CASO: CAUSA ALIYEVA E ALTRI c. AZERBAIGIAN

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CAUSA ALIYEVA E ALTRI c. AZERBAIGIAN

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 01,41,42,35,P1-1

NUMERO: 66249/16
STATO: Azerbaijan
DATA: 21/09/2021
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIFTH SECTION

CASE OF ALIYEVA AND OTHERS v. AZERBAIJAN
(Applications nos. 66249/16 and 6 others – see appended list)

JUDGMENT
Art 1 P1 • Peaceful enjoyment of possessions • Supreme Court’s failure to follow its own clear line of case-law resulting in applicants’ inability to obtain statutory additional compensation for expropriated property

STRASBOURG
21 September 2021
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of Aliyeva and Others v. Azerbaijan,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Síofra O’Leary, President,
M?rti?š Mits,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
L?tif Hüseynov,
Jovan Ilievski,
Lado Chanturia,
Arnfinn Bårdsen, judges,
and Victor Soloveytchik, Section Registrar,
Having regard to:
seven applications against the Republic of Azerbaijan lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by seven Azerbaijani nationals on various dates (see Appendix);
the decision to give notice to the Azerbaijani Government (“the Government”) of the complaints under Article 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
the parties’ observations;
Having deliberated in private on 31 August 2021,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

INTRODUCTION
1. The applications concern the applicants’ complaint about the non?payment of statutory additional compensation for their expropriated properties and raises issues under Article 14 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

THE FACTS
2. The applicants’ details are listed in the Appendix. They were all represented by Mr S. Bagirov, a lawyer based in Azerbaijan.
3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Mr Ç. ?sg?rov.
4. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
5. The applicants were owners of flats situated at Agil Guliyev Street, Elchin and Vusal Hajibabayevler Street and Fathi Khoshginabi Street in the Sabail District of Baku.
ORDERS ISSUED IN RESPECT OF THE AREA WHERE THE APPLICANTS’ FLATS WERE LOCATED
6. On 22 February 2011 the Head of the Baku City Executive Authority (“the BCEA”) issued order no. 92 on “vacating the area around several streets and the buildings at 5 Agil Guliyev Street in the Sabail District and demolishing the residential and non-residential buildings in these areas”. The parties did not provide the Court with a copy of this order. It appears from the case file that, pursuant to the order, Z.I., the Deputy Head of the BCEA’s Administration, was authorised to sign sale and purchase contracts with the owners of the flats subject to demolition, and that the owners were to be paid 1,500 Azerbaijani manats (AZN) per sq. m.
7. On 31 May 2011 the Head of the BCEA issued order no. 243 “concerning the relocation of residential and non-residential premises in the Sabail District, at 7 and 9 Agil Guliyev Street, 2 Fathi Khoshginabi Street, 9 Aydin Nasirov Street, 3 and 10/12 Elchin and Vusal Hajibabayevler Street, in connection with expansion of the highway” (“the BCEA’s order of 31 May 2011”). The order stated that the relocation of residential and non-residential properties was necessary for expanding the highway which connected the central part of the capital with the Bayil settlement as part of the historical Silk Way, establishing new road infrastructure and installing modern engineering communication devices. This had to be ensured by payment of compensation in the amount of AZN 1,500 per sq. m on the basis of sale and purchase contracts certified by a notary, as agreed with the Ministry of Finance and the State Committee on Property Issues. Z.I., the Deputy Head of the BCEA’s Administration was authorised to sign the sale and purchase contracts with the owners of the properties.
SALE AND PURCHASE OF THE APPLICANTS’ FLATS
8. On various dates between 21 July 2011 and 11 February 2012 the applicants concluded sale and purchase contracts with Z.I. on the basis of the orders of 22 February 2011 (the applicant in application no. 77691/16), and 31 May 2011 (the applicants in the other applications).
9. In accordance with the contracts, the applicants sold their flats for various amounts, calculated on the basis of AZN 1,500 per sq. m.
10. The applicants undertook to transfer their ownership rights to the flats and all the relevant documents to the BCEA at the time the contracts were approved by the notary.
COURT PROCEEDINGS
The applicants’ claims and the position of the defendants
11. It appears that, before initiating the court proceedings described below, on various dates in 2015 the applicants wrote to the BCEA, arguing that their flats had been expropriated for State needs and asking for the payment of “additional compensation” as provided for by law, consisting of the following: (a) compensation of 20% of the market prices of their properties, to be paid in addition to the purchase price (“the additional 20% compensation”), in accordance with Article 2.3 of Presidential Decree no. 689 of 26 December 2007 (“the 2007 Presidential Decree”, see paragraph 70 below), and (b) further additional compensation “for hardship” of 10% of the “total compensation” paid to them (“compensation for hardship”), in accordance with Article 66 of the Law on the Expropriation of Land for State Needs (“the Law on Expropriation”, see paragraph 69 below).
12. In its replies to the applicants dated 18 March 2015 and 11 August 2015, the BCEA refused to pay any additional compensation.
13. On various dates in 2015 each of the applicants initiated separate sets of proceedings before Baku Administrative Economic Court No. 1 against the BCEA, and the Ministry of Finance as a third party. Relying on Articles 157.9, 246 and 247 of the Civil Code, the applicants argued before the first-instance court that their flats had been expropriated for State needs and that they were therefore entitled to the additional 20% compensation and compensation for hardship. It appears that, while the proceedings were pending before the first-instance court, in support of their latter claims, the applicants in applications nos. 66249/16, 66271/16, 75978/16 and 77691/16 provided a certificate (aray??) from the local housing authorities indicating that they had lived in the flats in question for ten or more years. It also appears that the applicants in applications nos. 1038/17 and 52821/17 provided similar references later in the proceedings (after the delivery of the first?instance court judgments and while the proceedings were pending before the appellate court) indicating that they had lived in the flats in question for more than ten and eight years respectively.
14. The BCEA submitted objections to the claims made by the applicants in applications nos. 66249/16, 77691/16 and 1038/17, arguing that the applicants’ relocation had been carried out pursuant to its orders, in accordance with the President’s instruction and the development programme for implementation of the General Plan of Baku City. It further submitted that the amount of compensation to be paid to the owners of the residential and non-residential properties in the demolition area had been fixed at AZN 1,500 per sq. m and argued that amounts corresponding to the additional 20% compensation and compensation for hardship had already been included in this overall amount.
15. The Ministry of Finance filed objections in all cases, except with regard to the applicant in application no. 66271/16, asking the court to dismiss the applicants’ claims. It firstly argued that, in order for the applicants to be eligible for additional compensation, their properties needed to have been expropriated for State needs, which had not been the case. It also argued that, in accordance with domestic law, a decision by the Cabinet of Ministers was required for expropriation of privately owned property for State needs, and that there had been no such decision in their cases.
16. The Ministry of Finance further argued that the alienation of the applicants’ properties had to be regarded as a private civil-law transaction because it had been carried out on the basis of sale and purchase contracts in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Civil Code and the price of the properties had been determined on the basis of “supply and demand”. It noted that the BCEA had acted on behalf of the State as a private entity in those transactions and, in support of this argument, relied on Article 43.3 of the Civil Code. It also submitted that the applicants had given their contractual consent to sell their properties for the price offered and that subsequently asking for additional compensation was contrary to the provisions of the civil law on contracts.
First-instance judgments on the merits
17. Baku Administrative Economic Court No. 1 delivered separate judgments in each case. Below are summaries of its judgments, grouped according to the similarity of the conclusions and reasoning.
Applications nos. 66249/16 and 75978/16
18. By separate judgments delivered on 13 July 2015 Baku Administrative Economic Court No. 1 allowed in full the applicants’ claims for additional compensation under both the 2007 Presidential Decree and the Law on Expropriation. It held that it was evident from the circumstances of the cases concerned that the applicants’ flats had been expropriated for State needs and that the applicants had resided in the flats in question for more than ten years.
19. The court found that the arguments by the BCEA and the Ministry of Finance were unsubstantiated and noted that, had the flats not been expropriated for State needs as argued, the purchase price would have been negotiated by the applicants themselves and would not have been fixed by an agreement between the BCEA, the Ministry of Finance and the State Committee on Property Issues.
Applications nos. 77309/16, 77691/16 and 52821/17
20. On 23 September 2015 (application no. 77309/16), 11 November 2015 (application no. 77691/16) and 29 June 2015 (application no. 52821/17) the court allowed the applicants’ claims for the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree, providing reasoning similar to that in the cases concerning the applicants in applications nos. 66249/16 and 75978/16 (see paragraphs 18-19 above).
21. However, it dismissed their claims in respect of compensation for hardship under the Law on Expropriation, finding (i) that the claim was unsubstantiated (application no. 77309/16); (ii) that the claim had not been lodged within one calendar year of the adoption of the BCEA’s order of 22 February 2011, as required under Article 66.3 of the Law on Expropriation (application no. 77691/16); and (iii) that the applicant had not been in possession of the flat for the period required under Article 66.4 of the Law on Expropriation to qualify for such compensation (application no. 52821/17).
Applications nos. 66271/16 and 1038/17
22. On 19 November 2015 (application no. 66271/16) and 11 June 2015 (application no. 1038/17) the court dismissed the applicants’ claims in full. It noted that the applicants had voluntarily concluded the sale and purchase contracts and that the BCEA had acted in accordance with the provisions of civil law. It also noted that there had been no decision by the Cabinet of Ministers on expropriation of the applicant’s flats and that there had therefore been no expropriation or purchase for State needs.
Appeals
23. In the cases concerning the applicants in applications nos. 66249/16, 75978/16, 77309/16, 77691/16 and 52821/17, the BCEA and the Ministry of Finance lodged appeals, essentially reiterating their submissions made to the first-instance court (see paragraphs 14-16 above).
24. The applicants in applications nos. 77309/16, 77691/16 and 52821/17 also lodged appeals and asked the Baku Court of Appeal to allow their claims in the part concerning compensation for hardship under the Law on Expropriation. The applicants in applications nos. 66271/16 and 1038/17 lodged appeals, arguing that it was clear from the BCEA’s order of 31 May 2011 that their flats had been expropriated for State needs.
Appellate judgments
25. The Baku Court of Appeal delivered separate judgments in each case. Below are summaries of its judgments some of which are summarised together.
Applications nos. 66249/16, 77309/16 and 77691/16
26. On 5 February 2016 (applications nos. 66249/16 and 77309/16) and 21 January 2016 (application no. 77691/16) the Baku Court of Appeal quashed the first-instance court judgments in the three cases concerned and dismissed the applicants’ claims in full.
27. The court noted, inter alia, that the applicants had voluntarily concluded the sale and purchase contracts, the validity of which they had not contested, and which had not contained any provisions on the payment of additional compensation. It further noted that, in the cases concerned, no decision by the Cabinet of Ministers on expropriation had been taken in respect of the properties, and that the properties had not been expropriated for State needs.
28. In the cases concerning the applicants in applications nos. 66249/16 and 77309/16, the court, referring to Articles 66.1 to 66.3 of the Law on Expropriation, also added that, in any event, the period for a claim under that Law had expired, since four years had passed since the applicants had moved from the area in question after the sale of their flats.
Application no. 66271/16
29. On 26 January 2016 the Baku Court of Appeal upheld the first?instance court’s judgment dismissing the applicant’s claim, reiterating its reasoning.
Application no. 75978/16
30. On 27 October 2015 the appellate court quashed the first-instance court’s judgment in part, finding that the applicant had failed to lodge her claim for compensation for hardship “within one calendar year”, as required under Article 66.3 of the Law on Expropriation (without specifying the date from which the period of one calendar year was to be calculated). It dismissed the remainder of the BCEA’s and the Ministry of Finance’s appeals and upheld the first-instance court’s judgment in the part allowing the claim in respect of the additional 20% compensation.
Application no. 1038/17
31. On 21 September 2015 the appellate court reversed the lower court’s judgment and allowed the applicant’s claim in respect of the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree, finding that her property had been demolished for construction of a new highway, which was a State need. Referring to Article 157.9 of the Civil Code, the court concluded that the property in question had been expropriated for State needs. It noted that the fact that, in procedural terms, the expropriation decision had been taken by the BCEA (which had no competence under domestic law to initiate expropriation) and not the Cabinet of Ministers (which had such competence) did not affect or change the actual substance of the transaction and the purpose of the purchase of the applicant’s property.
32. However, the court dismissed the applicant’s claim in respect of compensation for hardship under the Law on Expropriation, finding that she had failed to provide any evidence that she had resided in the flat in question for more than ten years and that she had encountered difficulties in connection with her moving flats.
33. On 21 September 2015 the Supreme Court quashed the above?mentioned judgment based on the appeal by the Ministry of Finance, finding the reasoning in respect of the additional 20% compensation incorrect. It remitted the case to the appellate court for fresh examination.
34. On 25 May 2016 the Baku Court of Appeal, having re-examined the case, dismissed the applicant’s appeal, holding that her property had not been expropriated for State needs and noting that no decision had been taken by the Cabinet of Ministers, the competent body, in this regard. It also added that the applicant had made her claim for compensation for hardship belatedly.
Application no. 52821/17
35. On 30 September 2015 the appellate court upheld the lower court’s judgment allowing the applicant’s claim in the part relating to the additional 20% compensation and dismissing it in the part relating to compensation for hardship. The court noted that even though the defendant had failed to comply with the expropriation procedure under domestic law (without referring to any specific provisions), this could not be grounds for depriving persons whose property had been expropriated of their rights enshrined in the legislation. As to the other part of the claim, it held that the applicant had not submitted her claim in respect of compensation for hardship to the BCEA until 2015 and had therefore failed to comply with the time-limit prescribed by Article 66.3 of the Law on Expropriation.
36. On 22 December 2016, following an appeal by the Ministry of Finance, the Supreme Court quashed the above-mentioned judgment and remitted it to the appellate court for fresh examination.
37. Having re-examined the appeal, on 28 February 2017 the appellate court dismissed the applicant’s appeal, reasoning that there had been no expropriation for State needs and that the purchase of her property had constituted a voluntary contractual transaction. It also reiterated its earlier conclusion that the applicant’s claim for compensation for hardship had been lodged belatedly.
Cassation appeals
38. All the applicants lodged cassation appeals, except the applicant in application no. 75978/16, in whose case the appeal was lodged by the opposing party (see paragraph 40 below for details). The applicants maintained that the main purpose of purchasing their property was expansion of the highway, which had economic and strategic importance for the State, and that under Article 157.9 of the Civil Code and Article 3.1.1 of the Law on Expropriation, building roads and other communication lines constituted State needs.
39. In addition, the applicants made reference to several cases in which similar claims by other individuals living in the same area who had concluded similar contracts with the BCEA following its order of 31 May 2011 had been allowed by the Supreme Court in full or in part (see paragraphs 72-87 below).
40. In the case of the applicant in application no. 75978/16, the Ministry of Finance lodged a cassation appeal providing the same arguments as in its appeals before the appellate court in the above-mentioned cases.
Final decisions of the Supreme Court
41. On the various dates indicated in the Appendix, the Supreme Court ruled against the applicants, quashing the appellate court’s judgment allowing the claim of the applicant in application no. 75978/16 in part, and upholding the lower court’s judgments dismissing the claims of the applicants in the other applications. Below are summaries of the Supreme Court’s decisions, grouped according to the similarity of the legal reasoning.
Cases concerning the applicants in applications nos. 66249/16, 66271/16, 1038/17 and 52821/17
42. In its decisions concerning these cases, the Supreme Court firstly referred to the relevant sale and purchase contracts between the parties, noting that the validity of the contracts and the purchase price determined had not been contested.
43. The court further noted that in the cases concerned there had been no expropriation for State needs and that the decision on relocation had not been taken by the Cabinet of Ministers. It held that, as agreed with the Ministry of Finance and the State Committee on Property Issues, the owners of the properties had been paid AZN 1,500 per sq. m and no decision had been taken in respect of the payment of any additional compensation. The Supreme Court therefore concluded that the applicants were not entitled to the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree.
44. As to the applicants’ claim concerning compensation for hardship, the court made a general reference to Articles 66.1 to 66.3 of the Law on Expropriation (see paragraph 69 below), without providing further reasoning. In connection with applications nos. 66249/16 and 52821/17, in addition to its conclusion that the applicants’ property had not been expropriated for State needs, it also noted that the applicants had submitted their claims for compensation for hardship belatedly.
Cases concerning the applicants in applications nos. 75978/16, 77309/16 and 77691/16
45. In its decisions concerning these cases, the Supreme Court also referred to the sale and purchase contracts, noting that the applicants had voluntarily sold their flats to the BCEA at a price agreed by both parties. The court further noted that the contracts had not contained any provisions stating that the flats or the land on which they were situated had been expropriated for State needs or determining the payment of any additional compensation. It therefore concluded that the flats had not been expropriated for State needs.
46. In applications nos. 77309/16 and 77691/16, the Supreme Court also added the following reasoning:
“On the other hand, it appears from the case material that there had been no decision by the relevant executive authority (the Cabinet of Ministers of the Republic of Azerbaijan) on expropriation of the area in question for State needs under the [Law on Expropriation].
Even if this were the case, in accordance with Article 30.1 of the [Law on Expropriation], the expropriating authority may acquire the rights to the land from persons affected by the expropriation ... by negotiation (voluntary sale and purchase).
Under Article 30.2 of this Law, the expropriating authority, as buyer, or the person [affected by the expropriation] ..., as seller, may be the initiators of the voluntary sale and purchase by negotiation.
As indicated by the circumstances of the case, the acquisition of the flat in question in accordance with the sale and purchase contract concluded voluntarily between the applicant and the defendant authority by payment of the agreed price was in accordance with the requirements of Articles 646.1 and 648.1 of the Civil Code and Articles 30 and 52.7 of the [Law on Expropriation].”

