CASO: CASE OF DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS RESOURCE CENTRE AND MUSTAFAYEV v. AZERBAIJAN

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS RESOURCE CENTRE AND MUSTAFAYEV v. AZERBAIJAN

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,13,18,P1-1,P4-2

NUMERO: 74288/14 64568/16
STATO: Azerbaijan
DATA: 14/10/2021
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIFTH SECTION
CASE OF DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS RESOURCE CENTRE AND MUSTAFAYEV v. AZERBAIJAN
(Applications nos. 74288/14 and 64568/16)

JUDGMENT

Art 18 (+ Art 1 P1 and Art 2 P4) • Restriction for unauthorised purposes • Freezing of bank accounts of a human rights defender and his NGO and imposition of travel bans for the purpose of punishing them for, and impeding, their work
Art 1 P 1 • Control of the use of property • Unlawful freezing of the applicants’ bank accounts • Applicants not charged with any criminal offence and not materially liable for the actions of another accused person
Art 13 (+ Art 1 P1) • Effective remedy • Domestic authorities’ failure to provide applicants with any remedies to contest the interference with their property rights
Art 2 P4 • Freedom to leave a country • Imposition of a travel ban in connection with an alleged tax debt, without any measures taken to collect it • Unlawful imposition of a travel ban in connection with criminal proceedings against third parties

STRASBOURG

14 October 2021
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Democracy and Human Rights Resource Centre and Mustafayev v. Azerbaijan,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Síofra O’Leary, President,
Ganna Yudkivska,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
L?tif Hüseynov,
Jovan Ilievski,
Arnfinn Bårdsen,
Mattias Guyomar, judges,
and Martina Keller, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having regard to:
the applications (nos. 74288/14 and 64568/16) against the Republic of Azerbaijan lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by Democracy and Human Rights Resource Centre (“the applicant association”) (applications nos. 74288/14 and 64568/16), and Mr Asabali Gurban oglu Mustafayev (?sab?li Qurban o?lu Mustafayev – “the applicant”), an Azerbaijani national, (application no. 64568/16), on 26 November 2014 and 31 October 2016, respectively;
the decision to give notice to the Azerbaijani Government (“the Government”) of the applications;
the observations submitted by the respondent Government and the observations in reply submitted by the applicants;
the comments submitted by the Open Society Justice Initiative and the International Commission of Jurists, which were granted leave to intervene by the President of the Section;
Having deliberated in private on 21 September 2021,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
INTRODUCTION
1. The present two applications concern the restrictions imposed on the bank accounts of the applicants and on the freedom of movement of the applicant by the domestic authorities. The applicants raise various complaints under Articles 6, 11, 13, 18 and 34 of the Convention, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention.
THE FACTS
2. The applicants’ details and the names of their representatives are listed in the Appendix.
3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Mr Ç. ?sg?rov.
I. BACKGROUND INFORMATION
4. The applicant is a lawyer and a member of the Azerbaijani Bar Association. He specialised in protection of human rights and has represented applicants in a large number of cases before the Court.
5. He is also the founder and chairman of the applicant association, a non-governmental organisation specialising in legal education and protection of human rights. The applicant association was registered by the Ministry of Justice on 30 June 2006 and acquired the status of a legal entity.
6. On 22 April 2014 the Prosecutor General’s Office opened criminal case no. 142006023 under Articles 308.1 (abuse of power) and 313 (forgery by an official) of the Criminal Code in connection with alleged irregularities in the financial activities of a number of non-governmental organisations. The decision did not provide an exhaustive list of the non-governmental organisations against which criminal proceedings were instituted but referred to the activities of some non-governmental organisations, without citing the name of the applicants.
7. Soon thereafter the bank accounts of numerous non-governmental organisations and civil society activists were frozen by the domestic authorities within the framework of criminal case no. 142006023. The domestic proceedings concerning the freezing of those bank accounts are the subject of the present two and other applications pending before the Court (see, for example the communicated cases, Imranova and Others v. Azerbaijan, nos. 59462/14 and 4 others; Economic Research Centre and Others v. Azerbaijan, nos. 74254/14 and 5 others; and Abdullayev and Others v. Azerbaijan, nos. 74363/14 and 7 others).
8. Various human rights defenders and civil society activists were also arrested within the framework of the same criminal proceedings in connection with their activities within or with various non-governmental organisations. The domestic proceedings concerning the arrest and pre-trial detention of some of those human rights defenders and civil society activists have already been examined by the Court (see, for example, Rasul Jafarov v. Azerbaijan, no. 69981/14, 17 March 2016; Mammadli v. Azerbaijan, no. 47145/14, 19 April 2018; Aliyev v. Azerbaijan, nos. 68762/14 and 71200/14, 20 September 2018; and Yunusova and Yunusov v. Azerbaijan (no. 2), no. 68817/14, 16 July 2020).
9. In July 2014 the applicant was invited to the Prosecutor General’s Office where he was questioned about the applicant association’s activities. Between July 2014 and 2016 he was again questioned, on several occasions, by the prosecuting authorities about the same activities.
II. IMPOSITION OF THE RESTRICTIONS ON THE APPLICANTS’ BANK ACCOUNTS
A. In respect of the applicant association’s bank accounts
10. Following a request submitted by the Prosecutor General’s Office, on 19 May 2014 the Nasimi District Court, relying on Article 248 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCrP”), issued an attachment order in respect of all bank accounts of the applicant association hosted in the International Bank of Azerbaijan, pending the investigation (cinay?t t?qibinin davam etdiyi müdd?t ?rzind?), in criminal case no. 142006023. The order referred to the prosecuting authorities’ request according to which there was evidence that the amount of 11,993 US dollars, received on 14 May 2014 by the applicant association from the United States of America’s National Endowment for Democracy, constituted the object of a criminal offence and was used “as its instrument”. According to the order, it was amenable to appeal within three days after its announcement. It appears from the transcripts of the Nasimi District Court’s hearing of 19 May 2014 that it was not public and was held in the absence of the applicant association’s representative. The case file does not contain any document indicating that the applicant association was provided with a copy of the order.
11. According to the applicant association, on an unspecified date in July 2014 its chairman, the applicant, went to the local branch of the International Bank of Azerbaijan where he was informed by a bank official of the attachment order.
12. On 14 July 2014 the applicant association asked the Nasimi District Court for a copy of the attachment order and received it on the same day.
13. On 16 July 2014 the applicant association appealed against the Nasimi District Court’s order of 19 May 2014, claiming a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. It submitted that an attachment order could not be taken in respect of its bank accounts within the meaning of Article 248 of the CCrP since neither the applicant association nor its members were accused in any criminal proceedings. It also noted that an attachment order could be taken within the meaning of Article 248.1 of the CCrP only for the purposes of ensuring the payment of a civil claim or the confiscation of property when provided for by criminal law. However, criminal case no. 142006023 was instituted under Articles 308.1 and 313 of the Criminal Code which did not provide for confiscation of property as a sanction. Lastly, it pointed out that the attachment order was disproportionate since, even assuming that there were doubts about the origin of the money received from the United States of America’s National Endowment for Democracy, the attachment order should have concerned only the impugned amount, and not all the bank accounts of the applicant association. Together with its appeal, the applicant association also lodged a request for restoration of the time-limit for lodging an appeal. In support of its restoration request, it submitted that it had never been informed of the Nasimi District Court’s hearing of 19 May 2014 and had obtained a copy of the impugned order only on 14 July 2014.
14. On 18 July 2014 the Nasimi District Court dismissed the applicant association’s request for restoration of the time-limit for lodging an appeal. The court found that the applicant association had failed to submit any evidence showing that there was a valid reason for missing the three-day time-limit for lodging an appeal. The decision did not address the applicant association’s arguments concerning the court’s failure to inform it of its hearing of 19 May 2014 or to provide it with a copy of the impugned order of its own initiative.
15. On 21 July 2014 the applicant association appealed against that decision, reiterating its previous arguments.
16. On 24 July 2014 the Baku Court of Appeal dismissed the appeal, without examining the applicant association’s arguments in respect of the restoration of the time-limit for lodging an appeal.
B. In respect of the applicant’s bank accounts
17. It appears from the documents in the case file that on an unspecified date in 2014 the prosecuting authorities lodged a request with the Nasimi District Court for an attachment order in respect of the applicant’s bank accounts within the framework of criminal case no. 142006023. Despite the Court’s explicit request to the Government to submit copies of all the documents relating to the domestic proceedings, the Government failed to provide the Court with a copy of the above mentioned request.
18. On 30 October 2014 the Nasimi District Court granted the request and issued an attachment order in respect of the applicant’s bank accounts hosted in the International Bank of Azerbaijan, except for incoming operations, pending the investigation in criminal case no. 142006023. The order did not refer to any legal provision as a legal basis. As regards the justification of the attachment order, the court referred to the prosecuting authorities’ request in the following terms:
“[According to] the competent authority in respect of the criminal case, in connection with the suspension of operations relating to 850 euros transferred from the international organisation “Conseil de l’Europe” [in French in the original text], situated in the French Republic, to bank account no. ... of Mustafayev Asabali Gurban oglu [the applicant], an Azerbaijani national born on ..., the client of the International Bank of Azerbaijan, as there is evidence that this amount of money, constituting the object of a criminal offence, was used as its instrument, it is necessary to attach the bank accounts of Mustafayev Asabali Gurban oglu, hosted in the International Bank of Azerbaijan, during the period of the continuation of criminal proceedings, except for incoming operations, for the purposes of ensuring the conduct of a complete, thorough and objective preliminary investigation, the confiscation in the future of the amounts of money obtained by criminal way and preventing their disposal of.”
It appears from the transcripts of the Nasimi District Court’s hearing of 30 October 2014 that it was not public and was held in the absence of the applicant and his representative. The case file does not contain any document indicating that the applicant was provided with a copy of that order.
19. According to the applicant, on an unspecified date in December 2014 he went to the local branch of the International Bank of Azerbaijan to check whether 850 euros (EUR) had been transferred to his account by the Council of Europe as a payment of legal aid by the Court. However, he was informed by a bank official that there was an attachment order in respect of his bank accounts.
20. Following a request submitted by the prosecuting authorities, on 28 August 2015 the Nasimi District Court decided to remove the attachment in respect of the amount of EUR 850 transferred to the applicant’s account by the Council of Europe.
III. IMPOSITION OF TRAVEL BANS
A. The travel ban imposed by the prosecuting authorities
21. On an unspecified date in Autumn 2014 the applicant learned that his right to leave the country had been restricted and that he was no longer allowed to leave Azerbaijan.
22. According to the applicant, on 13 September 2015 he attempted to take a flight from Baku to Tbilisi in order to attend an event. However, he was orally informed at the Baku airport that there was a travel ban imposed on him by the prosecuting authorities. He was not provided with any written document.
23. Following the applicant’s numerous applications to various domestic authorities, by letters dated 28 December 2016, 8 August 2018 and 7 June 2019 the Prosecutor General’s Office informed him that his application concerning the imposition of a travel ban on him was added to the case file of criminal case no. 142006023 and he would be informed of its result.
24. By a letter dated 23 July 2019 the Prosecutor General’s Office informed the applicant that the travel ban imposed on him had been lifted on 23 July 2019 as that restriction was no longer necessary within the framework of criminal case no. 142006023.
B. The travel ban imposed by a court for tax debt of the applicant association
25. Following an inspection carried out by the tax authorities in respect of the applicant association’s financial activities, on 12 and 13 March 2015 the tax authorities drew up a report and decided that the applicant association should pay to the State budged 4,897 Azerbaijani manats (AZN) (approximately EUR 2,450 at the material time).
26. On 14 April 2015 the applicant association lodged a claim, asking the court to declare invalid the tax authorities’ report of 12 March 2015 and decision of 13 March 2015.
27. On 29 October 2015 the Sumgait Administrative-Economic Court granted the tax authorities’ request, to suspend the examination of the applicant association’s claim pending the criminal case in connection with its activities.
28. Following a request submitted by the tax authorities, on 8 July 2016 the Sumgait City Court decided to restrict the applicant’s right to leave the country. The court relied on Articles 355-5 and 355-7 of the Code of Civil Procedure (“the CCP”) and found that the applicant was the head of the executive body of the applicant association which had a tax debt in the amount of AZN 7,385 (approximatively EUR 3,700 at the material time). Although the court decision indicated that the applicant’s right to leave the country was temporarily (müv?qq?ti olaraq) restricted, it did not provide any time-limit for the imposed restriction.
29. On 28 July 2016 the applicant appealed against that decision, noting that there was no court decision finding that the applicant association had a tax debt since the relevant domestic proceedings had been suspended. In any event, even assuming that there was a tax debt, it could be paid from the sums on the applicant association’s bank account and there was no reason for restricting his right to leave the country. In that connection, he also pointed out that a travel ban had already been imposed on him by the prosecuting authorities.
30. On 22 September 2016 the Sumgait Court of Appeal upheld the first instance court’s decision of 28 July 2016, holding that the existence of a previous travel ban did not prevent the imposition of a travel ban by different State authority in separate proceedings. The appellate court did not address the applicant’s other arguments.
31. On 5 December 2016 the applicant lodged a cassation appeal, reiterating his previous complaints.
32. On 9 February 2017 the Supreme Court dismissed the applicant’s cassation appeal.
IV. OTHER REMEDIES USED BY THE APPLICANTS
33. On 31 May 2016 the applicant lodged a complaint with the Nasimi District Court complaining of the unlawfulness of the prosecuting authorities’ actions under Article 449 of the CCrP (the procedure of review of the lawfulness of procedural actions or decisions by the prosecuting authorities). In particular, he asked the court to declare unlawful the imposition of a travel ban on him by the prosecuting authorities and the imposition of restrictions on the bank accounts of the applicants.
34. On 5 July 2016 the Nasimi District Court refused to admit the claim, holding that the prosecuting authorities’ actions complained of could not be challenged before the domestic courts pursuant to Article 449 of the CCrP. The applicant was provided with a copy of that decision on 14 July 2016.
