CASO: In the case of Grbac v. Croatia

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: In the case of Grbac v. Croatia

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 64795/19
STATO: Croazia
DATA: 16/12/2021
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION

CASE OF GRBAC v. CROATIA

(Application no. 64795/19)





JUDGMENT


Art 1 P1 • Peaceful enjoyment of possessions • Domestic courts’ dismissal of applicant’s claim to ex lege ownership of socially owned property through adverse possession due to civil action being brought after Constitutional Court’s invalidation of legal provision allowing such claims • Findings contrary to domestic case-law and Court’s Trgo v. Croatia judgment • Resulting failure to assess evidence and establish facts as to whether statutory requirements for such ownership satisfied • Applicant’s claim with sufficient basis in national law • Art 1 P1 applicable • Findings in Trgo applicable: consequences of a mistake by the State authority – enacting unconstitutional legislation–to be borne by the State and not the individual • No indication of any third-party rights being affected



STRASBOURG

16 December 2021



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.




In the case of Grbac v. Croatia,

The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:

Péter Paczolay, President,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Alena Polá?ková,
Erik Wennerström,
Raffaele Sabato,
Lorraine Schembri Orland,
Ioannis Ktistakis, judges,
and Renata Degener, Section Registrar,

Having regard to:

the application (no. 64795/19) against the Republic of Croatia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Croatian national, Mr Milutin Grbac (“the applicant”), on 2 December 2019;

the decision to give notice to the Croatian Government (“the Government”) of the complaints concerning access to court and the right of property;

the parties’ observations;

Having deliberated in private on 16 November 2021,

Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

INTRODUCTION

1. The case concerns a property dispute between the applicant and the local authorities. The applicant claimed to have ex lege acquired ownership of certain parts of plots of land by adverse possession, as he and his legal predecessors had possessed those parts for more than eighty years.

THE FACTS

2. The applicant was born in 1949 and lives in Rijeka. He was represented by Mr K. Lan?a, an advocate practising in Opatija.

3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Ms Š. Stažnik.

4. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.

BACKGROUND TO THE CASE
5. The legislation of the former Yugoslavia, in particular section 29 of the 1980 Basic Property Act (see paragraph 45 below), prohibited the acquisition of ownership of socially owned property[1] by adverse possession (dosjelost).

6. When incorporating the 1980 Basic Property Act into the Croatian legal system on 8 October 1991, Parliament repealed the above-mentioned provision (see paragraph 47 below).

7. Subsequently, the new Property Act of 1996, which entered into force on 1 January 1997, provided in section 388(4) that the period prior to 8 October 1991 was to be included in calculating the relevant time-limit for acquiring ownership by adverse possession of socially owned immovable property (see paragraph 51 below).

8. Following several petitions for an abstract constitutional review (prijedlog za ocjenu ustavnosti) lodged by former owners of properties that had been appropriated under the socialist regime, on 8 July 1999 the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) accepted the initiative and decided to institute proceedings for a review of the constitutionality of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act.

9. By a decision of 17 November 1999, the Constitutional Court invalidated with ex nunc effect section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act. It held that the impugned provision had retroactive effect, resulting in negative consequences for the rights of third parties (primarily those who, under restitution legislation, were entitled to the restitution of property appropriated during the socialist regime), and was therefore unconstitutional (for the relevant part of the Constitutional Court’s decision see Trgo v. Croatia, no. 35298/04, § 17, 11 June 2009). The Constitutional Court’s decision came into effect on 14 December 1999, when it was published in the Official Gazette.

CIVIL PROCEEDINGS IN THE APPLICANT’S CASE
10. On 27 November 2006 Rijeka Township notified the applicant that he had been unlawfully occupying parts of two plots of land owned by the Township. Those parts were situated within an enclosed area of land adjoining the applicant’s house (hereafter “the applicant’s smallholding”).

11. On 19 March 2007 Rijeka Township brought a civil action against the applicant in the Rijeka Municipal Court (Op?inski sud u Rijeci) asking the court to order him to surrender the disputed parts into the Township’s possession. The Township asserted that the applicant, who was the owner of two adjacent plots, had illegally annexed parts of the two neighbouring plots of land (hereafter “the disputed parts” or “the property in dispute”) owned by the Township.

12. On 11 April 2007 the applicant responded to the civil action and lodged a counterclaim asking the court to issue a declaratory judgment establishing that he was the owner of the disputed parts, which he asserted that he had acquired by adverse possession. He submitted (a) that all the land within his smallholding had been bought by his father in 1955 from a certain Ms O.B. by means of an oral sale and purchase agreement, and (b) that the disputed parts allegedly belonging to Rijeka Township had always been a part of his smallholding because they were situated within the area enclosed by an old dry stone wall surrounding his property.

13. The applicant also stated that in 1955 his father and O.B. had not known that the property which had been the object of their sale and purchase agreement had formally (as recorded in the land register and cadastre) consisted of several plots of land. In 1963 his father had realised that some of that property had not been formally owned by O.B. but that it had been recorded in the land register as socially owned property. However, his father had believed that this situation had been fully regulated by a decision of the so-called Usurpation Commission of 27 April 1963 whereby one plot of land that had until then been recorded in the land register as being in social ownership had been recorded in his father’s name.

14. The applicant furthermore explained that in 1972 his father had wished to transfer to him by deed of gift the property that he had bought from O.B. However, at that time they had realised that one plot – which was a part of that property – was still recorded in the land register under O.B.’s name. In order to correct this the applicant had on 12 January 1972 concluded a written sale and purchase agreement whereby O.B. had sold him that plot (which his father had actually already bought from her and taken possession of in 1955 – this was expressly mentioned in the agreement). On the same day the applicant’s father had transferred another plot (which was a part of that property) into the applicant’s ownership by deed of gift. These two plots were in 1986 merged into a single plot and recorded as such in the land register under the applicant’s name.

15. In reply Rijeka Township submitted that by the applicant’s own admission the applicant’s father had by 1963 already known that what he had bought from O.B. had not been owned by her (see paragraph 13 above). Furthermore, it was unclear how his father could have believed that the discrepancy between the actual situation and the status of the property in the land register had been resolved by a decision of the Usurpation Commission, which had only transferred into his ownership the land that had been in his possession at that time. From that decision a contrary conclusion had to be drawn – namely that the disputed parts had not been in the applicant’s father’s possession, as otherwise they would have been transferred into his ownership as well.

16. Rijeka Township furthermore submitted that in 1986 the cadastral authorities had conducted a survey in the area, the purpose of which had been to update and consolidate the cadastre so to reflect the actual situation. Had the applicant been in possession of the disputed parts at the time, a new plot would have been created and he would have been recorded as its possessor in the cadastre. The Township therefore argued that the applicant had not been in possession of the disputed parts before 1986 but that he had occupied them afterwards. Since, in their view, from his counterclaim it followed that he and his father had known that those parts had not been theirs (see paragraphs 13-14 above), the applicant and his father had not held those parts in good faith. This meant that under domestic law the applicant could not have become the owner of those parts by adverse possession (under section 159(3) of the 1996 Property Act – see paragraph 50 below).

17. In the course of the first-instance proceedings, the Municipal Court heard the applicant and three witnesses called by him, conducted an on-site inspection, ordered a report from an expert surveyor and consulted various documents (including the letter of 12 May 2009 – see paragraph 20 below).

18. In his testimony the applicant stated that he had not known that the disputed parts had not been covered by the sale and purchase agreement between his father and O.B. (see paragraph 13 above) because the object of the sale had actually been a single piece of land enclosed by a dry stone wall. When replying to a question posed by the plaintiff’s representative he also stated:

“I am aware that in 1985 and 1986 the cadastral authorities were surveying the land in the area ... and that I was invited to comment. The employees in the Cadastre [Office] told me that they were undertaking a consolidation [of the cadastre] and that my plot was too big and had to be reduced and asked me to sign some documents. I signed those [documents] but told them that my father had left that [land] to me as a gift. They [replied] that all that was socially owned in any case and that I was only the beneficiary of the land in question. I did not exactly read what I signed on that occasion.”

19. All three witnesses (two of whom were born in 1944 and one in 1947) testified that the disputed parts had been in the possession of the applicant’s family since 1955 and before that in the possession of Ms O.B., and that no one had ever contested their ownership of those parts.

20. This was also confirmed in a letter of 12 May 2009 to Rijeka Township by the Council of the Local Board of Pehlin (Vije?e Mjesnog odbora Pehlin)[2]. The relevant part of that letter, which was signed by four councillors, read as follows:

“The majority of the members of the Council of the Local Board of Pehlin were born in Rijeka and have permanently resided in Pehlin since their birth. They know that the disputed [parts] have been in the long-term possession of the Grbac family – first in the possession of late Milan Grbac and then, after a transfer by deed of gift, in the possession of his son Milutin Grbac.

Before the Grbac family entered into possession [of the property in dispute], [it] had been in the long-term possession of the late Ms O.B.

The accuracy of our statements is discernible from the Rijeka Municipal Court’s survey of 7 February 1972, which corresponds to the actual situation.

We therefore suggest that Rijeka Township take these statements into account in the further course of the proceedings in this case.”

21. The expert surveyor’s report established that the applicant was in possession of 98 sq. m of plot no. 388/1, as well 832 sq. m of plot no. 388/593; both plots were recorded in the land register as being under the ownership of Rijeka Township. Neither party objected to the expert report.

22. By a judgment of 22 April 2011, the Rijeka Municipal Court ruled in favour of Rijeka Township and ordered the applicant to surrender the disputed parts into the Township’s possession. At the same time the court dismissed the counterclaim lodged by the applicant (see paragraph 12 above) seeking to be declared their owner.

23. The court established, firstly, that the two plots in question (see paragraph 21 above) had on 8 October 1991 been in social ownership and that under the relevant legislation it had not been possible to acquire ownership of such property by adverse possession (see paragraph 52 below) unless the statutory requirements for doing so had been met by 6 April 1941 or after 8 October 1991.

24. However, all the witnesses called by the applicant and heard by the court had been too young (see paragraph 19 above) to know whether his predecessors had been in the possession of the property in dispute before 6 April 1941. Consequently, the applicant had not demonstrated that the statutory requirements for acquiring ownership by adverse possession had been met before that date.

25. The period from 8 October 1991 until 27 November 2006 (when Rijeka Township had notified the applicant that the property in dispute had not belonged to him – see paragraph 10 above) had been too short because immovable property owned by the local authorities could be acquired by adverse possession only after forty years (under section 159(4) of the 1996 Property Act – see paragraph 50 below).

26. The applicant appealed. In his appeal he argued that the prohibition on acquiring ownership of socially owned property by adverse possession had existed from the moment at which the property in question had passed into social ownership until 8 October 1991. It was therefore necessary to find out when the two plots of land currently owned by Rijeka Township (see paragraph 21 above) had been transferred into social ownership – a fact which the Municipal Court had not established. To his knowledge, the land in the area had not passed into social ownership until the 1960s. The applicant also argued that the period before an item of property had been transferred into social ownership and the period after 8 October 1991 had to be combined when calculating the time necessary for acquiring ownership of such property by adverse possession.

27. By a decision of 8 May 2013 the Rijeka County Court (Županijski sud u Rijeci) allowed the applicant’s appeal, quashed the first-instance judgment of 22 April 2011 (see paragraph 22 above) for incompleteness of facts and remitted the case for fresh consideration. It accepted the applicant’s argument that it was necessary to ascertain when the two plots owned by Rijeka Township had passed into social ownership.

28. In the fresh proceedings, on 21 January 2014, the Rijeka Municipal Court heard two additional witnesses (born in 1933 and in 1940 respectively) called by the applicant who testified that the disputed parts had been situated within the area of land bounded by a dry stone wall (see paragraph 18 above); they furthermore testified that that area of land had been in the long-term possession of (and had belonged to) Ms M.O. and her family for many years before she had sold it to the applicant’s father in 1955.

29. On 7 February 2014 two more witnesses were heard (who were at that time aged eighty-two and eighty-three, respectively). The testimony given by the first of those witnesses echoed that of the two above?mentioned witnesses (see paragraph 28), whereas the second knew nothing of the matter.

30. In reply to a request for information lodged by the court, on 24 April 2014 its land registry division informed it that from the data in the land register it was impossible to discern when the two plots in question (see paragraph 21 above) on which the disputed parts of land were located had passed into social ownership because the old land register folio containing that information had been damaged.

31. By a judgment of 17 June 2014, the Municipal Court again ruled in favour of Rijeka Township and dismissed the applicant’s counterclaim.

32. The court held that the applicant had not proved that the land in the area had passed into social ownership in the 1960s (see paragraph 26 above) and thus had not demonstrated that his predecessors had acquired ownership by adverse possession before the property in dispute had become socially owned. Likewise, the applicant had not proved that his predecessors had been in the possession of the property in dispute before 6 April 1941 because the witnesses heard had been too young (see paragraph 19 and 28?29 above) to have had any knowledge of that. It then reiterated its earlier finding that the period from 8 October 1991 until 27 November 2006 (see paragraph 10 above) had been too short because immovable property owned by the local authorities could be acquired by adverse possession only after forty years (see paragraph 25 above and section 159(4) of the 1996 Property Act cited in paragraph 50 below). Lastly, the court held that the period before the transfer of an item of property into social ownership and the period after 8 October 1991 could not be combined for the purposes of calculating the time necessary for acquiring ownership of such property by adverse possession.

33. The applicant again appealed. He once more argued that the Municipal Court had failed to establish when the two plots owned by Rijeka Township on which the disputed parts were located had been transferred into social ownership (see paragraph 26 above). In any event, he and his legal predecessors had acquired those parts by virtue of possessing them continuously and in good faith before and after 6 April 1941. He also reiterated his earlier argument that the period before a piece of property had been transferred into social ownership and the period after 8 October 1991 had to be combined when calculating the time necessary for acquiring ownership of such property by adverse possession (see paragraph 26 above).

34. By a judgment of 21 January 2015 the Rijeka County Court dismissed the applicant’s appeal and upheld the first-instance judgment of 17 June 2014 (see paragraph 31 above). It held that as the relevant land register records were damaged (see paragraph 30 above) the burden of proving when the two plots owned by Rijeka Township had passed into social ownership had rested on the applicant, who could have provided proof by other means – for example, by furnishing a decision whereby those plots had been transferred into social ownership.

35. On 27 April 2015 the applicant lodged an extraordinary appeal on points of law (izvanredna revizija – see paragraph 61 below) with the Supreme Court (Vrhovni sud Republike Hrvatske) against the second?instance judgment. He submitted that the first- and second-instance judgments had been based, inter alia, on the view that the period between 6 April 1941 and 8 October 1991 could not be included in the calculation of the relevant time-limit for acquiring ownership by adverse possession of socially owned immovable property. However, that view, reflected in the existing case-law of the domestic courts, was contrary to the Court’s judgment in the case of Trgo (cited above) and thus had to be revisited.

36. The applicant also called into question the view of the civil courts that as the relevant records (that is to say the land register) – whose maintenance was the duty of the State – had been destroyed, it was incumbent on him (and not on the party whom it benefited – see paragraphs 32 and 34 above) to prove when the two plots belonging to Rijeka Township had been transferred into social ownership.

37. By a decision of 16 April 2019, the Supreme Court declared the applicant’s extraordinary appeal on points of law inadmissible because the point of law that he had raised was not important for the uniform application of the law.

38. The Supreme Court held that the respective factual circumstances in the applicant’s case and in Trgo were different. In particular, in Trgo the civil action had been brought while section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act in its original text had still been in force, whereas the applicant in the present case had lodged his counterclaim after that provision had been repealed and replaced with a new one, under which the period between 6 April 1941 and 8 October 1991 could not be included in the calculation of the relevant time-limit for acquiring ownership by adverse possession of socially owned immovable property (see paragraph 12 above and paragraphs 51-52 below).

39. The Supreme Court also added that the Court’s view that the time at which a civil action was brought was irrelevant – expressed in the Chamber judgment in the case of Radomilja and Others v. Croatia (no. 37685/10, § 52, 28 June 2016) – no longer had legal force because that judgment had been revised by the Grand Chamber’s judgment in respect of the same case (see Radomilja and Others v. Croatia [GC], nos. 37685/10 and 22768/12, 20 March 2018), when the Court, for different reasons, had held that domestic courts’ judgments dismissing applicants’ claims to be declared the owners of socially owned property by adverse possession had not been in breach of the Convention.

