicant’s book online in order to enable the “general public to be able to get acquainted with it” and not for “commercial purposes”. They argued that the domestic courts’ conclusions had been based on a thorough examination of the applicant’s submissions, and that he had failed to substantiate the alleged damage caused by unauthorised publication of his book.

The Court’s assessment
30. The Court reiterates that protection of intellectual property rights, including the protection of copyright, falls within the scope of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 72, ECHR 2007?I, and SIA AKKA/LAA v. Latvia, no. 562/05, § 41, 12 July 2016). In the present case, the applicant was the author of the book in question and benefitted from protection of copyright under domestic law. This fact was never contested by the domestic courts (compare Balan v. Moldova, no. 19247/03, § 34, 29 January 2008, and Kamoy Radyo Televizyon Yay?nc?l?k ve Organizasyon A.?. v. Turkey, no. 19965/06, § 37, 16 April 2019). Therefore, the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

31. The Court notes that the reproduction of the applicant’s book and its online publication, without his consent, affected his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. The dispute in the present case was between private parties. In this regard, the Court recalls that the State has a positive obligation to take necessary measures to protect the right to property, particularly where there is a direct link between the measures an applicant might legitimately expect from the authorities and his or her effective enjoyment of possessions, even in cases involving litigation between private parties. This positive obligation aims at ensuring in its legal system that property rights are sufficiently protected by law and that adequate remedies are provided whereby the aggrieved party can seek to defend his or her rights, including, where appropriate, by claiming damages in respect of any loss sustained. The required measures can therefore be preventive or remedial. As to possible preventive measures, the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies is a wide one, especially in a situation where the State has to have regard to competing private interests. As regards remedial measures, States are under an obligation to afford judicial procedures that offer the necessary procedural guarantees and therefore enable the domestic courts and tribunals to adjudicate effectively and fairly any disputes between private persons (see Kanevska v. Ukraine (dec.), no. 73944/11, § 45, 17 November 2020, and Saraç and Others v. Turkey, no. 23189/09, §§ 70-75, 30 March 2021 and the case-law cited therein). In this connection, the Court’s jurisdiction to verify that domestic law has been correctly interpreted and applied is limited and it is not its function to take the place of the national courts. Rather, its role is to ensure that the decisions of those courts are not arbitrary or otherwise manifestly unreasonable (see Zagreba?ka banka d.d. v. Croatia, no. 39544/05, § 250, 12 December 2013, and Mindek v. Croatia, no. 6169/13, §§ 77-78, 30 August 2016).

32. Turning to the facts of the case, the Court observes that the applicant has not claimed that the rights of authors were not sufficiently protected by Azerbaijani law but that the application of the existing law by the courts in his case was unlawful and arbitrary. Under domestic law, as a general rule, authorisation by the author and payment of royalties was required in order to use his or her work (see paragraph 15 above). However, the domestic courts justified the defendant’s actions relying mainly on several articles of the Law on Copyright which provided for exceptions to the general rule that reproduction required the author’s authorisation (see paragraphs 10 and 12?13 above). The applicant claimed, however, that none of the exceptions applied in the circumstances of his case. The Court notes the following.

33. Article 17.1 of the Law on Copyright provided that the reproduction of a lawfully published work by a physical person, in one copy, was authorised, without the author’s consent or payment of royalties, for exclusively personal purposes. However, the defendant in the instant case was a legal person and, as is apparent from the case file, had not used the applicant’s book for “exclusively personal purposes” but had made it available online for an unlimited number of readers. In addition, under Article 17.2 of the Law on Copyright the above-mentioned provision did not apply to reproduction of books in their entirety. The domestic courts had not established at any stage of the proceedings that the applicant’s book had not been reproduced in its entirety.

34. Under Article 18 of the Law on Copyright libraries, archives and educational institutions were allowed to reproduce works without authorisation in specific cases. The applicant in his appeal before the domestic courts (see paragraph 11 above) argued that the defendant did not belong to any of these categories. While the Supreme Court did not explicitly elaborate on that argument, it noted that the applicant’s book had been published under the library section of the defendant’s website and that the purpose had been to provide information on the history of Azerbaijan (see paragraph 13 above). The Government submitted a similar argument, asserting that there was no commercial purpose on the part of the defendant (see paragraph 29 above). The Court observes that while the lack of any commercial purpose was relevant in application of Article 18 of the Law on Copyright, it was not the only element to be taken into account. Even assuming that online services offered by the defendant could be regarded as being covered by the notion of “libraries”, any such interpretation of the relevant provision being incumbent on the domestic courts, they failed to mention which specific case provided for under subparagraphs (a) and (b) of Article 18 of the Law on Copyright could justify the reproduction of the applicant’s book without his authorisation. In the Court’s view, seeing that the defendant made the applicant’s book freely available online and therefore – practically to a world-wide audience, not to visitors of a library building, elaborate reasoning by the courts was needed to justify the application of Article 18 to the applicant’s case.