35. By a letter dated 15 July 2016, a judge of the Nasimi District Court returned the applicant’s ensuing appeal of the same date, informing him that he had missed the time-limit for lodging an appeal.
36. On 26 July 2016 the applicant appealed against the judge’s letter, submitting that he had not missed the time-limit in question.
37. On 4 August 2014 the Baku Court of Appeal decided to return the case to the first-instance court, holding that the question of the restoration of time-limits for lodging an appeal should be examined by the lower court.
38. There is no information in the case file about further developments concerning those proceedings.
V. FURTHER DEVELOPMENTS
39. On 19 December 2018 the applicant association paid the tax debt imposed by the tax authorities.
40. There is no information in the case file about further developments concerning the freezing of the applicants’ bank accounts.
41. No information is available in the case file as regards the outcome of criminal case no. 142006023.
RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK
I. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
42. Articles 308 and 313 of the Criminal Code are described in detail in the Court’s judgment Rasul Jafarov v. Azerbaijan (no. 69981/14, §§ 53-54, 17 March 2016).
43. The institution of criminal responsibility of legal persons was introduced into the Criminal Code for the first time by a law of 7 March 2012 in the form of a new chapter (15-2) which listed the measures applicable in respect of legal persons. However, the procedural provisions relating to those measures were adopted in the form of a new chapter (LVI I) of the Code of Criminal Procedure (“the CCrP”) only by a law dated 29 November 2016.
44. Article 121 of the CCrP deals with the obligation of the investigating authorities to examine applications and requests submitted to them. In accordance with Article 121.3, the rejection of an application or request does not prevent its renewed presentation at later stages of the criminal proceedings or to another investigating authority. The application or request may be renewed if new evidence is adduced or if it is established during the criminal proceedings that it must be granted.
45. According to Articles 248 and 249 of the CCrP, in order to ensure the execution of a judgment in its part pertaining to a civil claim or confiscation of property in circumstances provided for under criminal law, an investigator or prosecutor can apply to a court for attachment of property of the alleged perpetrator of a criminal offence. Attachment of property prevents the proprietor or owner from disposing of and, if necessary, using the property. In particular, the relevant part of Article 248 provides as follows:
Article 248. Nature of attachment of property
“248.1. Attachment of property:
248.1.1. shall be carried out with the aim of securing a civil claim or the confiscation of property in circumstances provided for under criminal law;
...
248.2. Property of the accused person or property of persons who may be held materially liable, irrespective of what comprises this property or in whose possession it is, may be subject to attachment.
248.3. Attachment shall apply to the accused person’s share in the joint property of the accused and his or her spouse or in the property owned by the accused persons jointly with other persons. If there is sufficient evidence that the property [was an instrument of a criminal offence, was an object of a criminal offence or constitutes proceeds of crime], the whole property or the greater part thereof shall be attached.
[If the object or proceeds of crime has been used, disposed of or is unavailable for confiscation for other reasons], money or other property belonging to the accused person, which is equivalent in value [to the instrument or proceeds of crime], shall be subject to attachment. ...”
46. The relevant provisions of the domestic law relating to the right of a person to leave the country and Article 449 of the CCrP are described in detail in the Court’s judgment Mursaliyev and Others v. Azerbaijan (nos. 66650/13 and 10 others, §§ 15-18, 13 December 2018). In addition, on 20 October 2015 the failure to pay taxes was added to Article 9.3.6-1 of the Migration Code as one of the cases in which a citizen’s right to leave the country may be restricted on the basis of a court decision.
47. On 20 October 2015 a new chapter (Chapter 40-2) relating to the proceedings on temporary restriction of the right to leave the country of taxpayer physical persons or heads of executive bodies of legal persons was added to the Code of Civil Procedure (“the CCP”). In particular, in accordance with Article 355-5.1 of the CCP, the relevant domestic authority is entitled to apply to the relevant court for temporarily restricting the above-mentioned persons’ right to leave the country in view of ensuring the payment of tax debt.
II. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL MATERIAL
48. A number of relevant international documents concerning the protection of human rights defenders are described in detail in the Court’s judgment in Aliyev v. Azerbaijan (nos. 68762/14 and 71200/14, §§ 88-92, 20 September 2018).
49. On 19 August 2014 the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights published the following press release:
“Persecution of rights activists must stop – UN experts call on the Government of Azerbaijan
GENEVA (19 August 2014) – United Nations human rights experts [Michel Forst, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders; Maina Kai, the Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association; and David Kaye, the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression] today condemned the growing tendency to prosecute prominent human rights defenders in Azerbaijan, and urged the Government ‘to show leadership and reverse the trend of repression, criminalization and prosecution of human rights work in the country.’
“We are appalled by the increasing incidents of surveillance, interrogation, arrest, sentencing on the basis of trumped-up charges, assets-freezing and ban on travel of the activists in Azerbaijan,” they said. “The criminalization of rights activists must stop. Those who were unjustifiably detained for defending rights should be immediately freed.” ...”
50. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders visited Azerbaijan from 14 to 22 September 2016. On 22 September 2016 he “called on Azerbaijan to rethink [its] punitive approach to civil society” and published the following end of mission statement:
“I have shared with the Government my preliminary conclusion that, over the last two-three years, the civil society in Azerbaijan has faced the worst situation since the independence of the country. Dozens of NGOs, their leaders, employees and their families have been subject to administrative and legal persecution, including the seizure of their assets and bank accounts, travel bans, enormous tax penalties and even imprisonment.
Civil society has been paralysed as a result of such intense pressure. Human rights defenders have been accused by public officials to be a fifth column of the Western governments, or foreign agents, which has led to misperception in the population of the truly valuable role played by civil society. Activists promoting fundamental freedoms and criticising violations have been accused of being political opponents, touting values that run counter to those of their society or culture. They were denounced as politically or financially motivated actors. They were attacked, threatened or brought to court and sentenced under such charges as “hooliganism”, “money-laundering”, “provocation”, “drug-trafficking” or incitement to overthrow the State ...”
51. The relevant extracts of Report (CommDH(2019)27) of 11 December 2019 by the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe, following her visit to Azerbaijan from 8 to 12 July 2019, read as follows:
“1.1.2. Restrictions on the right to leave the country
20. The Commissioner observes that dozens of journalists, lawyers, political activists and human rights defenders are banned from leaving the country, in circumstances which give rise to justifiable doubts about the lawfulness of such travel bans.”
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
52. Having regard to the similar subject matter of the applications, the Court finds it appropriate to examine them jointly in a single judgment.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
53. Relying on Articles 6 and 11 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, the applicants complained that the freezing of their bank accounts had amounted to a violation of their rights protected under the Convention. Having regard to the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the present complaint falls to be examined solely under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
1. The parties’ submissions
54. The Government submitted that the applicants had failed to exhaust domestic remedies. In particular, they noted that the applicant had failed to raise his complaint before the domestic authorities and that the applicant association had failed to lodge a new request with the domestic courts in accordance with Article 121.3 of the CCrP.
55. The applicants disagreed with the Government’s submissions, pointing to all the attempts they had made to have the issues examined.
2. The Court’s assessment
56. The relevant general principles on exhaustion of domestic remedies have been summarised in Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia ((preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, §§ 69-77, 25 March 2014).
57. The Court notes that in the cases in which the applicants complained of both the initial freezing of their assets and of the continuation of the measure for a number of years, it is appropriate to consider the exhaustion issue separately for the two matters (see BENet Praha, spol. s r.o. v. the Czech Republic, no. 33908/04, § 81, 24 February 2011, and Apostolovi v. Bulgaria, no. 32644/09, § 81, 7 November 2019).
58. In the present case, as regards the freezing of the applicant association’s bank accounts, the Government’s objection seems to be limited to the continuation of the restrictions (see paragraph 54 above). However, the Government failed to explain how a request lodged in accordance with Article 121.3 of the CCrP dealing with examination of the applications and requests submitted to the investigating authorities (see paragraph 44 above) could constitute an effective remedy in respect of the continued freezing of the applicant association’s bank accounts ordered on the basis of a court decision.
59. As to the Government’s objection concerning the freezing of the applicant’s bank accounts, it appears from the documents in the case file that the applicant was not provided with a copy of the attachment order of 30 October 2014 following its delivery by the relevant court and learned about its existence only in December 2014 (see paragraphs 18 and 19 above). This failure of the domestic authorities deprived him of the possibility to challenge effectively the impugned attachment order before the relevant appellate court, within three days after its announcement. Moreover, the applicant could not be blamed for not trying to appeal against the attachment order of 30 October 2014 asking for restoration of the time-limit for lodging an appeal once he learned about its existence in December 2014 in view of the domestic courts’ refusal to examine, without giving any reasoning, the applicant association’s similar appeal against the Nasimi District Court’s order of 19 May 2014 (see paragraphs 14 and 16 above).
60. As regards the continuation of the restrictions on the applicant’s bank accounts, the Court has already found that a request submitted in accordance with Article 121.3 of the CCrP could not constitute an effective remedy in that connection (see paragraph 58 above) and the Government failed to specify any other remedy for that purpose. The Court also cannot overlook the fact that the applicants tried to make use of the judicial review procedure under Article 449 of the CCrP, but the domestic courts had refused to examine their complaint (see paragraphs 33-38 above).
61. For the above reasons, the Court finds that the applicants’ complaint cannot be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies, and that the Government’s objection in this regard must be dismissed.
62. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
63. The applicants maintained their complaint, submitting that the freezing of their bank accounts had constituted an unlawful and unjustified interference with their property rights.
(b) The Government
64. The Government submitted that the interference with the applicants’ rights had been lawful and justified. The interference was based on Article 248 of the CCrP and those provisions of the domestic law were sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application. They further maintained that the freezing of the applicants’ bank accounts constituted a restriction made in the public interest, with a view to ensuring the proper administration of justice.
(c) The third party
65. The Open Society Justice Initiative emphasized the importance of access to banking facilities for the functioning of non-governmental organisations and human rights lawyers and submitted that the restriction in that regard is a matter of significant concern. It noted that where similar restrictions are imposed on non-governmental organisations and lawyers, those restrictions should be carefully scrutinised, bearing in mind the crucial role played by human rights defenders acting in the public interest.
2. The Court’s assessment
66. The Court notes that it was not disputed by the Government that there had been an interference with the applicants’ property rights. In that connection, the Court reiterates that the freezing of bank accounts has to be regarded as a measure of control of the use of property (see Uzan and Others v. Turkey, nos. 19620/05 and 3 others, § 194, 5 March 2019, and Yunusova and Yunusov v. Azerbaijan (no. 2), no. 68817/14, § 167, 16 July 2020).
67. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see, among other authorities, Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 58, ECHR 1999 II, and Béláné Nagy v. Hungary [GC], no. 53080/13, § 112, 13 December 2016). This concept requires firstly that the impugned measures should have a basis in domestic law. It also refers to the quality of the law in question, requiring that it be accessible to the persons concerned, precise, and foreseeable. Although it is primarily for the national authorities to interpret and apply domestic law, the Court is required to verify whether the way in which the domestic law is interpreted and applied produces consequences consistent with the principles of the Convention, as interpreted in the light of the Court’s case law (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, §§ 109 and 110, ECHR 2000-I, and Batkivska Turbota Foundation v. Ukraine, no. 5876/15, § 56, 9 October 2018).
68. In that connection, the Court observes that it has already found in a previous case against Azerbaijan concerning attachment of property that the interference did not comply with the lawfulness requirement enshrined in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, since the applicant in that case did not belong to the categories of persons to whom an attachment measure could be applied. In particular, the Court held that in accordance with Article 248 et seq. of the CCrP, dealing with the attachment of property, the attachment could be ordered only in respect of property of the “accused person” or “other persons who could be held materially liable” for the criminal actions of the accused (see Rafig Aliyev v. Azerbaijan, no. 45875/06, §§ 122-26, 6 December 2011).
69. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court observes that the Government, while arguing that the interference was lawful under Article 248 of the CCrP, did not explain how that provision could be applied in respect of the applicants who had not been charged with any criminal offence within the framework of criminal case no. 142006023 or in other proceedings. In particular, it is undisputed by the parties that the applicant was not an accused person within the framework criminal case no. 142006023, but was only questioned on several occasions between 2014 and 2016. In that connection, the Court does not lose sight of the fact that the Nasimi District Court did not even refer to any legal provision as a legal basis for its order of 30 October 2014 in relation to the applicant’s account (see paragraph 18 above) (compare Frizen v. Russia, no. 58254/00, § 34, 24 March 2005).
70. Moreover, the Court cannot overlook the fact that although the institution of criminal responsibility of legal persons was introduced into the Azerbaijani Criminal Code on 7 March 2012, there were no procedural provisions in the CCrP relating to the measures applicable in respect of legal persons for their criminal responsibility until 29 November 2016 (see paragraph 43 above).
71. Lastly, the Court notes that it was not argued by the Government and it does not appear from the documents in the case file that any of the applicants could be a “person who could be held materially liable” for the criminal actions of another accused person.
72. In these circumstances, the Court concludes that the applicants did not belong to the categories of persons to whom an attachment measure could be applied under the domestic law and the interference could thus not be considered lawful within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The above conclusion makes it unnecessary to ascertain whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see Yunusova and Yunusov (no. 2), cited above, § 169).
73. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of both applicants.
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
74. The applicants complained that they had not had effective domestic remedies at their disposal in respect of their complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention as provided in Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. Admissibility
75. The Court notes that this complaint is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
76. The applicants maintained their complaint.
77. The Government contested their submissions.
78. The Court reiterates that Article 13 of the Convention guarantees the availability at national level of a remedy to enforce the substance of the Convention rights and freedoms in whatever form they may happen to be secured. The effect of that provision is thus to require the provision of a domestic remedy to deal with the substance of an “arguable complaint” under the Convention and to grant appropriate relief. The scope of the Contracting States’ obligations under Article 13 varies depending on the nature of the applicant’s complaint. However, the remedy required by Article 13 must be “effective” in practice as well as in law. The “effectiveness” of a “remedy” within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant (see Hirsi Jamaa and Others v. Italy [GC], no. 27765/09, § 197, ECHR 2012, and Edward and Cynthia Zammit Maempel v. Malta, no. 3356/15, § 66, 15 January 2019).