40. Then, on 3 July 2019, the applicant lodged a constitutional complaint against the Supreme Court’s decision. He relied on the relevant Articles of the Croatian Constitution guaranteeing the right to fair proceedings, the right of ownership and the right to equality before the law. The applicant argued that the Supreme Court and the lower courts had not applied the relevant provisions of the Convention and that the Supreme Court had unjustifiably declared his extraordinary appeal on points of law inadmissible. He averred that, contrary to the reasoning of the Supreme Court (see paragraph 39 above), the Grand Chamber in its judgment in Radomilja and Others had not called into question the Chamber’s finding that the time at which a civil action was brought was irrelevant for the application of the Trgo-related case-law, but had found no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 for different reasons.

41. By a decision of 25 September 2019, the Constitutional Court (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) declared the applicant’s constitutional complaint inadmissible, finding that the case did not raise a constitutional issue. It expressly agreed with and reiterated the Supreme Court’s reasoning concerning the legal effects of the Court’s judgments in Trgo and Radomilja and Others on the applicant’s case (see paragraphs 38-39 above).

42. The Constitutional Court’s decision was served on the applicant’s representative on 9 October 2019.

RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK AND PRACTICE

PROPERTY LEGISLATION AND PRACTICE
The 1811 Civil Code
43. Article 1468 of the Austrian General Civil Code of 1811 (Op?i gra?anski zakonik – “the 1811 Civil Code”), which was applicable in Croatia from 1852 until 1980 (see Radomilja and Others, cited above, §§ 47-49), provided that if immovable property was not recorded in the land register in the name of the person in whose possession it was, the possessor could acquire the ownership of such property by adverse possession after thirty years.

The 1980 Basic Property Act
44. Section 28 of the Basic Ownership Relations Act (Zakon o osnovnim vlasni?kopravnim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia nos. 6/80 and 36/90 – “the 1980 Basic Property Act”), which entered into force on 1 September 1980, provided that a person possessing in good faith immovable property owned by someone else would become its owner by adverse possession after twenty years.

45. Section 29 prohibited the acquisition of ownership by adverse possession of socially owned property.

46. Section 72(1) provided that possession had to be considered in good faith if the possessors did not know or could not have known that the property they possessed was not theirs. Section 72(2) provided that possession in good faith had to be presumed.

47. Section 3 of the Act on the Incorporation of the Basic Ownership Relations Act (Zakon o preuzimanju zakona o osnovnim vlasni?kopravnim odnosima, Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia no. 53/91 of 8 October 1991), which entered into force on 8 October 1991, repealed section 29 of the Basic Property Act.

The 1996 Property Act
48. Since 1 January 1997 matters concerning possession and ownership have been regulated by the Ownership and Other Rights In Rem Act (Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Official Gazette no. 91/96, with subsequent amendments – “the 1996 Property Act”).

49. Section 18 provides when a possessor is considered to be in good faith. The relevant part of that provision reads as follows:

Section 18

“(1) Possession is lawful if the possessor has a valid legal basis for that possession (right to possession).

(2) ...

(3) Possession is in good faith if the possessor, when he or she acquired it, did not know nor, given the circumstances, did not have sufficient reason to suspect that he or she did not have the right to possession. However, good faith ceases as soon as the possessor learns that he or she does not have the right to possession.

(4) If, in a dispute over the right to possession, it has been decided by a final decision that the right to possession does not belong to the possessor, his possession shall be [considered to be] in bad faith from the moment at which he or she received the [relevant] statement of claim. ....

(5) Possession shall be considered to be in good faith, unless proven otherwise.”

50. The relevant provision of the 1996 Property Act concerning acquisition of ownership in general and, specifically, by adverse possession, read as follows:

Legal grounds for acquisition

Section 114

(1) Ownership may be acquired by legal transaction, by decision of a court or other public authority, by succession, or by operation of law.

Acquisition [of ownership] by operation of law

...

(d) Acquisition by adverse possession

Section 159

(1) Ownership may be acquired by adverse possession on the basis of the exclusive possession of a [particular] property if such possession is of the quality required by law and has lasted continuously for a period of time determined by law, and if the possessor is capable of being the owner of such property.

(2) An exclusive possessor who possesses lawfully, in good faith and whose possession is free of vice[3] shall acquire ownership of movable property after three years and of immovable property after ten years.

(3) An exclusive possessor who possesses at least in good faith shall acquire ownership of movable property after ten years and of immovable property after twenty years of continuous exclusive possession.

(4) An exclusive possessor of a property owned by the Republic of Croatia, counties or [other local authorities] ... shall acquire ownership by adverse possession once his or her ... possession has lasted continuously for a period twice as long as that set out in paragraphs 2 and 3 of this section.”

51. The original text of section 388 of the 1996 Property Act provided as follows:

Section 388

“(1) The acquisition, modification, legal effects and termination of rights in rem after the entry into force of this Act shall be assessed on the basis of its provisions ...

(2) The acquisition, modification, legal effects and termination of rights in rem until the entry into force of this Act shall be assessed on the basis of the rules applicable at the time of the acquisition, modification or termination of those rights or of their legal effects.

(3) If the prescribed time-limits for acquiring or terminating rights in rem set out in this Act started to run before its entry into force, they shall continue to run pursuant to paragraph 2 of this section ...

(4) In calculating the period for acquiring by adverse possession immovable property socially owned on 8 October 1991, and for acquiring [other] rights in rem over such property, the period before that date shall also be taken into account.”

52. After the Constitutional Court, on 17 November 1999, had invalidated paragraph 4 of section 388 of the 1996 Property Act as unconstitutional (see paragraph 9 above), that provision was amended by the 2001 Amendment to the 1996 Property Act (Zakon o izmjeni i dopuni Zakona vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima, Official Gazette no. 114/01), which entered into force on 20 December 2001. The new text of paragraph 4 reads as follows:

“In calculating the period for acquiring by adverse possession immovable property socially owned on 8 October 1991, and for acquiring [other] rights in rem over such property, the period before that date shall not be taken into account.”

Relevant practice
As regards the acquisition of immovable property by adverse possession in the period between 6 April 1941 and 8 October 1991
53. According to the interpretation adopted at the extended plenary session of the Federal Supreme Court of Yugoslavia of 4 April 1960, a person in possession of immovable property in good faith would acquire ownership of it by adverse possession after twenty years. That interpretation applied (retroactively) from 6 April 1941 until its adoption on 4 April 1960 and from that date until 1 September 1980, when the 1980 Basic Property Act entered into force and codified that interpretation (see paragraph 44 above). In a number of cases the Supreme Court of Croatia referred to this interpretation as valid law at the time (for those cases see Radomilja and Others, cited above, §§ 59-60).

54. In decision no. Rev-291/14-2 of 17 April 2018 the Supreme Court, upon an extraordinary appeal on points of law and referring to the Court’s judgment in Trgo, ruled in favour of the plaintiffs, who sought to be declared the owners by adverse possession of certain land that had in earlier times been socially owned. It quashed the lower courts’ judgments whereby those courts had dismissed the plaintiffs’ action brought on 7 September 2009 and remitted the case. The relevant part of the Supreme Court’s decision reads as follows:

“When acquiring ownership by adverse possession of property that before 8 October 1991 was in social ownership, the period elapsed before 8 October 1991 should also be taken into account when calculating the time necessary for acquiring ownership by adverse possession, if this does not violate the ownership rights of third persons who did not acquire those rights on the basis of section 388(4) of the [1996 Property Act] but on the basis of other provisions of that Act.

The risk of any mistake made by the State authorities must be borne by the State, and the errors must not be remedied at the expense of the individual who acquired ownership by adverse possession on the basis of a statutory provision that the Constitutional Court later invalidated as unconstitutional – especially in those cases where there is no other conflicting private interest of third persons.

Since from the information in the case-file it can be discerned that the plaintiffs’ predecessors possessed the immovable property in dispute even before 8 October 1991, the [first-instance] court shall in the fresh proceedings examine in detail those circumstances as well, take other evidence that the parties may propose and examine whether there are circumstances [warranting] the application of the legal view expressed by the European Court of Human Rights in the judgment of Trgo v. Croatia ... as regards the acquiring of ownership by adverse possession in respect of immovable property that was, by the acts of the former authorities, transferred from [private] ... to social ownership.”

55. The Supreme Court reiterated the same view in cases nos. Rev?158/2017-2 of 7 May 2019 in respect of a civil action brought on 27 February 2014, Rev-x 974/2017-2 of 7 May 2019 in respect of a civil action brought on 28 September 2004, Rev-578/2017-2 of 7 May 2019 in respect of a civil action brought on 29 November 2010, Rev-389/2014-5 of 29 May 2019 in respect of civil action brought on 9 November 2011, and Rev-2771/2013-2 of 13 August 2019 in respect of a civil action brought on 23 August 2011.

As regards possession in good faith
56. The Supreme Court of Croatia has consistently held that the mere fact that someone other than the possessor was recorded in the land register as the owner of a piece of real estate does not render his or her possession as being in bad faith and thus does not prevent such a possessor from acquiring ownership of that property by adverse possession. For example, in cases nos. Rev-2426/1990 of 15 February 1991 and Rev-1209/2016-3 of 11 February 2020 the Supreme Court held that:

“... the [lower] courts correctly concluded ... that the possession of the plaintiffs’ ancestors had been in good faith, regardless of the fact that the appellant’s ancestors were recorded in the land register as the owners of the disputed real estate. In particular, next to the established fact that the plaintiffs’ ancestors always behaved as the owners of the disputed real estate, and that the appellant’s ancestors never disputed their right of ownership, even though they exercised [it] in plain view of them, the mere fact that the appellant’s ancestors were recorded in the land register as the owners does not render the possession of the plaintiffs’ ancestors as being in bad faith. The plaintiffs’ ancestors had no reason to consult the land register to establish the land-register status of the property. On the basis of the above circumstances, they had a well-founded belief that they were the owners. Therefore, their failure to consult the land register cannot be held against them [by way of arguing] that they could not have remained unaware [of the fact] that the owners [as recorded] in the land register were the appellant’s ancestors.”

57. However, in case nos. Rev-1719/2013 of 21 September 2016 and Rev-830/2014-2 of 16 July 2019 the Supreme Court held that the concerned possessors of immovable property had lost the possibility to claim to be acting in good faith after they, by participating in certain land registry proceedings, had learned that the property they had possessed thus far was not recorded under their name in the land register.

58. The Government referred to judgment of the Zagreb County Court no. Gž-1537/16-3 of 15 January 2019, in which that court held that the party opposing a possessor’s claim for acquiring ownership by adverse possession was not required to prove the possessor’s bad faith if from the possessor’s own testimony it followed that his or her possession had been in bad faith.

CIVIL PROCEDURE ACT
59. The Civil Procedure Act (Zakon o parni?nom postupku, Official Gazette of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia no. 4/77, with subsequent amendments, and Official Gazette of the Republic of Croatia no. 53/91, with subsequent amendments), in its section 2(1), provides that civil courts must decide within the bounds of the claim lodged within the proceedings. Section 354(2)(12) provides that deciding ultra or extra petitum in a judgment always constitutes a serious breach of civil procedure and grounds for appeal and an appeal on points of law.

60. Section 186(3) embodies the principle of iura novit curia by providing that civil courts are not bound by the legal basis indicated by the plaintiffs for their claims.

61. The text of paragraphs 2-4 of section 382 of the Civil Procedure Act, as in force at the relevant time, which concerned the remedy of an extraordinary appeal on points of law, is reproduced in Mireni?-Huzjak v. Croatia (dec.), no. 72996/16, § 26, 24 September 2019. Such an appeal could have been lodged, inter alia, in the event that a decision in the civil proceedings had depended on the resolution of a point of substantive or procedural law in respect of which there had existed established case-law, but that case-law had had to be revisited in view of changes in the legal system occasioned by decisions of the European Court of Human Rights.

62. The relevant provision of the Civil Procedure Act concerning the reopening of proceedings following a final judgment of the European Court of Human Rights (namely, section 428a) is cited in Lovri? v. Croatia (no. 38458/15, § 24, 4 April 2017).

OTHER RELEVANT LEGISLATION
63. The relevant provision of the 1999 Constitutional Court Act is cited in Radomilja and Others, cited above, § 46). Section 53 provides that primary legislation (that is to say statutes) can only be invalidated as unconstitutional by the Constitutional Court with ex nunc – that is, with pro futuro – effect, meaning that the legal effects that it produced before being invalidated will remain. Secondary (subordinate) legislation can be invalidated with ex tunc effect under certain, rather restrictive, circumstances, in which case the effects that it produced before being invalidated will be erased.

64. The Act on Compensation for, and Restitution of, Property Appropriated During the Yugoslav Communist Regime (Zakon o naknadi za imovinu oduzetu za vrijeme jugoslavenske komunisti?ke vladavine, Official Gazette nos. 92/96, with subsequent amendments – “the Restitution Act”), which entered into force on 1 January 1997, enabled former owners of confiscated or nationalised property, or their heirs in the first line of succession (direct descendants or a spouse), to obtain under certain conditions either the restitution of or compensation for property appropriated under the socialist regime.

THE LAW

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
65. The applicant complained that the domestic courts’ decisions dismissing his claim to be declared the owner of the property in dispute had been in breach of his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. He relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.

The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”

Admissibility
66. The Government disputed the admissibility of this complaint, arguing that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was not applicable to the present case and that the applicant had failed to exhaust domestic remedies.

Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) The parties’ arguments

(i) The Government

67. The Government submitted that the applicant’s claim to be declared the owner of the property in dispute did not have a sufficient basis in national law and thus could not qualify as an “asset” and hence a “possession” to which Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 would be applicable. In this regard they first submitted that when examining this issue, the period between 1941 and 1991 had to be excluded. In the alternative, they contended that the applicant’s claim could not be considered to constitute a “possession”, even if the Court were to take that period into account.

68. In the Government’s view the applicant had not relied on the period between 1941 and 1991 when lodging his counterclaim (see paragraph 12 above). Likewise, in the domestic proceedings he had never relied on the original version of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act (see paragraph 51 above) and had in both of his appeals against the first-instance judgments accepted the statutory prohibition on acquiring ownership of socially owned immovable property by adverse possession in that fifty-year period (see paragraphs 26 and 32 above).

69. Thus, unlike in the Trgo case, it could not be said that the applicant before the domestic courts had “reasonably relied on legislation, later on abrogated as unconstitutional” (see Trgo, cited above, § 67).

70. The domestic courts could not have taken the said fifty-year period into account proprio motu because under domestic law they had been bound by the factual basis of the applicant’s counterclaim, which had not included that period. In those circumstances, taking that period into account would have meant deciding beyond the scope of the case and would have constituted a serious breach of civil procedure (see paragraph 59 above).

71. Furthermore, although the first-instance judgment in his case had been delivered on 17 June 2014 – that is, five years after the Court’s judgment in Trgo – the applicant for the first time relied on Trgo in the extraordinary appeal on points of law that he had lodged on 27 April 2015 (see paragraph 34 above).

72. In this regard the Government referred to the Court’s view, expressed in the Grand Chamber judgment in Radomilja and Others, that the temporal element was of central importance for acquiring ownership by adverse possession and that the later addition of a period amounting to more than fifty years to the factual basis of the complaint had therefore to be seen as changing the substance of that complaint (see Radomilja and Others, cited above, § 132).

73. The Government argued that the same should apply to the proceedings before the Croatian Supreme Court and that the applicant’s reliance on Trgo at as late a stage as in his appeal on points of law should be seen as changing the substance on his initial (counter)claim. That remedy had not allowed the parties to change their unsuccessful legal strategy and obtain a new judgment from the Supreme Court on entirely different legal grounds.

74. If the period between 1941 and 1991 was excluded, as argued above, it still could not be said that the applicant’s claim to be declared the owner of the property in dispute had a sufficient basis in national law and that it amounted to a “possession” attracting the guarantees of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In this regard the Government in essence referred to the same reasons for which the Grand Chamber had found that Article inapplicable in Radomilja and Others (cited above, §§ 144-151).

75. The Government then went on to argue that the applicant’s claim did not have a sufficient basis in national law in any case (that is, even if the said fifty-year period was taken into account). In particular, while in Trgo it had not been disputed that the applicant had been in continuous possession in good faith since 1953 (see Trgo, § 48), that was not so in the present case. In this regard the Government referred to the arguments of the Rijeka Township advanced in the civil proceedings in question (see paragraphs 15?16 above).