35. As to Article 15.3 of the Law on Copyright, referred to by the Supreme Court, the Court observes that that provision concerned the rule of exhaustion of right to distribution. As the wording of that provision and Agreed statement concerning Article 6 of the WIPO Copyright Convention suggest (see paragraphs 15 and 23 above), that rule referred to lawfully published and fixed copies of works which were put into circulation by sale as tangible objects. As is apparent from the facts of the present case, while the applicant had published his book and physical copies were available in the book market, nothing suggests that he had ever authorised its reproduction and communication to the public in a digital form. The Supreme Court did not explain why it considered this provision relevant to the circumstances of the present case where the dispute concerned not the distribution of the lawfully published copies of the applicant’s book but its reproduction in a new, digital, form and its online publication without his consent.

36. In sum, in the Court’s view, the domestic courts failed to provide reasons establishing that the above?mentioned provisions of the Law on Copyright, relied on by them, could constitute legal grounds for the situation at hand (compare Andriy Rudenko v. Ukraine, no. 35041/05, § 44, 21 December 2010, and Atima Limited v. Ukraine, no. 56714/11, § 44, 20 May 2021). The respondent State therefore failed to discharge its positive obligation under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to protect intellectual property notably through effective remedial measures.

37. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 OF THE CONVENTION
38. The applicant complained that the domestic courts’ judgments in his case had not been reasoned.

39. Having regard to its conclusions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraphs 26-37 above), the facts of the case and the parties’ submissions, the Court considers that there is no need to give a separate ruling on the admissibility and merits of the above-mentioned complaint (see, for a similar approach, AsDAC v. the Republic of Moldova, no. 47384/07, §§ 54-55, 8 December 2020).

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
40. Article 41 of the Convention provides:

“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”

Damage
41. The applicant claimed 78,286 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage, comprising of 13,344 manats (AZN) (approximately EUR 6,630 at the time of the submission of the claim) for the unauthorised reproduction and publication of his book, plus an unspecified amount for the lost profit and an adjustment for inflation. He submitted that his book was sold for AZN 13 in Azerbaijan, whereas its price in foreign countries was 63 United States Dollars. He provided a print-out from a website in respect of the latter. He also claimed EUR 50,000 for non-pecuniary damage.

42. The Government submitted that (i) the applicant had failed to submit any evidence showing the price of the book at the local bookstores; (ii) the print-out from the internet store did not contain an indication of the date on which it had been printed; (iii) the applicant had failed to present any indexes or calculation as regards the inflation rate; and (iv) a finding of a violation would constitute sufficient reparation for non-pecuniary damage.

43. The Court firstly notes that the sums claimed in respect of lost profits and adjustment for inflation have not been specified and that no supporting documents have been provided in respect of them. These parts of the claim must therefore be rejected. As to the part of the claim concerning damages for the unauthorised reproduction and publication of his book, the information and documents submitted by the applicant are insufficient for the precise calculation of the damages claimed. Nevertheless, the Court accepts that the applicant must have suffered on account of the unauthorised reproduction of his book and its online publication, which justifies an award of just satisfaction (compare, mutatis mutandis, Rasul Jafarov v. Azerbaijan, no. 69981/14, § 193, 17 March 2016). At the same time, the Court considers that the applicant has suffered non-pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated for solely by the finding of a violation. Ruling on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicant the global sum of EUR 5,000 in respect of both pecuniary and non?pecuniary damage.

Costs and expenses
44. The applicant also claimed AZN 1,000 (approximately EUR 500) in respect of legal fees for his representation before the domestic courts and the Court, and EUR 41 for postal expenses.

45. The Government submitted that the applicant had failed to provide any proof to substantiate his claims.

46. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these were actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, the applicant has not provided the Court with any relevant supporting documents. It therefore dismisses the claims under this head.

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,

Declares the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention admissible;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds that it is not necessary to examine the admissibility and merits of the complaint under Article 6 of the Convention;
Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary and non?pecuniary damage, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:

(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 1 September 2022, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.



Victor Soloveytchik Síofra O’Leary
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUINTA SEZIONE

CASO SAFAROV c. AZERBAIJAN

(Ricorso n. 885/12)









SENTENZA

Art. 1 P1 - Godimento pacifico dei beni - Obblighi positivi - Mancanza di motivazione da parte dei giudici nazionali nel respingere la richiesta di risarcimento per violazione del diritto d'autore nei confronti di un privato, che ha pubblicato online una versione digitale del libro del ricorrente, senza autorizzazione né pagamento di diritti d'autore



STRASBURGO

1° settembre 2022



La presente sentenza diventerà definitiva nei casi previsti dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nel caso Safarov contro Azerbaigian,

La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Quinta Sezione), riunita in Camera composta da:

Síofra O'Leary, Presidente,
M?rti?š Mits,
L?tif Hüseynov,
Lado Chanturia,
Ivana Jeli?,
Arnfinn Bårdsen,
Kate?ina Šimá?ková, giudici,
e Victor Soloveytchik, cancelliere di sezione,

visti i seguenti atti:

il ricorso (n. 885/12) contro la Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da un cittadino azero, il signor Rafig Firuz oglu Safarov (Rafiq Firuz o?lu S?f?rov - "il ricorrente"), il 22 dicembre 2011;

la decisione di notificare al Governo dell'Azerbaigian ("il Governo") i reclami relativi all'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione e all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione e di dichiarare irricevibile il resto del ricorso;

le osservazioni delle parti;

Avendo deliberato in privato il 28 giugno 2022,

pronuncia la seguente sentenza, adottata in tale data:

INTRODUZIONE

1. Il presente caso riguarda il reclamo del ricorrente per la mancata tutela da parte dello Stato dei suoi interessi di proprietà intellettuale in relazione alla violazione del suo diritto d'autore a causa della riproduzione non autorizzata del suo libro e della sua pubblicazione online. Il caso solleva principalmente questioni relative all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.

I FATTI

2. Il ricorrente è nato nel 1959 e vive a Baku. È stato rappresentato dall'avvocato F. Agayev, residente in Azerbaigian.

3. Il Governo era rappresentato dal suo agente, sig. Ç. ?sg?rov.

4. I fatti del caso possono essere riassunti come segue.

5. Il ricorrente è autore di un libro intitolato "Cambiamenti nella composizione etnica della popolazione del Governatorato di Irevan nei secoli XIX e XX", pubblicato nel 2009.

6. In una data imprecisata del 2010 l'Unione Pubblica Irali (di seguito Irali), una Ong giovanile, ha pubblicato una versione elettronica del libro sul sito web di uno dei suoi progetti www.history.az.

7. In una data imprecisata del 2010 il ricorrente è venuto a conoscenza della pubblicazione del suo libro sul sito web summenzionato. Le informazioni sul sito web indicavano che il libro era stato scaricato 417 volte.

8. In una data imprecisata del 2010 Irali ha rimosso il libro dal sito web su richiesta del ricorrente.

9. Il 3 agosto 2010 il ricorrente ha presentato un ricorso civile presso il Tribunale di Sabail contro Irali. Invocando, tra l'altro, gli articoli 14, 15, 30, 31 e 45 della Legge sul diritto d'autore e sui diritti connessi (in seguito "Legge sul diritto d'autore") (si vedano i paragrafi 14-15 e 18-20 qui di seguito), il ricorrente lamentava che Irali aveva riprodotto una versione digitale del suo libro e l'aveva pubblicata sul suo sito web senza la sua autorizzazione e senza pagargli alcuna royalty. Egli ha chiesto 50.067 manats azeri (AZN) (circa 47.460 euro (EUR) all'epoca dei fatti) a titolo di danno patrimoniale e 28.800 AZN (circa 27.300 euro all'epoca dei fatti) a titolo di danno non patrimoniale.

10. Il 13 ottobre 2010 il Tribunale distrettuale di Sabail, pur ritenendo che il libro del ricorrente fosse stato pubblicato da Irali sul suo sito web, ha respinto le sue richieste basandosi principalmente sul paragrafo introduttivo dell'articolo 18.1 della legge sul diritto d'autore (si veda il paragrafo 17). Il tribunale ha inoltre ritenuto che il libro fosse stato rimosso dal sito web su richiesta del ricorrente e che quest'ultimo non avesse dimostrato di aver subito un danno patrimoniale o non patrimoniale.

11. Il 22 novembre 2010 il ricorrente ha presentato ricorso presso la Corte d'appello di Baku. Oltre ai suoi precedenti argomenti (si veda il paragrafo 9), ha sostenuto che (i) il tribunale di primo grado non aveva menzionato nessuno degli scopi elencati in modo esaustivo nei sottoparagrafi dell'articolo 18 della Legge sul diritto d'autore e (ii) tale articolo riguardava esclusivamente biblioteche, archivi e istituzioni educative.

12. Il 24 gennaio 2011 la Corte d'appello di Baku ha confermato la sentenza del tribunale di primo grado, ribadendone la motivazione. Si è inoltre basata sull'articolo 17.1 della legge sul diritto d'autore (si veda il paragrafo 16).
13. Il 14 giugno 2011 la Corte suprema ha respinto il ricorso per cassazione del ricorrente. Oltre alle motivazioni fornite dai tribunali di grado inferiore, ha fatto riferimento anche agli articoli 14.1 (q) e 15.3 della legge sul diritto d'autore (cfr. paragrafi 14-15). 1 (q) e 15.3 della legge sul diritto d'autore (si vedano i paragrafi 14-15). Il tribunale ha osservato che, pubblicando il suo libro e rendendone disponibili le copie in vendita, il ricorrente si è avvalso del diritto di comunicare la sua opera. Ha inoltre osservato che lo scopo della pubblicazione del libro da parte della convenuta nella sezione biblioteca del suo sito web era quello di fornire informazioni sulla storia dell'Azerbaigian.