79. Having declared the applicants’ complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible, the Court finds that it was arguable. The applicants were therefore entitled to an “effective” domestic remedy within the meaning of Article 13.
80. The Court has already found that the domestic authorities’ failure to provide the applicants with a copy of the relevant attachment orders deprived them of their right to challenge those orders before the appellate courts (see paragraph 61 above). The Government also failed to submit that there was any other remedy by which the applicants could have challenged those attachment orders in these particular circumstances and the continuation of the restrictions imposed by those orders.
81. In view of the fact that the respondent State failed to provide to the applicants any remedies to contest the interference with their rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1., the Court concludes that the applicants did not have in practice an effective remedy in relation to their complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Yunusova and Yunusov (no. 2), cited above, § 178).
82. There has, accordingly, been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of both applicants.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 2 OF PROTOCOL No. 4 TO THE CONVENTION
83. The applicant complained that his right to leave his own country had been breached by the domestic authorities. The relevant part of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention reads as follows:
“2. Everyone shall be free to leave any country, including his own.
3. No restrictions shall be placed on the exercise of [this right] other than such as are in accordance with law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, for the maintenance of ordre public, for the prevention of crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others ...”
A. Admissibility
84. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
85. The applicant maintained that both travel bans imposed on him had been unlawful, had not pursued any legitimate aim and had not been a necessary measure in a democratic society.
86. The Government contested that there was a travel ban imposed on the applicant by the prosecuting authorities. As regards the travel ban imposed by the court, they submitted that it was in accordance with Article 355-5.1 of the CCP, pursued the legitimate aims of maintenance of public order and prevention of crime and was necessary in a democratic society.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) As regards the travel ban imposed by the prosecuting authorities
87. The Court refers to the general principles established in its case-law and set out in the judgment Mursaliyev and Others v. Azerbaijan (nos. 66650/13 and 10 others, §§ 29-31, 13 December 2018), which are equally pertinent to the present case.
88. In the present case, although the Government disputed the applicant’s assertion that there was a travel ban imposed on him by the prosecuting authorities, the Court notes that, in letters dated 28 December 2016, 8 August 2018, 7 June and 23 July 2019, the Prosecutor General’s Office clearly acknowledged the imposition of a travel ban on the applicant (see paragraphs 23-24 above). Furthermore, the fact that on 13 September 2015, prior to the imposition of the judicial travel ban, the applicant was prevented from travelling abroad (see paragraph 22 above) also confirms the applicant’s assertion. Accordingly, the Court accepts that the prosecuting authorities imposed a travel ban on the applicant which prevented him from travelling abroad. The Court agrees with the applicant that this measure amounted to an interference with his right to leave his own country within the meaning of Article 2 § 2 of Protocol No. 4.
89. As to the question whether the interference was in accordance with law, the Court notes that in Mursaliyev and Others (cited above, §§ 29-36) having examined an identical complaint based on the same facts, the Court found that the imposition of a travel ban on the applicants, who were only witnesses in criminal proceedings, by the investigating authorities in the absence of any judicial decision was not “in accordance with law”. The Court considers that the analysis and finding it made in the Mursaliyev and Others judgment also apply to the present case and sees no reason to deviate from that finding.
90. There has accordingly been a violation of the applicant’s right to leave his country, as guaranteed by Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention, on account of the travel ban imposed on him by the prosecuting authorities.
(b) As regards the travel ban imposed by the court
91. The Court notes that it is not in dispute between the parties that the domestic courts’ decision to restrict the applicant’s right to leave the country amounted to an interference with his right to leave his own country within the meaning of Article 2 § 2 of Protocol No. 4. That is also the Court’s opinion. It must therefore be examined whether it was “in accordance with law”, pursued one or more of the legitimate aims set out in Article 2 § 3 of Protocol No. 4 and whether it was “necessary in a democratic society” to achieve such an aim.
92. Without ruling on the question whether the imposition of a travel ban on the applicant could be considered justified in the light of the suspension of the court proceedings relating to the tax dispute between the applicant association and the tax authorities, the Court observes that such a measure could be imposed in accordance with Article 9.3.6-1 of the Migration Code and Article 355-5.1 of the CCP (see paragraphs 46-47 above). The Court also notes that a measure which seeks to restrict an individual’s right to leave the country for the purpose of securing the payment of taxes may pursue the legitimate aims of maintenance of ordre public and protection of the rights of others (see Riener v. Bulgaria, no. 46343/99, §§ 114-17, 23 May 2006). However, having regard to the particular circumstances of the present case, the respondent Government has not demonstrated that the impugned measure pursued any of the legitimate aims set out in Article 2 § 3 of Protocol No. 4.
93. In particular, the Court notes that neither the tax authorities nor the domestic courts sought to collect the tax debt in question without imposing a travel ban on the applicant. In particular, they did not consider deducting the alleged tax debt from the money available on the applicants’ bank accounts or seizing any other assets owned by them despite the applicant’s explicit request in that regard in the court proceedings (see paragraphs 29 and 31 above). The Government have not contested the applicant’s submission that the sum allegedly due, AZN 7,385, was available on the bank accounts.
94. The tax authorities and the domestic courts also failed to put forward any argument how the imposition of the travel ban in question was necessary for the collection of the tax debt. In that connection, the Court reiterates that restriction on the right to leave one’s country on grounds of unpaid debt can only be justified as long as it serves its aim – recovering the debt (see Napijalo v. Croatia, no. 66485/01, 13 November 2003, §§ 78-82, and Stetsov v. Ukraine, no. 5170/15, § 29, 11 May 2021).
95. The foregoing considerations are sufficient to enable the Court to conclude that the interference in question with the applicant’s right to leave his country did not pursue a legitimate aim. This finding makes it unnecessary to determine whether the interference was necessary in a democratic society.
96. There has accordingly been a violation of the applicant’s right to leave his country, as guaranteed by Article 2 § 2 of Protocol No. 4, on account of the travel ban imposed on him by the domestic courts.
V. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 18 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION AND ARTICLE 2 OF PROTOCOL No. 4 TO THE CONVENTION
97. Relying on Article 34 and 18 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 11 of the Convention, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention, the applicants argued that their Convention rights had been restricted for purposes other than those prescribed in the Convention. Having regard to the circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the present complaint falls to be examined solely under Article 18 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of both applicants and, also in conjunction with Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention in respect of the applicant. Article 18 provides:
“The restrictions permitted under [the] Convention to the said rights and freedoms shall not be applied for any purpose other than those for which they have been prescribed.”
A. Admissibility
98. At the outset, the Court considers that both the right to protection of property and the right to freedom of movement are qualified rights subject to restrictions permitted under the Convention (see OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos v. Russia, no. 14902/04, §§ 663-66, 20 September 2011; Merabishvili v. Georgia ([GC], no. 72508/13, §§ 265, 271, 287 and 290, 28 November 2017; and Navalnyy v. Russia ([GC], nos. 29580/12 and 4 others, §§ 164 165, 15 November 2018) and finds that the complaint under Article 18 is applicable in the present case. The Court also notes that the complaint under that provision is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
99. The applicants submitted that the restrictions complained of had been politically motivated and had been applied with the intention of punishing them for their engagement in human rights defence work. In that connection, they noted that they had actively participated in the protection of human rights in the country and the measures taken against them intended to paralyse their work. They also noted that the adoption of those measures could not be viewed in isolation and was part of a targeted repressive campaign against human rights defenders and NGO activists, who were either subjected to similar restrictions or were arrested and detained on the basis of various fabricated accusations.
(b) The Government
100. The Government’s submissions were exactly the same as those that they had made in Rashad Hasanov and Others v. Azerbaijan (nos. 48653/13 and 3 others, §§ 114-15, 7 June 2018).
(c) The third party
101. The International Commission of Jurists submitted a summary of international standards on non-interference with the work of lawyers and underlined the special role of the lawyers in the administration of justice. The third party expressed its concern about the situation of human rights defenders in Azerbaijan and the practice of harassment of the lawyers, drawing attention to the importance of the national context.
2. The Court’s assessment
102. The Court will examine the applicants’ complaint in the light of the relevant general principles set out by the Grand Chamber in its judgments in Merabishvili (cited above, §§ 287-317) and Navalnyy (cited above, §§ 164 65).
103. The Court considers at the outset that in the present application the complaint under Article 18 constitutes a fundamental aspect of the case that has not been addressed above in relation to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention and merits a separate examination.
104. The Court notes that it has already found that the freezing of the applicants’ bank accounts and the imposition of the travel ban on the applicant by the prosecuting authorities were unlawful and the imposition of the travel ban on the applicant by the domestic courts did not pursue any legitimate aim. Therefore, no issue arises in the present case with respect to the plurality of purposes where a restriction is applied both for an ulterior purpose and a purpose prescribed by the Convention (compare Merabishvili, cited above, §§ 318 54).
105. However, the mere fact that the restriction of the applicants’ rights did not pursue a purpose prescribed by the Convention is not in itself a sufficient basis to conclude that Article 18 has also been violated. Therefore, it remains to be seen whether there is proof that the authorities’ actions were actually driven by an ulterior purpose.
106. The Court considers that, in the present case, it can be established beyond a reasonable doubt that such proof follows from a juxtaposition of the relevant case-specific facts with contextual factors.
107. Firstly, as regards the applicants’ status, the Court notes that the applicant association is specialised in protection of human rights and the applicant is a lawyer and the legal representative before the Court in a large number of cases. The Court reiterates that it attaches particular importance to the special role of human rights defenders in promoting and defending human rights, including in close cooperation with the Council of Europe, and their contribution to the protection of human rights in the member States (see Aliyev v. Azerbaijan, nos. 68762/14 and 71200/14, § 208, 20 September 2018). In that connection, the Court is struck by the fact that, at the request of the prosecuting authorities, on 30 October 2014 the Nasimi District Court adopted, without relying on any legal basis, an attachment order in respect of an amount of money transferred from the Council of Europe to the applicant as legal aid on the grounds that the amount in question constituted the object of a criminal offence and was used “as its instrument” (see paragraph 18 above). The Court deems that this fact points to the possibility that the attachment of the applicant’s bank accounts was used as a measure preventing him from exercising his professional legal activity.
108. Secondly, the Court takes note of the fact that the restriction of the applicants’ rights within the framework of a criminal case in which they were not charged with any criminal offence was not only devoid of any legal basis, but was also applied in a manner capable of paralyzing their work. In particular, the domestic courts and the Government did not give any explanation why the attachment orders were not limited to specific amounts, but were applied in respect of all bank accounts of the applicants, preventing them practically from conducting their professional activities. They also failed to put forward legitimate reasons for the imposition of the travel bans on the applicant.
109. Thirdly, the Court considers that the applicants’ situation cannot be viewed in isolation and should be viewed against the backdrop of the arbitrary arrest and detention of government critics, civil society activists and human rights defenders in the respondent State. The Court points out that in the case of Aliyev (cited above, § 223) it found that its judgments in a series of similar cases reflected a pattern of arbitrary arrest and detention of government critics, civil society activists and human rights defenders through retaliatory prosecutions and misuse of the criminal law in breach of Article 18. The Court also cannot overlook the reports and opinions made by various international human rights instances about the use of freezing of bank accounts and imposition of travel bans on the civil society activists in this context (see paragraphs 49-51 above).
110. The Court considers that the above mentioned elements are sufficient to enable it to conclude that there was an ulterior purpose in the restriction of the applicants’ rights ; namely, it was to punish the applicants for their activities in the area of human rights and to prevent them from continuing those activities.
111. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 18 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of both applicants and in conjunction with Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention in respect of the applicant.
VI. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
112. Article 46 of the Convention, in so far as relevant, reads as follows:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution. ...”
113. The applicants argued that the most appropriate form of individual redress would be the immediate cessation of the freezing of their bank accounts and the lifting of one of the two travel bans which continued to be imposed on the applicant. The applicants also asked the Court to indicate to the Government to implement general measures addressing the protection of civil society activists and human rights defenders.
114. The Government did not make any submissions in that respect.
115. The Court reiterates that, by virtue of Article 46 of the Convention, the Contracting Parties have undertaken to abide by the final judgments of the Court in any case to which they are parties, with execution being supervised by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe. In the present case, given the variety of means available to achieve restitutio in integrum and the nature of the issues involved, the Committee of Ministers is better placed than the Court to assess the specific measures to be taken. It should thus be left to the Committee of Ministers to supervise, on the basis of the information provided by the respondent State and with due regard to the applicants’ evolving situation, the adoption of measures aimed, among others, at eliminating any impediment to the exercise of their activities. Those measures should be feasible, timely, adequate and sufficient to ensure the maximum possible reparation for the violations found by the Court, and they should put the applicants, as far as possible, in the position in which they had been before the freezing of their bank accounts and the imposition of the travel bans on the applicant (see Aliyev, cited above, § 228, and Bagirov v. Azerbaijan, nos. 81024/12 and 28198/15, § 110, 25 June 2020).
VII. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
116. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
117. The applicant association claimed 42,416.15 euros (EUR) and the applicant EUR 11,337.60 in respect of pecuniary damage. In that connection, they referred to the disruption of their activities, the inability to access various funds, the payment of the taxes and the unpaid salary to the applicant from grants.
118. The applicants each claimed EUR 30,000 in respect of non pecuniary damage.
119. The Government submitted that the amounts claimed by the applicants were unsubstantiated and excessive and that a finding of a violation would constitute sufficient just satisfaction. They noted that the applicants had not been deprived of their property and that their inability to receive grants could not be considered as a ground for claiming pecuniary damage since the grants were not made for their personal enrichment.
120. The Court observes at the outset that the applicants were not deprived of the amounts of money available on their bank accounts on account of the freezing of their bank accounts. The Court also notes that the present application does not concern the tax inspection carried out by the domestic authorities and the question of lawfulness of the imposition of a tax debt on the applicant association as a result of that inspection. Accordingly, the Court does not discern any causal link between the violations found and the pecuniary damage alleged in respect of the tax debt paid by the applicant association.