76. Moreover, the Government noted that the sale and purchase agreement and the deed of gift of 12 January 1972 had indicated both the cadastral number and the surface area of each of the then two plots of land owned by the applicant’s father (see paragraph 14 above). It was thus difficult to believe that the applicant and his father had not noticed that they were actually in possession of an area of land that was considerably larger in surface than that which was indicated in those documents (see paragraph 21 above).

77. The Government furthermore referred to domestic practice, according to which a party opposing a possessor’s action to acquire ownership by adverse possession was not required to prove the possessor’s bad faith and rebut the statutory presumption of good faith (see section 159(3) of the 1996 Property Act in paragraph 49 above) if from the possessor’s own testimony it followed that his or her possession had been in bad faith (see paragraphs 13 and 58 above).

78. Lastly, they pointed out that the applicant and his father had participated in several cadastral surveys in the area over the years – notably the one conducted in 1986 (see paragraphs 16 and 18 above) – and thus could not have remained unaware that the disputed parts that they had been occupying were not in their ownership. Given that knowledge, their possession of those parts could not have been in good faith (see paragraph 54 above).

(ii) The applicant

79. The applicant submitted that in his counterclaim and throughout the proceedings before the domestic courts he had consistently argued that he and his legal predecessors had been in lawful and continuous possession in good faith of the property in dispute for more than eighty years. He thus contested the Government’s argument that those courts could not have taken the period between 1941 and 1991 into account (see paragraph 67 above).

80. To the Government’s argument that he had not relied on the original version of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act (see paragraph 65 above) the applicant replied that he had not been required to do so because, owing to the principle of iura novit curia, civil courts were not bound by the legal arguments of parties.

81. As regards the Government’s remaining arguments, the applicant stressed that what his father had bought from Ms O.B. was in reality a single land unit that had from all sides been bounded by a dry stone wall. She had been the actual owner of all the land within those bounds, regardless of the fact that, as it turned out, it had formally stretched over several cadastral plots and that some of that land had been formally recorded in the land register as socially owned property.

82. The applicant and his father had believed that this discrepancy between the actual situation on the one hand and the situation recorded in the cadastre and the land register on the other hand had been rectified in 1963 (see paragraph 13 above). That belief had been perpetuated by the fact that before 2006 (see paragraph 10 above) no one had contested their right to possess the land within those bounds or called into question their good faith and the continuous nature of their possession.

83. The fact that Rijeka Township pro forma had disputed the uninterrupted character of their possession and their good faith (see paragraphs 15-16 above) should not have been of any relevance in the light of the evidence taken in the domestic proceedings (see paragraphs 19?20 and 28-29 above). The applicant pointed out that under domestic law Rijeka Township had borne the burden of proving that his and his father’s possession had not been in good faith (under section 18(5) of the 1996 Property Act – see paragraph 49 above) and that it had not been continuous.

84. The applicant concluded that he had ex lege acquired the ownership of the property in dispute on the basis of the original version of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act, before that provision had been invalidated by the Constitutional Court in 1999.

(b) The Court’s assessment

85. The Court reiterates that an applicant may allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his or her “possessions” within the meaning of that provision (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 35, ECHR 2004?IX).

86. Even though that Article does not guarantee the right to acquire property, its application is not limited to “existing possessions”. It also extends to “assets”, including claims in respect of which an applicant can argue that he or she has at least a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining effective enjoyment of a property right (ibid., § 35). Such expectations will arise only in respect of claims for which there is a sufficient basis in national law – that is, in respect of claims which are sufficiently established as to be enforceable (see Stran Greek Refineries and Stratis Andreadis v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 59, Series A no. 301?B, and Kopecký, cited above, §§ 49 and 52).

87. In the present case the applicant argued that he had acquired ownership of the property in dispute by adverse possession. Under Croatian law, ownership will be acquired by adverse possession ipso jure when all statutory conditions are met (see paragraph 50 above). However, in reality the question of whether the possessors satisfied the statutory conditions for acquiring ownership by adverse possession must be determined in proceedings before civil courts, because possessors need a declaratory judgment acknowledging their ownership in order to be able to effectively enjoy their property. The Court therefore considers that the proprietary interest relied on by the applicant in the present case was in the nature of a claim and cannot be characterised as an “existing possession” within the meaning of the Court’s case-law (see Trgo, cited above, § 46).

88. The Court must therefore examine whether that claim had a sufficient basis in national law. However, before doing so, it must address a preliminary issue.

(i) Preliminary issue

89. The Government argued that the period between 1941 and 1991 should not be taken into account when assessing the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the present case (see paragraph 67-74 above).

90. In this regard it is to be noted that from the very beginning of the civil proceedings in question the applicant alleged that he, and his father before him, had been in continuous and uninterrupted possession of the disputed parts since 1955 (see paragraphs 12-14 above). Moreover, the age and testimony of all the witnesses heard in the first round of the proceedings before the Rijeka Municipal Court suggest that they had been called by the applicant to corroborate those factual allegations – namely to testify that he and his father had indeed been in the possession of the property in dispute since 1955 (see paragraph 19 above).

91. Only after the adoption of the first-instance judgment of 22 April 2011 (see paragraph 22 above) did it become clear that the Municipal Court was not going to take the period between 1941 and 1991 into account in calculating the time necessary for acquiring ownership by adverse possession. Accordingly, the applicant changed his legal strategy and in his appeal against that judgment (see paragraph 26 above) submitted two alternative arguments, which he pursued in the second round of the proceedings before the first- and the second-instance courts (see paragraphs 28-34 above). Specifically, he argued (a) that it had to be established when the two plots of land owned by Rijeka Township, including the disputed parts, had passed into social ownership, and (b) that the periods of time that elapsed before the passing of those two plots into social ownership and after 1991 should be combined (see paragraph 26 above). That is why in the second round of the proceedings before the Rijeka Municipal Court he called older witnesses (see paragraphs 28-29 above) who, given their age, could, in his view, testify that his legal predecessors had been in the long-term possession of the property in question even before the 1960s, when, to his knowledge, the land in the area had passed into social ownership (see paragraph 26 above).

92. Once these alternative arguments failed, the applicant changed his legal strategy again and in his extraordinary appeal on points of law relied on the Court’s judgment in the Trgo case (see paragraph 35 above).

93. There is nothing to suggest that the applicant was not allowed to do so under domestic law. The Court also notes that under the Civil Procedure Act civil courts are not bound by the legal arguments of parties (see paragraph 60 above).

94. Furthermore, it seems evident that the purpose of the applicant relying on the grounds cited in his extraordinary appeal on points of law (see paragraphs 35 and 61 above) was to bring domestic case-law into line with that of the Court. If the Government’s argument were to be accepted, then parties to civil proceedings would, for example, not be able to rely in extraordinary appeals on points of law on the Court’s judgment that became final shortly after the adoption of the second-instance decision in their particular case. That would have frustrated the very purpose of such grounds of appeal.

95. Contrary to the Government’s argument (see paragraphs 72-73 above), the applicant’s reliance on Trgo in his appeal on points of law did not entail a change in the factual basis of his (counter)claim which, as established above, did not exclude the period between 1941 and 1991.

96. Had the Supreme Court considered that the factual basis of the applicant’s (counter)claim did not encompass this period, it is reasonable to assume that this would have been reflected in its decision on the applicant’s extraordinary appeal on points of law. That court declared the remedy in question inadmissible after giving detailed reasons as to why the applicant’s case had to be distinguished from Trgo (see paragraphs 38-39 above). Absent from those reasons was the applicant’s alleged non-reliance on the period between 1941 and 1991 and on the original version of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act.

97. The Court also notes that the Constitutional Court endorsed the reasoning of the Supreme Court (see paragraph 41 above).

98. Lastly, as regards the Government’s argument that the view expressed in the Grand Chamber judgment in Radomilja and Others should apply by analogy to the proceedings before the Croatian Supreme Court in the present case (see paragraphs 72-73 above), the Court notes that the situations in the two cases are not comparable. In this regard it is sufficient to note that the Grand Chamber in Radomilja and Others did not take into account the period between 6 April 1941 and 8 October 1991 because the applicants in their observations before the Chamber had expressly excluded it from the factual and legal basis of their complaints. However, in the present case the applicant had not excluded that period at all, let alone expressly, from the factual or legal basis of his counterclaim in the proceedings before the first- and the second-instance courts (see paragraphs 90-91 above).

99. In view of the above, the Court cannot accept the Government’s argument that the period between 1941 and 1991 should be excluded when assessing applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the present case.

(ii) Whether the applicant’s claim had a sufficient basis in national law

100. The Court firstly notes that the property in dispute was in social ownership on 8 October 1991 (see paragraph 23 above). During the socialist regime and up until that date it was not possible to acquire ownership of socially owned property by adverse possession (see paragraphs 5 and 45 above).

101. Section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act, which entered into force on 1 January 1997, provided that the period prior to 8 October 1991 was to be included in calculating the time-limit necessary for acquiring ownership of such property by adverse possession (see paragraphs 7 and 51 above). By a decision of 17 November 1999, which came into effect on 14 December 1999, the Constitutional Court invalidated that provision as unconstitutional (see paragraph 9 above).

102. However, the effects which that provision produced while it was in force remained because under Croatian law the Constitutional Court’s decisions invalidating primary legislation (statutes) have only ex nunc effect (see paragraph 63 above).

103. According to the view taken by the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court in the present case the circumstances of this case were different from those in Trgo, where Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 had been found to be applicable (see paragraphs 38-39 and 41 above). They considered that this was so because the applicant in the instant case had lodged his counterclaim on 11 April 2007 – that is to say, after section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act in its original version was no longer in force (see paragraphs 7, 9 and 12 and 51 above).

104. In this regard the Court reiterates its findings in the Trgo case:

“46. The Court notes that under Croatian law ownership will, in principle, be acquired by adverse possession ipso jure when all statutory conditions are met ...

...

48. It would appear from the findings of the domestic courts [...] that it was uncontested that the applicant and his mother had been in exclusive and continuous possession in good faith of the property in question since 1953, that is for more than forty years, and that he had thus already in 1993 met the statutory conditions for acquiring ownership by adverse possession. It may therefore be inferred that the applicant, on the basis of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act, ex lege became the owner of the land at issue on 1 January 1997 when the Act entered into force. That provision remained in force until the Constitutional Court abrogated it almost three years later. The Court thus considers that the applicant’s claim had a sufficient basis in national law to qualify as an “asset” protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.”

105. These findings suggest that the date on which the applicant in Trgo had brought a civil action was irrelevant for establishing whether his claim to be declared the owner of property by adverse possession could qualify as an “asset” protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Rather, what was important was whether the ownership of the property in question had been vested in him by operation of law at the time when the original version of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act had still been in force (see paragraphs 7, 9 and 50-51 above).

106. This view – that the time at which a civil action is brought is irrelevant for acquiring ownership by adverse possession on the basis of the original version of section 388(4) of the 1996 Property Act – is in line with what by now seems to be the well-established case-law of the Supreme Court (see paragraphs 54-55 above).

107. In this regard it cannot but be noted that the Supreme Court’s decision in the applicant’s case was not in line with that case-law. More specifically, it contradicts the decision of the same court in a similar case adopted a year earlier (see paragraph 54 above) and with several decisions in similar cases adopted within a month of the decision in the applicant’s case (see paragraph 55 above).

108. It follows that the factual differences which the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court cited when distinguishing the present case from Trgo are irrelevant for determining the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in the instant case.

109. Unlike the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court in the applicant’s case, the Government did not even attempt to argue that the time at which the applicant’s counterclaim had been lodged was relevant for the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Rather, they contended that, unlike in Trgo where the findings of the domestic courts suggested that the applicant and his mother had been in continuous possession of the property in question in good faith for the required period of time, those statutory requirements had not been met in the present case (see paragraphs 75-78 above).

110. Whether the applicant and his predecessors had met those statutory requirements for acquiring ownership by adverse possession had in the present case indeed been disputed domestically by Rijeka Township (see paragraphs 15-16 above).

111. The Court reiterates that, in principle, it cannot be said that an applicant has a sufficiently established claim amounting to an “asset” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 where the question of whether or not he or she complied with the statutory requirements is to be determined in judicial proceedings and the courts ultimately find that this was not the case (see, for example, Kopecký, cited above, §§ 50 and 58).

112. The Court furthermore reiterates that it is not its task to take the place of the domestic courts, which are in the best position to assess the evidence before them, establish facts and interpret domestic law (see, for example, Khamidov v. Russia, no. 72118/01, § 170, 15 November 2007). It has emphasised that, when it comes to establishing the facts, it is sensitive to the subsidiary nature of its role, and that it must be cautious in taking on the role of a first-instance tribunal of fact, where this is not rendered unavoidable by the circumstances (see, for example, B?rbulescu v. Romania [GC], no. 61496/08, § 129, ECHR 2017 (extracts)).

113. In the present case the domestic courts took the evidence relevant for establishing whether the applicant and his predecessors had possessed the property in dispute continuously and in good faith in the period between 1941 and 1991. However, those courts did not assess that evidence and establish the relevant facts with a view to reaching a conclusion as to whether those statutory requirements for acquiring ownership by adverse possession had been satisfied in the applicant’s case. That was so because the courts were of the view that the fifty-year period in question could not be taken into account in calculating the time necessary for acquiring ownership of socially owned property by adverse possession.

114. Their view is contrary to the Court’s judgment in the Trgo case (see Trgo, cited above, §§ 54-68) and to the above-mentioned case-law of the Supreme Court (see paragraphs 54-55).

115. Since under the Court’s case-law Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 applies only to those claims for which there is a sufficient basis in national law (see paragraphs 86-88 above), the examination by the domestic courts of whether the applicant and his legal predecessors had satisfied the statutory requirements for acquiring ownership by adverse possession in the period between 6 April 1941 and 8 October 1991 was important for determining whether that Article is applicable to the present case.

116. In the absence of the relevant findings by the domestic courts, the principle of subsidiarity requires the Court to make those findings itself for the purposes of establishing whether the applicant’s claim had a sufficient basis in national law. The need for the Court to take on this role in the present case is further supported by the principle that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, like the Convention as a whole, must be interpreted in such a way as to guarantee rights that are practical and effective, not theoretical or illusory (see, among many other authorities, Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 114, 25 October 2012). It would run contrary to that principle to hold that the applicant’s claim did not have a sufficient basis in national law merely because the domestic courts failed to examine whether the relevant statutory requirements were satisfied – especially in a situation where their failure to do so was based on a view which was contrary to the Court’s case-law.

117. In the Court’s view, the evidence gathered by the domestic courts, together with the relevant statutory provisions of the domestic law, is enough to conclude that the applicant’s claim to be declared the owner of the property in dispute had a sufficient basis in national law.

118. In particular, the Court notes that in the absence of the relevant findings by the domestic courts the applicant can rely on the statutory presumption that property is possessed in good faith (see section 18(5) of the 1996 Property Act cited in paragraph 49 above). It further notes that, save for one witness who knew nothing of the matter, all the remaining six witnesses heard in the domestic proceedings testified that the disputed parts had been in the possession of the applicant’s family since 1955 and, before that, in the possession of Ms O.B., and that no one had ever contested their ownership of those parts (see paragraphs 19 and 28-29 above). This was confirmed by several members of the Council of the Local Board of Pehlin in the letter of 12 May 2009 (see paragraph 20 above).

119. The Court therefore concludes that the applicant’s claim to be declared the owner of the property in dispute had a sufficient basis in national law and that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is therefore applicable.

120. It follows that the Government’s objection based on the inapplicability of that Article must be dismissed.

121. The Court finds it important to emphasise that this finding is without prejudice to a possible future finding by the domestic courts (see paragraph 139 below) that the applicant’s and his predecessors’ possession was not continuous and in good faith and that therefore he did not acquire ownership of the property in dispute by adverse possession. It merely means that, for the Court, given the relevant statutory provisions of the domestic law and the evidence taken domestically, his claim had a sufficient basis in national law to attract the guarantees of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, it being understood that this Article applies to such claims as well, and not only to “existing possessions” (see paragraph 86 above).