QUADRO GIURIDICO PERTINENTE

DIRITTO INTERNO PERTINENTE
Legge sul diritto d'autore e sui diritti connessi del 5 giugno 1996

14. L'articolo 14.1 della legge stabilisce che:

Diritti morali (non di proprietà)

"1. L'autore di un'opera ha i seguenti diritti morali (non patrimoniali):

a) il diritto di essere riconosciuto come autore dell'opera (copyright);

...

q) il diritto di comunicare o far comunicare la propria opera in qualsiasi forma... (diritto di comunicazione)."

15. L'articolo 15 della legge prevedeva quanto segue:

Diritti di proprietà (economici)

"1. L'autore o un altro titolare di diritti d'autore ha il diritto esclusivo di utilizzare la propria opera in qualsiasi forma e con qualsiasi mezzo, salvo i casi previsti dalla Legge.

2. Per diritto esclusivo dell'autore di utilizzare la propria opera si intende il diritto di eseguire, autorizzare o vietare di eseguire i seguenti atti:

riproduzione diretta o indiretta dell'opera (diritto di riproduzione);

distribuzione di copie dell'opera con qualsiasi mezzo, compresa la vendita, il noleggio e altri mezzi (diritto di distribuzione);

...

I diritti d'autore devono essere pagati per l'uso dell'opera, tranne nel caso in cui l'autore stesso rifiuti di accettare i diritti d'autore, o con le restrizioni previste dalla Legge.

3. Se copie di un'opera legittimamente pubblicata sono state messe in circolazione tramite vendita, è consentita la successiva distribuzione di tali copie senza il consenso dell'autore e il pagamento dei diritti d'autore all'autore (tranne nel caso previsto dall'articolo 16 della Legge).

Tuttavia, il diritto di distribuire l'originale o le copie dell'opera mediante il noleggio di tali copie, indipendentemente dal diritto di proprietà, rimane all'autore o all'altro titolare del diritto d'autore.

4. L'autore ha il diritto di ricevere royalties per ogni tipo di utilizzo dell'opera (diritto a ricevere royalties). L'importo e il metodo di calcolo delle royalties sono determinati da un contratto stipulato tra gli autori (titolari dei diritti) e gli utilizzatori...".

L'articolo 16 della legge riguardava le opere d'arte e il diritto a un interesse di rivendita.

16. L'articolo 17 della Legge, nella versione in vigore all'epoca dei fatti, prevedeva quanto segue:

Uso personale di opere e fonogrammi

"1. La riproduzione, in un unico esemplare, di un'opera legalmente pubblicata da parte di una persona fisica per scopi esclusivamente personali, senza alcun intento di lucro, è consentita senza il consenso dell'autore o di un altro titolare del diritto d'autore o il pagamento di diritti d'autore, tranne nei casi previsti dal paragrafo 3 del presente articolo.

2. Il paragrafo 1 del presente articolo non si applica nei seguenti casi:

...

riproduzione reprografica di originali di libri (nella loro interezza)...".

L'articolo 17.3 riguardava la riproduzione di opere audiovisive e fonogrammi.

La riproduzione reprografica, come definita dall'articolo 4 della Legge, era la riproduzione in facsimile in qualsiasi formato dell'originale o di una copia dell'opera (scritta e altre opere grafiche) mediante fotocopia o con mezzi tecnici diversi dalla pubblicazione.

17. L'articolo 18 della legge prevedeva quanto segue:

Riproduzione reprografica di opere da parte di biblioteche, archivi e istituzioni educative

"1. È consentita la riproduzione reprografica di un'opera in un determinato volume necessario per uno scopo specifico, senza il consenso dell'autore o il pagamento di diritti d'autore, a condizione che vengano citati il nome dell'autore di cui si utilizza l'opera e la fonte, e che non vi sia alcun intento di lucro":

a) il rilascio di copie di opere a biblioteche e archivi, da parte di altre biblioteche e archivi, per la riproduzione di opere legittimamente pubblicate allo scopo di sostituire copie perse, distrutte o inutilizzabili, se è impossibile acquisire tali copie in condizioni normali con qualsiasi altro mezzo;

b) la riproduzione in un unico esemplare da parte delle biblioteche di un articolo separato pubblicato legalmente e di altre opere di piccole dimensioni o di un breve estratto di un'opera o di brevi parti di opere scritte (ad eccezione dei programmi informatici) per scopi educativi, scientifici o personali su richiesta di persone fisiche;

...

v) riproduzione di articoli pubblicati legalmente e di altre opere di piccole dimensioni o di brevi estratti di opere scritte (ad eccezione dei programmi informatici) per corsi di formazione in istituti di istruzione generale".

18. L'articolo 30.1 della Legge prevedeva che i diritti di proprietà dell'autore potessero essere trasferiti ad altri sulla base di un contratto.