121. However, the Court has no doubt that the freezing of the applicants’ bank accounts disturbed the applicants’ activities and entailed pecuniary losses for them. At the same time, it would be speculative to calculate the exact amount of those losses. The Court also considers that the applicants have suffered non pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated for solely by the finding of a violation, and that compensation should thus be awarded (see Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish and Others v. Romania [GC], no. 76943/11, § 182, 29 November 2016, and Religious Community of Jehovah’s Witnesses v. Azerbaijan, no. 52884/09, § 50, 20 February 2020). Making an assessment on an equitable basis and in the light of all the information in its possession, the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicant association an aggregate sum of EUR 8,000 and the applicant an aggregate sum of EUR 15,000, all heads of damage combined, plus any tax that may be chargeable on those amounts (compare Bagirov, cited above, § 116, and Yunusova and Yunusov (no. 2), cited above, § 206).
B. Costs and expenses
122. The applicants claimed EUR 1,900 for legal services incurred before the domestic courts and the Court for their representation by Mr R. Mustafazade. They submitted the relevant contracts concluded with Mr R. Mustafazade and asked that the compensation in that connection be paid directly into Mr R. Mustafazade’s bank account.
123. The applicants also claimed 13,346.56 pounds sterling (GBP) for legal services incurred in the proceedings before the Court for their representation by Ms R. Remezaite and Mr P. Leach, as well as EUR 905.55 for translation. In support of that claim, they submitted time sheets from their representatives and invoices for translation expenses.
124. The Government considered that the amounts claimed by the applicants were unsubstantiated and excessive. They asked the Court to apply a strict approach in respect of the applicants’ claims and pointed out that the applicants had failed to submit any contract concerning their representation by Ms R. Remezaite and Mr P. Leach and to justify the claimed costs and expenses.
125. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. The Court also points out that under Rule 60 of the Rules of Court any claim for just satisfaction must be itemised and submitted in writing together with the relevant supporting documents or vouchers, failing which the Chamber may reject the claim in whole or in part (see Malik Babayev v. Azerbaijan, no. 30500/11, § 97, 1 June 2017). In the present case the applicant failed to produce any contract concerning their representation by Ms R. Remezaite and Mr P. Leach or any other relevant documents showing that they had paid or were under a legal obligation to pay the fees charged by their representatives (see Merabishvili, cited above, § 372; Bagirov, cited above, § 120; and Nasirov and Others v. Azerbaijan, no. 58717/10, § 89, 20 February 2020). As regards the part of the claim for translation of various documents, the Court does not consider that the translation of those documents was necessary for its proceedings (see Allahverdiyev v. Azerbaijan, no. 49192/08, § 71, 6 March 2014, and Sakit Zahidov v. Azerbaijan, no. 51164/07, § 70, 12 November 2015). Therefore, the Court dismisses that part of the claim for costs and expenses.
126. As regards the applicants’ representation by Mr R. Mustafazade, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the amount of work carried out by the applicants’ representative, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 1,900 to the applicants, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants. The Court also specifies that the amount awarded in that respect is to be paid directly into the bank account of Mr R. Mustafazade.
C. Default interest
127. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Decides to join the applications;
2. Declares the applications admissible;
3. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of both applicants;
4. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of both applicants;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention on account of the travel ban imposed on the applicant by the prosecuting authorities;
6. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention on account of the travel ban imposed on the applicant by the domestic courts;
7. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 18 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of both applicants and in conjunction with Article 2 of Protocol No. 4 to the Convention in respect of the applicant;
8. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 8,000 (eight thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, to the applicant association in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 15,000 (fifteen thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, to the applicant in respect of pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 1,900 (one thousand and nine hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses, to be paid directly into the bank account of their representative, Mr R. Mustafazade;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
9. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 14 October 2021, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Martina Keller Síofra O’Leary
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUINTA SEZIONE
CASO DI DEMOCRAZIA E CENTRO RISORSE DIRITTI UMANI E MUSTAFAYEV c. AZERBAIGIAN
(Domande n. 74288/14 e 64568/16 )

GIUDIZIO

Art 18 (+ Art 1 P1 e Art 2 P4) • Restrizione per scopi non autorizzati • Congelamento dei conti bancari di un difensore dei diritti umani e della sua ONG e imposizione di divieti di viaggio allo scopo di punirli e ostacolare il loro lavoro
Art 1 P 1 • Controllo dell'uso dei beni • Blocco illegittimo dei conti bancari dei ricorrenti • I ricorrenti non sono accusati di alcun reato e non sono materialmente responsabili delle azioni di un altro imputato
Articolo 13 (+ Articolo 1 P1) • Ricorso effettivo • Omissione delle autorità nazionali di fornire ai richiedenti tutti i mezzi di ricorso per contestare l'interferenza con i loro diritti di proprietà
Art 2 P4 • Libertà di lasciare un paese • Imposizione di un divieto di viaggio in relazione a un presunto debito fiscale, senza alcuna misura adottata per riscuoterlo • Imposizione illegale di un divieto di viaggio in relazione a procedimenti penali contro terzi

STRASBURGO

14 ottobre 2021
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.


Nel caso del Centro risorse per la democrazia e i diritti umani e Mustafayev c. Azerbaigian,
La Corte Europea dei Diritti dell'Uomo (Quinta Sezione), riunita in una Sezione composta da:
Siofra O'Leary, Presidente,
Ganna Yudkivska,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
Latif Huseynov,
Jovan Ilievski,
Arnfinn Bårdsen,
Mattias Guyomar, giudici,
e Martina Keller, vice cancelliere di sezione,
Aver riguardo di:
i ricorsi (n. 74288/14 e 64568/16 ) contro la Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian presentati alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") dal Democracy and Human Rights Resource Center ("l'associazione richiedente") (domande n. 74288/14 e 64568/16 ), e il sig. Asabali Gurban oglu Mustafayev ( ?sab?li Qurban o?lu Mustafayev – "il ricorrente"), cittadino azero, (domanda n. 64568/16 ) , rispettivamente il 26 novembre 2014 e il 31 ottobre 2016;
la decisione di notificare le domande al governo azero ("il governo");
le osservazioni presentate dal Governo convenuto e le osservazioni in replica presentate dai ricorrenti;
le osservazioni presentate dall'Open Society Justice Initiative e dalla Commissione internazionale dei giuristi, autorizzate ad intervenire dal Presidente della Sezione;
Avendo deliberato in forma riservata il 21 settembre 2021,
Emette la seguente sentenza, adottata in tale data:
INTRODUZIONE
1. I presenti due ricorsi riguardano le restrizioni imposte ai conti bancari dei ricorrenti e alla libertà di circolazione del ricorrente dalle autorità nazionali. I ricorrenti sollevano varie doglianze sotto gli articoli 6, 11, 13, 18 e 34 della Convenzione, l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione e l'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 alla Convenzione.
I FATTI
2. I dettagli dei richiedenti ei nomi dei loro rappresentanti sono elencati nell'Appendice.
3. Il governo era rappresentato dal suo agente, il sig. Ç. sg?rov.
I. INFORMAZIONI DI BASE
4. Il ricorrente è un avvocato e membro dell'Ordine degli avvocati dell'Azerbaigian. Si è specializzato nella tutela dei diritti umani e ha rappresentato i ricorrenti in un gran numero di cause dinanzi alla Corte .
5. È anche il fondatore e presidente dell'associazione richiedente, un'organizzazione non governativa specializzata in educazione giuridica e tutela dei diritti umani . L'associazione richiedente è stata registrata dal Ministero della Giustizia il 30 giugno 2006 ed ha acquisito lo status di persona giuridica.
6. Il 22 aprile 2014 l'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale ha aperto il procedimento penale n. 142006023 ai sensi degli articoli 308,1 (abuso di potere) e 313 (falsificazione da parte di un funzionario) del codice penale in relazione a presunte irregolarità nell'attività finanziaria di alcune organizzazioni non governative . La decisione non ha fornito un elenco esaustivo delle organizzazioni non governative contro le quali è stato avviato un procedimento penale, ma ha fatto riferimento alle attività di alcune organizzazioni non governative, senza citare il nome dei ricorrenti.
7. Subito dopo i conti bancari di numerose organizzazioni non governative e attivisti della società civile sono stati congelati dalle autorità nazionali nell'ambito del procedimento penale n. 142006023 . Il procedimento nazionale relativo al congelamento di quei conti bancari sono oggetto dei due presenti e di altri ricorsi pendenti dinanzi alla Corte (vedi, ad esempio, i casi comunicati, Imranova e altri c. Azerbaijan , nn. 59462/14 e altri 4; economica Research Center e altri c. Azerbaigian , nn.74254 / 14 e altri 5, e Abdullayev e altri c. Azerbaigian , nn. 74363/14 e altri 7).
8. Vari difensori dei diritti umani e attivisti della società civile sono stati inoltre arrestati nell'ambito dello stesso procedimento penale in relazione alle loro attività all'interno o con varie organizzazioni non governative. I procedimenti interni relativi all'arresto e alla custodia cautelare di alcuni di questi difensori dei diritti umani e attivisti della società civile sono già stati esaminati dalla Corte (si veda, ad esempio, Rasul Jafarov c. Azerbaigian , n. 69981/14 , 17 marzo 2016 ; Mammadli c. Azerbaigian , n. 47145/14 , 19 aprile 2018; Aliyev c. Azerbaijan , n. 68762/14 e 71200/14 , 20 settembre 2018; e Yunusova e Yunusov c. Azerbaigian (n. 2) , n. 68817/14 , 16 luglio 2020).
9. Nel luglio 2014 il ricorrente è stato invitato presso l'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale dove è stato interrogato sulle attività dell'associazione ricorrente. Tra il luglio 2014 e il 2016 è stato nuovamente interrogato, a più riprese, dalla Procura sulle medesime attività.
II. IMPOSIZIONE DELLE RESTRIZIONI SUI CONTI BANCARI DEI RICHIEDENTI
A. Per quanto riguarda i conti bancari dell'associazione richiedente
10. A seguito di una richiesta presentata dall'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale, il 19 maggio 2014 il tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi , basandosi sull'articolo 248 del codice di procedura penale ("il CCrP"), ha emesso un ordine di sequestro nei confronti di tutti i conti bancari del associazione richiedente ospitata presso la Banca Internazionale dell'Azerbaigian , in attesa dell'indagine ( cinay?t t?qibinin davam etdiyi müdd?t ?rzind? ), nel procedimento penale n. 142006023. L'ordinanza si riferiva alla richiesta delle autorità inquirenti secondo la quale risultava che la somma di 11.993 dollari statunitensi, ricevuta il 14 Maggio 2014 dall'associazione ricorrente del National Endowment for Democracy degli Stati Uniti d'America, ha costituito oggetto di un reato ed è stato utilizzato “come suo strumento”. Secondo l'ordinanza, era disponibile a presentare ricorso entro tre giorni dal suo annuncio. Dalle trascrizioni dell'udienza del tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi del 19 maggio 2014 risulta che non era pubblico e si è svolto in assenza del rappresentante dell'associazione ricorrente. Il fascicolo non contiene alcun documento che indichi che all'associazione richiedente sia stata fornita una copia dell'ordinanza.
11. Secondo l'associazione ricorrente, in una data non specificata nel luglio 2014 il suo presidente, il ricorrente, si è recato presso la filiale locale della Banca internazionale dell'Azerbaigian dove è stato informato da un funzionario di banca dell'ordine di sequestro.
12. Il 14 luglio 2014 l'associazione ricorrente ha chiesto al tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi una copia dell'ordine di sequestro e l'ha ricevuta lo stesso giorno.
13. Il 16 luglio 2014 l'associazione ricorrente ha impugnato l'ordinanza della Corte distrettuale di Nasimi del 19 maggio 2014 , lamentando una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione. Ha sostenuto che un ordine di sequestro non poteva essere preso nei confronti dei suoi conti bancari ai sensi dell'articolo 248 del CCrP poiché né l'associazione ricorrente né i suoi membri erano stati accusati in alcun procedimento penale. Ha inoltre rilevato che un provvedimento di sequestro conservativo può essere adottato ai sensi dell'articolo 248, paragrafo 1, del CCrP solo al fine di garantire il pagamento di un'azione civile o la confisca dei beni quando prevista dal diritto penale. Tuttavia, il procedimento penale n. 142006023 è stato istituito ai sensi degli artt 308.1 e 313 cp che non prevedevano la confisca dei beni quale sanzione. Infine, ha sottolineato che il provvedimento di sequestro era sproporzionato in quanto, anche supponendo che vi fossero dubbi sull'origine del denaro ricevuto dal National Endowment for Democracy degli Stati Uniti d'America, il provvedimento di sequestro avrebbe dovuto riguardare solo l'importo contestato, e non tutti i conti bancari dell'associazione richiedente. Unitamente al proprio ricorso, l'associazione ricorrente ha presentato anche istanza di ripristino del termine per la presentazione del ricorso. A sostegno della sua richiesta di ripristino, ha sostenuto di non essere mai stata informata dell'udienza del 19 maggio 2014 del tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi e di aver ottenuto copia dell'ordinanza impugnata solo il 14 luglio 2014.
14. Il 18 luglio 2014 il tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi ha respinto la richiesta dell'associazione ricorrente per il ripristino del termine per presentare ricorso. Il tribunale ha ritenuto che l'associazione ricorrente non avesse presentato alcuna prova che dimostrasse l'esistenza di un motivo valido per il mancato rispetto del termine di tre giorni per presentare ricorso. La decisione non ha affrontato gli argomenti dell'associazione ricorrente relativi all'omissione da parte del tribunale di informarla della sua udienza del 19 maggio 2014 o di fornirle una copia dell'ordinanza impugnata di propria iniziativa.
15. Il 21 luglio 2014 l'associazione ricorrente ha impugnato tale decisione, ribadendo i suoi precedenti argomenti.
16. Il 24 luglio 2014 la Corte d'appello di Baku ha respinto il ricorso, senza esaminare le argomentazioni dell'associazione ricorrente in merito al ripristino del termine per presentare ricorso.