Exhaustion of domestic remedies
(a) The parties’ arguments

(i) The Government

122. The Government submitted that, while the applicant in his constitutional complaint had formally stated that a number of his constitutional rights had been violated, it was clear from its content that he had only complained of a violation of his right of access to the Supreme Court (see paragraph 40 above). Specifically, in his constitutional complaint the applicant had complained that even though he had met all the formal requirements for lodging an extraordinary appeal on points of law and had argued that the existing case-law had to be revisited in the light of the Court’s judgment in Trgo, the Supreme Court had nevertheless declared his appeal on points of law inadmissible.

123. In the alternative, the Government argued that the applicant should have sought restitution of the disputed land by instituting administrative proceedings under the Restitution Act (see paragraph 64 above).

(ii) The applicant

124. The applicant replied that he had used all available remedies. In particular, he submitted that he could not have instituted the relevant proceedings suggested by the Government because he could not have been considered a former owner under the Restitution Act (see paragraph 64 above), since neither he nor his father had ever been registered as the owners of the property in dispute.

(b) The Court’s assessment

125. As regards the Government’s argument that the applicant in his constitutional complaint had essentially complained only of a breach of his right of access to the Supreme Court (see paragraph 122 above), the Court finds it sufficient to note that the applicant relied on the relevant Article of the Croatian Constitution guaranteeing the right of ownership and that he adduced rather intricate arguments based on three Court judgments adopted in cases similar to his, which all concerned the application of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraph 40 above).

126. As regards the Government’s argument that the applicant should have instituted the relevant proceedings under the Restitution Act, the Court considers that this remedy has essentially the same purpose as the applicant’s counterclaim lodged in the civil proceedings complained of (see paragraph 12 above), it being understood that when one remedy has been attempted, the use of another remedy that has essentially the same purpose is not required in order for the applicants to comply with their obligation to exhaust domestic remedies under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention (see Kozac?o?lu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, §§ 44 et seq., 19 February 2009, and Micallef v. Malta [GC], no. 17056/06, § 58, ECHR 2009).

127. It follows that the Government’s objections concerning the non?exhaustion of domestic remedies must also be dismissed.

Conclusion as regards admissibility
128. The Court furthermore notes that this complaint is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
The parties’ arguments
(a) The applicant

129. The applicant firstly submitted that no third parties had ever acquired or claimed any rights in respect of the property in dispute. He then reiterated his argument, which he had raised before the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court, that the first- and the second-instance judgments in his case had been contrary to the Court’s judgment in Trgo (see paragraphs 35 and 40 above) and, as such, in breach of his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions.

(b) The Government

130. The Government argued that if the Court were to accept that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention was applicable in the present case – and that, consequently, the Rijeka Municipal Court judgment (see paragraph 31 above) constituted an interference with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions – then the interference in question had been justified. In particular, it had been lawful, as it had been based on the amended text of section 388 of the 1996 Property Act (in particular, its paragraph 4) and on the relevant provisions of the 1811 Civil Code (see paragraphs 43 and 52 above). The interference in question had also been in the public (general) interest and had been proportionate.

The Court’s assessment
131. The Court has already found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in a case raising similar issues as the present one (see Trgo, cited above, §§ 54-68).

132. Having examined all the material submitted to it, the Court considers that the Government have not put forward any fact or argument capable of persuading it to reach a different conclusion in the present case.

133. In particular, and without prejudice to a possible future finding to the contrary by the domestic courts (see paragraph 139 below), there is no indication, and nor did the Government submit, that anyone apart from Rijeka Township acquired any rights over the property in dispute, or that any party except the applicant (or his predecessors) ever claimed any rights in respect of that property. Therefore, it would seem that the concerns that prompted the Constitutional Court to invalidate section 388(4) of 1996 Property Act (see paragraph 9 above) were not present in the applicant’s case. That provision was invalidated in order to protect the rights of third parties, whereas the applicant’s case did not seem to involve any such rights (see Trgo, cited above, § 66).

134. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
135. The applicant complained that the domestic courts’ decision to shift to him the burden of proving when the property in dispute had been transferred into social ownership, even though the relevant records (the land register) had been destroyed, had been in breach of his right of access to a court, as guaranteed by Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:

“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ... everyone is entitled to a ... ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”

136. Having regard to the facts of the case, the submissions of the parties and its findings under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraphs 65-134 above), the Court considers that it has examined the main legal question raised by the present application and that it is not necessary to examine the admissibility and merits of this remaining complaint (see, for example, Centre for Legal Resources on behalf of Valentin Câmpeanu v. Romania [GC], no. 47848/08, § 156, ECHR 2014, and Kamil Uzun v. Turkey, no. 37410/97, § 64, 10 May 2007).

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
137. Article 41 of the Convention provides:

“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”

138. The Court reiterates that a judgment in which it finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to that breach and to make reparation for its consequences. If national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, §§ 32-33, ECHR 2000-XI). In this regard the Court notes that the applicant can now lodge a request under section 428a of the Civil Procedure Act (see paragraph 62 above) with the Rijeka Municipal Court for the reopening of the above-mentioned civil proceedings, in respect of which the Court has found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

139. Given the nature of the applicant’s complaint and the reasons for which it has found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court considers that in the present case the most appropriate way of affording redress would be to reopen the proceedings complained of in due course (see Trgo, cited above, § 75).

140. Having regard to the foregoing and given that the applicant’s representative did not submit a claim for just satisfaction, the Court considers that there is no call to award the applicant any sum on that account.

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT[, UNANIMOUSLY,]

Declares, by a majority, the complaint concerning the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions admissible;
Holds, by five votes to two, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds, unanimously, that it is not necessary to examine the admissibility and merits of the complaint under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 16 December 2021, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.

{signature_p_2}

Renata Degener Péter Paczolay
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE

CASO GRBAC c. CROAZIA

(Domanda n. 64795/19 )


GIUDIZIO
Art. 1 P1 - Godimento pacifico del possesso - Rigetto da parte dei tribunali nazionali della rivendicazione del ricorrente della proprietà ex lege di beni di proprietà sociale attraverso il possesso avverso a causa di un'azione civile intentata dopo l'invalidazione da parte della Corte costituzionale della disposizione legale che permetteva tali rivendicazioni - Conclusioni contrarie alla giurisprudenza interna e alla sentenza della Corte Trgo v. Croazia - Conseguente mancata valutazione delle prove e mancato accertamento dei fatti in merito alla sussistenza dei requisiti di legge per tale proprietà - Rivendicazione del ricorrente sufficientemente fondata nel diritto nazionale - Art. 1 P1 applicabile - Conclusioni della sentenza Trgo applicabili: conseguenze di un errore dell'autorità statale - emanazione di una normativa incostituzionale - a carico dello Stato e non del singolo - Nessuna indicazione di diritti di terzi lesi



STRASBURGO

16 dicembre 2021



Questa sentenza diventerà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Grbac c. Croazia,

La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (prima sezione), riunita in sezione composta da:

Péter Paczolay, Presidente,
Ksenija Turkovi?,
Alena Polá?ková,
Erik Wennerström,
Raffaele Sabato,
Lorena Schembri Orland,
Ioannis Ktistakis, giudici,
e Renata Degener, cancelliere di sezione,

visto:

il ricorso (n. 64795/19) contro la Repubblica di Croazia presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da un cittadino croato, il signor Milutin Grbac ("il ricorrente"), il 2 dicembre 2019;

la decisione di notificare al governo croato ("il governo") le denunce relative all'accesso alla giustizia e al diritto di proprietà;

le osservazioni delle parti;

avendo deliberato in privato il 16 novembre 2021,

emette la seguente sentenza, adottata in tale data:

INTRODUZIONE

1. La causa riguarda una controversia immobiliare tra la ricorrente e le autorità locali. Il ricorrente sosteneva di aver acquisito ex lege la proprietà di alcune parti di appezzamenti di terreno per possesso avverso, in quanto lui e i suoi predecessori legali avevano posseduto tali parti per più di ottanta anni.

I FATTI

2. Il ricorrente è nato nel 1949 e vive a Rijeka. Era rappresentato dall'avvocato K. Lan?a, che esercita a Opatija.

3. Il governo era rappresentato dal suo agente, la signora Š. Stažnik.

4. I fatti della causa, come presentati dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.

CONTESTO DEL CASO
5. La legislazione dell'ex Jugoslavia, in particolare la sezione 29 della legge sulla proprietà di base del 1980 (si veda il successivo paragrafo 45), vietava l'acquisizione della proprietà di beni di proprietà sociale per possesso avverso (dosjelost).

6. Al momento dell'incorporazione della legge sulla proprietà di base del 1980 nell'ordinamento giuridico croato, l'8 ottobre 1991, il Parlamento ha abrogato la suddetta disposizione (cfr. paragrafo 47 infra).

7. Successivamente, la nuova legge sulla proprietà del 1996, entrata in vigore il 1° gennaio 1997, ha previsto all'articolo 388 che il periodo precedente all'8 ottobre 1991 fosse incluso nel calcolo del termine pertinente per l'acquisizione della proprietà per possesso inverso di beni immobili di proprietà sociale (cfr. paragrafo 51 infra).

8. A seguito di diverse petizioni di revisione costituzionale astratta (prijedlog za ocjenu ustavnosti) presentate da ex proprietari di immobili che erano stati appropriati sotto il regime socialista, l'8 luglio 1999 la Corte costituzionale (Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske) ha accettato l'iniziativa e ha deciso di avviare un procedimento di revisione della costituzionalità dell'articolo 388, paragrafo 4, della legge sulla proprietà del 1996.

9. Con una decisione del 17 novembre 1999, la Corte costituzionale ha invalidato con effetto ex nunc l'articolo 388 della legge sulla proprietà del 1996. Essa ha ritenuto che la disposizione impugnata avesse un effetto retroattivo, con conseguenze negative per i diritti di terzi (principalmente coloro che, in base alla legislazione sulla restituzione, avevano diritto alla restituzione dei beni appropriati durante il regime socialista), ed era quindi incostituzionale (per la parte rilevante della decisione della Corte costituzionale si veda Trgo c. Croazia, no. 35298/04, § 17, 11 giugno 2009). La decisione della Corte costituzionale è entrata in vigore il 14 dicembre 1999, quando è stata pubblicata nella Gazzetta ufficiale.

PROCEDIMENTO CIVILE NEL CASO DELLA RICORRENTE
10. Il 27 novembre 2006 la Città di Fiume notificò al ricorrente che egli occupava illegalmente due parti di lotti di terreno di proprietà della Città. Tali parti erano situate all'interno di un'area recintata di terreno adiacente all'abitazione del ricorrente (in prosieguo: la "piccola azienda agricola del ricorrente").

11 . Il 19 marzo 2007 il Comune di Rijeka ha intentato un'azione civile contro il ricorrente presso il Tribunale municipale di Fiume ( Op?inski sud u Rijeci ) chiedendo al tribunale di ordinargli di consegnare le parti controverse in possesso del Comune. Il Comune asseriva che il ricorrente, proprietario di due lotti adiacenti, aveva illegalmente annesso parti dei due appezzamenti di terreno limitrofi (di seguito “le parti contese” o “la proprietà controversa”) di proprietà del Comune.

12 . L'11 aprile 2007 il ricorrente si è costituito parte civile e ha presentato una domanda riconvenzionale chiedendo al tribunale di emettere una sentenza dichiarativa che stabilisse che egli era il proprietario delle parti contestate, che asseriva di aver acquisito per possesso avverso. Egli sosteneva (a) che tutto il terreno all'interno della sua piccola proprietà era stato acquistato da suo padre nel 1955 da una certa signora O.B. per mezzo di un contratto orale di compravendita, e (b) che le parti contestate presumibilmente appartenenti alla città di Rijeka erano sempre state parte della sua piccola proprietà perché erano situate all'interno dell'area racchiusa da un vecchio muro a secco che circondava la sua proprietà.

Il ricorrente ha anche dichiarato che nel 1955 suo padre e O.B. non sapevano che la proprietà che era stata oggetto del loro contratto di compravendita era formalmente (come registrato nel registro fondiario e nel catasto) costituita da diversi lotti di terreno. Nel 1963 suo padre si era reso conto che una parte di quella proprietà non era stata formalmente di proprietà di O.B. ma che era stata registrata nel catasto come proprietà sociale. Tuttavia, suo padre aveva creduto che questa situazione fosse stata completamente regolata da una decisione della cosiddetta Commissione di Usurpazione del 27 aprile 1963, con la quale un appezzamento di terreno che fino ad allora era stato registrato nel catasto come proprietà sociale era stato registrato a nome di suo padre.
14 . Il ricorrente spiegava inoltre che nel 1972 suo padre aveva voluto cedergli con atto di donazione la proprietà che aveva acquistato da OB. Tuttavia, in quel momento si erano accorti che un terreno – che faceva parte di tale proprietà – era ancora censito nel registro fondiario a nome di OB. Per rimediare a ciò il ricorrente aveva concluso il 12 gennaio 1972 un contratto scritto di compravendita con il quale OB gli aveva venduto quel terreno (che suo padre aveva in realtà già acquistato da lei e preso possesso nel 1955 – ciò era espressamente menzionato nel contratto ). Lo stesso giorno il padre del ricorrente aveva trasferito un altro terreno (che faceva parte di tale proprietà ) nella proprietà del ricorrente mediante atto di donazione. Questi due appezzamenti furono fusi nel 1986 in un unico appezzamento e registrati come tali nel registro fondiario sotto il nome del richiedente.

15 In risposta, Rijeka Township sosteneva che, per ammissione della stessa ricorrente, il padre di quest'ultima aveva già saputo nel 1963 che ciò che aveva acquistato da O.B. non era stato di sua proprietà (cfr. paragrafo 13 sopra). Inoltre, non era chiaro come suo padre potesse credere che la discrepanza tra la situazione reale e lo stato della proprietà nel catasto fosse stata risolta da una decisione della Commissione di Usurpazione, che aveva solo trasferito nella sua proprietà il terreno che era stato in suo possesso in quel momento. Da questa decisione si doveva trarre una conclusione contraria, cioè che le parti contestate non erano state in possesso del padre del ricorrente, perché altrimenti sarebbero state trasferite anche nella sua proprietà.
16 La città di Rijeka ha inoltre affermato che nel 1986 le autorità catastali avevano condotto un'indagine nella zona, il cui scopo era quello di aggiornare e consolidare il catasto in modo da riflettere la situazione reale. Se il ricorrente fosse stato in possesso delle parti contestate all'epoca, sarebbe stato creato un nuovo lotto e sarebbe stato registrato come suo possessore nel catasto. Il Comune ha quindi sostenuto che il ricorrente non era stato in possesso delle parti contestate prima del 1986, ma che le aveva occupate dopo. Poiché, a loro avviso, dalla sua domanda riconvenzionale risultava che lui e suo padre avevano saputo che quelle parti non erano state loro (vedi paragrafi 13-14 sopra), il ricorrente e suo padre non avevano detenuto quelle parti in buona fede. Ciò significava che secondo il diritto interno il ricorrente non avrebbe potuto diventare proprietario di quelle parti per possesso avverso (ai sensi dell'articolo 159 del Property Act del 1996 - si veda il paragrafo 50 di seguito).

17. Nel corso del procedimento di primo grado, il Tribunale municipale ascoltò il ricorrente e tre testimoni da lui chiamati, effettuò un sopralluogo, ordinò una relazione di un perito e consultò vari documenti (tra cui la lettera del 12 maggio 2009 - si veda il paragrafo 20 qui sotto).

18. Nella sua testimonianza il ricorrente ha dichiarato di non aver saputo che le parti contestate non erano state coperte dal contratto di compravendita tra suo padre e O.B. (cfr. paragrafo 13 supra) perché l'oggetto della vendita era stato effettivamente un unico pezzo di terreno racchiuso da un muro a secco. Rispondendo a una domanda posta dal rappresentante del querelante ha anche dichiarato:

"Sono consapevole che nel 1985 e 1986 le autorità catastali stavano rilevando i terreni nella zona ... e che sono stato invitato a commentare. Gli impiegati del catasto mi dissero che stavano facendo un consolidamento [del catasto] e che il mio terreno era troppo grande e doveva essere ridotto e mi chiesero di firmare alcuni documenti. Ho firmato quei [documenti] ma ho detto loro che mio padre mi aveva lasciato quel [terreno] come regalo. Loro [hanno risposto] che tutto ciò era comunque di proprietà sociale e che io ero solo il beneficiario del terreno in questione. Non ho letto esattamente ciò che ho firmato in quell'occasione".