47. In all cases, the Supreme Court failed to address the applicants’ submissions concerning previous judgments in which similar compensation claims had been allowed (see paragraphs 72-87 below for a summary of these judgments).
RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK
RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
The 1995 Constitution
48. Article 13 § I of the Constitution provides:
“Property in the Republic of Azerbaijan is inviolable and is protected by the State.”
49. Article 29 § IV of the Constitution provides:
“No one shall be deprived of his or her property without a court decision. Total confiscation of property is not permitted. Expropriation of property for State needs may be permitted only subject to prior and fair compensation corresponding to its value.”
50. The legislative system of the Republic of Azerbaijan is comprised, in order of hierarchy, of the Constitution, acts passed by referendum, laws enacted by Parliament, presidential decrees, decisions of the Cabinet of Ministers and normative acts of the central executive authorities (Articles 148 § I and 149). International treaties to which the Republic of Azerbaijan is a party constitute an integral part of its legislative system (Article 148 § II).
51. The President of the Republic of Azerbaijan issues decrees when establishing general rules and presidential orders in respect of other matters (Article 113 § I). Presidential decrees cannot contradict the Constitution and laws. The application and execution of decrees, only if published, are obligatory for all citizens, executive authorities and legal entities (Article 149 § IV).
The 2000 Civil Code
52. Article 43.3 of the Code provides that the Republic of Azerbaijan participates in civil-law relationships in the same way as other legal entities. In such cases, the powers of the Republic of Azerbaijan are exercised by its bodies which are not legal entities.
53. Article 157.9 of the Civil Code, as in force at the material time, provided:
“Private property may be expropriated by the State, when required for State or public needs, only in the cases permitted by law, for the purposes of building roads or other means of communication, delimiting the State border strip or constructing defence facilities, by decision of the relevant State authority [the Cabinet of Ministers], and subject to prior payment of compensation in an amount corresponding to its market value.”
54. Article 246 of the Code, as in force at the material time, provided:
“246.1. A decision to expropriate land for State needs shall be taken by the relevant executive authority [the Cabinet of Ministers] ... in accordance with Article 157.9 of this Code.