B. Per quanto riguarda i conti bancari del richiedente
17. Risulta dai documenti nel fascicolo che in una data non specificata nel 2014 le autorità inquirenti hanno presentato una richiesta al tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi per un ordine di sequestro in relazione ai conti bancari del ricorrente nell'ambito della causa penale n. 142006023 . Nonostante esplicita richiesta della Corte al Governo di presentare le copie di tutti i documenti relativi al procedimento nazionale, il governo non è riuscito a fornire alla Corte una copia della suddetta richiesta.
18. Il 30 ottobre 2014 il tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi ha accolto la richiesta e ha emesso un ordine di sequestro in relazione ai conti bancari del ricorrente ospitati presso la Banca internazionale dell'Azerbaigian, ad eccezione delle operazioni in entrata, in attesa dell'indagine nel procedimento penale n. 142006023. L'ordinanza non faceva riferimento ad alcuna disposizione di legge come base giuridica. Quanto alla giustificazione del provvedimento di sequestro, il giudice ha richiamato la richiesta dell'autorità inquirente nei seguenti termini:
“[Secondo] l'autorità competente in materia di procedimento penale, in relazione alla sospensione delle operazioni relative a 850 euro trasferiti dall'organizzazione internazionale “Conseil de l'Europe” [in francese nel testo originale], con sede nella Repubblica francese, sul conto corrente n. ... di Mustafayev Asabali Gurban oglu [il ricorrente], cittadino azero nato il ..., cliente della Banca Internazionale dell'Azerbaigian, in quanto vi sono prove che tale somma di denaro, costituente oggetto di reato, era utilizzato come suo strumento, è necessario pignorare i conti bancari di Mustafayev Asabali Gurban oglu, ospitato presso la Banca Internazionale dell'Azerbaigian, durante il periodo di prosecuzione del procedimento penale, salvo che per le operazioni in entrata, al fine di assicurare lo svolgimento delle un completo,
Dalle trascrizioni dell'udienza del tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi del 30 ottobre 2014 risulta che non era pubblico e si è svolto in assenza del ricorrente e del suo rappresentante. Il fascicolo non contiene alcun documento che indichi che al ricorrente è stata fornita una copia di tale ordinanza.
19. Secondo il ricorrente, in una data non specificata nel dicembre 2014 si è recato presso la filiale locale della Banca internazionale dell'Azerbaigian per verificare se 850 euro (EUR) fossero stati trasferiti sul suo conto dal Consiglio d'Europa a titolo di pagamento di aiuto da parte della Corte. Tuttavia, è stato informato da un funzionario di banca dell'esistenza di un ordine di sequestro conservativo nei confronti dei suoi conti bancari.
20. A seguito di una richiesta presentata dalle autorità inquirenti, il 28 agosto 2015 il tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi ha deciso di rimuovere il sequestro conservativo relativo all'importo di EUR 850 trasferito sul conto del ricorrente dal Consiglio d'Europa.
III. IMPOSIZIONE DI DIVIETI DI VIAGGIO
A. Il divieto di viaggio imposto dalle autorità giudiziarie
21. In una data non specificata nell'autunno 2014 il ricorrente ha appreso che il suo diritto di lasciare il paese era stato limitato e che non gli era più permesso di lasciare l'Azerbaigian.
22. Secondo il ricorrente, il 13 settembre 2015 ha tentato di prendere un volo da Baku a Tbilisi per partecipare a un evento. Tuttavia, è stato informato oralmente all'aeroporto di Baku che gli era stato imposto un divieto di viaggio dalle autorità giudiziarie. Non gli è stato fornito alcun documento scritto.
23. A seguito delle numerose richieste del ricorrente a varie autorità nazionali, con lettere datate 28 dicembre 2016, 8 agosto 2018 e 7 giugno 2019 l'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale lo ha informato che la sua domanda relativa all'imposizione di un divieto di viaggio nei suoi confronti è stata aggiunta al fascicolo del caso del procedimento penale n. 142006023 e sarebbe stato informato del suo risultato.
24. Con lettera del 23 luglio 2019 l'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale ha informato il ricorrente che il divieto di viaggio impostogli era stato revocato il 23 luglio 2019 in quanto tale restrizione non era più necessaria nell'ambito del procedimento penale n. 142006023.
B. Il divieto di viaggio imposto da un tribunale per debito tributario dell'associazione richiedente
25. A seguito di un'ispezione effettuata dalle autorità fiscali in relazione alle attività finanziarie dell'associazione ricorrente, il 12 e 13 marzo 2015 le autorità fiscali hanno redatto un verbale e hanno deciso che l'associazione ricorrente avrebbe dovuto versare allo Stato 4.897 manat azerbaigiani (AZN ) (circa EUR 2.450 all'epoca dei fatti).
26. In data 14 aprile 2015 l'associazione ricorrente ha depositato un ricorso, chiedendo al giudice di dichiarare invalido il verbale dell'Agenzia delle Entrate del 12 marzo 2015 e la decisione del 13 marzo 2015.
27. Il 29 ottobre 2015 il tribunale amministrativo-economico di Sumgait ha accolto la richiesta dell'amministrazione finanziaria di sospendere l'esame della domanda dell'associazione ricorrente in attesa del procedimento penale in relazione alla sua attività.
28. A seguito di una richiesta presentata dalle autorità fiscali, l'8 luglio 2016 il tribunale della città di Sumgait ha deciso di limitare il diritto del ricorrente di lasciare il paese . La corte ha invocato gli articoli 355-5 e 355-7 del codice di procedura civile ("il CCP") e ha rilevato che il ricorrente era il capo dell'organo esecutivo dell'associazione ricorrente che aveva un debito fiscale per un importo di AZN 7.385 (circa EUR 3.700 all'epoca dei fatti). Sebbene la decisione del tribunale indicasse che il diritto del ricorrente di lasciare il paese era temporaneamente limitato ( müv?qq?ti olaraq ), non prevedeva alcun limite di tempo per la restrizione imposta.
29. Il 28 luglio 2016 il ricorrente ha presentato ricorso contro tale decisione, rilevando che non vi era alcuna decisione del tribunale che dichiarasse che l'associazione ricorrente aveva un debito fiscale poiché i relativi procedimenti nazionali erano stati sospesi. In ogni caso, anche supponendo che ci fosse un debito d'imposta, poteva essere pagato dalle somme sul conto bancario dell'associazione richiedente e non c'era motivo per limitare il suo diritto di lasciare il paese. In tale contesto, ha anche sottolineato che gli era già stato imposto un divieto di viaggio dalle autorità inquirenti.
30. Il 22 Settembre 2016 la Corte d'appello di Sumgait ha confermato la decisione del giudice di primo grado del 28 luglio 2016, sostenendo che l'esistenza di un divieto di viaggio precedente non ha impedito l'imposizione di un divieto di viaggio da da parte di una diversa autorità statale in un procedimento separato. La corte d'appello non ha affrontato gli altri argomenti del ricorrente.
31. Il 5 dicembre 2016 il ricorrente ha presentato ricorso per cassazione, ribadendo le sue precedenti doglianze.
32. Il 9 febbraio 2017 la Corte Suprema ha respinto il ricorso per cassazione del ricorrente.
IV. ALTRI RIMEDI UTILIZZATI DAI RICORRENTI
33. Il 31 maggio 2016 il ricorrente ha presentato una denuncia al tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi lamentando l'illegittimità delle azioni delle autorità inquirenti ai sensi dell'articolo 449 del CCrP (la procedura di riesame della legittimità delle azioni o delle decisioni procedurali delle autorità inquirenti) . In particolare, ha chiesto al giudice di dichiarare illegittima l'imposizione di un divieto di viaggio nei suoi confronti da parte delle autorità inquirenti e l'imposizione di restrizioni sui conti bancari dei ricorrenti.
34. Il 5 luglio 2016 il tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi ha rifiutato di accogliere la domanda, ritenendo che le azioni delle autorità inquirenti denunciate non potessero essere impugnate dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali ai sensi dell'articolo 449 del CCrP. Al ricorrente è stata fornita copia di tale decisione il 14 luglio 2016.
35. Con lettera datata 15 luglio 2016, un giudice del tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi ha rinviato il successivo ricorso del ricorrente della stessa data, informandolo di aver mancato il termine per presentare ricorso.
36. Il 26 luglio 2016 il ricorrente ha impugnato la lettera del giudice, sostenendo di non aver mancato il termine in questione.
37. Il 4 agosto 2014 la Corte d'appello di Baku ha deciso di rinviare la causa al giudice di primo grado, ritenendo che la questione del ripristino dei termini per proporre ricorso dovesse essere esaminata dal giudice a quo.
38. Non ci sono informazioni nel fascicolo di causa su ulteriori sviluppi relativi a tali procedimenti.
V. ULTERIORI SVILUPPI
39. Il 19 dicembre 2018 l'associazione ricorrente ha pagato il debito fiscale imposto dalle autorità fiscali.
40. Non ci sono informazioni nel fascicolo di causa su ulteriori sviluppi riguardo al congelamento dei conti bancari dei richiedenti.
41. Nessuna informazione è disponibile nel fascicolo per quanto riguarda l'esito del procedimento penale n. 142006023.
QUADRO GIURIDICO PERTINENTE
I. DIRITTO NAZIONALE PERTINENTE
42. Gli articoli 308 e 313 del codice penale sono descritti in dettaglio nella sentenza della Corte Rasul Jafarov c. Azerbaigian (n. 69981/14 , §§ 53-54, 17 marzo 2016).
43. L'istituto della responsabilità penale delle persone giuridiche è stato introdotto per la prima volta nel codice penale con una legge del 7 marzo 2012 sotto forma di un nuovo capitolo (15-2) che elencava le misure applicabili nei confronti delle persone giuridiche. Tuttavia, le disposizioni procedurali relative a tali misure sono state adottate nella forma di un nuovo capo (LVI - I) del codice di procedura penale ("il CCrP") solo con legge del 29 novembre 2016.
44. L' articolo 121 della CCrP riguarda l'obbligo delle autorità inquirenti di esaminare le domande e le richieste loro presentate. Ai sensi dell'articolo 121, paragrafo 3, il rigetto di una domanda o richiesta non impedisce la sua rinnovata presentazione in fasi successive del procedimento penale o ad altra autorità inquirente. L'istanza o richiesta può essere rinnovata se vengono addotte nuove prove o se viene accertato nel corso del procedimento penale che deve essere concesso.
45. Secondo gli articoli 248 e 249 del CCrP, al fine di garantire l'esecuzione di una sentenza nella sua parte relativa a un'azione civile o la confisca dei beni nelle circostanze previste dal diritto penale, un investigatore o pubblico ministero può rivolgersi a un tribunale per il pignoramento dei beni del presunto autore di reato. Il pignoramento di beni impedisce al proprietario o alla proprietaria di disporre e, se necessario, di utilizzare il bene . In particolare, la parte rilevante dell'articolo 248 prevede quanto segue:
Articolo 248. Natura del pignoramento dei beni
“248.1. Attaccamento di proprietà :
248.1.1. deve essere effettuato allo scopo di garantire un'azione civile o la confisca dei beni nelle circostanze previste dal diritto penale;
...
248.2. Proprietà della persona accusata o di proprietà di persone che possono essere ritenute responsabili materialmente, indipendentemente da quello che comprende questo immobile o da chi li possiede, possono essere sottoposti a sequestro.
248.3Il sequestro si applica alla quota dell'imputato nei beni comuni dell'imputato e del suo coniuge o nei beni posseduti dall'imputato in comune con altre persone. Se vi sono prove sufficienti che il bene [era uno strumento di un reato, era un oggetto di un reato o costituiva un provento di reato], l'intero bene o la maggior parte di esso viene pignorato.
[Se l'oggetto o il provento del reato è stato utilizzato, eliminato o non è disponibile per la confisca per altri motivi], il denaro o altri beni appartenenti all'imputato, di valore equivalente [allo strumento o al provento del reato], sono soggetti a sequestro. ..."
46. Le disposizioni pertinenti del diritto interno relative al diritto di una persona di lasciare il paese e l'articolo 449 del CCrP sono descritte in dettaglio nella sentenza della Corte Mursaliyev e altri c. Azerbaigian (nn. 66650/13 e 10 altri, §§ 15-18, 13 dicembre 2018). Inoltre, il 20 ottobre 2015 il mancato pagamento delle tasse è stato aggiunto all'articolo 9.3.6-1 del Codice dell'immigrazione come uno dei casi in cui il diritto di un cittadino a lasciare il Paese può essere limitato sulla base di una decisione del tribunale.
47. Il 20 ottobre 2015 è stato aggiunto al codice di procedura civile un nuovo capitolo (capitolo 40-2) relativo ai procedimenti sulla limitazione temporanea del diritto di lasciare il paese dei contribuenti persone fisiche o dei capi degli organi esecutivi delle persone giuridiche ( “il PCC”). In particolare, ai sensi dell'articolo 355-5.1 del CCP , l'autorità nazionale competente ha il diritto di chiedere al tribunale competente di limitare temporaneamente il diritto delle suddette persone di lasciare il paese al fine di garantire il pagamento del debito fiscale.
II. MATERIALE INTERNAZIONALE PERTINENTE
48. Numerosi documenti internazionali pertinenti relativi alla protezione dei difensori dei diritti umani sono descritti in dettaglio nella sentenza della Corte Aliyev c. Azerbaijan (nn. 68762/14 e 71200/14 , §§ 88-92, 20 settembre 2018).