19. Tutti e tre i testimoni (due dei quali nati nel 1944 e uno nel 1947) testimoniarono che le parti contestate erano in possesso della famiglia della ricorrente dal 1955 e prima ancora in possesso della signora O.B., e che nessuno aveva mai contestato la loro proprietà di quelle parti.

20. Ciò fu confermato anche in una lettera del 12 maggio 2009 alla città di Fiume da parte del Consiglio del Consiglio locale di Pehlin (Vije?e Mjesnog odbora Pehlin). La parte rilevante di tale lettera, firmata da quattro consiglieri, recitava come segue:

"La maggioranza dei membri del Consiglio locale di Pehlin sono nati a Fiume e risiedono permanentemente a Pehlin dalla loro nascita. Essi sanno che le [parti] contestate sono state a lungo in possesso della famiglia Grbac - prima in possesso del defunto Milan Grbac e poi, dopo un trasferimento per atto di donazione, in possesso di suo figlio Milutin Grbac.

Prima che la famiglia Grbac entrasse in possesso [della proprietà in questione], [essa] era stata a lungo in possesso della defunta signora O.B.

L'esattezza delle nostre affermazioni è rilevabile dalla perizia del Tribunale Municipale di Fiume del 7 febbraio 1972, che corrisponde alla situazione reale.

Suggeriamo quindi che la municipalità di Fiume tenga conto di queste dichiarazioni nell'ulteriore corso del procedimento in questo caso."

21. La perizia stabilì che la ricorrente era in possesso di 98 mq del lotto n. 388/1, nonché di 832 mq del lotto n. 388/593; entrambi i lotti erano registrati nel registro fondiario come di proprietà della Città di Fiume. Nessuna delle parti si è opposta alla perizia.

22. Con una sentenza del 22 aprile 2011, il Tribunale municipale di Fiume si pronunciò a favore della Città di Fiume e ordinò al ricorrente di consegnare le parti controverse in possesso della Città. Allo stesso tempo, il tribunale ha respinto la domanda riconvenzionale presentata dal ricorrente (cfr. paragrafo 12) per essere dichiarato proprietario.

23. Il tribunale stabilì, in primo luogo, che i due appezzamenti in questione (si veda il paragrafo 21 supra) erano, alla data dell'8 ottobre 1991, in proprietà sociale e che, ai sensi della legislazione pertinente, non era stato possibile acquisire la proprietà di tali beni per possesso avverso (si veda il paragrafo 52 supra) a meno che i requisiti di legge per farlo fossero stati soddisfatti entro il 6 aprile 1941 o dopo l'8 ottobre 1991.

24. Tuttavia, tutti i testimoni chiamati dal ricorrente e ascoltati dal tribunale erano troppo giovani (si veda il paragrafo 19 supra) per sapere se i suoi predecessori fossero stati in possesso della proprietà in questione prima del 6 aprile 1941. Di conseguenza, il ricorrente non aveva dimostrato che i requisiti di legge per l'acquisizione della proprietà per possesso avverso fossero stati soddisfatti prima di tale data.

25 . Il periodo dall'8 ottobre 1991 al 27 novembre 2006 (quando il comune di Rijeka aveva notificato al ricorrente che la proprietà in causa non gli era appartenuta – si veda il paragrafo 10 supra) era stato troppo breve perché i beni immobili di proprietà delle autorità locali potevano essere acquistati da possesso sfavorevole solo dopo quarant'anni (ai sensi della sezione 159(4) del Property Act del 1996 – si veda il paragrafo 50 di seguito).

26 . Il ricorrente ha presentato ricorso. Nel suo ricorso sosteneva che il divieto di acquisire la proprietà dei beni sociali per usurpazione era esistito dal momento in cui il bene in questione era passato in proprietà sociale fino all'8 ottobre 1991. Occorreva quindi conoscere quando i due lotti di terreno attualmente di proprietà del comune di Rijeka (paragrafo 21) erano stati trasferiti in proprietà sociale – un fatto che il tribunale municipale non aveva stabilito. Per quanto ne sapeva, la terra nell'area era passata alla proprietà sociale solo negli anni '60. Il ricorrente ha anche sostenuto che il periodo prima che un bene fosse stato trasferito nella proprietà sociale e il periodo successivo all'8 l'ottobre 1991 doveva essere combinato nel calcolo del tempo necessario per acquisire la proprietà di tali beni per possessione avversa.

27. Con decisione dell'8 maggio 2013, il tribunale distrettuale di Fiume ( Županijski sud u Rijeci ) ha accolto il ricorso del ricorrente, ha annullato la sentenza di primo grado del 22 aprile 2011 (paragrafo 22 supra) per incompletezza dei fatti e ha rinviato la causa per nuova considerazione. Accettò l'argomento del richiedente che era necessario accertare quando i due lotti di proprietà del Comune di Rijeka erano passati in proprietà sociale.

28 . Nel nuovo procedimento, il 21 gennaio 2014, il tribunale municipale di Fiume ha ascoltato due ulteriori testimoni (nati rispettivamente nel 1933 e nel 1940) chiamati dal ricorrente che attestavano che le parti controverse erano state situate all'interno dell'area di terreno delimitata da una pietra a secco muro (vedi paragrafo 18 supra); hanno inoltre testimoniato che quell'area di terreno era stata in possesso a lungo termine della (e apparteneva alla) sig.ra MO e alla sua famiglia per molti anni prima che essa l'avesse venduta al padre della ricorrente nel 1955.

29. Il 7 febbraio 2014 furono ascoltati altri due testimoni (che all'epoca avevano rispettivamente ottantadue e ottantatré anni). La deposizione resa dal primo di questi testimoni riecheggiava quella dei due testimoni summenzionati (cfr. paragrafo 28), mentre il secondo non sapeva nulla della questione.
30. In risposta a una richiesta di informazioni presentata dal tribunale, il 24 aprile 2014 la sua divisione catastale l'ha informata che dai dati del registro fondiario era impossibile discernere quando i due lotti in questione (cfr. paragrafo 21 sopra) su cui si trovavano le parti di terreno contestate erano passati in proprietà sociale perché il vecchio foglio del registro fondiario contenente tali informazioni era stato danneggiato.
31 . Con una sentenza del 17 giugno 2014, il tribunale municipale si è pronunciato nuovamente a favore del comune di Rijeka e ha respinto la domanda riconvenzionale del ricorrente.

32 . La corte ha ritenuto che il ricorrente non avesse dimostrato che la terra nell'area fosse passata in proprietà sociale negli anni '60 (si veda il paragrafo 26 supra) e quindi non aveva dimostrato che i suoi predecessori avevano acquisito la proprietà per possesso sfavorevole prima che la proprietà in discussione fosse diventata proprietà sociale. Allo stesso modo, la ricorrente non aveva dimostrato che i suoi predecessori erano stati in possesso della proprietà in discussione prima del 6 aprile 1941, perché i testimoni ascoltati erano troppo giovani (vedi paragrafo 19 e 28 - 29 supra) per aver avuto alcuna conoscenza di questo. Ha quindi ribadito la sua precedente constatazione secondo cui il periodo dall'8 ottobre 1991 al 27 novembre 2006 (cfr il paragrafo 10 supra) era stato troppo breve perché i beni immobili di proprietà delle autorità locali potevano essere acquisiti per possesso sfavorevole solo dopo quarant'anni (vedere paragrafo 25 sopra e sezione 159 (4) del Property Act del 1996 citata nel paragrafo 50 sotto). Infine, la Corte ha ritenuto che il periodo antecedente il passaggio di un bene in proprietà sociale e il periodo successivo all'8 ottobre 1991 non potessero essere cumulati ai fini del calcolo del tempo necessario per acquisire la proprietà di tale bene per usurpazione.

33. Il richiedente fece nuovamente appello. Ancora una volta dibatté che la Corte municipale non era riuscita a stabilire quando i due lotti di proprietà del Comune di Rijeka su cui si trovavano le parti controverse erano stati trasferiti in proprietà sociale (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). In ogni caso, lui e i suoi predecessori legali avevano acquisito quelle parti in virtù del loro possesso continuativo e in buona fede prima e dopo il 6 aprile 1941. Ribadì anche la sua precedente tesi secondo cui il periodo prima che un pezzo di proprietà fosse stato trasferito nella proprietà sociale e il periodo dopo l'8 ottobre 1991 doveva essere combinato quando si calcolava il tempo necessario per acquisire la proprietà di tale proprietà per possesso sfavorevole (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra).

34 . Con una sentenza del 21 gennaio 2015 il tribunale della contea di Rijeka ha respinto il ricorso del ricorrente e ha confermato la sentenza di primo grado del 17 giugno 2014 (paragrafo 31 supra). Ha ritenuto che, poiché i registri catastali pertinenti erano stati danneggiati (vedere paragrafo 30 supra), l'onere di provare quando i due lotti di proprietà del comune di Rijeka erano passati in proprietà sociale era spettato al ricorrente, che avrebbe potuto fornire la prova con altri mezzi - per esempio, fornendo una decisione in base alla quale quei terreni erano stati trasferiti in proprietà sociale.

35 . Il 27 aprile 2015 la ricorrente ha proposto un ricorso straordinario in cassazione ( izvanredna revizija - vedi paragrafo 61 sotto) con la Corte Suprema ( Vrhovni Sud Republike Hrvatske ) contro il secondo - grado di giudizio. Ha sostenuto che le sentenze di primo e di secondo grado si erano basate, tra l'altro, sulla considerazione che il periodo compreso tra il 6 aprile 1941 e l'8 ottobre 1991 non poteva essere incluso nel calcolo del termine pertinente per l'acquisizione della proprietà in caso di pregiudizio possesso di beni immobili di proprietà sociale. Tuttavia, tale punto di vista, riflesso nella giurisprudenza esistente dei tribunali nazionali, era contrario alla sentenza della Corte nel caso Trgo (citato sopra) e quindi doveva essere rivisitato.

36. Il ricorrente ha anche messo in discussione il punto di vista dei tribunali civili che, poiché i relativi atti (vale a dire il registro fondiario) – la cui conservazione era compito dello Stato – erano stati distrutti, spettava a lui (e non sulla parte di cui ha beneficiato – si vedano i paragrafi 32 e 34 supra) per provare quando i due lotti appartenenti al comune di Rijeka erano stati trasferiti in proprietà sociale.

37. Con decisione del 16 aprile 2019, la Corte Suprema ha dichiarato irricevibile il ricorso straordinario in cassazione del ricorrente in quanto la questione di diritto da lui sollevata non era rilevante per l'applicazione uniforme della legge.

38 . La Corte Suprema ha ritenuto che le rispettive circostanze di fatto nel caso del ricorrente e in Trgo fossero differenti. In particolare, in Trgo l'azione civile era stata intentata mentre era ancora in vigore l' articolo 388 del Property Act del 1996 nel suo testo originale, mentre il ricorrente nella presente causa aveva presentato domanda riconvenzionale dopo che tale disposizione era stata abrogata e sostituito con uno nuovo, in base al quale il periodo compreso tra il 6 aprile 1941 e l'8 ottobre 1991 non poteva essere incluso nel calcolo del termine rilevante per l'acquisizione della proprietà per usurpazione di beni immobili di proprietà sociale (vedi paragrafo 12 sopra e paragrafi 51-52 sotto).

39 . La Corte Suprema ha inoltre aggiunto che il punto di vista della Corte secondo cui il momento in cui è stata intentata un'azione civile era irrilevante – espresso nella sentenza della Camera nella causa Radomilja e altri c. Croazia (n. 37685/10 , § 52, 28 giugno 2016 ) – non aveva più forza giuridica perché tale sentenza era stata rivista dalla sentenza della Grande Camera nella medesima causa (v. Radomilja e altri c. Croazia [GC], nn. 37685/10 e 22768/12 , 20 marzo 2018) , quando la Corte, per ragioni diverse, aveva ritenuto che le sentenze dei tribunali nazionali che rigettavano le pretese dei ricorrenti di essere dichiarati proprietari di beni di proprietà sociale per possessione sfavorevole non aveva violato la Convenzione.

40 . Quindi, il 3 luglio 2019, il ricorrente ha presentato ricorso costituzionale contro la decisione della Corte Suprema. Si è basato sugli articoli pertinenti della Costituzione croata che garantiscono il diritto a un processo equo, il diritto di proprietà e il diritto all'uguaglianza davanti alla legge. Il ricorrente ha sostenuto che la Corte Suprema e le corti inferiori non avevano applicato le disposizioni pertinenti della Convenzione e che la Corte Suprema aveva ingiustificatamente dichiarato irricevibile il suo ricorso straordinario per cassazione. Egli ha affermato che, contrariamente al ragionamento della Corte suprema (paragrafo 39 supra), la Grande Camera nella sua sentenza Radomilja e a. non aveva rimesso in discussione l'accertamento della Camera secondo cui il momento in cui è stata intentata un'azione civile era irrilevante per l'applicazione della giurisprudenza Trgo- correlata, ma non aveva riscontrato violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 per ragioni diverse.

41 . Con decisione del 25 settembre 2019, la Corte costituzionale ( Ustavni sud Republike Hrvatske ) ha dichiarato irricevibile il ricorso costituzionale del ricorrente, ritenendo che la causa non sollevasse un problema costituzionale. Ha espressamente concordato con il reiterato ragionamento della Corte Suprema riguardo agli effetti giuridici delle sentenze della Corte in Trgo e Radomilja e Altri sul caso del ricorrente (vedere paragrafi 38-39 supra).

42. La decisione della Corte costituzionale è stata notificata al rappresentante del ricorrente il 9 ottobre 2019.

QUADRO GIURIDICO E PRATICA RILEVANTI

LEGISLAZIONE E PRASSI IN MATERIA DI PROPRIETÀ
Il Codice Civile del 1811
43. L'articolo 1468 del Codice civile generale austriaco del 1811 (Op?i gra?anski zakonik - "il Codice civile del 1811"), che era applicabile in Croazia dal 1852 al 1980 (cfr. Radomilja e altri, già citato, §§ 47-49), prevedeva che se un bene immobile non era registrato nel catasto a nome della persona in cui era in possesso, il possessore poteva acquisire la proprietà di tale bene per possesso avverso dopo trenta anni.
Legge sulla proprietà di base del 1980
44 . Sezione 28 della Legge sui rapporti di proprietà di base ( Zakon o osnovnim vlasni?kopravnim odnosima , Gazzetta ufficiale della Repubblica socialista federale di Jugoslavia n. 6/80 e 36/90 - "la Legge sulla proprietà di base del 1980 "), entrata in vigore il 1 settembre 1980, a condizione che una persona che possiede in buona fede un bene immobile di proprietà altrui ne diventi proprietario per usurpazione dopo vent'anni.

45 . La sezione 29 vietava l'acquisizione della proprietà mediante possesso avverso di proprietà di proprietà sociale .

46. La sezione 72 prevedeva che il possesso doveva essere considerato in buona fede se i possessori non sapevano o non potevano sapere che la proprietà che possedevano non era loro. L'articolo 72, paragrafo 2, prevedeva che si dovesse presumere il possesso in buona fede.

47 . Sezione 3 della legge sulla costituzione della legge sui rapporti di proprietà di base ( Zakon o preuzimanju zakona o osnovnim vlasni?kopravnim odnosima , Gazzetta ufficiale della Repubblica di Croazia n. 53/91 dell'8 ottobre 1991), entrata in vigore l'8 ottobre 1991 , abrogato l'articolo 29 della Legge sulla proprietà di base .

La legge sulla proprietà del 1996
48. Dal 1 ° gennaio 1997 le questioni riguardanti il possesso e la proprietà sono stati regolati dalla proprietà e gli altri diritti reali Act ( Zakon o vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima , Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 91/96 , con successive modifiche - “del 1996 Property Act” ).

49 . L'articolo 18 prevede quando un possessore è considerato in buona fede. La parte pertinente di tale disposizione recita:

Sezione 18

“(1) Il possesso è lecito se il possessore ha una base giuridica valida per quel possesso (diritto di possesso).

(2) ...

(3) Il possesso è in buona fede se il possessore, quando lo ha acquisito, non sapeva né, date le circostanze, non aveva motivi sufficienti per sospettare di non avere diritto al possesso. Tuttavia, la buona fede cessa non appena il possessore viene a conoscenza di non avere diritto al possesso.