...

246.5. The provisions of Articles 246 to 249 of this Code shall, along with the land expropriated for State needs, also apply to buildings (houses, constructions, devices) located or nor located on that land and expropriated for the same purpose.”
55. Presidential Decree no. 386 of 25 August 2000, which deals with various aspects of implementation of the 2000 Civil Code, as amended by Presidential Decree no. 78 of 17 June 2004 and as in force at the material time, designated the Cabinet of Ministers as “the relevant executive authority” referred to in Articles 157.9 and 246.1 of the Civil Code.
56. Article 247 of the Code, as in force at the material time, provided:
“247.1. The purchase price of land expropriated for State needs shall be calculated in the manner determined by the relevant executive authority and paid to the owner no earlier than [eighty] calendar days and no later than [one hundred and twenty] calendar days from the date he or she receives notification under Article 246.3.
247.2. The purchase price shall include the market price of the land and the immovable property on it, as well as all damage incurred by the owner resulting from the expropriation of his or her land, including loss of profit and damage caused by early termination of his or her obligations to third parties...”
57. Articles 646.1 and 648.1 are part of sub-chapter 5 (Purchase and sale of immovable items) of chapter 29 (Purchase and sale) of section 7 (Obligations arising out of contracts) of the Code.
58. Article 646.1 of the Code provides that under the sale and purchase contract, the seller undertakes to transfer the land, house, building, construction, flat or other immovable property to the buyer.
59. Article 648.1 of the Code provides that when selling and purchasing immovable property, each party complies with his or her obligation to offer or accept by taking all the necessary steps to register the transfer of ownership rights in the State register of immovable property.
Law on the Expropriation of Land for State Needs of 20 April 2010 (“the Law on Expropriation”)
60. The Law on Expropriation provides for complex and detailed procedures and a number of substantive and procedural requirements in respect of expropriation of immovable property. Below is a summary of the expropriation procedure established by the Law and the text of the relevant provisions.
61. Article 1.1.1 of the Law defines expropriation (al?nma) as follows:
“Expropriation – voluntary or compulsory purchase by the State of land (or part thereof) in private or municipal ownership by termination of the rights of ownership, use and lease, including encumbrances (restrictions) on the use of the land, as well as the repossession of used and/or leased State land from the user or lessee by payment of appropriate compensation.”
62. Under Article 1.1.2, the definition of “land” also includes immovable property located on it (constructions, buildings and similar objects connected to the land).
63. Article 3.1 of the Law provides:
“The State needs for which expropriation [may take place] under this Law are as follows:
3.1.1. building and installing roads of State importance and other communication lines (main oil and gas pipelines, sewers, high-voltage electricity lines, hydraulic structures); ...”
64. Land expropriated for State needs may be expropriated on the basis of an agreement with the owner (“voluntary sale and purchase”) or, if no agreement can be reached, in a compulsory manner by court order subject to payment of compensation (“compulsory expropriation”) (Article 4.1).