49. Il 19 agosto 2014 l'Ufficio dell'Alto Commissario delle Nazioni Unite per i diritti umani ha pubblicato il seguente comunicato stampa:
“La persecuzione degli attivisti per i diritti deve cessare – esperti delle Nazioni Unite chiedono al governo dell'Azerbaigian
GINEVRA (19 agosto 2014) – Esperti dei diritti umani delle Nazioni Unite [Michel Forst, Relatore Speciale sulla situazione dei difensori dei diritti umani ; Maina Kai, Relatore Speciale sui diritti alla libertà di riunione pacifica e di associazione; e David Kaye, il relatore speciale sulla promozione e la protezione del diritto alla libertà di opinione e di espressione] hanno condannato oggi la crescente tendenza a perseguire i difensori dei diritti umani di spicco in Azerbaigian e hanno esortato il governo "a mostrare leadership e invertire la tendenza alla repressione , criminalizzazione e perseguimento del lavoro sui diritti umani nel paese.'
"Siamo sconvolti dai crescenti episodi di sorveglianza, interrogatori, arresti, condanne sulla base di accuse inventate, congelamento di beni e divieto di viaggio degli attivisti in Azerbaigian", hanno affermato. “La criminalizzazione degli attivisti per i diritti deve finire. Coloro che sono stati ingiustificatamente detenuti per la difesa dei diritti dovrebbero essere immediatamente liberati”. ...”
50. Il Relatore speciale delle Nazioni Unite sulla situazione dei difensori dei diritti umani ha visitato l'Azerbaigian dal 14 al 22 settembre 2016. Il 22 settembre 2016 ha "invitato l'Azerbaigian a ripensare il [suo] approccio punitivo alla società civile" e ha pubblicato la seguente conclusione della missione dichiarazione:
“Ho condiviso con il governo la mia conclusione preliminare che, negli ultimi due-tre anni, la società civile in Azerbaigian ha affrontato la peggiore situazione dall'indipendenza del paese. Decine di ONG, i loro leader, dipendenti e le loro famiglie sono stati oggetto di persecuzioni amministrative e legali, compreso il sequestro dei loro beni e conti bancari, divieti di viaggio, enormi sanzioni fiscali e persino la reclusione.
La società civile è rimasta paralizzata a causa di una pressione così intensa. I difensori dei diritti umani sono stati accusati dai funzionari pubblici di essere una quinta colonna dei governi occidentali, o agenti stranieri, il che ha portato a un'errata percezione nella popolazione del ruolo veramente prezioso svolto dalla società civile. Gli attivisti che promuovono le libertà fondamentali e criticano le violazioni sono stati accusati di essere oppositori politici, propagandando valori contrari a quelli della loro società o cultura. Sono stati denunciati come attori motivati politicamente o finanziariamente. Sono stati attaccati, minacciati o portati in tribunale e condannati con accuse come "teppismo", "riciclaggio di denaro", "provocazione", "traffico di droga" o incitamento a rovesciare lo Stato ..."
51. I pertinenti estratti del Rapporto (CommDH(2019)27) dell'11 dicembre 2019 del Commissario per i diritti umani del Consiglio d'Europa, a seguito della sua visita in Azerbaigian dall'8 al 12 luglio 2019, recitano quanto segue:
“1.1.2. Restrizioni al diritto di lasciare il Paese
20. Il Commissario osserva che a decine di giornalisti, avvocati, attivisti politici e difensori dei diritti umani è vietato lasciare il Paese, in circostanze che fanno sorgere fondati dubbi sulla liceità di tali divieti di viaggio”.
LA LEGGE
I. UNIONE DELLE DOMANDA
52. Considerato l'analogo oggetto dei ricorsi, la Corte ritiene opportuno esaminarli congiuntamente in un'unica sentenza.
II. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N o . 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
53. Appellandosi agli Articoli 6 e 11 della Convenzione e all'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, i ricorrenti si lamentavano che il congelamento dei loro conti bancari era stato considerato una violazione dei loro diritti tutelati dalla Convenzione. Considerate le circostanze del caso, la Corte ritiene che la presente doglianza debba essere esaminata esclusivamente ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione , che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le precedenti disposizioni non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far applicare le leggi che ritenga necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni secondo l'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni. "
A. Ammissibilità
1. Le argomentazioni delle parti
54. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non erano riusciti ad esaurire le vie di ricorso interne. In particolare, hanno notato che il ricorrente non aveva presentato la sua denuncia alle autorità nazionali e che l'associazione ricorrente non aveva presentato una nuova richiesta ai tribunali nazionali in conformità con l'articolo 121.3 del CCrP.
55. I ricorrenti non erano d'accordo con le osservazioni del Governo, indicando tutti i tentativi che avevano fatto per far esaminare le questioni.
2. La valutazione della Corte
56. I principi generali pertinenti sull'esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali sono stati riassunti in Vu?kovi? e altri c. Serbia ((eccezione preliminare) [GC], n. 17153/11 e altri 29, §§ 69-77, 25 marzo 2014).
57. La Corte rileva che nei casi in cui i ricorrenti si sono lamentati sia del congelamento iniziale dei loro beni sia della prosecuzione della misura per un certo numero di anni, è opportuno considerare la questione dell'esaurimento separatamente per le due questioni (vedi BENet Praha, spol. s rov Repubblica Ceca , n. 33908/04 , § 81, 24 febbraio 2011, e Apostolovi c. Bulgaria , n. 32644/09 , § 81, 7 novembre 2019).
58. Nella presente causa, per quanto riguarda il congelamento dei conti bancari dell'associazione ricorrente, l'obiezione del Governo sembra essere limitata alla continuazione delle restrizioni (vedere paragrafo 54 supra). Tuttavia, il governo non ha spiegato come una richiesta presentata ai sensi dell'articolo 121.3 della CCrP relativa all'esame delle domande e delle richieste presentate alle autorità inquirenti (si veda il paragrafo 44 supra) possa costituire un ricorso effettivo nei confronti del continuo congelamento dei conti bancari dell'associazione richiedente ordinati sulla base di una decisione del tribunale.
59. Per quanto riguarda l'obiezione del Governo relativa al congelamento dei conti bancari del ricorrente, risulta dai documenti nel fascicolo che al ricorrente non è stata fornita una copia dell'ordine di sequestro del 30 ottobre 2014 a seguito della sua consegna da parte del tribunale competente e appreso della sua esistenza solo nel dicembre 2014 (paragrafi 18 e 19 supra). Questo fallimento delle autorità interne lo ha privato della possibilità di impugnare efficacemente l'ordine di sequestro impugnato dinanzi alla corte d'appello competente, entro tre giorni dal suo annuncio. Inoltre, non poteva essere imputato al ricorrente di non aver tentato di impugnare l'ordinanza di sequestro del 30 ottobre 2014 che chiedeva il ripristino del termine per proporre ricorso una volta venuto a conoscenza della sua esistenza nel dicembre 2014 in considerazione del rifiuto dei tribunali nazionali di esaminare, senza fornire alcuna motivazione, l'analogo ricorso dell'associazione ricorrente contro l'ordinanza della Corte distrettuale di Nasimi del 19 maggio 2014 (paragrafi 14 e 16 supra).
60. Per quanto riguarda la continuazione delle restrizioni sui conti bancari dei ricorrenti, la Corte ha già constatato che una richiesta presentata ai sensi dell'articolo 121.3 della CCrP non poteva costituire un rimedio efficace a tale riguardo (si veda il precedente paragrafo 58) e il governo non ha specificato alcun altro rimedio a tale scopo. La Corte non può inoltre trascurare il fatto che i ricorrenti hanno cercato di avvalersi della procedura di controllo giurisdizionale ai sensi dell'articolo 449 della CCrP, ma i tribunali nazionali hanno rifiutato di esaminare il loro reclamo (si vedano i paragrafi 33-38 sopra).
61. Per le ragioni di cui sopra, la Corte rileva che la doglianza dei ricorrenti non può essere respinta per mancato esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne e che l'eccezione del Governo a questo riguardo deve essere respinta.
62. La Corte nota che questa doglianza non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione. Non è inammissibile per nessun altro motivo. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ammissibile.
B. meriti
1. Le argomentazioni delle parti
(un) I ricorrenti
63. I ricorrenti hanno mantenuto la loro denuncia, sostenendo che il congelamento dei loro conti bancari aveva costituito un'ingerenza illecita e ingiustificata con i loro diritti di proprietà .
(b) Il governo
64. Il Governo ha sostenuto che l'interferenza con i diritti dei ricorrenti era stata legittima e giustificata. L'ingerenza era basata sull'articolo 248 del CCrP e quelle disposizioni del diritto interno erano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione. Sostennero inoltre che il congelamento dei conti bancari dei ricorrenti costituiva una restrizione operata nell'interesse pubblico, al fine di garantire la corretta amministrazione della giustizia.
(c) La terza parte
65. L'Open Society Justice Initiative ha sottolineato l'importanza dell'accesso alle strutture bancarie per il funzionamento delle organizzazioni non governative e degli avvocati per i diritti umani e ha affermato che la restrizione al riguardo è motivo di notevole preoccupazione. Ha osservato che laddove restrizioni simili sono imposte a organizzazioni non governative e avvocati, tali restrizioni dovrebbero essere esaminate attentamente, tenendo presente il ruolo cruciale svolto dai difensori dei diritti umani che agiscono nell'interesse pubblico.
2. La valutazione della Corte
66. La Corte nota che non è stato contestato dal Governo che c'era stata un'interferenza con i diritti di proprietà dei richiedenti . A questo proposito, la Corte ribadisce che il congelamento dei conti bancari deve essere considerato come una misura di controllo dell'uso della proprietà (vedi Uzan e altri c. Turchia , n. 19620/05 e altri 3, § 194, 5 marzo 2019, e Yunusova e Yunusov c. Azerbaijan (n. 2) , n. 68817/14, § 167, 16 luglio 2020).
67. La Corte ribadisce che il primo e più importante requisito dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica con il pacifico godimento dei beni dovrebbe essere lecita (si veda, tra le altre autorità, Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n.31107 / 96 , § 58, CEDU 1999 - II, e Béláné Nagy c. Ungheria [GC], n.53080 / 13 , § 112, 13 dicembre 2016). Questo concetto richiede in primo luogo che le misure impugnate abbiano un fondamento nel diritto interno. Fa inoltre riferimento alla qualità della legge in questione, esigendo che sia accessibile agli interessati, precisa e prevedibile. Sebbene spetti in primo luogo alle autorità nazionali interpretare e applicare il diritto interno, la Corte è tenuta a verificare se il modo in cui il diritto interno è interpretato e applicato produca conseguenze coerenti con i principi della Convenzione, come interpretati alla luce della giurisprudenza della Corte (vedi Beyeler contro Italia. [GC], n. 33202/96 , §§ 109 e 110, CEDU 2000-I, e Batkivska Turbota Fondazione v Ukraine. , n. 5876/15 , § 56, 9 ottobre 2018).
68. A questo proposito, la Corte osserva di aver già riscontrato in una precedente causa contro l'Azerbaigian riguardante il sequestro di proprietà che l'ingerenza non soddisfaceva il requisito di legalità sancito dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, poiché il ricorrente in quella causa non apparteneva alle categorie di soggetti cui poteva essere applicato un provvedimento di sequestro. In particolare, la Corte ha ritenuto che, ai sensi degli artt. 248 e ss. del CCrP, in materia di pignoramento dei beni , il sequestro conservativo può essere disposto solo nei confronti dei beni dell'"imputato" o di "altre persone che potrebbero essere ritenute materialmente responsabili" delle azioni criminali dell'imputato (cfr. Rafig Aliyev c. Azerbaigian , n. 45875/06 , §§ 122-26, 6 dicembre 2011).
69. Passando alle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte osserva che il Governo, pur sostenendo che l'ingerenza era legittima ai sensi dell'articolo 248 del CCrP, non ha spiegato come tale disposizione potesse essere applicata nei confronti dei ricorrenti che non erano stati accusato di qualsiasi reato nell'ambito del procedimento penale n. 142006023 o in altri procedimenti. In particolare, è pacifico dalle parti che il ricorrente non era un imputato nell'ambito della causa penale n. 142006023, ma è stato solo più volte interrogato tra il 2014 e il 2016. A tal proposito, la Corte non perde di vista il fatto che il Tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi non ha nemmeno fatto riferimento ad alcuna norma giuridica come fondamento normativo della sua ordinanza del 30 ottobre 2014 in relazione al resoconto del ricorrente (paragrafo 18 supra) (confrontare Frizen c. Russia , n. 58254/00 , § 34, 24 marzo 2005).
70. Inoltre, la Corte non può ignorare il fatto che, sebbene l'istituto della responsabilità penale delle persone giuridiche sia stato introdotto nel codice penale azero il 7 marzo 2012, non vi erano disposizioni procedurali nel CCrP relative alle misure applicabili nei confronti delle persone giuridiche per la loro responsabilità penale fino al 29 novembre 2016 (paragrafo 43 supra).
71. Infine, la Corte osserva che non è stato sostenuto dal Governo e non risulta dai documenti del fascicolo che uno qualsiasi dei ricorrenti potrebbe essere una "persona che potrebbe essere ritenuta materialmente responsabile" per le azioni criminali di un altro persona accusata.
72. In queste circostanze, la Corte conclude che i ricorrenti non appartenevano alle categorie di persone alle quali poteva essere applicato un provvedimento di sequestro conservativo ai sensi del diritto interno e l'ingerenza non poteva quindi essere considerata lecita ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. .1 della Convenzione. La suddetta conclusione rende superfluo accertare se sia stato raggiunto un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della collettività e le esigenze della tutela dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo (cfr. Yunusova e Yunusov (n. 2) , cit., §169).
73. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell' Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione a riguardo di entrambi i richiedenti.
III. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE IN COMBINAZIONE CON L'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N o . 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
74. I ricorrenti si lamentavano di non aver avuto a loro disposizione vie di ricorso nazionali effettive riguardo alla loro denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione come previsto dall'articolo 13 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:
“Ognuno i cui diritti e le cui libertà sanciti nella [la] Convenzione sono violati avrà un ricorso effettivo dinanzi a un'autorità nazionale nonostante la violazione sia stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale”.
A. Ammissibilità
75. La Corte nota che questa doglianza non è né manifestamente infondata né inammissibile per nessun altro motivo elencato nell'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ammissibile.