19. Ai sensi dell'articolo 31 della Legge, il suddetto contratto doveva specificare, tra l'altro, le modalità di utilizzo dell'opera e l'importo dei diritti d'autore da corrispondere.
20. Ai sensi dell'articolo 45 della legge, nell'esaminare le controversie in materia di diritto d'autore, i tribunali, su richiesta dell'attore, possono, tra l'altro, concedere un risarcimento compreso tra 110 e 55.000 AZN. L'autore può inoltre richiedere alla persona che ha violato i suoi diritti il pagamento dei diritti d'autore che avrebbe potuto normalmente percepire.

DIRITTO INTERNAZIONALE PERTINENTE
Convenzione di Berna per la protezione delle opere letterarie e artistiche del 9 settembre 1886.
21. L'articolo 9 della Convenzione, di cui l'Azerbaigian è parte dal 1999, prevede:

Diritto di riproduzione:
1. In generale; 2. Possibili eccezioni; 3. Registrazioni sonore e visive

"(1) Gli autori di opere letterarie e artistiche protette dalla presente Convenzione hanno il diritto esclusivo di autorizzare la riproduzione di tali opere, in qualsiasi modo o forma.

(2) Spetta alla legislazione dei paesi dell'Unione permettere la riproduzione di tali opere in alcuni casi particolari, a condizione che tale riproduzione non sia in contrasto con il normale sfruttamento dell'opera e non pregiudichi irragionevolmente i legittimi interessi dell'autore...".

Trattato dell'OMPI sul diritto d'autore del 20 dicembre 1996
22. L'articolo 1 del Trattato, di cui l'Azerbaigian è parte dal 2006, prevede:

Relazione con la Convenzione di Berna

"(1) Il presente Trattato è un accordo speciale ai sensi dell'articolo 20 della Convenzione di Berna per la protezione delle opere letterarie e artistiche...

...

(4) Le Parti contraenti si conformano agli articoli da 1 a 21 e all'appendice della Convenzione di Berna".

Le Dichiarazioni concordate relative al Trattato, adottate alla stessa data del Trattato, prevedono che:

"Il diritto di riproduzione di cui all'articolo 9 della Convenzione di Berna e le eccezioni ivi consentite si applicano pienamente all'ambiente digitale, in particolare all'uso di opere in forma digitale. Resta inteso che la memorizzazione di un'opera protetta in forma digitale su un supporto elettronico costituisce una riproduzione ai sensi dell'articolo 9 della Convenzione di Berna."

23. L'articolo 6 del Trattato prevede:

Diritto di distribuzione

"(1) Gli autori di opere letterarie e artistiche godono del diritto esclusivo di autorizzare la messa a disposizione del pubblico dell'originale e delle copie delle loro opere mediante vendita o altro trasferimento di proprietà.

(2) Nessuna disposizione del presente Trattato pregiudica la libertà delle Parti contraenti di determinare le eventuali condizioni alle quali si applica l'esaurimento del diritto di cui al paragrafo (1) dopo la prima vendita o altro trasferimento di proprietà dell'originale o di una copia dell'opera con l'autorizzazione dell'autore".

La dichiarazione concordata relativa agli articoli 6 e 7 [Diritto di noleggio] prevede:

"Come usato in questi articoli, le espressioni "copie" e "originale e copie", essendo soggette al diritto di distribuzione e al diritto di noleggio ai sensi dei suddetti articoli, si riferiscono esclusivamente a copie fisse che possono essere messe in circolazione come oggetti tangibili."

24. L'articolo 8 del Trattato prevede:

"...gli autori di opere letterarie e artistiche godono del diritto esclusivo di autorizzare qualsiasi comunicazione al pubblico delle loro opere, su filo o senza filo, compresa la messa a disposizione del pubblico delle loro opere in modo che i membri del pubblico possano accedervi dal luogo e nel momento scelti individualmente".

25. L'articolo 10 del Trattato prevede:

Limitazioni ed eccezioni

"(1) Le Parti contraenti possono, nella loro legislazione nazionale, prevedere limitazioni o eccezioni ai diritti concessi agli autori di opere letterarie e artistiche ai sensi del presente Trattato in alcuni casi particolari che non siano in contrasto con il normale sfruttamento dell'opera e non pregiudichino irragionevolmente i legittimi interessi dell'autore.

(2) Le Parti contraenti, nell'applicare la Convenzione di Berna, limiteranno le limitazioni o le eccezioni ai diritti ivi previsti a determinati casi speciali che non siano in conflitto con il normale sfruttamento dell'opera e non pregiudichino irragionevolmente i legittimi interessi dell'autore."

La dichiarazione concordata relativa all'articolo 10 prevede che:

"Resta inteso che le disposizioni dell'articolo 10 consentono alle Parti contraenti di portare avanti ed estendere in modo appropriato all'ambiente digitale le limitazioni e le eccezioni previste dalle loro leggi nazionali che sono state considerate accettabili ai sensi della Convenzione di Berna. Allo stesso modo, tali disposizioni devono essere intese nel senso di consentire alle Parti contraenti di concepire nuove eccezioni e limitazioni che siano appropriate nell'ambiente della rete digitale.