65. The Law and Presidential Decree no. 382 of 15 February 2011 on its implementation designate the following State authorities and other bodies as having various roles and powers in the expropriation process: (a) the Cabinet of Ministers as the body which, inter alia, determines the existence of a State need, appoints an “expropriating authority”, and issues an expropriation order (Articles 9 and 19 and other provisions); (b) the “expropriating authority” appointed by the Cabinet of Ministers, which is responsible for executing the expropriation and has a wide range of competences and obligations (Article 6 and other provisions); (c) the Ministry of Finance as the supervisory authority, which monitors compliance of the expropriating authority and other bodies with the requirements of domestic law, examines various complaints, and presents proposals and reports on various aspects of the expropriation to the Cabinet of Ministers (Article 8 and other provisions); (d) an “expropriation group” established by the expropriating authority and including representatives of various State authorities, which holds meetings with the persons affected by the expropriation on various issues (Article 22 and other provisions); (e) a valuation commission established by the Cabinet of Ministers (Article 19 and other provisions); (f) a relocation commission set up by the expropriating authority, which participates in drawing up and implementing a relocation plan and takes the necessary steps to defend the interests of the persons affected by the expropriation (Article 40 and other provisions); (g) other bodies such as independent appraisers working with the valuation commission (Articles 23-24 and other provisions); and (h) the domestic courts which, inter alia, finalise the “compulsory” expropriation by approving the acquisition by the State of possession of the property (Article 52 and other provisions).
66. The default “compulsory expropriation” procedure consists of a number of steps taken by the Cabinet of Ministers, the “expropriating authority” and other authorities mentioned above, which include, inter alia, valuation of the property, determination of compensation and assistance in relocation, if necessary (Chapters II, III and V). The expropriation is completed after the acquisition of property is approved by the court upon application of the expropriating authority. If the parties have no objections to the terms of expropriation and compensation, the court approves the acquisition without examining the terms; otherwise, it reviews the relevant documents and complaints (Article 52). The applicant and the expropriating authority are free to use alternative dispute resolution to resolve their disputes (Article 52.7).
67. As noted above, the Law allows for the option of “voluntary sale and purchase”, which can be initiated by either party (Article 30). The purchase price determined in the context of the “voluntary sale and purchase” is the same in type and substance as the compensation determined in accordance with Chapter VII of the Law (see paragraph 68 below), however, that amount is increased by 10% in order to encourage the person affected to sell voluntarily (Article 32.3). Once an offer containing, inter alia, the proposed price is made (Article 33), the person affected can make a counter-offer, which may be accepted by the expropriating authority subject to obtaining the Ministry of Finance’s consent (Article 34). The purchase of the land is formalised by the conclusion of a sale and purchase contract between the person affected by the expropriation and the expropriating authority acting on behalf of the State (Article 35). Within ninety calendar days, the expropriating authority pays the full price to the owner, bears the costs of transferring ownership to the State and assists the owner in vacating the property and relocating to his or her new place of residence (Article 36).
68. Chapter VII of the Law on Expropriation concerns compensation. All persons affected by expropriation must be paid fair compensation in accordance with the provisions of the Law. Compensation is calculated by determining either the market price of the land or the recovery price, where the determination of the former is impossible (Articles 55 and 58). Compensation can be paid in different forms, including the allocation of land comparable to the expropriated land in terms of size, quality and production capacity comparable to the expropriated one or a lump sum payment (Article 65).
69. Article 66 of the Law provides:
“66.1. In all cases of expropriation of residential property in accordance with this Law, the expropriating authority shall pay to the claimant compensation for hardship in addition to the payments to which persons affected by the expropriation are entitled.
66.2. Compensation for hardship shall be paid to the person affected by the expropriation on presentation of a document confirming that he or she has lived in the expropriated property as [his or her] main place of residence for at least five years.
66.3. The person affected by the expropriation shall submit his or her claim for compensation for hardship to the expropriating authority within one calendar year of the occurrence of the event provided for in Article 66.2 of this Law.
66.4. Compensation for hardship shall be determined [as a] percentage of the total compensation to be paid to the claimant, depending on the period that the person affected by the expropriation has lived in the residential property:
66.4.1. for a period of 5 to 6 years – 5%;
66.4.2. for a period of 6 to 7 years – 6%;
66.4.3. for a period of 7 to 8 years – 7%;
66.4.4. for a period of 8 to 9 years – 8%;
66.4.5. for a period of 9 to 10 years – 9%;
66.4.6. for a period of more than 10 years – 10%.”
Presidential Decree no. 689 of 26 December 2007
70. Article 2.3 of the Decree provides:
“... the owner of the immovable property which is expropriated for State needs shall be paid, in addition to the purchase price, the amount of 20[%] of the market price of that immovable property calculated in accordance with the legislation (...dövl?t ehtiyaclar? üçün al?nan da??nmaz ?mlak?n mülkiyy?tçisin? h?min da??nmaz ?mlak?n qanunvericiliy? uy?un olaraq hesablanm?? bazar qiym?tinin 20 faizi miqdar?nda sat?nalma qiym?tin? ?lav? haqq öd?nilir).”
71. Under Article 3 of the Decree, the Presidential Administration was instructed to prepare and present to the President the draft Law on Expropriation within two months.
Case-law of the Supreme Court
Cases brought by other individuals affected by the BCEA’s order of 31 May 2011
72. As mentioned above (see paragraph 39 above), in several cases the Supreme Court upheld the lower courts’ judgments allowing in full or in part similar claims lodged by other individuals living in the same area as the applicants who had been affected by the same order of the BCEA.
73. It appears from those decisions that during the proceedings before the domestic courts, the BCEA and the Ministry of Finance presented arguments similar to those made in the applicants’ cases.
(a) Judgment in case no. 2-1(102)-739/15
74. On 14 October 2015 the Supreme Court dismissed the BCEA’s cassation appeal and upheld the appellate court’s judgment awarding A.B. the additional 20% compensation and dismissing her claim for compensation for hardship.
75. It firstly noted that the BCEA’s order of 31 May 2011 had been adopted for expanding the highway which connected the central part of the capital with the Bayil settlement as part of the Silk Way and served as an entry-exit point to the south of the country, establishing new road infrastructure and installing modern engineering communication devices. The court concluded that this showed that A.B.’s property had been expropriated for State needs and that she should therefore be awarded the additional 20% compensation in accordance with the 2007 Presidential Decree.
76. The court also added that since compensation had already been awarded in previous similar cases, A.B.’s claim should be allowed.
(b) Judgment in case no. 2-1(102)-99/2016
77. On 7 January 2016 the Supreme Court dismissed the Ministry of Finance’s cassation appeal and upheld the appellate court’s judgment awarding L.K. the additional 20% compensation and dismissing his claim for compensation for hardship. The court held that L.K. was entitled to the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree and that the fact that the decision on expropriation had not been taken by the competent authority did not exclude his right to claim this compensation. As regards the claim for compensation for hardship, it referred to Articles 66.1?66.3 of the Law on Expropriation without providing any specific reasoning.
(c) Judgment in case no. 2-1(102)-102/2016
78. On 13 January 2016 the Supreme Court dismissed the BCEA’s and the Ministry of Finance’s cassation appeals and upheld the appellate court’s judgment awarding P.A. the additional 20% compensation and dismissing her claim for compensation for hardship.
79. The court noted that because the aim of the relocation was to expand the highway, establish new road infrastructure and install modern engineering communication devices, P.A.’s flat had been demolished for State needs.
80. It held that the absence of an expropriation order by the Cabinet of Ministers did not change the fact that the property in question had been expropriated for State needs, and that the fact that there had been no decision only affected the issue of the lawfulness of the expropriation.
81. Lastly, addressing the Ministry of Finance’s argument about the existence of a sale and purchase contract between the parties, the court noted that although the BCEA had already issued an expropriation order and demolition of her property, demolition work had started and the purchase price for expropriation had been determined, P.A. had been faced with a situation where she had had no other choice but to agree to sign the contract and had therefore not sold her flat voluntarily.
(d) Judgment in case no. 2-1(102)-201/16
82. On 19 January 2016 the Supreme Court dismissed the BCEA’s and the Ministry of Finance’s cassation appeals and upheld the appellate court’s judgment awarding Z.A. the additional 20% compensation and compensation for hardship.
83. The court held that the Ministry of Finance’s reliance on the general civil-law provisions on contracts was incorrect because Z.A. had not decided to sell her flat voluntarily, but had done so because of the BCEA’s order. In other words, as she had been in an unequal situation in public-law relations with a State body, Z.A. had had no choice to act otherwise.
84. The court also noted that the State authority’s failure to comply with the requirements of the Law on Expropriation did not deprive the person affected by expropriation of the right to rely on the provisions of that law for defending his or her property rights. As to the absence of any provision on the obligation to pay additional compensation in the contract, the court noted that the obligation to pay that compensation did not arise from a contract, but from the law.
85. Lastly, in reply to the Ministry of Finance’s argument that Z.A. had submitted her claim for compensation for hardship to the BCEA four years after the alienation of her property and had therefore missed the time-limit under Article 66.3 of the Law on Expropriation, the court noted that the BCEA had itself had to apply this time-limit when responding to Z.A.’s letter asking for the above compensation before initiating the court proceedings. It added that, following the BCEA’s refusal, Z.A. had applied to the court within the prescribed time-limit.
(e) Judgment in case no. 2-1(102)-198/2017
86. On 24 January 2017 the Supreme Court dismissed the BCEA’s and the Ministry of Finance’s cassation appeals and upheld the appellate court’s judgment awarding R.J. the additional 20% compensation and compensation for hardship.
87. The court noted that it was not disputed that funds had been allocated by the State to the BCEA to carry out the demolition work pursuant to the BCEA’s order of 31 May 2011. Referring to the relevant provisions of the 2007 Presidential Decree and the Law on Expropriation and taking into account the fact that R.J. had lived in the expropriated flat for more than ten years before the expropriation, the Supreme Court concluded that the appellate court’s decision awarding her the additional compensation had been justified.
Cases brought by individuals affected by the BCEA’s other orders
88. In a series of decisions (for example, in cases nos. 2-2(102)-948/13 of 18 September 2013, 2-2(102)-1204/13 of 21 November 2013, 2?2(102)?43/14 of 9 January 2014, 2-1(102)-543/14 of 30 April 2014, 2?1(102)-1130/14 of 10 October 2014, 2-1(102)-1399/2014 of 4 December 2014, 2-1(102)-649/2015 of 23 July 2015, 2-1(102)-1011/15 of 5 August 2015, 2-1(102)-1203/15, and 2-1(102)-1233/2015 of 19 November 2015) which concerned the claims for additional 20% compensation, and in some cases, also compensation for hardship by some individuals affected by other orders of the BCEA, the Supreme Court allowed the claims for additional 20% compensation or upheld the lower courts’ judgments allowing those claims, finding that their properties had been expropriated for State needs. As to compensation for hardship, the domestic courts allowed the claim in one case noting that the complainant had lived in her flat for more than ten years before its demolition. In the other cases, the courts found that the complainants had failed to provide proof of their claims and dismissed them as unsubstantiated.
RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL INSTRUMENTS AND REPORTS
89. The relevant reports of the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and of the Council of Europe Committee on the Honouring of Obligations and Commitments by Member States are summarised and cited in Khalikova v. Azerbaijan (no. 42883/11, §§ 90-91, 22 October 2015).
90. In February 2012 Human Rights Watch issued a detailed report concerning the ongoing forced evictions and expropriations in Baku, entitled “They took everything from me – Forced Evictions, Unlawful Expropriations, and House Demolitions in Azerbaijan’s Capital”. The report was based on Human Rights Watch researchers’ visits to Baku in June, September and December 2011 and in January 2012 during which sixty?seven interviews were carried out with property owners, lawyers and NGO representatives. The relevant extract of the report reads:
“Since 2008, the government of Azerbaijan has undertaken a sweeping program of urban renewal in Baku ... In the course of this program, the authorities have illegally expropriated hundreds of properties, primarily apartments and homes in middle-class neighbourhoods, to be demolished to make way for parks, roads, a shopping [centre], and luxury residential buildings. The government has forcibly evicted homeowners, often without warning or in the middle of the night, and at times in clear disregard for residents’ health and safety, in order to demolish their homes. It has refused to provide homeowners fair compensation based on the market values of properties, many of which are in highly-desirable locations and neighbourhoods.
The Baku City Executive Authority and the Azerbaijan State Committee on Property oversee the expropriations and forced evictions documented in this report. Once the authorities have identified a property for expropriation and demolition, the government typically offers monetary compensation or resettlement to the residents. However, not all homeowners receive compensation or resettlement offers or accept the government’s offers. They therefore remain in their homes. When the authorities arrive to demolish the homes, they forcibly evict the remaining homeowners and their families.
When governments expropriate private property for [S]tate needs, they must provide a fair and transparent process for compensation that reflects market value of the property as well as compensation for relocation and other expenses. However, the Azerbaijani authorities have offered some homeowners, typically those with homes smaller than 60 square [metres], monetary compensation at a single, government-fixed rate of 1,500 manat[s] (US$1,900) per square [metre], without regard to the property’s location, age, condition, use, or any other factors. Homeowners were not aware of any independent appraisals of their homes ordered by the government, and the government has not responded to several inquiries by Human Rights Watch as to whether it conducted independent appraisals of homes...”
91. The report’s chapter entitled “Forced Sale at an Arbitrary Price” contained the following:
“Homeowners from the neighbourhood behind the Heydar Aliyev Hall and the Bayil neighbourhood near the National Flag Square described the government’s compensation process to Human Rights Watch. For apartments and houses smaller than 60 square [metres], the government’s compensation mechanism requires homeowners to enter into a real estate transaction with a private individual at a fixed price, set by the government, in order to receive monetary compensation for their homes. This mechanism amounts to a forced sale by property owners since, by order of the Baku City Executive Authority, property owners do not have the opportunity to sell their properties by any other means.
According to a February 2011 letter issued by the State Committee on Property [Issues], the compensation rate is 1,500 manat[s] (US$1,900) per square [metre], irrespective of the property’s location, age, condition, quality of renovation, or any other factors. The authorities have not publici[s]ed or explained how this rate was determined and by whom, or how the same rate was established for homes expropriated prior to the Committee’s February 2011 letter. In no cases known to Human Rights Watch has the government conducted appraisals to determine the market value of properties, nor does it consider in its awarding of compensation any independent appraisals ordered by homeowners.
A similar compensation system exists for homes expropriated and demolished next to the National Flag Square in the Bayil neighbo[u]rhood where, in order to receive monetary compensation, owners of apartments smaller than 60 square [metres] are also required to conclude real estate transactions with a private individual at the fixed rate of 1,500 manat[s] (US$1,900) per square [metre].”
THE LAW
JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS92. Having regard to the similar subject matter of the applications, the Court finds it appropriate to examine them jointly in a single judgment.