(4) Se, in una controversia sul diritto di possesso, è stato deciso con una decisione definitiva che il diritto di possesso non appartiene al possessore, il suo possesso è [considerato] in malafede dal momento in cui ha ricevuto la [relativa] dichiarazione di credito
(5) Il possesso è considerato in buona fede, salvo prova contraria”.

50 . La disposizione pertinente della comunicazione del 1996 Proprietà atto relativo acquisto della proprietà in generale e, nello specifico, per usucapione, come segue:

Motivi legali per l'acquisizione

Sezione 114

(1) La proprietà può essere acquisita per negozio giuridico, per decisione di un tribunale o di altra autorità pubblica, per successione o per effetto di legge.

Acquisizione [di proprietà] per effetto di legge

...

(d) Acquisizione per possessione avversa

Sezione 159

(1) La proprietà può essere acquisita per possesso sfavorevole sulla base del possesso esclusivo di una [particolare] proprietà se tale possesso è della qualità richiesta dalla legge ed è durato ininterrottamente per un periodo di tempo determinato dalla legge, e se il possessore è in grado di essere il proprietario di tale proprietà .

(2) Un possessore esclusivo che possiede legalmente, in buona fede e il cui possesso è libero da vizio acquisisce la proprietà dei beni mobili dopo tre anni e dei beni immobili dopo dieci anni.

(3) Il possessore esclusivo che possiede almeno in buona fede acquisisce la proprietà dei beni mobili dopo dieci anni e dei beni immobili dopo vent'anni di possesso esclusivo continuativo.

(4) Un possessore esclusivo di una proprietà di proprietà della Repubblica di Croazia, contee o [altre autorità locali] ... acquisirà la proprietà per possessione avversa una volta che il suo ... possesso è durato ininterrottamente per un periodo doppio del tempo di cui ai commi 2 e 3 della presente sezione”.

51 . Il testo originale della sezione 388 del Property Act del 1996 prevedeva quanto segue:

Sezione 388

"(1) L'acquisizione, la modifica, gli effetti giuridici e la cessazione dei diritti reali dopo l'entrata in vigore della presente legge sono valutati sulla base delle sue disposizioni ...

(2) L'acquisizione, la modifica, gli effetti giuridici e la cessazione dei diritti reali fino all'entrata in vigore della presente legge sono valutati sulla base delle norme applicabili al momento dell'acquisizione, della modifica o della cessazione di tali diritti o dei loro effetti giuridici.

(3) Se i termini prescritti per l'acquisizione o la cessazione dei diritti reali di cui alla presente legge hanno iniziato a decorrere prima della sua entrata in vigore, continuano a decorrere ai sensi del paragrafo 2 di questa sezione ...

(4) Nel calcolo del periodo per l'acquisizione per possesso sfavorevole di beni immobili di proprietà sociale all'8 ottobre 1991, e per l'acquisizione di [altri] diritti reali su tali beni , si tiene conto anche del periodo precedente a tale data”.

52 . Dopo che la Corte costituzionale, il 17 novembre 1999, aveva invalidato il paragrafo 4 della sezione 388 della legge sulla proprietà del 1996 come incostituzionale (vedere paragrafo 9 supra), tale disposizione è stata modificata dall'emendamento del 2001 alla legge sulla proprietà del 1996 ( Zakon o izmjeni i dopuni Zakona vlasništvu i drugim stvarnim pravima , Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 114/01 ), entrato in vigore il 20 dicembre 2001. Il nuovo testo del comma 4 così recita:

“Nel computo del termine per l'acquisizione per usurpazione di beni immobili di proprietà sociale all'8 ottobre 1991, e per l'acquisizione di [altri] diritti reali su tali beni , non si tiene conto del periodo antecedente a tale data”.

Pratica pertinente
Per quanto riguarda l'acquisto di beni immobili per usurpazione nel periodo compreso tra il 6 aprile 1941 e l'8 ottobre 1991
53. Secondo l'interpretazione adottata nella sessione plenaria allargata della Corte Suprema Federale di Jugoslavia del 4 aprile 1960, una persona in possesso di un bene immobile in buona fede ne acquisirebbe la proprietà per usurpazione dopo vent'anni. Tale interpretazione si è applicata (retroattivamente) dal 6 aprile 1941 fino alla sua adozione il 4 aprile 1960 e da tale data fino al 1° settembre 1980, quando è entrato in vigore il Basic Property Act del 1980 e ha codificato tale interpretazione (v. punto 44 supra). In un certo numero di casi la Corte Suprema della Croazia ha fatto riferimento a questa interpretazione come legge valida all'epoca (per tali casi si veda Radomilja e altri , citata sopra, §§ 59-60).

54 . Nella decisione n. Rev-291/14-2 del 17 aprile 2018 la Suprema Corte, su ricorso straordinario in cassazione e richiamandosi alla sentenza Trgo , si è pronunciata in favore dei ricorrenti, che chiedevano di essere dichiarati proprietari per possesso sfavorevole di certa terra che in passato era stata di proprietà sociale. Ha annullato le sentenze dei tribunali inferiori per cui quei tribunali avevano respinto l'azione dei querelanti presentata il 7 settembre 2009 e rinviato la causa. La parte rilevante della decisione della Suprema Corte recita quanto segue:

“Nell'acquisire la proprietà per usurpazione un bene che prima dell'8 ottobre 1991 era in proprietà sociale, nel computo del tempo necessario per l'acquisizione per usurpazione si deve tener conto anche del periodo intercorso prima dell'8 ottobre 1991, se questo non viola il diritti di proprietà di terzi che non hanno acquisito tali diritti sulla base della sezione 388 del [1996 Property Act] ma sulla base di altre disposizioni di tale legge.

Il rischio di un eventuale errore dell'autorità statale deve essere a carico dello Stato, e gli errori non devono essere sanati a spese del soggetto che ha acquisito la proprietà per usurpazione sulla base di una disposizione statutaria che la Corte Costituzionale ha poi invalidato come incostituzionale – soprattutto nei casi in cui non vi sia altro interesse privato conflittuale di terzi.

Dal momento che dalle informazioni nel fascicolo si può discernere che predecessori degli attori possedevano il bene immobile in discussione, anche prima dell'8 ottobre 1991, il [primo grado] giudice nel procedimento freschi esaminare in dettaglio tali circostanze pure, prendere altre prove che le parti possono proporre ed esaminare se vi siano circostanze [che giustifichino] l'applicazione del punto di vista giuridico espresso dalla Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo nella sentenza Trgo c. Croazia ... per quanto riguarda l'acquisizione della proprietà da parte avversa possesso di un bene immobile che, con gli atti delle precedenti autorità, è stato trasferito da [ privato ]... a proprietà sociale”.

55 . La stessa Corte di Cassazione ha ribadito nelle cause nn. Rev ? 158/2017-2 del 7 maggio 2019 in relazione a un'azione civile proposta il 27 febbraio 2014, Rev-x 974/2017-2 del 7 maggio 2019 in relazione a un'azione civile proposta il 28 settembre 2004, Rev-578 /2017-2 del 7 maggio 2019 in relazione ad un'azione civile promossa il 29 novembre 2010, Rev-389/2014-5 del 29 maggio 2019 in relazione ad un'azione civile promossa il 9 novembre 2011, e Rev-2771/2013-2 del 13 agosto 2019 in relazione ad un'azione civile promossa il 23 agosto 2011.

Per quanto riguarda il possesso in buona fede
56. La Corte Suprema della Croazia ha costantemente ritenuto che il solo fatto che una persona diversa dal possessore sia stata registrata nel registro fondiario come proprietario di un immobile non rende il suo possesso come in malafede e quindi non impedisce a tale possessore di acquisire la proprietà di tale proprietà per possessione avversa. Ad esempio, nei casi nn. Rev-2426/1990 del 15 febbraio 1991 e Rev-1209/2016-3 dell'11 febbraio 2020 la Suprema Corte ha ritenuto che:

“... i tribunali [di grado inferiore] hanno correttamente concluso... che il possesso degli antenati dei ricorrenti era stato in buona fede, indipendentemente dal fatto che gli antenati del ricorrente fossero registrati nel registro fondiario come proprietari dei beni immobili contestati . In particolare, accanto al fatto accertato che gli antenati dei ricorrenti si sono sempre comportati come proprietari dei beni immobili contestati, e che gli antenati del ricorrente non hanno mai contestato il loro diritto di proprietà, pur esercitandolo sotto i loro occhi, il solo fatto che gli antenati della ricorrente siano stati iscritti nel catasto come proprietari non rende in malafede il possesso degli antenati dei ricorrenti. Gli antenati dei querelanti non avevano motivo di consultare il registro fondiario per stabilire lo stato catastale della proprietà. Sulla base delle circostanze di cui sopra, avevano una convinzione fondata di essere i proprietari. Pertanto, la loro mancata consultazione del registro fondiario non può essere addebitata loro [a titolo di argomentazione] che non avrebbero potuto ignorare [il fatto] che i proprietari [come registrato] nel registro fondiario erano gli antenati del ricorrente".

57. Tuttavia, nei casi nn. Rev-1719/2013 del 21 settembre 2016 e Rev-830/2014-2 del 16 luglio 2019 la Suprema Corte ha ritenuto che gli interessati possessori di beni immobili avessero perso la possibilità di pretendere di agire in buona fede dopo che essi, partecipando a certi procedimenti catastali, avevano appreso che i beni che avevano posseduto fino a quel momento non erano iscritti a loro nome nel catasto.

58 . Il governo ha fatto riferimento alla sentenza del tribunale distrettuale di Zagabria n. Gž-1537/16-3 del 15 gennaio 2019, in cui tale giudice ha ritenuto che la parte che si opponeva alla pretesa del possessore per acquisto di proprietà per usurpazione non era tenuta a provare la malafede del possessore se dalla testimonianza del possessore stesso risultava che la sua o il suo possesso era stato in malafede.

ATTO DI PROCEDURA CIVILE
59 . La Legge di Procedura Civile ( Zakon o parni?nom postupku , Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica Socialista Federale di Jugoslavia n. 4/77 , con successive modifiche, e Gazzetta Ufficiale della Repubblica di Croazia n. 53/91 , con successive modifiche), nella sua l'articolo 2, paragrafo 1, prevede che i giudici civili debbano decidere entro i limiti della domanda presentata nell'ambito del procedimento. L'articolo 354, paragrafo 2, punto 12, prevede che decidere ultra o extra petitum in una sentenza costituisce sempre una grave violazione della procedura civile e dei motivi di ricorso e di cassazione.

60 . L'articolo 186, paragrafo 3, incarna il principio della iura novit curia , prevedendo che i tribunali civili non sono vincolati dalla base giuridica indicata dai ricorrenti per le loro pretese.

61 . Il testo dei paragrafi 2-4 della sezione 382 della legge sulla procedura civile, come in vigore all'epoca, che riguardava il ricorso in cassazione straordinario, è riprodotto in Mireni?-Huzjak c. Croazia (dec.) , no. 72996/16 , § 26, 24 settembre 2019. Tale ricorso avrebbe potuto essere presentato, tra l'altro , nel caso in cui una decisione nel procedimento civile fosse dipesa dalla risoluzione di un punto di diritto sostanziale o procedurale rispetto al quale era esistita una giurisprudenza consolidata, ma tale giurisprudenza aveva dovuto essere rivisitata alla luce dei cambiamenti nell'ordinamento giuridico provocati dalle decisioni della Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo.

62 . La disposizione pertinente della legge sulla procedura civile relativa alla riapertura dei procedimenti a seguito di una sentenza definitiva della Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (vale a dire, sezione 428a) è citata in Lovri? c. Croazia (n. 38458/15 , § 24, 4 aprile 2017 ).

ALTRA LEGISLAZIONE PERTINENTE
63 . La disposizione attinente dell'Atto della Corte Costituzionale del 1999 è citata in Radomilja e altri , citata sopra, § 46). L'articolo 53 prevede che la normativa primaria (vale a dire gli statuti) può essere invalidata in quanto incostituzionale dalla Corte costituzionale solo con effetto ex nunc – cioè con pro futuro – nel senso che permangono gli effetti giuridici che essa produceva prima di essere invalidata. La legislazione secondaria (subordinata) può essere invalidata con effetto ex tunc in determinate circostanze, piuttosto restrittive, nel qual caso gli effetti che essa produceva prima di essere invalidata verranno cancellati.

64 . La legge sul risarcimento e sulla restituzione dei beni stanziati durante il regime comunista jugoslavo ( Zakon o naknadi za imovinu oduzetu za vrijeme jugoslavenske komunisti?ke vladavine , Gazzetta ufficiale n. 92/96 , con successive modifiche - "la legge sulla restituzione"), che entrata in vigore il 1° gennaio 1997, consentiva agli ex proprietari di beni confiscati o nazionalizzati , o ai loro eredi in prima linea (discendenti diretti o coniugi), di ottenere, a determinate condizioni, la restituzione o l'indennizzo dei beni stanziati ai sensi dell'art. regime socialista.

LA LEGGE

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
65 . Il richiedente si lamentò che le decisioni dei tribunali nazionali che rigettavano la sua richiesta di essere dichiarato il proprietario della proprietà in controversia avevano violato il suo diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Ha invocato l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione, che recita come segue:

“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Le precedenti disposizioni non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far applicare le leggi che ritenga necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni secondo l'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni. "

ammissibilità
66. Il Governo contestò l'ammissibilità di questa doglianza, sostenendo che l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non era applicabile alla presente causa e che il richiedente non aveva esaurito le vie di ricorso interne.

Applicabilità dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1
(un) Le argomentazioni delle parti

(io) Il governo

67 . Il Governo ha sostenuto che la richiesta del ricorrente di essere dichiarato proprietario della proprietà in controversia non aveva una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale e quindi non poteva qualificarsi come un "bene" e quindi un "possesso" di cui l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 sarebbe applicabile. A questo proposito, hanno in primo luogo sostenuto che, nell'esaminare tale questione, si doveva escludere il periodo compreso tra il 1941 e il 1991. In subordine, sostenevano che la domanda del ricorrente non poteva essere considerata un "bene", anche se la Corte dovesse tener conto di tale periodo.

68. Dal punto di vista del Governo, il ricorrente non si era basato sul periodo compreso tra il 1941 e il 1991 per presentare la sua domanda riconvenzionale (vedere paragrafo 12 supra). Allo stesso modo, nei procedimenti nazionali non si era mai basato sulla versione originale della sezione 388 (4) del Property Act del 1996 (vedere paragrafo 51 supra) e in entrambi i suoi ricorsi contro le sentenze di primo grado aveva accettato il divieto legale di acquisire proprietà di beni immobili di proprietà sociale per possessione avversa in quel periodo di cinquant'anni (vedere paragrafi 26 e 32 sopra).

69. Pertanto, a differenza della causa Trgo , non si può affermare che il ricorrente dinanzi ai tribunali interni si sia "ragionevolmente invocato una normativa, successivamente abrogata come incostituzionale" (vedere Trgo , sopra citata, § 67).

70. I tribunali nazionali non avrebbero potuto prendere in considerazione il suddetto periodo di cinquant'anni proprio motu perché secondo il diritto interno erano stati vincolati dalla base di fatto della domanda riconvenzionale del ricorrente, che non aveva incluso quel periodo. In tali circostanze, prendere in considerazione tale periodo avrebbe significato decidere oltre l'ambito della causa e avrebbe costituito una grave violazione della procedura civile (paragrafo 59 supra).

71. Inoltre, sebbene la sentenza di primo grado nel suo caso fosse stata pronunciata il 17 giugno 2014 – cioè cinque anni dopo la sentenza della Corte nella causa Trgo – il ricorrente per la prima volta ha invocato Trgo nell'appello straordinario in cassazione che aveva depositato il 27 aprile 2015 (paragrafo 34 supra).

72 . Al riguardo il Governo ha richiamato la tesi della Corte, espressa nella sentenza di Grande Camera Radomilja e a. , secondo cui l'elemento temporale era di importanza centrale per l'acquisizione della proprietà per usurpazione e che la successiva aggiunta di un periodo di oltre cinquanta anni alla base fattuale della doglianza doveva quindi essere considerata come una modifica della sostanza di tale doglianza (si veda Radomilja e altri , citata sopra, § 132).