B. meriti
76. I ricorrenti hanno mantenuto la loro denuncia.
77. Il Governo contestò le loro osservazioni.
78. La Corte ribadisce che l'articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce la disponibilità a livello nazionale di un ricorso per far valere la sostanza dei diritti e delle libertà della Convenzione in qualsiasi forma possano essere garantiti. L'effetto di tale disposizione è quindi di richiedere la disposizione di un ricorso interno per trattare la sostanza di una "reclamo discutibile" ai sensi della Convenzione e per concedere un rimedio appropriato. La portata degli obblighi degli Stati contraenti ai sensi dell'articolo 13 varia a seconda della natura del reclamo del ricorrente. Tuttavia, il rimedio richiesto dall'articolo 13 deve essere "effettivo" sia in pratica che in diritto. L'"efficacia" di un "rimedio" ai sensi dell'articolo 13 non dipende dalla certezza di un esito favorevole per il richiedente (si veda Hirsi Jamaa e altri c. Italia [GC], n. 27765/09 , § 197, CEDU 2012, e Edward e Cynthia Zammit Maempel c. Malta , n. 3356/15 , § 66, 15 gennaio 2019).
79. Avendo dichiarato ammissibile il ricorso dei ricorrenti ai sensi dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1, la Corte rileva che era discutibile. I ricorrenti avevano quindi diritto a un ricorso interno "effettivo" ai sensi dell'articolo 13.
80. La Corte ha già riscontrato che l'incapacità delle autorità nazionali di fornire ai ricorrenti una copia dei relativi ordini di sequestro li ha privati del loro diritto di impugnare tali ordini dinanzi alle corti d'appello (vedere paragrafo 61 supra). Il Governo non ha inoltre sostenuto che esisteva qualsiasi altro mezzo di ricorso mediante il quale i ricorrenti avrebbero potuto impugnare tali ordini di sequestro in queste particolari circostanze e la continuazione delle restrizioni imposte da tali ordini.
81. In considerazione del fatto che lo Stato convenuto non ha fornito ai ricorrenti alcun rimedio per contestare l'ingerenza nei loro diritti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la Corte conclude che i ricorrenti non avevano in pratica un ricorso effettivo in relazione alla loro denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (vedere Yunusova e Yunusov (n. 2) , citata sopra, § 178).
82. C'è stata, di conseguenza, una violazione dell' Articolo 13 della Convenzione in concomitanza con l' Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a riguardo di entrambi i richiedenti.
IV. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 2 DEL PROTOCOLLO N o . 4 ALLA CONVENZIONE
83. Il ricorrente si lamentava che il suo diritto di lasciare il proprio paese era stato violato dalle autorità nazionali. La parte pertinente dell'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 alla Convenzione recita come segue:
“2. Ciascuno è libero di lasciare qualsiasi Paese, compreso il proprio.
3. Non possono essere poste restrizioni all'esercizio di [questo diritto] se non quelle previste dalla legge e necessarie in una società democratica nell'interesse della sicurezza nazionale o della sicurezza pubblica, per il mantenimento dell'ordine pubblico , per la prevenzione dei reati, per la tutela della salute o della morale, o per la tutela dei diritti e delle libertà altrui...”
A. Ammissibilità
84. La Corte nota che questa doglianza non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione. Rileva inoltre che non è inammissibile per nessun altro motivo. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ammissibile.
B. meriti
1. Le argomentazioni delle parti
85. Il ricorrente ha sostenuto che entrambi i divieti di viaggio impostigli erano illegittimi, non avevano perseguito alcuno scopo legittimo e non erano stati una misura necessaria in una società democratica.
86. Il Governo ha contestato l'esistenza di un divieto di viaggio imposto al ricorrente dalle autorità inquirenti. Per quanto riguarda il divieto di viaggio imposto dal tribunale, hanno sostenuto che era conforme all'articolo 355-5.1 del PCC, perseguiva gli scopi legittimi del mantenimento dell'ordine pubblico e della prevenzione della criminalità ed era necessario in una società democratica.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Per quanto riguarda il divieto di viaggio imposto dalle autorità di perseguimento penale
87. La Corte fa riferimento ai principi generali stabiliti nella sua giurisprudenza ed esposti nella sentenza Mursaliyev e altri c. Azerbaijan (nn. 66650/13 e altri 10, §§ 29-31, 13 dicembre 2018), che sono ugualmente pertinente al caso di specie.
88. Nel caso di specie, sebbene il Governo abbia contestato l'affermazione del ricorrente secondo cui gli era stato imposto un divieto di viaggio dalle autorità inquirenti, la Corte rileva che, con lettere del 28 dicembre 2016, 8 agosto 2018, 7 giugno e 23 luglio 2019 , l'Ufficio del Procuratore Generale ha chiaramente riconosciuto l'imposizione di un divieto di viaggio al ricorrente (si vedano i paragrafi 23-24 supra) . Inoltre, il fatto che il 13 settembre 2015, prima dell'imposizione del divieto di viaggio giudiziale, al ricorrente sia stato impedito di recarsi all'estero (paragrafo 22 supra) conferma anche l'affermazione del ricorrente. Di conseguenza, la Corte accetta che le autorità inquirenti abbiano imposto al ricorrente un divieto di viaggio che gli ha impedito di recarsi all'estero. La Corte concorda con il ricorrente che tale misura costituisce un'ingerenza nel suo diritto di lasciare il proprio paese ai sensi dell'articolo 2 § 2 del Protocollo n. 4.
89. Per quanto riguarda la questione se l'ingerenza fosse conforme alla legge, la Corte osserva che in Mursaliyev e altri (cit., §§ 29-36) dopo aver esaminato un reclamo identico basato sugli stessi fatti, la Corte ha ritenuto che l'imposizione di un divieto di viaggio ai ricorrenti, che erano solo testimoni in procedimenti penali, da parte delle autorità inquirenti in assenza di una decisione giudiziaria non era “a norma di legge”. La Corte ritiene che l'analisi e l'accertamento effettuato nella sentenza Mursaliyev e a . si applichino anche al caso di specie e non vede alcun motivo per discostarsi da tale constatazione.
90. V'è di conseguenza stata una violazione del diritto del richiedente di lasciare il suo paese, come garantito dall'articolo 2 del Protocollo n ° 4 alla Convenzione, a causa del divieto di viaggio imposto su di lui da parte delle autorità di perseguimento penale .
(b) Per quanto riguarda il divieto di viaggio imposto dal tribunale
91. La Corte nota che non è in discussione tra le parti che la decisione dei tribunali nazionali di limitare il diritto del ricorrente di lasciare il paese equivaleva a un'interferenza con il suo diritto di lasciare il proprio paese ai sensi dell'articolo 2 § 2 della Protocollo n. 4. Questa è anche l'opinione della Corte. Occorre quindi esaminare se fosse “a norma di legge”, perseguisse uno o più degli scopi legittimi enunciati nell'articolo 2 § 3 del Protocollo n. 4 e se fosse “necessario in una società democratica” realizzare tale scopo.
92. Senza pronunciarsi sulla questione se l'imposizione di un divieto di viaggio al ricorrente possa ritenersi giustificata alla luce della sospensione del procedimento giurisdizionale relativo al contenzioso tributario tra l'associazione ricorrente e l'amministrazione finanziaria, la Corte osserva che una tale misura potrebbe essere imposta in conformità con l'Articolo 9.3.6-1 del Codice Migrazione e l'Articolo 355-5.1 del CCP (vedi paragrafi 46-47 sopra) . La Corte rileva inoltre che una misura volta a limitare il diritto di un individuo di lasciare il paese al fine di garantire il pagamento delle imposte può perseguire gli obiettivi legittimi del mantenimento dell'ordine pubblico e della tutela dei diritti altrui (si veda Riener c. Bulgaria , no. 46343/99, §§ 114-17, 23 maggio 2006) . Tuttavia, tenuto conto delle particolari circostanze del caso di specie, il Governo convenuto non ha dimostrato che la misura impugnata perseguisse uno degli obiettivi legittimi enunciati nell'articolo 2 § 3 del Protocollo n. 4.
93. In particolare, la Corte nota che né le autorità fiscali né i tribunali nazionali hanno cercato di riscuotere il debito fiscale in questione senza imporre un divieto di viaggio al ricorrente. In particolare, non hanno preso in considerazione la detrazione del presunto debito d'imposta dal denaro disponibile sui conti bancari dei ricorrenti o il sequestro di altri beni di loro proprietà nonostante l'esplicita richiesta del ricorrente al riguardo nei procedimenti giudiziari (vedere paragrafi 29 e 31 supra) . Il Governo non ha contestato la tesi del richiedente secondo cui la somma presumibilmente dovuta, AZN 7,385, era disponibile sui conti bancari.
94. Anche le autorità fiscali e le corti nazionali non hanno avanzato alcuna argomentazione sulla necessità dell'imposizione del divieto di viaggio in questione per la riscossione del debito fiscale. A tale proposito, la Corte ribadisce che la restrizione al diritto di lasciare il proprio Paese per motivi di debito non pagato può essere giustificata solo nella misura in cui serve al suo scopo – il recupero del debito (si veda Napijalo c. Croazia , n. 66485/01 , 13 novembre 2003, §§ 78-82, e Stetsov c. Ucraina , n. 5170/15, § 2 9, 11 maggio 2021).
95. Le precedenti considerazioni sono sufficienti per consentire alla Corte di concludere che l'ingerenza in questione nel diritto del ricorrente di lasciare il suo paese non perseguiva uno scopo legittimo. Questa constatazione rende superfluo determinare se l'interferenza fosse necessaria in una società democratica.
96. Di conseguenza c'è stata una violazione del diritto del ricorrente di lasciare il suo paese, come garantito dall'Articolo 2 § 2 del Protocollo N.ro 4, a causa del divieto di viaggio impostogli dai tribunali nazionali.
V. VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 18 DELLA CONVENZIONE COMBINATO CON L'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N o . 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE E DELL'ARTICOLO 2 DEL PROTOCOLLO N o . 4 ALLA CONVENZIONE
97. Basandosi sugli articoli 34 e 18 della Convenzione in combinato disposto con l'articolo 11 della Convenzione, l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione e l'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 alla Convenzione, i ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che i loro diritti della Convenzione erano stati limitati per scopi diversi da quelli prescritti dalla Convenzione. Tenuto conto delle circostanze del caso, la Corte ritiene che la presente doglianza debba essere esaminata esclusivamente ai sensi dell'articolo 18 della Convenzione in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione nei confronti di entrambi i ricorrenti e, anche in combinato disposto con con l'Articolo 2 del Protocollo N.ro 4 alla Convenzione nei confronti del richiedente. L'articolo 18 prevede:
"Le restrizioni consentite ai sensi della Convenzione [della] Convenzione a detti diritti e libertà non devono essere applicate per scopi diversi da quelli per i quali sono state prescritte".
A. Ammissibilità
98. In via preliminare, la Corte considera che sia il diritto alla protezione della proprietà che il diritto alla libertà di movimento sono diritti qualificati soggetti a restrizioni consentite dalla Convenzione (cfr. OAO Neftyanaya Kompaniya Yukos c. Russia, n. 14902/04, §§ 663-66, 20 settembre 2011; Merabishvili c. Georgia ([GC], n. 72508/13, §§ 265, 271, 287 e 290, 28 novembre 2017; e Navalnyy c. Russia ([GC], nn. 29580/12 e altri 4, §§ 164 165, 15 novembre 2018) e ritiene che la denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 18 sia applicabile nel caso di specie. La Corte osserva inoltre che la denuncia ai sensi di tale disposizione non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione. Rileva inoltre che non è irricevibile per altri motivi. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ricevibile.

meriti
1. Le argomentazioni delle parti
(un) I ricorrenti
99. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che le restrizioni contestate erano state motivate politicamente ed erano state applicate con l'intenzione di punirli per il loro impegno nel lavoro di difesa dei diritti umani . A tale proposito, hanno rilevato di aver partecipato attivamente alla tutela dei diritti umani nel paese e che le misure adottate nei loro confronti miravano a paralizzare il loro lavoro . Hanno anche notato che l'adozione di tali misure non poteva essere considerata isolatamente e faceva parte di una campagna repressiva mirata contro i difensori dei diritti umani e gli attivisti delle ONG, che sono stati soggetti a restrizioni simili o sono stati arrestati e detenuti sulla base di varie accuse inventate .
(b) Il governo
100. Le argomentazioni del Governo erano esattamente le stesse che avevano fatto in Rashad Hasanov e altri c. Azerbaijan (nn. 48653/13 e altri 3, §§ 114-15, 7 giugno 2018).
(c) La terza parte
101. La Commissione internazionale dei giuristi ha presentato una sintesi degli standard internazionali sulla non interferenza con il lavoro degli avvocati e ha sottolineato il ruolo speciale degli avvocati nell'amministrazione della giustizia. La terza parte ha espresso la sua preoccupazione per la situazione dei difensori dei diritti umani in Azerbaigian e la pratica delle molestie nei confronti degli avvocati, richiamando l'attenzione sull'importanza del contesto nazionale.
2. La valutazione della Corte
102. La Corte esaminerà la doglianza dei ricorrenti alla luce dei principi generali pertinenti enunciati dalla Grande Camera nelle sue sentenze Merabishvili (cit., §§ 287-317) e Navalnyy (cit., §§ 164 65 ).
103. La Corte ritiene in via preliminare che nel presente ricorso la denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 18 costituisce un aspetto fondamentale della causa che non è stato affrontato sopra in relazione all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione e all'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 della Convenzione e merita un esame separato.
104. La Corte osserva che ha già constatato che il congelamento dei conti bancari dei ricorrenti e l'imposizione del divieto di viaggio al ricorrente da parte delle autorità giudiziarie erano illegittimi e che l'imposizione del divieto di viaggio al ricorrente da parte dei tribunali nazionali non ha perseguito alcun obiettivo legittimo. Pertanto, nessuna questione si pone nel caso di specie in relazione alla pluralità di scopi quando una restrizione è applicata sia per uno scopo ulteriore che per uno scopo prescritto dalla Convenzione (confrontare Merabishvili, sopra citata, §§ 318 54).