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
93. The applicants complained that there had been an unlawful interference with their right to property owing to the domestic courts’ failure to award them the additional increases in compensation to which they had been entitled under domestic law. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
Scope of the complaint raised by the applicant in application no. 52821/17
94. In her observations submitted to the Court after notice of the application had been given to the Government, the applicant in the above application also referred to the additional 10% increase in compensation as “encouragement for voluntary sale” as provided for under Article 32.3 of the Law on Expropriation (see paragraph 67 above).
95. In her complaints before the domestic courts and initial application to the Court, the applicant only complained about the domestic authorities’ failure to award her compensation for hardship under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation and the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree, and never made any claims or complaints in connection with the increase in compensation provided for by Article 32.3 of the Law on Expropriation.
96. Having regard to the fact that this issue was not part of the complaint of which the Government were given notice on 7 November 2018, the Court will limit its consideration to the applicant’s initial complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, namely the complaint regarding the domestic authorities’ failure to pay her the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree and compensation for hardship under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation (compare, for example, Khizanishvili and Kandelaki v. Georgia, no. 25601/12, § 42, 17 December 2019).
Admissibility
Applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
(a) The parties’ submissions
(i) The Government
97. With respect to applications nos. 66249/16, 66271/16, 75978/16, 77309/16, 77691/16 and 1038/17, the Government, referring to the domestic courts’ conclusions, submitted that the applicants had sold their flats to the BCEA for the price agreed between the parties and had failed to prove that their flats had been expropriated for State needs. They had not therefore been entitled to any expropriation-related compensation.
98. With respect to application no. 52821/17, the Government submitted that an expropriation order by the Cabinet of Ministers had been required for expropriation of the property for State needs and that, since no such decision had been taken, the alienation of the property had to be regarded as a “purchase” rather than “expropriation”. They added that the BCEA had acted as “an independent party” rather than a State entity when signing the contract. The Government also noted that the calculation had been based on the market price and not on a fixed price. With regard to compensation for hardship under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation, they submitted that the applicant’s property rights had been registered on 18 January 2012 (just before the sale of her flat) and that she had therefore failed to meet the minimum residence requirement under that provision.
(ii) The applicants
99. The applicants argued that their flats had been expropriated for State needs and that they had therefore been eligible to receive additional compensation under domestic law.
100. They also claimed that they had agreed to sell their flats to the State with the expectation that they would benefit from the additional guarantees provided for in the domestic legislation, that is, the additional 20% compensation and compensation for hardship. According to them, the State authorities had informed them that the payment of additional compensation would only be possible after the conclusion of the sale and purchase contract and that, considering this promise, they had agreed to sign the relevant contracts.
101. The applicants further argued that the authorities had essentially obliged them to sign the sale and purchase contracts and that they had agreed to sign them owing to their difficult financial situation and the insistence of the BCEA.
(b) The Court’s assessment
(i) General principles
102. The Court reiterates that, according to its case-law, an applicant can allege a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in so far as the impugned decisions relate to his or her “possessions” within the meaning of that provision. “Possessions” can be “existing possessions” or claims that are sufficiently established to be regarded as “assets”.
103. In certain circumstances, a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining an “asset” may also enjoy the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Thus, where a proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, the person in whom it is vested may be regarded as having a “legitimate expectation” if there is a sufficient basis for the interest in national law, for example where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming its existence (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 52, ECHR 2004-IX; Anheuser?Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 65, ECHR 2007?I; and Radomilja and Others v. Croatia [GC], nos. 37685/10 and 22768/12, § 142, 20 March 2018).
104. By way of contrast, the hope of recognition of a property right which it has been impossible to exercise effectively cannot be considered a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, nor can a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfilment of the condition (see, inter alia, Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, § 69, ECHR 2002?VII, and Kopecký, cited above, § 35).
(ii) Application of these principles to the present cases
105. The Court notes that the applicants’ complaint concerns two different monetary claims: a claim for the additional 20% compensation on the basis of the 2007 Presidential Decree and a claim for compensation for hardship under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation. The Court will determine the applicability of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to each of these claims separately.
(?) Additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree
106. Article 2.3 of the 2007 Presidential Decree entitled a person whose property had been expropriated for State needs to additional compensation. This compensation appeared to be essentially a fixed premium calculated at the rate of 20% of the market price of the expropriated property. It appears from the text of the 2007 Presidential Decree that the only requirement for entitlement to the compensation was that the property had to be expropriated for State needs. No other conditions (such as time-limits and specific procedural requirements) were laid down therein. Nor does it follow from the text of the Decree that entitlement to this compensation was conditional on the expropriation being conducted in accordance with the procedures established by the Law on Expropriation (which had not yet been enacted at the time the Decree entered into force) or any other legislative act.
107. In the present cases, the applicants’ flats were transferred into State ownership in 2011 and early 2012 pursuant to the sale and purchase contracts they concluded with Z.I., who acted on the authority given to him to do so by the BCEA. The sale and purchase were initiated pursuant to the BCEA’s orders of 22 February and 31 May 2011 concerning the relocation of residential and non-residential properties in the relevant area. The applicants argued that these transactions had, in fact, constituted expropriation of their properties for State needs and that they had therefore been entitled to the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree. The Government, on the other hand, argued that the Decree had been inapplicable to their situation because the transactions had constituted voluntary civil-law transactions where the person delegated by the BCEA had acted as a private party.
108. The Court observes that while the applicants’ claims for additional compensation were refused by final decisions of the Supreme Court on the basis of the conclusion that their properties were not expropriated for State needs, in a number of other cases, the Supreme Court upheld the lower courts’ judgments allowing additional compensation claims lodged by other individuals living in the same neighbourhood as the applicants who had been similarly affected by the BCEA’s order of 31 May 2011 and had claimed the same compensation relying on the same grounds. In those latter cases, the Supreme Court concluded that, despite the authorities’ failure to follow the relevant expropriation procedure and, in particular, the absence of an expropriation order by the Cabinet of Ministers, the property in question had indeed been expropriated for State needs. Moreover, in its decision of 14 October 2015 the Supreme Court also referred to the existence of previous similar cases in which compensation claims had been allowed (see paragraph 76 above). It has not been argued by the Government that such an approach, which appears to recognise the existence of a legitimate expectation for the applicants to obtain the 20% compensation they claimed, was the result of an isolated judicial error or that it was for some reason irrelevant to the applicants’ cases. While similar relevant cases appear to have been decided by the domestic courts differently, the applicants’ claim to additional 20% compensation was supported by a clearly identifiable line of Supreme Court case-law.
109. The Court further notes that in the cases of Akhverdiyev (no. 76254/11, 29 January 2015) and Khalikova (cited above) the applicants’ house and flat respectively were demolished following similar orders issued by the BCEA, which were based on the General Plan of Baku City. In the case of Akhverdiyev, the applicant was offered, as compensation, vouchers to two State-owned flats, while in Khalikova the applicant was offered AZN 1,500 per sq. m of her flat. In both cases, the applicants refused to accept the BCEA’s offers and vacate their properties. Both applicants challenged the lawfulness of the BCEA’s actions before the domestic courts, albeit unsuccessfully, and their properties were demolished. In the case of Khalikova, the applicant subsequently concluded a sale and purchase contract with the representative of the BCEA, more than two months after the demolition of her flat (see Khalikova, cited above, § 65). The Court found that, in both cases, the deprivation of the applicants’ properties had not been carried out in compliance with the conditions provided for by the applicable domestic law, and more specifically the applicable legislation on expropriation. In particular, it was not demonstrated that, under domestic law, the BCEA had competence to expropriate privately owned property (see Akhverdiyev, § 92, and Khalikova, § 138, both cited above). In the present cases, unlike those mentioned above, the applicants did not challenge the lawfulness of the BCEA’s actions before the domestic courts and their complaints do not concern the expropriation as such. However, what is relevant to the complaint in the present cases is that, particularly in the Akhverdiyev case, the Government expressly argued before the Court that the applicants’ properties had been lawfully “expropriated ... for public needs” by the BCEA (see Akhverdiyev, cited above, § 63). Having regard to the fact that the circumstances in which the alienation of privately owned properties occurred in those cases and in the present cases were to a large extent similar (that is, the alienation and deprivation of title were initiated pursuant to orders by the BCEA and in Khalikova a sale and purchase contract was eventually signed), the Court observes that the Government’s position on the question whether the alienation could be characterised under domestic law as expropriation for State or public needs was inconsistent.
110. In view of the above, the Court also notes that the refusal to award compensation to the applicants was not due to any long-standing divergence of domestic case-law resulting from varying interpretations by the domestic courts of the legal provision concerning the payment of the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree, as it has not been demonstrated that there were any conflicting interpretations of that provision (contrast, for example, Albu and Others v. Romania, nos. 34796/09 and 63 others, §§ 35 et seq. and 47, 10 May 2012). The refusal stemmed from the domestic courts’, and notably the Supreme Court’s conclusions in these particular cases, departing from its findings in previous similar cases, that the Decree was inapplicable in the applicants’ situation because that situation did not amount to expropriation for State needs (see paragraph 108 above).
111. Having regard to above considerations, the Court concludes, for the purposes of the present complaint, that the applicants’ position that their flats had, in fact, been expropriated for State needs by the BCEA, acting on behalf of the State, and that therefore they were entitled to the additional 20% compensation was based on a clear line of Supreme Court case-law and, despite the existing contradictions in the domestic courts’ approach, amounted to a “legitimate expectation” which was sufficiently established in domestic law and a sufficient body of domestic case-law to give rise to the notion of “possessions” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (compare Brezovec v. Croatia, no. 13488/07, §§ 42-43 and 45, 29 March 2011).
112. It follows that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable in respect of the applicants’ claim concerning the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree.
(?) Compensation for hardship under the Law on Expropriation
113. The Court reiterates that a conditional claim which lapses as a result of the non-fulfilment of the condition cannot be considered a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 104 above).
114. It appears that, under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation, persons wishing to obtain compensation for hardship had to satisfy the following conditions: (i) submission of a document confirming that they had lived in the expropriated property as a main place of residence for at least five years (Article 66.2), (ii) claims for this compensation had to be submitted to the expropriating authority, and (iii) such claims had to be submitted within one calendar year of the occurrence of the event provided for in Article 66.2 of the Law (Article 66.3). Depending on the length of the residence period, the amount of compensation varied between 5 and 10% (see paragraph 69 above). Accordingly, unlike the 2007 Presidential Decree, which provided for the right to receive additional compensation without a time restriction or any other conditions for claiming it, Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation provided for a time restriction in the form of a claim period and specified the authority (“the expropriating authority”) to which such a claim was to be submitted.
115. The Court notes that, under Articles 6 and 9 of the Law on Expropriation, the “expropriating authority” was an authority appointed by the Cabinet of Ministers in its expropriation order (see paragraph 65 above). As already noted, no such order was issued in the present cases and the applicants eventually submitted their claims to the BCEA, which, as noted above, had no competence to expropriate private property of its own motion.
116. Nevertheless, even accepting that the applicants might have satisfied the first condition requiring them to prove the minimum length of residence of, depending on the applicant, eight or ten years and more (see paragraph 13 above) and that they submitted their claim to the relevant authority, there are other elements which make it difficult to accept that the applicants had a “legitimate expectation”.
117. In particular, the applicants relinquished title to their properties on various dates between 21 July 2011 and 11 February 2012. At that time, none of the applicants initiated any court proceedings challenging the lawfulness of the expropriation procedure owing to the authorities’ failure to comply with the requirements of the Law on Expropriation. Thereafter, three to four years after the loss of title to their flats, the applicants brought claims against the BCEA under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation. However, by that time, even if the expropriation had been carried out in accordance with that Law, any period for claiming compensation under it would have long expired.
118. Lastly, while it is possible to conclude from the material before the Court that there existed a sufficient body of domestic case-law which, together with the applicable domestic legal provisions, constituted a sufficient basis for the applicants’ claims in respect of the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree, the same cannot be said in respect of their claims for compensation for hardship under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation. In fact, in only three cases brought by other individuals affected by the BCEA’s orders similar claims were eventually allowed (see paragraphs 82, 86 and 88 above).
119. In sum, the Court considers that the applicants have failed to demonstrate convincingly that at the time of lodging their claims they could have had a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining compensation for hardship under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation. Accordingly, with respect to that claim, the applicants cannot be regarded as having had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
120. It follows that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is not applicable to this part of the complaint.
Conclusion as regards admissibility
121. The Court reiterates its finding that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is inapplicable to the part of the complaint concerning the applicants’ claims in respect of compensation for hardship under Article 66 of the Law on Expropriation (see paragraph 120 above). It follows that this part of the complaint is incompatible ratione materiae and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.
122. As to the part of the complaint concerning the applicants’ claims in respect of the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree, the Court reiterates its finding that Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable (see paragraph 112 above) and further notes that this part of the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention and not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
Merits
The parties’ submissions
123. The applicants argued that there had been an unlawful interference with their right to property owing to the domestic authorities’ refusal to allow their claims for additional compensation.
124. The Government submitted that the public authority’s interference with the applicants’ right to property had been necessary in a democratic society in the interest of the economic well-being of the country (more precisely for the improvement of the city’s appearance) and had been in line with the domestic legislation.
The Court’s assessment
(a) Whether there was an interference
125. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 contains three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and sets out the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers the deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that a State is entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. These rules are not unconnected, however: the second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions and are therefore to be construed in the light of the principle laid down in the first rule (see, for example, Kozac?o?lu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, § 48, 19 February 2009, and Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 93, 25 October 2012).
126. As noted above, in the present cases, the applicants have not challenged the lawfulness of the BCEA’s actions and the expropriation procedure before the domestic courts and thus the Court will not deal with the lawfulness and the proportionality of the interference with the applicants’ right to the ownership of their flats. For that reason, unlike cases concerning expropriation of the property where the issue of alleged unlawful refusal to pay compensation would be dealt with in the context of the lawfulness and the proportionality of the expropriation itself, here the Court has to decide whether the refusal to pay the additional 20% compensation itself constituted an interference with the applicants’ right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions.
127. The Court notes that in cases of disputes between private parties a court decision rejecting a pecuniary claim will not necessarily amount to an interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions unless such decision is arbitrary or otherwise manifestly unreasonable (see Anheuser?Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 83, ECHR 2007?I), but in the present cases the applicants alleged that the State had refused to pay them additional compensation unlawfully. Nonetheless, their complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are mainly focused on the inconsistent approach of the domestic courts and alleged arbitrariness of their decisions. Therefore, the existence of interference depends on whether the domestic courts indeed decided arbitrarily. This question is inseparable from the issue of the lawfulness of the interference (see Damjanac v. Croatia, no. 52943/10, §§ 88-89, 24 October 2013) and will be examined below.
(b) Whether the interference was lawful
128. The Court reiterates that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful (see Guiso?Gallisay v. Italy, no. 58858/00, § 82, 8 December 2005, and Leki? v. Slovenia [GC], no. 36480/07, § 94, 11 December 2018). The requirement of lawfulness, within the meaning of the Convention, demands compliance with the relevant provisions of domestic law and compatibility with the rule of law (see Kushoglu v. Bulgaria, no. 48191/99, § 49, 10 May 2007; Parvanov and Others v. Bulgaria, no. 74787/01, § 44, 7 January 2010; and Seryavin and Others v. Ukraine, no. 4909/04, § 40, 10 February 2011).
129. Moreover, the existence of a legal basis is not in itself sufficient to satisfy the principle of lawfulness. When speaking of “law”, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 alludes to a concept which comprises statutory law as well as case-law (see Mullai and Others v. Albania, no. 9074/07, § 113, 23 March 2010).
130. The Court reiterates that the parties disagreed as to whether the situation at hand could be regarded as expropriation for State needs. The Court refers in this connection to its above conclusion that the applicants’ claim that their flats were expropriated for State needs was at least supported by a line of Supreme Court case-law (see paragraph 111 above). In these circumstances, it was essential that the domestic courts to which the applicants turned for protection would provide a clear and comprehensive answer regarding the question whether the applicants were entitled to the additional 20% compensation payment they claimed.
131. However, the domestic courts, and more specifically the Supreme Court, which is the highest judicial body to which the applicants had ordinary recourse, delivered judgments containing conflicting assessments of the same situation in the applicants’ cases and in cases brought by other individuals.
132. Moreover, despite the applicants’ direct references to previous final decisions in which similar claims had been allowed, the Supreme Court remained silent in its decisions concerning their cases and did not make any clarifications as to why it had reached a different conclusion in the present cases (see paragraph 47 above).
133. The Court has already stressed on many occasions that the role of a supreme court is precisely to resolve such conflicts, and if conflicting practice develops within one of the highest judicial authorities in a country, that court itself becomes a source of legal uncertainty, thereby undermining the principle of legal certainty and weakening public confidence in the judicial system (compare, mutatis mutandis, Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish and Others v. Romania [GC], no. 76943/11, § 123, 29 November 2016).
134. The Court has also held that where such manifestly conflicting decisions interfere with the right to peaceful enjoyment of possessions and no reasonable explanation is given for the divergence, such interferences cannot be considered lawful for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention because they lead to inconsistent case-law which lacks the required precision to enable individuals to foresee the consequences of their actions (see, mutatis mutandis, Jokela v. Finland, no. 28856/95, § 65, ECHR 2002?IV; see also Saghinadze and Others v. Georgia, no. 18768/05, §§ 116-18, 27 May 2010; and Brezovec, cited above, § 67).
135. Having regard to the above considerations, the Court concludes that the domestic courts’ decisions, and in particular the relevant decisions of the Supreme Court, refusing the applicants’ claims, constituted an interference with their right to peaceful enjoyment of their possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Such interference was incompatible with the principle of lawfulness and hence contravened Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. This finding makes it unnecessary to examine whether a fair balance was struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the applicants’ fundamental rights.
136. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN TOGETHER WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
137. The applicants complained that they had suffered discrimination on account of the domestic courts’ refusal to award them additional compensation when other individuals in the same situation had been paid such compensation. In this connection, they relied on Article 14 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as ... property ... or other status.”
138. The Government submitted that the applicants had failed to argue on which ground they had been discriminated against. They further submitted that the applicants’ complaint in this regard had to be rejected as manifestly ill-founded.
139. The applicants maintained that while their neighbours in the same situation had received additional compensation, their claims had been dismissed without any reasonable justification.
140. The Court reiterates that in order for an issue to arise under Article 14 there must be a difference in the treatment of persons in analogous or relevantly similar situations. Such a difference of treatment is discriminatory if it has no objective and reasonable justification; in other words, if it does not pursue a legitimate aim or if there is not a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised. Article 14 does not prohibit all differences in treatment, but only those differences based on an identifiable, objective or personal characteristic, or “status”, by which individuals or groups are distinguishable from one another (see Carvalho Pinto de Sousa Morais v. Portugal, no. 17484/15, §§ 44-45, 25 July 2017).
141. In the present cases, the applicants relied on domestic court judgments in which claims by other individuals similarly affected by the BCEA’s order of 31 May 2011 had been allowed. However, they failed to argue that the difference in treatment was based on an identifiable personal characteristic. In these circumstances, the Court considers that the complaint of discriminatory treatment is unsubstantiated (compare Xuereb v. Malta (dec.), no. 50867/09, 20 September 2011).
142. It follows that this complaint is manifestly ill-founded and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 and 4 of the Convention.