73 . Il governo ha sostenuto che lo stesso dovrebbe valere per i procedimenti dinanzi alla Corte suprema croata e che l'affidamento del ricorrente su Trgo in una fase tardiva come nel suo ricorso per cassazione dovrebbe essere visto come una modifica della sostanza della sua domanda iniziale (contro) . Tale rimedio non aveva consentito alle parti di modificare la loro strategia giuridica infruttuosa e di ottenere una nuova sentenza dalla Corte Suprema su basi giuridiche completamente diverse.

74 . Se si escludeva il periodo compreso tra il 1941 e il 1991, come sopra argomentato, non si poteva ancora affermare che la richiesta del ricorrente di essere dichiarato proprietario del bene controverso avesse una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale e che si trattasse di un "possesso" attrarre le garanzie dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1. A questo proposito il Governo in sostanza ha fatto riferimento alle stesse ragioni per le quali la Grande Camera aveva ritenuto inapplicabile l'Articolo in Radomilja e altri (cit., §§ 144-151).

75 . Il Governo ha poi proseguito sostenendo che la domanda del ricorrente non aveva in ogni caso una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale (vale a dire, anche se si tenesse conto di detto periodo di cinquant'anni). In particolare, mentre in Trgo non era stato contestato che il ricorrente fosse stato in continuo possesso in buona fede dal 1953 (si veda Trgo , § 48), non era così nel caso di specie . A questo proposito il Governo si riferì agli argomenti del Comune di Rijeka avanzati nei procedimenti civili in questione (vedere paragrafi 15 ? 16 sopra).

76. Inoltre, il Governo ha notato che il contratto di compravendita e l'atto di donazione del 12 gennaio 1972 avevano indicato sia il numero catastale che la superficie di ciascuno degli allora due appezzamenti di terreno di proprietà del padre del ricorrente (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra). Era quindi difficile credere che il ricorrente e suo padre non si fossero accorti di essere effettivamente in possesso di un'area di terreno di superficie considerevolmente più ampia di quella indicata in quei documenti ( paragrafo 21 supra).

77 . Il Governo si richiamava inoltre alla prassi interna, secondo la quale una parte che si opponeva all'azione del possessore per acquisire la proprietà per lesione non era tenuta a provare la malafede del possessore ea confutare la presunzione statutaria di buona fede (cfr. Property Act al paragrafo 49 sopra) se dalla testimonianza del possessore ne risultava che il suo possesso era stato in malafede (vedere paragrafi 13 e 58 sopra).

78 . Infine, hanno sottolineato che il ricorrente e suo padre avevano partecipato a diverse perizie catastali nell'area nel corso degli anni – in particolare quella condotta nel 1986 (paragrafi 16 e 18 supra) – e quindi non potevano ignorare che le parti contestate che avevano occupato non erano di loro proprietà. Data tale conoscenza, il loro possesso di quelle parti non avrebbe potuto essere in buona fede (vedere paragrafo 54 supra).

(ii) Il richiedente

79. Il ricorrente ha sostenuto che nella sua domanda riconvenzionale e durante i procedimenti dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali aveva costantemente sostenuto che lui e i suoi predecessori legali erano stati in legittimo e continuo possesso in buona fede della proprietà in controversia per più di ottanta anni. Contestò così l'argomento del Governo secondo cui quei tribunali non avrebbero potuto prendere in considerazione il periodo tra il 1941 e il 1991 (vedere paragrafo 67 supra).

80. All'argomento del Governo secondo il quale non si era basato sulla versione originale della sezione 388 del Property Act del 1996 (vedere paragrafo 65 supra) il ricorrente ha risposto che non gli era stato richiesto di farlo perché, a causa del principio di iura novit curia , i tribunali civili non erano vincolati dalle argomentazioni giuridiche delle parti.

81. Per quanto riguarda le restanti argomentazioni del Governo, il ricorrente ha sottolineato che ciò che suo padre aveva acquistato dalla sig.ra O.B. era in realtà un'unica unità di terra che era stata delimitata da tutti i lati da un muro a secco. Era stata l'effettiva proprietaria di tutti i terreni all'interno di quei confini, indipendentemente dal fatto che, come si è scoperto, si trattava formalmente di diversi appezzamenti catastali e che parte di quel terreno era stato formalmente registrato nel registro fondiario come proprietà sociale proprietà .

82. Il ricorrente e suo padre avevano creduto che questa discrepanza tra la situazione effettiva da un lato e la situazione registrata nel catasto e nel registro fondiario dall'altro fosse stata rettificata nel 1963 (vedere paragrafo 13 sopra). Tale convinzione era stata perpetuata dal fatto che prima del 2006 (paragrafo 10 supra) nessuno aveva contestato il proprio diritto di possedere la terra entro quei limiti o messo in discussione la propria buona fede e la continuità del proprio possesso.

83. Il fatto che il comune di Rijeka pro forma avesse contestato il carattere ininterrotto del loro possesso e la loro buona fede ( paragrafi 15-16 supra) non avrebbe dovuto avere alcuna rilevanza alla luce delle prove raccolte nei procedimenti interni ( paragrafi 19 - 20 e 28-29 sopra). Il ricorrente ha sottolineato che in base al diritto interno il comune di Rijeka aveva sostenuto l'onere di provare che il suo possesso e quello di suo padre non erano stati in buona fede (ai sensi della sezione 18(5) della Legge sulla proprietà del 1996 – si veda il paragrafo 49 supra) e che aveva non è stato continuo.

84. Il richiedente concluse di aver acquisito ex lege la proprietà della proprietà in questione sulla base della versione originale della sezione 388 dell'Atto sulla proprietà del 1996 , prima che tale disposizione fosse stata invalidata dalla Corte Costituzionale nel 1999.

(b) La valutazione della Corte

85. La Corte ribadisce che un ricorrente può addurre una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 solo nella misura in cui le decisioni impugnate si riferiscono ai suoi "beni" ai sensi di tale disposizione (vedere Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC ], n.44912 / 98 , § 35, CEDU 2004?IX).

86 . Anche se tale articolo non garantisce il diritto di acquisire proprietà , la sua applicazione non è limitata ai "beni esistenti". Si estende anche ai "beni", comprese le rivendicazioni rispetto alle quali un richiedente può sostenere di avere almeno una "legittima aspettativa" di ottenere il godimento effettivo di un diritto di proprietà (ibid., § 35). Tali aspettative sorgeranno solo in relazione a crediti per i quali esiste una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale, ovvero in relazione a crediti sufficientemente stabiliti per essere esecutivi (si veda Stran Greek Refineries e Stratis Andreadis c. Grecia , 9 dicembre 1994 , § 59, serie A n. 301?B, e Kopecký , sopra citata, §§ 49 e 52).

87. Nella presente causa il richiedente dibatté di aver acquisito la proprietà della proprietà in questione per possesso sfavorevole. Secondo la legge croata, la proprietà sarà acquisita per possessione ipso iure quando tutte le condizioni legali sono soddisfatte (vedere paragrafo 50 supra). Tuttavia, in realtà, la questione se i possessori soddisfino le condizioni legali per l'acquisizione della proprietà per lesione deve essere determinata in un procedimento davanti ai giudici civili, perché i possessori hanno bisogno di una sentenza dichiarativa che riconosca la loro proprietà per poter godere effettivamente della loro proprietà. La Corte ritiene pertanto che l'interesse patrimoniale fatto valere dalla ricorrente nella presente causa avesse natura di credito e non possa essere qualificato come un "bene esistente" ai sensi della giurisprudenza della Corte (si veda Trgo , sopra citata, §46).

88 . La Corte deve quindi esaminare se tale censura fosse sufficientemente fondata nel diritto nazionale. Tuttavia, prima di farlo, deve affrontare una questione preliminare.

(io) Problema preliminare

89. Il Governo dibatté che il periodo tra il 1941 e il 1991 non doveva essere preso in considerazione nel valutare l'applicabilità dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla presente causa (vedere paragrafo 67-74 sopra).

90 . A questo proposito va notato che fin dall'inizio del procedimento civile in questione il ricorrente ha affermato che lui, e suo padre prima di lui, erano stati in continuo e ininterrotto possesso delle parti controverse dal 1955 (si vedano i paragrafi 12-14 sopra). Inoltre, l'età e la testimonianza di tutti i testimoni ascoltati nella prima tornata del procedimento dinanzi al tribunale municipale di Fiume suggeriscono che erano stati chiamati dal ricorrente per corroborare tali affermazioni fattuali, vale a dire per testimoniare che lui e suo padre erano stati effettivamente nel possesso della proprietà controversa dal 1955 (paragrafo 19 supra).

91 . Solo dopo l'adozione della sentenza di primo grado del 22 aprile 2011 (paragrafo 22 supra) è apparso chiaro che il tribunale municipale non avrebbe tenuto conto del periodo compreso tra il 1941 e il 1991 per calcolare il tempo necessario per acquisire la proprietà da parte di possessione avversa. Di conseguenza, il ricorrente ha modificato la sua strategia giuridica e nel suo ricorso contro tale sentenza (paragrafo 26 supra) ha presentato due argomenti alternativi, che ha portato avanti nella seconda fase del procedimento dinanzi ai giudici di primo e secondo grado ( paragrafi 28-34 sopra). In particolare, sosteneva (a) che doveva essere stabilito quando i due appezzamenti di terreno di proprietà del Comune di Fiume, comprese le parti contese, erano passati alla proprietà sociale, e (b) che i periodi di tempo trascorsi prima che passassero quei due appezzamenti in proprietà sociale e dopo il 1991 dovrebbero essere combinati (vedere paragrafo 26 sopra). Ecco perché nella seconda tornata del procedimento dinanzi al tribunale municipale di Fiume ha chiamato i testimoni più anziani (paragrafi 28-29 supra) che, data la loro età, potevano, a suo avviso, testimoniare che i suoi predecessori legali erano stati a lungo possesso a termine della proprietà in questione anche prima degli anni '60, quando, a sua conoscenza, la terra nell'area era passata in proprietà sociale (vedere paragrafo 26 supra).

92. Una volta fallite queste argomentazioni alternative, il ricorrente ha cambiato nuovamente la sua strategia giuridica e nel suo ricorso straordinario per cassazione si è basata sulla sentenza della Corte nella causa Trgo (paragrafo 35 supra).

93. Non c'è nulla che suggerisca che il ricorrente non fosse autorizzato a farlo in base al diritto interno. La Corte nota anche che ai sensi del Civil Procedure Act i tribunali civili non sono vincolati dagli argomenti legali delle parti (vedere paragrafo 60 sopra).

94. Inoltre, sembra evidente che lo scopo del ricorrente invocando i motivi citati nel suo ricorso straordinario per cassazione (paragrafi 35 e 61 supra) era quello di allineare la giurisprudenza nazionale a quella della Corte. Se la tesi del Governo dovesse essere accolta, le parti di un procedimento civile, ad esempio, non potrebbero invocare in sede di ricorso straordinario in cassazione la sentenza della Corte divenuta definitiva poco dopo l'adozione della decisione di secondo grado nella loro caso particolare. Ciò avrebbe vanificato lo scopo stesso di tali motivi di ricorso.

95. Contrariamente all'argomento del Governo (si vedano i paragrafi 72-73 supra), l'affidamento del ricorrente a Trgo nel suo ricorso per cassazione non ha comportato un cambiamento nella base fattuale della sua (contro) domanda che, come stabilito sopra, ha non esclude il periodo tra il 1941 e il 1991.

96. Se la Corte Suprema avesse ritenuto che la base fattuale della (contro)domanda del ricorrente non comprendesse questo periodo, è ragionevole presumere che ciò si sarebbe riflesso nella sua decisione sul ricorso straordinario del ricorrente per cassazione. Quel tribunale dichiarò il ricorso in questione irricevibile dopo aver fornito ragioni dettagliate sul motivo per cui il caso del richiedente doveva essere distinto da Trgo (vedere paragrafi 38-39 supra). Assente da tali ragioni era l'asserita non fiducia del ricorrente sul periodo tra il 1941 e il 1991 e sulla versione originale della sezione 388(4) dell'Atto sulla proprietà del 1996 .

97 . La Corte nota anche che la Corte Costituzionale ha approvato il ragionamento della Corte Suprema (vedere paragrafo 41 supra).

98. Infine, per quanto riguarda l'argomento del Governo secondo cui la tesi espressa nella sentenza della Grande Camera Radomilja e a. dovrebbe applicarsi per analogia al procedimento dinanzi alla Corte suprema croata nella presente causa (si vedano i paragrafi 72-73 supra), la Corte osserva che le situazioni nei due casi non sono comparabili. Al riguardo è sufficiente rilevare che la Grande Camera in Radomilja e altri non ha tenuto conto del periodo compreso tra il 6 aprile 1941 e l'8 ottobre 1991 poiché i ricorrenti nelle loro osservazioni davanti alla Camera l'avevano espressamente escluso dal fondamento di fatto e di diritto delle loro censure. Tuttavia, nel caso di specie, il ricorrente non aveva affatto escluso tale periodo, né tanto meno espressamente, dal fondamento di fatto o di diritto della sua domanda riconvenzionale nei procedimenti dinanzi ai giudici di primo e di secondo grado ( paragrafi 90-91 supra) .

99. In vista di quanto sopra, la Corte non può accettare l'argomento del Governo che il periodo tra il 1941 e il 1991 dovrebbe essere escluso quando valuta l'applicabilità dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla presente causa.

(ii) Se la domanda del ricorrente avesse una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale

100. La Corte nota in primo luogo che la proprietà in controversia era in proprietà sociale l'8 ottobre 1991 (vedere paragrafo 23 supra). Durante il regime socialista e fino a quella data non era possibile acquisire la proprietà di beni di proprietà sociale per possessione avversa (vedere paragrafi 5 e 45 supra).

101. La sezione 388 del Property Act del 1996 , entrata in vigore il 1 gennaio 1997, prevedeva che il periodo precedente all'8 ottobre 1991 dovesse essere incluso nel calcolo del termine necessario per acquisire la proprietà di tale proprietà da parte avversa possesso (paragrafi 7 e 51 supra). Con una decisione del 17 novembre 1999, entrata in vigore il 14 dicembre 1999, la Corte costituzionale ha invalidato tale disposizione in quanto incostituzionale (paragrafo 9 supra).

102. Tuttavia, gli effetti che tale disposizione ha prodotto mentre era in vigore sono rimasti perché secondo il diritto croato le decisioni della Corte costituzionale che invalidano la legislazione primaria (statuti) hanno solo effetto ex nunc (si veda il paragrafo 63 supra).

103. Secondo il punto di vista assunto dalla Corte Suprema e dalla Corte Costituzionale nel caso di specie, le circostanze di questo caso erano diverse da quelle in Trgo , dove era stato ritenuto applicabile l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (vedere paragrafi 38- 39 e 41 sopra). Ritenevano che ciò fosse vero perché il ricorrente nella presente causa aveva depositato la sua domanda riconvenzionale l'11 aprile 2007 – vale a dire, dopo che la sezione 388 (4) del Property Act del 1996 nella sua versione originale non era più in vigore (vedere paragrafi 7, 9 e 12 e 51 sopra).

104. A questo proposito la Corte ribadisce le sue conclusioni nella causa Trgo :

“46. La Corte osserva che secondo la legge croata la proprietà sarà, in linea di principio, acquisita per possessione ipso iure quando tutte le condizioni legali sono soddisfatte ...

...

48. Sembrerebbe dalle conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali [...] che non era contestato che il ricorrente e sua madre fossero stati in possesso esclusivo e continuo in buona fede della proprietà in questione dal 1953, cioè per più di quarant'anni, e che quindi aveva già nel 1993 soddisfatto le condizioni statutarie per l'acquisizione della proprietà per usurpazione. Si può quindi dedurre che il ricorrente, sulla base dell'articolo 388(4) del Property Act del 1996 , ex legeè diventata proprietaria del terreno in questione il 1° gennaio 1997 quando la legge è entrata in vigore. Tale disposizione è rimasta in vigore fino a quando la Corte Costituzionale non l'ha abrogata quasi tre anni dopo. La Corte ritiene quindi che la domanda del ricorrente avesse una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale per qualificarsi come un "bene" protetto dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1".