105. Tuttavia, il semplice fatto che la restrizione dei diritti dei ricorrenti non abbia perseguito uno scopo prescritto dalla Convenzione non è di per sé una base sufficiente per concludere che anche l'articolo 18 sia stato violato. Pertanto, resta da vedere se ci sono prove che le azioni delle autorità siano state effettivamente guidate da un ulteriore scopo.
106. La Corte ritiene che, nel caso di specie, si possa stabilire oltre ogni ragionevole dubbio che tale prova derivi da una giustapposizione dei fatti specifici del caso rilevanti con fattori contestuali.
107. In primo luogo, per quanto riguarda lo status dei ricorrenti, la Corte rileva che l'associazione ricorrente è specializzata nella tutela dei diritti umani e che il ricorrente è un avvocato e rappresentante legale dinanzi alla Corte in un gran numero di casi. La Corte ribadisce che attribuisce particolare importanza al ruolo speciale dei difensori dei diritti umani nella promozione e difesa dei diritti umani , anche in stretta collaborazione con il Consiglio d'Europa, e al loro contributo alla protezione dei diritti umani negli Stati membri (vedi Aliyev c. Azerbaigian , nn.68762 / 14 e 71200/14 , § 208, 20 settembre 2018). Al riguardo, la Corte è colpita dal fatto che, su richiesta delle autorità inquirenti, il 30 ottobre 2014 il tribunale distrettuale di Nasimi ha adottato, senza basarsi su alcun fondamento giuridico, un ordine di sequestro conservativo per una somma di denaro trasferita dal Consiglio d'Europa al ricorrente come patrocinio a spese dello Stato sulla base del fatto che l'importo in questione costituiva l'oggetto di un reato ed è stato utilizzato "come suo strumento" (vedere paragrafo 18 supra). La Corte ritiene che questo fatto indichi la possibilità che il sequestro conservativo dei conti bancari del ricorrente sia stato utilizzato come misura per impedirgli di esercitare la sua attività legale professionale.
108. In secondo luogo, la Corte prende atto del fatto che la limitazione dei diritti dei ricorrenti nell'ambito di un procedimento penale in cui essi non sono stati accusati di alcun reato non solo è stata priva di qualsiasi base giuridica, ma è stata anche applicata in modo tale da paralizzare il loro lavoro. In particolare, i tribunali nazionali e il governo non hanno spiegato perché gli ordini di sequestro non erano limitati a importi specifici, ma sono stati applicati a tutti i conti bancari dei ricorrenti, impedendo loro praticamente di svolgere le loro attività professionali. Inoltre, non hanno presentato ragioni legittime per l'imposizione dei divieti di viaggio al ricorrente.
109. In terzo luogo, la Corte ritiene che la situazione dei ricorrenti non possa essere considerata isolatamente e debba essere considerata sullo sfondo dell'arresto e della detenzione arbitrari di critici del governo, attivisti della società civile e difensori dei diritti umani nello Stato convenuto. La Corte sottolinea che nel caso di Aliyev (citato sopra, § 223) ha riscontrato che le sue sentenze in una serie di casi simili riflettevano un modello di arresto e detenzione arbitraria di critici del governo, attivisti della società civile e difensori dei diritti umani attraverso procedimenti di ritorsione e abuso del diritto penale in violazione dell'articolo 18. La Corte non può inoltre trascurare i rapporti e i pareri formulati da varie istanze internazionali per i diritti umani sull'uso del congelamento dei conti bancari e l'imposizione di divieti di viaggio agli attivisti della società civile in questo contesto (si vedano i paragrafi 49-51).
110. La Corte ritiene che gli elementi sopra menzionati siano sufficienti a permetterle di concludere che c'era uno scopo ulteriore nella restrizione dei diritti dei ricorrenti; in particolare, si trattava di punire i ricorrenti per le loro attività nel campo dei diritti umani e di impedire loro di continuare tali attività.
111. Vi è stata pertanto una violazione dell'articolo 18 della Convenzione in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione per quanto riguarda entrambi i ricorrenti e in combinato disposto con l'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 della Convenzione per quanto riguarda il ricorrente.
VI. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
112. L' articolo 46 della Convenzione, per quanto pertinente, recita quanto segue:
“1. Le Alte Parti contraenti si impegnano ad attenersi alla sentenza definitiva della Corte in ogni causa di cui siano parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte è trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri, che ne vigila sull'esecuzione. ...”
113. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che la forma più appropriata di ricorso individuale sarebbe stata l'immediata cessazione del congelamento dei loro conti bancari e la revoca di uno dei due divieti di viaggio che continuavano a essere imposti al ricorrente. I ricorrenti hanno anche chiesto alla Corte di indicare al governo di attuare misure generali riguardanti la protezione degli attivisti della società civile e dei difensori dei diritti umani .
114. Il Governo non ha presentato alcuna osservazione al riguardo.
115. La Corte ricorda che, in virtù dell'articolo 46 della Convenzione, le Parti contraenti si sono impegnate a rispettare le sentenze definitive della Corte in ogni causa di cui sono parti, la cui esecuzione è vigilata dal Comitato dei ministri della Consiglio d'Europa. Nel caso di specie, data la varietà dei mezzi a disposizione per conseguire la restitutio in integrum e la natura delle questioni in gioco, il Comitato dei ministri è in una posizione migliore rispetto alla Corte per valutare le misure specifiche da adottare. Dovrebbe quindi essere lasciato al Comitato dei Ministri vigilare, sulla base delle informazioni fornite dallo Stato convenuto e tenuto conto dell'evolversi della situazione dei ricorrenti, l'adozione di misure volte, tra l'altro, ad eliminare ogni impedimento alla esercizio delle loro attività. Tali misure dovrebbero essere attuabili, tempestive, adeguate e sufficienti a garantire la massima riparazione possibile per le violazioni riscontrate dalla Corte e dovrebbero mettere i ricorrenti, per quanto possibile, nella posizione in cui si trovavano prima del congelamento dei loro conti bancari e l'imposizione dei divieti di viaggio al richiedente (vedi Aliyev, sopra citata, § 228, e Bagirov c. Azerbaigian , nn. 81024/12 e 28198/15, § 110, 25 giugno 2020).
VII. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
116. L' articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte rileva che vi è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte Contraente interessata consente solo un risarcimento parziale, la Corte, se necessario, accorda un'equa soddisfazione alla parte lesa."
A. Danno
117. L'associazione ricorrente ha chiesto 42.416,15 euro (EUR) e il ricorrente 11.337,60 euro a riguardo del danno patrimoniale. In tale contesto, hanno fatto riferimento all'interruzione delle loro attività, all'impossibilità di accedere a vari fondi, al pagamento delle tasse e allo stipendio non corrisposto al ricorrente da sovvenzioni.
118. Ciascuno dei ricorrenti hanno chiesto 30.000 euro ciascuno per il danno non patrimoniale.
119. Il Governo ha sostenuto che gli importi richiesti dai ricorrenti erano infondati ed eccessivi e che una constatazione di una violazione costituirebbe sufficiente equa soddisfazione. Notarono che i richiedenti non erano stati privati della loro proprietà e che la loro incapacità di ricevere sovvenzioni non poteva essere considerata come un motivo per rivendicare un danno patrimoniale poiché le sovvenzioni non erano state fatte per il loro arricchimento personale.
120. La Corte osserva all'inizio che i ricorrenti non sono stati privati delle somme di denaro disponibili sui loro conti bancari a causa del congelamento dei loro conti bancari. La Corte nota anche che il presente ricorso non riguarda l'ispezione fiscale effettuata dalle autorità nazionali e la questione della legittimità dell'imposizione di un debito fiscale all'associazione richiedente a seguito di tale ispezione. Di conseguenza, la Corte non individua alcun nesso causale tra le violazioni accertate e il danno patrimoniale lamentato in relazione al debito d'imposta pagato dall'associazione ricorrente.
121. Tuttavia, il Tribunale non ha alcun dubbio che il congelamento dei conti bancari dei ricorrenti abbia perturbato le attività dei ricorrenti e abbia comportato per loro perdite pecuniarie. Allo stesso tempo, sarebbe speculativo calcolare l'importo esatto di tali perdite. La Corte ritiene inoltre che i ricorrenti abbiano subito danni non pecuniari che non possono essere compensati dalla sola constatazione di una violazione, e che il risarcimento dovrebbe quindi essere concesso (si veda Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish e altri c. Romania [GC], no. 76943/11, § 182, 29 novembre 2016, e Comunità religiosa dei testimoni di Geova c. Azerbaigian, no. 52884/09, § 50, 20 febbraio 2020). Facendo una valutazione su base equitativa e alla luce di tutte le informazioni in suo possesso, la Corte ritiene ragionevole assegnare all'associazione ricorrente una somma aggregata di 8.000 euro e al ricorrente una somma aggregata di 15.000 euro, tutte le teste di danno combinate, più qualsiasi tassa che possa essere esigibile su tali importi (confrontare Bagirov, citato, § 116, e Yunusova e Yunusov (n. 2), citato, § 206).
B. Costi e spese
122. I ricorrenti hanno chiesto EUR 1.900 per servizi legali sostenuti dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e alla Corte per la loro rappresentanza da parte del sig. R. Mustafazade . Hanno presentato i relativi contratti conclusi con il sig. R. Mustafazade e chiesto che l'indennizzo in tale contesto fosse versato direttamente sul conto bancario del sig. R. Mustafazade.
123. I ricorrenti hanno anche chiesto 13.346,56 sterline inglesi (GBP) per i servizi legali sostenuti nei procedimenti dinanzi alla Corte per la loro rappresentanza da parte della sig.ra R. Remezaite e del sig. P. Leach, nonché EUR 905,55 per la traduzione . A sostegno di tale affermazione, hanno presentato fogli di presenza dei loro rappresentanti e fatture per le spese di traduzione.
124. Il Governo ha ritenuto che gli importi richiesti dai ricorrenti fossero infondati ed eccessivi. Hanno chiesto alla Corte di applicare un approccio rigoroso nei confronti delle rivendicazioni dei ricorrenti e hanno sottolineato che i ricorrenti non avevano presentato alcun contratto relativo alla loro rappresentanza da parte della sig.ra R. Remezaite e del sig. P. Leach e di giustificare i costi e le spese rivendicati.
125. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un ricorrente ha diritto al rimborso dei costi e delle spese solo nella misura in cui è stato dimostrato che questi sono stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e sono ragionevoli quanto al quantum. La Corte ricorda inoltre che, ai sensi dell'articolo 60 del Regolamento della Corte, qualsiasi richiesta di giusta soddisfazione deve essere dettagliata e presentata per iscritto insieme ai relativi documenti giustificativi o voucher, in mancanza dei quali la Camera può respingere la richiesta in tutto o in parte (si veda Malik Babayev c. Azerbaijan, no. 30500/11, § 97, 1 giugno 2017). Nel caso di specie, i ricorrenti non hanno prodotto alcun contratto relativo alla loro rappresentanza da parte della signora R. Remezaite e del signor P. Leach o qualsiasi altro documento pertinente che dimostri che essi avevano pagato o avevano l'obbligo giuridico di pagare gli onorari richiesti dai loro rappresentanti (si veda Merabishvili, sopra citata, § 372; Bagirov, sopra citata, § 120; e Nasirov e altri c. Azerbaijan, no. 58717/10, § 89, 20 febbraio 2020). Per quanto riguarda la parte della richiesta di traduzione di vari documenti, la Corte non ritiene che la traduzione di tali documenti fosse necessaria per il suo procedimento (cfr. Allahverdiyev c. Azerbaigian, no. 49192/08, § 71, 6 marzo 2014, e Sakit Zahidov c. Azerbaigian, no. 51164/07, § 70, 12 novembre 2015). Pertanto, la Corte respinge questa parte della richiesta di costi e spese.
126. Per quanto riguarda la rappresentanza dei ricorrenti da parte del sig. R. Mustafazade , tenuto conto dei documenti in suo possesso e della mole di lavoro svolta dal rappresentante dei ricorrenti, la Corte ritiene ragionevole assegnare la somma di EUR 1.900 al richiedenti, più qualsiasi imposta che potrebbe essere a carico dei richiedenti. La Corte precisa inoltre che l'importo concesso in tal senso deve essere versato direttamente sul conto bancario del sig. R. Mustafazade.
C. Interessi di mora
127. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
1. Decide di accogliere i ricorsi;
2. Dichiara ricevibili i ricorsi;
Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione nei confronti di entrambi i ricorrenti;
4. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione nei confronti di entrambi i ricorrenti;
5. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 della Convenzione a causa del divieto di viaggio imposto al ricorrente dalle autorità procedenti;
6. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 della Convenzione a causa del divieto di viaggio imposto al ricorrente dai tribunali nazionali;
7. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 18 della Convenzione in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione nei confronti di entrambi i ricorrenti e in combinato disposto con l'articolo 2 del Protocollo n. 4 della Convenzione nei confronti del ricorrente;
8. Dichiara
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare ai ricorrenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva in conformità con l'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, i seguenti importi, da convertire nella valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data del regolamento:
(i) 8.000 euro (ottomila euro), più le tasse eventualmente applicabili, all'associazione ricorrente per i danni patrimoniali e non patrimoniali;
(ii) EUR 15.000 (quindicimila euro), più le imposte eventualmente applicabili, alla ricorrente per i danni patrimoniali e non patrimoniali;
(iii) EUR 1.900 (millenovecento euro), più le imposte eventualmente applicabili ai ricorrenti, per costi e spese, da versare direttamente sul conto corrente del loro rappresentante, il signor R. Mustafazade;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei suddetti tre mesi fino al saldo, sugli importi di cui sopra saranno dovuti interessi semplici ad un tasso pari al tasso di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Centrale Europea durante il periodo di mora, più tre punti percentuali;
9) Per il resto, la domanda di equa soddisfazione delle ricorrenti è respinta.Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto il 14 ottobre 2021, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.
Martina Keller Siofra O'Leary
vice registro Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 23/05/2022.