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
143. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
Damage
Pecuniary damage
144. The applicants claimed the following amounts in respect of pecuniary damage:
(i) the applicant in application no. 66249/16 claimed 24,601 Azerbaijani manats (AZN) (approximately 11,900 euros (EUR) at the time of submission of the claim);
(ii) the applicant in application no. 66271/16 claimed AZN 20,412 (approximately EUR 9,870 at the time of submission of the claim);
(iii) the applicant in application no. 75978/16 claimed AZN 18,225 (approximately EUR 8,810 at the time of submission of the claim);
(iv) the applicant in application no. 77309/16 claimed AZN 11,295 (approximately EUR 5,460 at the time of submission of the claim);
(v) the applicant in application no. 77691/16 claimed AZN 18,306 (approximately EUR 8,850 at the time of submission of the claim);
(vi) the applicant in application no. 1038/17 claimed AZN 17,446 (approximately EUR 8,840 at the time of submission of the claim);
(vii) the applicant in application no. 52821/17 claimed AZN 21,870 (approximately EUR 11,400 at the time of submission of the claim).
145. In support of their claims, the applicants submitted the sale and purchase contracts of their flats. The claimed amounts were calculated as 30% (20% + 10%) of the amount of the purchase price indicated in those contracts.
146. The Government alleged that the applicants had already received fair and adequate compensation for their flats and asked the Court to dismiss their claims under this head.
147. Under the terms of Article 41 of the Convention, the Court may only award just satisfaction to an applicant if it “finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto” with respect to that applicant (see Apostolovi v. Bulgaria, no. 32644/09, § 116, 7 November 2019). In the present cases, the applicants’ complaint concerning compensation for hardship was declared inadmissible. It follows that their claims in this regard must be rejected.
148. Regard being had to the Court’s finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the applicants’ complaint concerning the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree, it considers that an award should be made in this regard. In this connection, the Court notes that the claims in this regard appear to have been calculated by the applicants as 20% of the amount of the purchase price actually paid to them. As noted above, under the 2007 Presidential Decree, the amount in question should be calculated as a percentage of the total compensation determined on the basis of the market price of the expropriated property (see paragraph 106 above). In the present cases, all applicants received a standard compensation in the amount of AZN 1,500 per sq. m and there is no information in the case files about whether this was lower or higher than the “market price” pursuant to the domestic expropriation legislation. However, in so far as the applicants never challenged the lawfulness of the expropriation procedure itself and the amount of original compensation that they received (that is, the purchase prices indicated in the sale and purchase contracts), and the Government did not question the premise on which the applicants’ claim was based and never argued that they had received amounts higher than the market value of their properties, the Court considers that, in the circumstances of the present cases, the amount claimed by the applicants can be calculated on the basis of the respective purchase prices.
149. As noted above, the claims in the present cases were expressed in Azerbaijani manats. As a general practice, in cases where just satisfaction claims (under various heads) were made in the national currency, the Court has converted them into euros as of the date of submission of the claims (see Shukurov v. Azerbaijan, no. 37614/11, § 33, 27 October 2016, with further references, and Khadija Ismayilova v. Azerbaijan, nos. 65286/13 and 57270/14, § 180, 10 January 2019). The Court finds that it is appropriate to follow the above-mentioned approach in the present cases, and thus the conversion rate to be used in respect of the applicants’ claims for pecuniary damage should be the rate applicable on the date on which the claim was submitted. It therefore awards the following sums under this head, plus any tax that may be chargeable on those amounts to the applicants:
(i) EUR 7,930 to the applicant in application no. 66249/16;
(ii) EUR 6,580 to the applicant in application no. 66271/16;
(iii) EUR 5,880 to the applicant in application no. 75978/16;