105. Queste conclusioni suggeriscono che la data in cui il ricorrente in Trgo aveva intentato un'azione civile era irrilevante per stabilire se la sua pretesa di essere dichiarato proprietario di un bene per possesso sfavorevole potesse qualificarsi come un "bene" protetto dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. .1 alla Convenzione. Piuttosto, ciò che era importante era se la proprietà della proprietà in questione fosse stata conferita a lui per effetto di legge nel momento in cui la versione originale della sezione 388 (4) del Property Act del 1996 era ancora in vigore (vedere paragrafi 7 , 9 e 50-51 sopra).

106. Questo punto di vista – secondo cui il momento in cui viene intentata un'azione civile è irrilevante per l'acquisizione della proprietà per possessione sfavorevole sulla base della versione originale dell'articolo 388(4) del Property Act del 1996 – è in linea con ciò che sembra ormai essere la giurisprudenza consolidata della Corte Suprema (paragrafi 54-55 supra).

107. A questo proposito non si può non notare che la decisione della Corte Suprema nel caso del ricorrente non era in linea con quella giurisprudenza. Più specificamente, contraddice la decisione della stessa corte in una causa simile adottata un anno prima (vedere paragrafo 54 supra) e con diverse decisioni in casi simili adottate entro un mese dalla decisione nel caso del richiedente (vedere paragrafo 55 sopra).

108. Ne consegue che le differenze di fatto che la Corte Suprema e la Corte Costituzionale hanno citato nel distinguere la presente causa da Trgo sono irrilevanti per determinare l'applicabilità dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 nella presente causa.

109. Diversamente dalla Corte Suprema e dalla Corte Costituzionale nel caso del ricorrente, il Governo non ha nemmeno tentato di sostenere che il momento in cui era stata depositata la domanda riconvenzionale del ricorrente fosse rilevante per l'applicabilità dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione . Piuttosto, sostenevano che, a differenza di Trgo, dove le conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali suggerivano che il ricorrente e sua madre erano stati in possesso continuativo della proprietà in questione in buona fede per il periodo di tempo richiesto, tali requisiti legali non erano stati soddisfatti nel caso di specie (paragrafi 75-78 supra).

110. Se il richiedente ei suoi predecessori avessero soddisfatto quei requisiti legali per l'acquisizione della proprietà per possesso sfavorevole nella presente causa era stato effettivamente contestato a livello nazionale dal Comune di Rijeka (vedere paragrafi 15-16 sopra).

111. La Corte ribadisce che, in linea di principio, non si può affermare che un ricorrente abbia un credito sufficientemente accertato che equivalga a un "bene" ai fini dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. con i requisiti di legge deve essere determinato in procedimenti giudiziari e alla fine i tribunali ritengono che non sia stato così (si veda, ad esempio, Kopecký , citata sopra, §§ 50 e 58).

112 . La Corte ribadisce inoltre che non è suo compito sostituirsi ai tribunali nazionali, che sono nella posizione migliore per valutare le prove dinanzi a loro, accertare i fatti e interpretare il diritto interno (si veda, ad esempio, Khamidov c. Russia , n. . 72118/01 , § 170, 15 novembre 2007). Ha sottolineato che, quando si tratta di accertare i fatti, è sensibile alla sussidiarietà del suo ruolo, e che deve essere prudente nell'assumere il ruolo di giudice di primo grado di fatto, ove ciò non sia reso inevitabile dalle circostanze (si veda, ad esempio, B?rbulescu c. Romania [GC], n. 61496/08 , § 129, CEDU 2017 (estratti)).

113. Nel caso di specie, i giudici nazionali hanno assunto le prove pertinenti per stabilire se il ricorrente e i suoi predecessori avessero posseduto ininterrottamente e in buona fede il bene controverso nel periodo tra il 1941 e il 1991. Tuttavia, tali giudici non hanno valutato tali prove e non hanno accertato i fatti pertinenti al fine di giungere ad una conclusione in merito alla sussistenza, nel caso del ricorrente, di tali requisiti di legge per l'acquisizione della proprietà per via del possesso a titolo oneroso. Questo perché i giudici erano del parere che il periodo di cinquant'anni in questione non poteva essere preso in considerazione nel calcolo del tempo necessario per l'acquisizione della proprietà di un bene sociale per possesso inverso.
114. La loro opinione è contraria alla sentenza della Corte nella causa Trgo (vedere Trgo , sopra citata, §§ 54-68) e alla giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema sopra menzionata (vedere paragrafi 54-55).

115 . Poiché in base alla giurisprudenza della Corte l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 si applica solo a quelle rivendicazioni per le quali esiste una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale (vedere paragrafi 86-88 supra), l'esame da parte dei tribunali nazionali se il ricorrente e il suo i predecessori legali avevano soddisfatto i requisiti legali per l'acquisizione della proprietà per possessione nel periodo compreso tra il 6 aprile 1941 e l'8 ottobre 1991 era importante per determinare se quell'articolo fosse applicabile al caso di specie.

116 . In assenza di accertamenti pertinenti da parte dei tribunali nazionali, il principio di sussidiarietà richiede che la Corte effettui essa stessa tali accertamenti allo scopo di stabilire se la domanda del ricorrente avesse una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale. La necessità che la Corte assuma tale ruolo nel caso di specie è ulteriormente corroborata dal principio secondo cui l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, come la Convenzione nel suo insieme, deve essere interpretato in modo da garantire diritti pratici ed efficace, non teorico o illusorio (si veda, tra molte altre autorità, Visti?š e Perepjolkins c. Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01 , § 114, 25 ottobre 2012). Sarebbe contrario a tale principio ritenere che la domanda del ricorrente non avesse una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale solo perché i tribunali nazionali non hanno esaminato se i requisiti legali pertinenti fossero soddisfatti, specialmente in una situazione in cui la loro incapacità di farlo era basata in una prospettiva contraria alla giurisprudenza della Corte.

117 . Dal punto di vista della Corte, le prove raccolte dai tribunali nazionali, insieme alle pertinenti disposizioni statutarie del diritto nazionale, sono sufficienti per concludere che la richiesta del ricorrente di essere dichiarato proprietario della proprietà controversa aveva una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale.

118. In particolare, la Corte nota che, in assenza delle pertinenti conclusioni da parte dei tribunali nazionali, il ricorrente può fare affidamento sulla presunzione legale che la proprietà sia posseduta in buona fede (vedere la sezione 18(5) della Proprietà del 1996 Atto citato al paragrafo 49 supra). Rileva inoltre che, salvo un testimone che non sapeva nulla della questione, tutti i restanti sei testimoni ascoltati nei procedimenti interni hanno testimoniato che le parti controverse erano state in possesso della famiglia del ricorrente dal 1955 e, prima ancora, in possesso della sig.ra OB, e che nessuno aveva mai contestato la proprietà di tali parti (paragrafi 19 e 28-29 supra). Ciò è stato confermato da diversi membri del Consiglio del Consiglio locale di Pehlin nella lettera del 12 maggio 2009 (paragrafo 20 supra).

119. La Corte perciò conclude che la richiesta del richiedente di essere dichiarato il proprietario della proprietà in controversia aveva una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale e che l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è perciò applicabile.

120. Ne consegue che l'eccezione del Governo basata sull'inapplicabilità di quell'Articolo deve essere respinta.

121. La Corte ritiene importante sottolineare che questa constatazione non pregiudica una possibile futura constatazione da parte dei tribunali nazionali (si veda il paragrafo 139 infra) che il possesso del ricorrente e dei suoi predecessori non fosse continuo e in buona fede e che pertanto egli non acquisire la proprietà del bene controverso per usurpazione. Significa semplicemente che, per la Corte, date le pertinenti disposizioni di legge del diritto nazionale e le prove raccolte a livello nazionale, la sua richiesta aveva una base sufficiente nel diritto nazionale per attirare le garanzie dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, fermo restando che questo articolo si applica anche a tali rivendicazioni, e non solo a "beni esistenti" (vedere paragrafo 86 sopra).

Esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne
(un) Le argomentazioni delle parti

(io) Il governo

122 . Il Governo ha sostenuto che, mentre il ricorrente nel suo ricorso costituzionale aveva formalmente affermato che alcuni dei suoi diritti costituzionali erano stati violati, era chiaro dal suo contenuto che si era solo lamentato di una violazione del suo diritto di accesso alla Corte Suprema ( vedi paragrafo 40 sopra). In particolare, nel suo ricorso in costituzionalità il ricorrente aveva lamentato che, pur avendo soddisfatto tutti i requisiti formali per proporre ricorso straordinario in cassazione, e aveva sostenuto che la giurisprudenza esistente doveva essere rivista alla luce della sentenza della Corte in Trgo , la Suprema Corte aveva comunque dichiarato inammissibile il suo ricorso per cassazione.

123 . In subordine, il Governo dibatté che il richiedente avrebbe dovuto chiedere la restituzione della terra contesa avviando procedimenti amministrativi sotto l'Atto di Restituzione (vedere paragrafo 64 sopra).

(ii) Il richiedente

124. Il ricorrente ha risposto di aver utilizzato tutti i rimedi disponibili. In particolare, ha sostenuto che non avrebbe potuto avviare i procedimenti pertinenti suggeriti dal governo perché non avrebbe potuto essere considerato un ex proprietario ai sensi della legge sulla restituzione (vedere paragrafo 64 supra), poiché né lui né suo padre erano mai stati registrati come i proprietari dell'immobile oggetto della controversia.

(b) La valutazione della Corte

125. Per quanto riguarda l'argomento del Governo secondo cui il ricorrente nel suo ricorso costituzionale si era essenzialmente lamentato solo di una violazione del suo diritto di accesso alla Corte Suprema (si veda il paragrafo 122 supra), la Corte ritiene sufficiente notare che il ricorrente si è basato sul rilevante articolo della Costituzione croata che garantisce il diritto di proprietà e che ha addotto argomenti piuttosto intricati sulla base di tre sentenze della Corte adottate in casi simili al suo, che riguardavano tutte l'applicazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione (vedere paragrafo 40 sopra).

126. Per quanto riguarda l'argomento del Governo secondo cui il ricorrente avrebbe dovuto avviare il procedimento pertinente ai sensi della legge sulla restituzione, la Corte ritiene che questo ricorso abbia essenzialmente lo stesso scopo della domanda riconvenzionale del ricorrente depositata nel procedimento civile lamentato (vedere paragrafo 12 supra), restando inteso che quando un ricorso è stato tentato, l'uso di un altro ricorso che ha essenzialmente lo stesso scopo non è richiesto affinché i ricorrenti adempiano al loro obbligo di esaurire le vie di ricorso nazionali ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione (si veda Kozac?o?lu c. Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03 , §§ 44 e segg., 19 febbraio 2009, e Micallef c. Malta [GC], n. 17056/06 , § 58, CEDU 2009).

127. Ne consegue che le obiezioni del governo concernenti la non - esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne deve essere respinto.

Conclusione sull'ammissibilità
128. La Corte nota, inoltre, che questa doglianza non è né manifestamente infondata né inammissibile per nessun altro motivo elencato nell'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ammissibile.

meriti
Le argomentazioni delle parti
(un) Il richiedente

129. Il richiedente, in primo luogo, presentò che nessun terzo aveva mai acquisito o rivendicato alcun diritto riguardo alla proprietà in questione. Ha quindi ribadito la sua tesi, che aveva sollevato dinanzi alla Corte suprema e alla Corte costituzionale, secondo cui le sentenze di primo e secondo grado nella sua causa erano contrarie alla sentenza della Corte nella causa Trgo ( paragrafi 35 e 40 supra) e , in quanto tale, in violazione del suo diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni.

(b) Il governo

130. Il Governo ha sostenuto che se la Corte dovesse accettare che l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione fosse applicabile nella presente causa – e che, di conseguenza, la sentenza della Corte municipale di Fiume (vedere paragrafo 31 supra) costituisse un'ingerenza con il diritto del ricorrente al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni – allora l'interferenza in questione era stata giustificata. In particolare, era stato lecito, in quanto basato sul testo modificato della sezione 388 del Property Act del 1996 (in particolare, il suo paragrafo 4) e sulle disposizioni pertinenti del codice civile del 1811 (vedere paragrafi 43 e 52 supra ). L'ingerenza in questione era stata anche nell'interesse pubblico (generale) ed era stata proporzionata.

La valutazione della Corte
131. La Corte ha già riscontrato una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione in una causa che solleva questioni simili a quella in esame (vedere Trgo , sopra citata, §§ 54-68).

132. Dopo aver esaminato tutto il materiale sottopostole, la Corte ritiene che il Governo non abbia avanzato alcun fatto o argomento in grado di persuaderlo a giungere a una conclusione diversa nella presente causa.

133. In particolare, e senza pregiudicare una possibile futura constatazione del contrario da parte dei tribunali nazionali (si veda il paragrafo 139 qui di seguito), non vi è alcuna indicazione, né il Governo ha presentato, che qualcuno oltre alla Città di Fiume abbia acquisito alcun diritto sulla proprietà in questione, o che qualsiasi parte tranne il ricorrente (o i suoi predecessori) abbia mai rivendicato alcun diritto su tale proprietà. Pertanto, sembrerebbe che le preoccupazioni che hanno spinto la Corte Costituzionale a invalidare l'articolo 388(4) del Property Act del 1996 (vedi paragrafo 9 sopra) non erano presenti nel caso del ricorrente. Tale disposizione è stata invalidata al fine di tutelare i diritti di terzi, mentre il caso della ricorrente non sembra coinvolgere tali diritti (si veda Trgo, sopra citata, § 66).
134 . Di conseguenza c'è stata una violazione dell' Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
135. Il ricorrente lamentava che la decisione dei tribunali nazionali di trasferire su di lui l'onere di provare quando la proprietà controversa era stata trasferita in proprietà sociale, anche se i relativi registri (il registro fondiario) erano stati distrutti, aveva violato il suo diritto di accesso a un tribunale, come garantito dall'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:

"Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti e doveri civili ... ognuno ha diritto a un ... ... udienza ... da [a] ... tribunale ..."

136. Considerando i fatti della causa, le osservazioni delle parti e le sue conclusioni ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione (paragrafi 65-134 supra), la Corte ritiene di aver esaminato la principale questione giuridica sollevata dal presente ricorso e che non è necessario esaminare l'ammissibilità e il merito di questa restante censura (si veda, ad esempio, Centre for Legal Resources per conto di Valentin Câmpeanu c. Romania [GC], n. 47848/08 , § 156, CEDU 2014, e Kamil Uzun c. Turchia , n.37410 / 97 , § 64, 10 maggio 2007).

APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
137. L' articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:

“Se la Corte rileva che vi è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte Contraente interessata consente solo un risarcimento parziale, la Corte, se necessario, concede un'equa soddisfazione al parte lesa."

138. La Corte ribadisce che una sentenza in cui constata una violazione impone allo Stato convenuto un obbligo legale di porre fine a tale violazione e di risarcire le sue conseguenze. Se il diritto nazionale non consente – o consente solo un risarcimento parziale – che sia effettuato un risarcimento, l'articolo 41 autorizza la Corte a concedere alla parte lesa la soddisfazione che ritiene appropriata (si veda Iatridis c. Grecia (equa soddisfazione) [GC], n. 31107/96 , §§ 32-33, CEDU 2000-XI). A questo proposito la Corte rileva che il ricorrente può ora presentare una richiesta ai sensi della sezione 428a della legge sulla procedura civile (cfr paragrafo 62 supra) con il Tribunale municipale di Fiume per la riapertura dei suddetti procedimenti civili, nei confronti dei quali la Corte ha riscontrato una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione.

139 . Data la natura della doglianza del ricorrente e le ragioni per le quali ha riscontrato una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la Corte ritiene che nel caso di specie il modo più appropriato di riparazione sarebbe quello di riaprire il procedimento lamentato in a tempo debito (vedi Trgo , sopra citata, § 75).

140. Tenuto conto di quanto precede e dato che il rappresentante del ricorrente non ha presentato una richiesta di equa soddisfazione, la Corte ritiene che non vi sia alcuna richiesta di concedere al ricorrente alcuna somma a tale riguardo.

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE[ALL'UNANIMITÀ]

Dichiara , a maggioranza, ammissibile il ricorso relativo al diritto al godimento pacifico dei beni;
Dichiara , con cinque voti contro due, che vi è stata violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione;
Dichiara , all'unanimità, che non è necessario esaminare l'ammissibilità e il merito del ricorso ai sensi dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto il 16 dicembre 2021, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.

{signature_p_2}

Renata Degener Peter Paczolay
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 23/05/2022.