Resta inoltre inteso che l'articolo 10, paragrafo 2, non riduce né estende l'ambito di applicabilità delle limitazioni e delle eccezioni consentite dalla Convenzione di Berna".

LA LEGGE
PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
26. Il ricorrente ha lamentato la mancata tutela da parte dello Stato dei suoi interessi di proprietà intellettuale in relazione alla violazione del suo diritto d'autore a causa della riproduzione illecita e della pubblicazione online del suo libro. Ha invocato l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione, che recita come segue:

"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Tuttavia, le disposizioni precedenti non pregiudicano in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di applicare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità all'interesse generale o per assicurare il pagamento di imposte o di altri contributi o sanzioni."

Ammissibilità
27. La Corte osserva che il ricorso non è manifestamente infondato né irricevibile per altri motivi elencati nell'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ricevibile.

Il merito
Le osservazioni delle parti
28. Il ricorrente ha sostenuto che, pubblicando il suo libro online, Irali ha permesso che venisse scaricato da un numero illimitato di persone. In risposta alle osservazioni del Governo (si veda il paragrafo 29), il ricorrente ha sostenuto che, anche se il convenuto non aveva alcun interesse commerciale, le sue azioni avevano violato il suo diritto d'autore. Ha inoltre sostenuto che le decisioni nazionali erano prive di un'adeguata motivazione e non erano conformi al diritto nazionale.

29. Il Governo ha sostenuto che il convenuto aveva messo online il libro del ricorrente per consentire al "grande pubblico di conoscerlo" e non per "scopi commerciali". Hanno sostenuto che le conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali si sono basate su un esame approfondito delle argomentazioni del ricorrente e che quest'ultimo non ha dimostrato il presunto danno causato dalla pubblicazione non autorizzata del suo libro.

La valutazione della Corte
30. La Corte ribadisce che la tutela dei diritti di proprietà intellettuale, compresa la tutela del diritto d'autore, rientra nell'ambito di applicazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si vedano Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 72, CEDU 2007-I, e SIA AKKA/LAA c. Lettonia, no. 562/05, § 41, 12 luglio 2016). Nel caso di specie, il ricorrente era l'autore del libro in questione e beneficiava della protezione del diritto d'autore ai sensi del diritto nazionale. Questo fatto non è mai stato contestato dai tribunali nazionali (cfr. Balan c. Moldavia, n. 19247/03, § 34, 29 gennaio 2008, e Kamoy Radyo Televizyon Yay?nc?l?k ve Organizasyon A.?. c. Turchia, n. 19965/06, § 37, 16 aprile 2019). Pertanto, il ricorrente aveva un "possesso" ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione.

31. La Corte osserva che la riproduzione del libro del ricorrente e la sua pubblicazione online, senza il suo consenso, hanno pregiudicato il suo diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. La controversia nel caso di specie era tra parti private. A questo proposito, la Corte ricorda che lo Stato ha l'obbligo positivo di adottare le misure necessarie per tutelare il diritto di proprietà, in particolare quando esiste un legame diretto tra le misure che un richiedente può legittimamente aspettarsi dalle autorità e il suo effettivo godimento dei beni, anche nei casi di controversie tra privati. Questo obbligo positivo mira a garantire nel proprio ordinamento giuridico che i diritti di proprietà siano sufficientemente tutelati dalla legge e che siano previsti rimedi adeguati con cui la parte lesa possa cercare di difendere i propri diritti, anche, se del caso, chiedendo il risarcimento dei danni subiti. Le misure richieste possono quindi essere preventive o correttive. Per quanto riguarda le possibili misure preventive, il margine di apprezzamento di cui dispone il legislatore nell'attuazione delle politiche sociali ed economiche è ampio, soprattutto in una situazione in cui lo Stato deve tenere conto di interessi privati concorrenti. Per quanto riguarda le misure correttive, gli Stati hanno l'obbligo di prevedere procedure giudiziarie che offrano le necessarie garanzie procedurali e che consentano quindi ai tribunali nazionali di giudicare in modo efficace ed equo le controversie tra privati (si vedano Kanevska c. Ucraina (dec.), n. 73944/11, § 45, 17 novembre 2020, e Saraç e altri c. Turchia, n. 23189/09, §§ 70-75, 30 marzo 2021 e la giurisprudenza ivi citata). A questo proposito, la competenza della Corte a verificare la corretta interpretazione e applicazione del diritto interno è limitata e non ha la funzione di sostituirsi ai giudici nazionali. Il suo ruolo è piuttosto quello di garantire che le decisioni di tali tribunali non siano arbitrarie o altrimenti manifestamente irragionevoli (cfr. Zagreba?ka banka d.d. c. Croazia, no. 39544/05, § 250, 12 dicembre 2013, e Mindek c. Croazia, no. 6169/13, §§ 77-78, 30 agosto 2016).
32. Passando ai fatti del caso, la Corte osserva che il ricorrente non ha sostenuto che i diritti degli autori non fossero sufficientemente tutelati dalla legge azera, ma che l'applicazione della legge esistente da parte dei tribunali nel suo caso fosse illegittima e arbitraria. Secondo il diritto nazionale, di norma, per utilizzare le opere dell'autore era necessaria l'autorizzazione di quest'ultimo e il pagamento dei diritti d'autore (cfr. paragrafo 15). Tuttavia, i tribunali nazionali hanno giustificato le azioni del convenuto basandosi principalmente su diversi articoli della legge sul diritto d'autore che prevedevano eccezioni alla regola generale secondo cui la riproduzione richiedeva l'autorizzazione dell'autore (si vedano i paragrafi 10 e 12-13). Il ricorrente ha tuttavia sostenuto che nessuna di queste eccezioni era applicabile alle circostanze del suo caso. La Corte osserva quanto segue.