(iv) EUR 3,640 to the applicant in application no. 77309/16;
(v) EUR 5,900 to the applicant in application no. 77691/16;
(vi) EUR 5,500 to the applicant in application no. 1038/17;
(vii) EUR 7,600 to the applicant in application no. 52821/17.
Non-pecuniary damage
150. Each applicant claimed AZN 10,000 (approximately EUR 4,840 at the time of submission of the claims by applicants in applications nos. 66249/16, 66271/16, 75978/16, 77309/16, 77691/16 and 1038/17 who submitted their claims jointly on the same date and approximately EUR 5,210 at the time of submission of the claim by the applicant in application no. 52821/17 who submitted her claim individually on a different date) for non-pecuniary damage.
151. The Government reiterated that the applicants had received reasonable compensation for their properties.
152. The Court considers that the applicants suffered non-pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated solely by the finding of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention. Ruling on an equitable basis, the Court awards each of the applicants the sum of EUR 3,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable.
Costs and expenses
153. Each applicant also claimed AZN 5,000 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and the Court.
154. The Government submitted that the applicants had not submitted any evidence proving that they had actually incurred any costs and expenses and asked the Court to reject their claims under this head. In application no. 52821/17, the Government considered, alternatively, that the sum of AZN 1,000 would constitute fair compensation under this head.
155. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. Under Rule 60 of the Rules of Court, all claims for just satisfaction must be itemised and submitted in writing together with any relevant supporting documents, failing which the Chamber may reject the claim in whole or in part. In the present case, the claims were neither itemised nor supported by any documentary evidence. The Court therefore rejects the applicants’ claims in respect of costs and expenses (compare Malik Babayev v. Azerbaijan, no. 30500/11, § 97, 1 June 2017).
Default interest
156. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
Decides to join the applications;
Declares the part of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention concerning the additional 20% compensation under the 2007 Presidential Decree admissible and the remainder of the applications inadmissible;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, plus any tax that may be chargeable, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) EUR 7,930 (seven thousand nine hundred thirty euros) to the applicant in application no. 66249/16 in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 6,580 (six thousand five hundred eighty euros) to the applicant in application no. 66271/16 in respect of pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 5,880 (five thousand eight hundred eighty euros) to the applicant in application no. 75978/16 in respect of pecuniary damage;
(iv) EUR 3,640 (three thousand six hundred forty euros) to the applicant in application no. 77309/16 in respect of pecuniary damage;
(v) EUR 5,900 (five thousand nine hundred euros) to the applicant in application no. 77691/16 in respect of pecuniary damage;
(vi) EUR 5,500 (five thousand five hundred euros) to the applicant in application no. 1038/17 in respect of pecuniary damage;
(vii) EUR 7,600 (seven thousand six hundred euros) to the applicant in application no. 52821/17 in respect of pecuniary damage;
(viii) EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros) to each applicant, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claims for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 21 September 2021, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Victor Soloveytchik Síofra O’Leary
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUINTA SEZIONE
CAUSA ALIYEVA E ALTRI c. AZERBAIGIAN
(Domande nn. 66249/16 e altre 6 – cfr. elenco allegato)
GIUDIZIO
Art 1 P1 • Il pacifico godimento dei beni • L'incapacità della Corte Suprema di seguire la propria chiara linea di giurisprudenza con conseguente incapacità dei richiedenti di ottenere un risarcimento aggiuntivo legale per la proprietà espropriata
STRASBURGO
21 settembre 2021
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.