33. L'articolo 17.1 della Legge sul Diritto d'Autore prevedeva che la riproduzione di un'opera legalmente pubblicata da parte di una persona fisica, in una sola copia, fosse autorizzata, senza il consenso dell'autore o il pagamento di diritti d'autore, per scopi esclusivamente personali. Tuttavia, il convenuto nel caso di specie era una persona giuridica e, come risulta dal fascicolo, non aveva utilizzato il libro della ricorrente per "scopi esclusivamente personali", ma lo aveva reso disponibile online per un numero illimitato di lettori. Inoltre, ai sensi dell'articolo 17.2 della legge sul diritto d'autore, la suddetta disposizione non si applicava alla riproduzione di libri nella loro interezza. I tribunali nazionali non avevano stabilito in nessuna fase del procedimento che il libro del ricorrente non fosse stato riprodotto nella sua interezza.

34. Ai sensi dell'articolo 18 della Legge sul diritto d'autore, le biblioteche, gli archivi e le istituzioni educative potevano riprodurre opere senza autorizzazione in casi specifici. Il ricorrente, nel suo ricorso dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali (si veda il precedente paragrafo 11), ha sostenuto che il convenuto non apparteneva a nessuna di queste categorie. Sebbene la Corte Suprema non abbia elaborato esplicitamente tale argomentazione, ha notato che il libro del ricorrente era stato pubblicato nella sezione biblioteca del sito web del convenuto e che lo scopo era quello di fornire informazioni sulla storia dell'Azerbaigian (si veda il paragrafo 13 sopra). Il Governo ha presentato un'argomentazione simile, affermando che non vi era alcuno scopo commerciale da parte della convenuta (cfr. paragrafo 29 supra). La Corte osserva che, pur essendo rilevante ai fini dell'applicazione dell'articolo 18 della Legge sul diritto d'autore, la mancanza di uno scopo commerciale non è l'unico elemento da prendere in considerazione. Anche ammettendo che i servizi online offerti dalla convenuta possano essere considerati come rientranti nella nozione di "biblioteche", essendo tale interpretazione della disposizione pertinente di competenza dei giudici nazionali, questi ultimi non hanno indicato quale caso specifico previsto dalle lettere a) e b) dell'articolo 18 della legge sul diritto d'autore possa giustificare la riproduzione del libro del ricorrente senza la sua autorizzazione. Secondo la Corte, visto che il convenuto ha reso il libro del ricorrente liberamente disponibile online e quindi - praticamente - a un pubblico mondiale, non ai visitatori di una biblioteca, era necessario un ragionamento elaborato da parte dei tribunali per giustificare l'applicazione dell'articolo 18 al caso del ricorrente.

35. Per quanto riguarda l'articolo 15.3 della Legge sul Diritto d'Autore, citato dalla Corte Suprema, la Corte osserva che tale disposizione riguardava la regola dell'esaurimento del diritto di distribuzione. Come suggeriscono la formulazione di tale disposizione e la dichiarazione concordata relativa all'articolo 6 della Convenzione dell'OMPI sul diritto d'autore (si vedano i paragrafi 15 e 23 supra), tale norma si riferiva a copie legittimamente pubblicate e fissate di opere che erano state messe in circolazione attraverso la vendita come oggetti tangibili. Come risulta dai fatti del caso di specie, mentre il ricorrente aveva pubblicato il suo libro e copie fisiche erano disponibili sul mercato librario, nulla indica che egli abbia mai autorizzato la sua riproduzione e comunicazione al pubblico in forma digitale. La Corte Suprema non ha spiegato perché ha ritenuto questa disposizione pertinente alle circostanze del caso di specie, in cui la controversia non riguardava la distribuzione delle copie legittimamente pubblicate del libro del ricorrente, ma la sua riproduzione in una nuova forma digitale e la sua pubblicazione online senza il suo consenso.

36. In sintesi, secondo la Corte, i tribunali nazionali non hanno fornito ragioni che dimostrino che le suddette disposizioni della Legge sul diritto d'autore, da loro invocate, possano costituire basi giuridiche per la situazione in questione (confrontare Andriy Rudenko c. Ucraina, no. 35041/05, § 44, 21 dicembre 2010, e Atima Limited c. Ucraina, no. 56714/11, § 44, 20 maggio 2021). Lo Stato convenuto è quindi venuto meno all'obbligo positivo di cui all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 di proteggere la proprietà intellettuale in particolare attraverso misure correttive efficaci.
37. Si è quindi verificata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 6 DELLA CONVENZIONE
38. Il ricorrente ha lamentato che le sentenze dei tribunali nazionali nel suo caso non erano state motivate.

39. Tenuto conto delle sue conclusioni ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione (si vedano i paragrafi 26-37 supra), dei fatti del caso e delle osservazioni delle parti, la Corte ritiene che non sia necessario pronunciarsi separatamente sulla ricevibilità e sul merito del suddetto reclamo (si veda, per un approccio simile, AsDAC c. Repubblica di Moldova, no. 47384/07, §§ 54-55, 8 dicembre 2020).

APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
40. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:

"Se la Corte constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente una riparazione solo parziale, la Corte accorda, se necessario, una giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".

Danno
41. Il ricorrente ha chiesto 78.286 euro (EUR) a titolo di danno patrimoniale, di cui 13.344 manats (AZN) (circa 6.630 euro al momento della presentazione della domanda) per la riproduzione e la pubblicazione non autorizzata del suo libro, più un importo non specificato per il mancato guadagno e un adeguamento all'inflazione. Ha dichiarato che il suo libro è stato venduto a 13 AZN in Azerbaigian, mentre il suo prezzo all'estero era di 63 dollari statunitensi. Per quest'ultimo dato ha fornito una stampa da un sito web. Ha inoltre chiesto 50.000 euro per danni non pecuniari.

42. Il Governo ha sostenuto che (i) il ricorrente non ha presentato alcuna prova che dimostri il prezzo del libro nelle librerie locali; (ii) la stampa dal negozio internet non conteneva un'indicazione della data in cui era stata stampata; (iii) il ricorrente non ha presentato alcun indice o calcolo per quanto riguarda il tasso di inflazione; e (iv) la constatazione di una violazione costituirebbe una riparazione sufficiente per il danno non patrimoniale.

43. La Corte osserva innanzitutto che le somme richieste in relazione al mancato guadagno e all'adeguamento all'inflazione non sono state specificate e che non sono stati forniti documenti giustificativi al riguardo. Queste parti della richiesta devono pertanto essere respinte. Per quanto riguarda la parte della domanda relativa ai danni per la riproduzione e la pubblicazione non autorizzata del suo libro, le informazioni e i documenti presentati dal ricorrente sono insufficienti per un calcolo preciso dei danni richiesti. Ciononostante, la Corte riconosce che il ricorrente deve aver sofferto a causa della riproduzione non autorizzata del suo libro e della sua pubblicazione online, il che giustifica la concessione di una giusta soddisfazione (si confronti, mutatis mutandis, Rasul Jafarov c. Azerbaijan, n. 69981/14, § 193, 17 marzo 2016). Allo stesso tempo, la Corte ritiene che il ricorrente abbia subito un danno non pecuniario che non può essere compensato dalla sola constatazione di una violazione. Decidendo in via equitativa, la Corte riconosce al ricorrente la somma complessiva di 5.000 euro per i danni patrimoniali e non patrimoniali.

Costi e spese
44. Il ricorrente ha chiesto anche 1.000 AZN (circa 500 euro) per le spese legali per la sua rappresentanza davanti ai tribunali nazionali e alla Corte, e 41 euro per le spese postali.

45. Il Governo ha affermato che il ricorrente non ha fornito alcuna prova a sostegno delle sue richieste.

46. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un ricorrente ha diritto al rimborso dei costi e delle spese solo nella misura in cui sia stato dimostrato che questi sono stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e sono ragionevoli nel loro ammontare. Nel caso di specie, il ricorrente non ha fornito alla Corte alcun documento giustificativo pertinente. Pertanto, la Corte respinge le richieste sotto questa voce.

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,

Dichiara ricevibile il reclamo ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione;
Dichiara che non è necessario esaminare la ricevibilità e il merito del reclamo ai sensi dell'articolo 6 della Convenzione;
Ritiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve versare al ricorrente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza sarà divenuta definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, 5.000 euro (cinquemila euro), più eventuali imposte, a titolo di danno patrimoniale e non patrimoniale, da convertire nella valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data del regolamento:

(b) che, a partire dalla scadenza dei suddetti tre mesi e fino al saldo, sull'importo di cui sopra siano dovuti interessi semplici ad un tasso pari al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea durante il periodo di mora, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;
Rigetta per il resto la domanda di equa soddisfazione del ricorrente.
Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto il 1° settembre 2022, ai sensi dell'articolo 77, paragrafi 2 e 3, del Regolamento della Corte.



Victor Soloveytchik Síofra O'Leary
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 20/02/2024.