Nel caso Aliyeva e altri c. Azerbaigian,
La Corte Europea dei Diritti dell'Uomo (Quinta Sezione), riunita in una Sezione composta da:
Siofra O'Leary, Presidente,
M?rti?š Mits,
Stéphanie Mourou-Vikström,
Latif Huseynov,
Jovan Ilievski,
lato Chanturia,
Arnfinn Bårdsen, giudici,
e Victor Soloveytchik, cancelliere di sezione,
Aver riguardo di:
sette ricorsi contro la Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian presentati alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da sette cittadini azeri in varie date (vedi Appendice);
la decisione di notificare al governo dell'Azerbaigian ("il governo") i ricorsi ai sensi dell'articolo 14 della Convenzione e dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione;
le osservazioni delle parti;
Avendo deliberato in forma riservata il 31 agosto 2021,
Emette la seguente sentenza, adottata in tale data:
INTRODUZIONE
1. I ricorsi riguardano la doglianza dei ricorrenti circa il mancato - pagamento del risarcimento aggiuntivo legale per le loro proprietà espropriate e sollevano questioni sotto l'Articolo 14 della Convenzione e l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
I FATTI
2. I dettagli dei richiedenti sono elencati nell'Appendice. Erano tutti rappresentati dal sig. S. Bagirov, un avvocato con sede in Azerbaigian.
3. Il Governo era rappresentato dal suo agente, il sig. Ç. sg?rov.
4. I fatti di causa, così come esposti dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.
5. I ricorrenti erano proprietari di appartamenti situati in via Agil Guliyev, via Elchin e Vusal Hajibabayevler e via Fathi Khoshginabi nel distretto Sabail di Baku.
I. ORDINANZE EMESSE IN RELAZIONE ALL'AREA IN CUI SI TROVAVANO GLI APPARTAMENTI DEI RICORRENTI
6. Il 22 febbraio 2011 il capo dell'Autorità esecutiva della città di Baku ("la BCEA") ha emesso l'ordinanza n. 92 su “liberare l'area intorno a diverse strade e gli edifici in via Agil Guliyev 5 nel distretto di Sabail e demolire gli edifici residenziali e non residenziali in queste aree”. Le parti non hanno fornito alla Corte copia di tale ordinanza. Dal fascicolo risulta che, a seguito dell'ordinanza, ZI, Vice Capo dell'Amministrazione della BCEA, era autorizzato a stipulare contratti di compravendita con i proprietari degli appartamenti oggetto di demolizione, e che i proprietari dovevano essere pagati 1.500 Manat dell'Azerbaigian (AZN) per mq.
7. In data 31 maggio 2011 il Capo della BCEA ha emesso l'ordinanza n. 243 “riguardante il trasferimento di locali residenziali e non residenziali nel distretto di Sabail, in via Agil Guliyev 7 e 9, via Fathi Khoshginabi 2, via Aydin Nasirov 9 , 3 e 10/12 Elchin e Vusal Hajibabayevler Street, in relazione all'ampliamento dell'autostrada” (“ordinanza BCEA del 31 maggio 2011”). L'ordinanza affermava che il trasferimento di proprietà residenziali e non residenziali era necessario per espandere l'autostrada che collegava la parte centrale della capitale con l'insediamento di Bayil come parte della storica Via della Seta, stabilendo nuove infrastrutture stradali e installando moderni dispositivi di comunicazione di ingegneria. Ciò doveva essere garantito dal pagamento di un indennizzo per un importo di 1.500 AZN al mq sulla base di contratti di compravendita certificati da un notaio, come concordato con il Ministero delle Finanze e il Comitato di Stato per le questioni immobiliari. ZI, il Vice Capo dell'Amministrazione della BCEA è stato autorizzato a firmare i contratti di compravendita con i proprietari degli immobili.
II. VENDITA E ACQUISTO DEGLI APPARTAMENTI DEI RICORRENTI
8. In varie date comprese tra il 21 luglio 2011 e l'11 febbraio 2012 i ricorrenti hanno concluso contratti di compravendita con ZI sulla base delle ordinanze del 22 febbraio 2011 (ricorrente con ricorso n. 77691/16 ) e del 31 maggio 2011 (i candidati nelle altre domande).
9. In conformità ai contratti, i ricorrenti hanno venduto i loro appartamenti per importi diversi, calcolati sulla base di 1.500 AZN per mq.
10. I richiedenti si impegnarono a trasferire i loro diritti di proprietà sugli appartamenti e tutti i documenti attinenti alla BCEA nel momento in cui i contratti furono approvati dal notaio.
III. PROCEDIMENTI GIUDIZIARI
A. Le pretese dei ricorrenti e la posizione dei convenuti
11. Risulta che, prima di avviare il procedimento giudiziario di seguito descritto, in varie date nel 2015 i ricorrenti hanno scritto al BCEA, sostenendo che i loro appartamenti erano stati espropriati per esigenze dello Stato e chiedendo il pagamento di un "compensazione aggiuntiva" come previsto dalla legge, consistente nelle seguenti: (a) indennità pari al 20% dei prezzi di mercato dei loro immobili, da versare in aggiunta al prezzo di acquisto (“l'addizionale 20%”), ai sensi dell'articolo 2, comma 3, del DPR n. . 689 del 26 dicembre 2007 (“il DPR 2007”, cfr. successivo paragrafo 70), e (b) un ulteriore indennizzo “per disagio” pari al 10% del “comprensorio complessivo” loro corrisposto (“indennità per disagio”), ai sensi dell'articolo 66 della legge sulla espropriazione di terreni per esigenze di Stato (“la legge sulla espropriazione ”, vedi punto 69 di seguito).
12. Nelle sue risposte ai ricorrenti datate 18 marzo 2015 e 11 agosto 2015, il BCEA ha rifiutato di pagare qualsiasi risarcimento aggiuntivo.
13. In varie date nel 2015 ciascuno dei ricorrenti ha avviato procedimenti separati dinanzi al Tribunale amministrativo economico n. 1 di Baku contro la BCEA e il Ministero delle finanze come terza parte. Basandosi sugli articoli 157.9, 246 e 247 del codice civile, i ricorrenti hanno sostenuto dinanzi al tribunale di primo grado che i loro appartamenti erano stati espropriati per esigenze statali e che avevano quindi diritto all'indennità aggiuntiva del 20% e al risarcimento per il disagio. Risulta che, mentre i procedimenti erano pendenti dinanzi al giudice di primo grado, a sostegno delle loro ultime pretese, i ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 66249/16 , 66271/16 , 75978/16 e 77691/16 hanno fornito un certificato ( aray?? ) dalle autorità locali per gli alloggi, indicando di aver abitato negli appartamenti in questione per dieci o più anni. Risulta inoltre che i ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 1038/17 e 52821/17 hanno fornito riferimenti simili successivamente nel procedimento (dopo la pronuncia delle sentenze di primo grado e mentre il procedimento era pendente dinanzi alla corte d'appello) indicando che avevano abitato negli appartamenti in questione per più di dieci e otto anni rispettivamente.
14. Il BCEA ha presentato obiezioni alle rivendicazioni fatte dai richiedenti nelle domande nn. 66249/16 , 77691/16 e 1038/17 , sostenendo che il trasferimento dei ricorrenti era stato effettuato secondo i suoi ordini, in conformità con le istruzioni del Presidente e il programma di sviluppo per l'attuazione del Piano Generale della città di Baku. Ha inoltre sostenuto che l'importo del risarcimento da pagare ai proprietari delle proprietà residenziali e non residenziali nell'area di demolizione era stato fissato a 1.500 AZN per mq e ha sostenuto che gli importi corrispondenti al risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% e al risarcimento per disagio era già stato incluso in questo importo complessivo.
15. Il Ministero delle finanze ha proposto opposizione in tutti i casi, salvo nei confronti del ricorrente con ricorso n. 66271/16 , chiedendo al giudice di respingere le domande dei ricorrenti. In primo luogo, ha sostenuto che, affinché i ricorrenti potessero beneficiare di un risarcimento aggiuntivo, le loro proprietà dovevano essere espropriate per esigenze statali, il che non era stato il caso. Sosteneva anche che, in conformità con il diritto interno, era necessaria una decisione del Consiglio dei ministri per l' espropriazione di proprietà privata per esigenze statali e che non c'era stata tale decisione nei loro casi.
16. Il Ministero delle Finanze ha inoltre sostenuto che l'alienazione delle proprietà dei ricorrenti doveva essere considerata un'operazione di diritto civile privato perché era stata effettuata sulla base di contratti di compravendita in conformità con le disposizioni pertinenti del Codice Civile e il prezzo degli immobili era stato determinato sulla base di “domanda e offerta”. Ha rilevato che la BCEA aveva agito per conto dello Stato in qualità di ente privato in tali operazioni e, a sostegno di tale argomento, ha invocato l'articolo 43, paragrafo 3, del codice civile. Ha anche sostenuto che i ricorrenti avevano dato il loro consenso contrattuale a vendere le loro proprietà al prezzo offerto e che successivamente chiedere un risarcimento aggiuntivo era contrario alle disposizioni del diritto civile sui contratti.
B. Giudizi di primo grado nel merito
17. La Corte Amministrativa Economica n. 1 di Baku ha emesso sentenze separate in ogni caso. Di seguito sono riassunti i suoi giudizi, raggruppati secondo la somiglianza delle conclusioni e del ragionamento.
1. Applicazioni nn. 66249/16 e 75978/16
18. Con sentenze separate consegnate il 13 luglio 2015 il tribunale amministrativo economico n. 1 di Baku ha accolto integralmente le richieste dei ricorrenti per un ulteriore risarcimento ai sensi sia del decreto presidenziale del 2007 che della legge sull'esproprio. Riteneva che fosse evidente dalle circostanze dei casi in questione che gli appartamenti dei ricorrenti erano stati espropriati per esigenze statali e che i ricorrenti avevano risieduto negli appartamenti in questione per più di dieci anni.
19. La corte ha ritenuto che le argomentazioni della BCEA e del Ministero delle finanze fossero prive di fondamento e ha osservato che, se gli appartamenti non fossero stati espropriati per esigenze statali come sostenuto, il prezzo di acquisto sarebbe stato negoziato dagli stessi ricorrenti e non sarebbe stato fissato da un accordo tra la BCEA, il Ministero delle finanze e il Comitato statale per le questioni immobiliari.
2. Applicazioni nn. 77309/16 , 77691/16 e 52821/17
20. In data 23 settembre 2015 (ricorso n. 77309/16 ), 11 novembre 2015 (ricorso n. 77691/16 ) e 29 giugno 2015 (ricorso n. 52821/17 ) il tribunale ha accolto le domande dei ricorrenti per l'ulteriore 20% risarcimento del danno ai sensi del DPR 2007, fornendo una motivazione analoga a quella nei casi riguardanti i ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 66249/16 e 75978/16 (paragrafi 18-19 supra).
21. Tuttavia, ha respinto le loro richieste in materia di compensazione per le difficoltà ai sensi della legge sulla espropriazione , trovando (i) che l'indicazione era infondata (domanda n. 77309/16 ); (ii) che l'indicazione non era stata presentata entro un anno solare di adozione dell'ordine del BCEA del 22 febbraio 2011 come previsto dall'articolo 66.3 della legge sulla espropriazione (domanda n. 77691/16 ); e (iii) che il richiedente non era stato in possesso dell'appartamento per il periodo richiesto dall'Articolo 66.4 della Legge sull'Esproprio per beneficiare di tale risarcimento (domanda n. 52821/17 ).
3. Applicazioni nn. 66271/16 e 1038/17
22. Il 19 novembre 2015 (ricorso n. 66271/16 ) e l'11 giugno 2015 (ricorso n. 1038/17 ) il tribunale ha respinto integralmente le domande dei ricorrenti. Notò che i ricorrenti avevano concluso volontariamente i contratti di compravendita e che la BCEA aveva agito in conformità con le disposizioni del diritto civile. Ha inoltre preso atto che non vi era stata alcuna decisione da parte del Consiglio dei Ministri sull’ esproprio degli appartamenti del ricorrente e che non vi era quindi stato alcun esproprio o acquisto per esigenze dello Stato.
C. ricorsi
23. Nelle cause riguardanti i ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 66249/16 , 75978/16 , 77309/16 , 77691/16 e 52821/17 , il BCEA e il Ministero delle finanze hanno presentato ricorso, ribadendo sostanzialmente le loro osservazioni presentate al giudice di primo grado (paragrafi 14-16 supra).
24. I ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 77309/16 , 77691/16 e 52821/17 hanno altresì presentato ricorso e chiesto alla Corte d'Appello di Baku di accogliere le loro pretese nella parte relativa al risarcimento del disagio ai sensi della Legge sull'Esproprio . I ricorrenti nelle domande nn. 66271/16 e 1038/17 hanno presentato ricorso, sostenendo che dall'ordinanza della BCEA del 31 maggio 2011 risultava chiaramente che i loro appartamenti erano stati espropriati per esigenze dello Stato.
D. Sentenze d'appello
25. La Corte d'Appello di Baku ha emesso sentenze separate in ciascuna causa. Di seguito sono riassunti i suoi giudizi alcuni dei quali sono riassunti insieme.
1. Applicazioni nn. 66249/16 , 77309/16 e 77691/16
26. Il 5 febbraio 2016 (ricorso n. 66249/16 e 77309/16 ) e il 21 gennaio 2016 (ricorso n. 77691/16 ) la Corte d'appello di Baku ha annullato le sentenze di primo grado nelle tre cause di cui trattasi e ha respinto la integralmente le pretese dei ricorrenti.
27. La corte ha osservato, tra l'altro, che i ricorrenti avevano concluso volontariamente i contratti di compravendita, la cui validità non avevano contestato e che non contenevano disposizioni sul pagamento di un risarcimento aggiuntivo. Essa ha inoltre osservato che, nei casi citati, nessuna decisione da parte del Consiglio dei Ministri sull’esproprio era stata presa in relazione alle proprietà, e che le proprietà non erano state espropriate per esigenze dello Stato.
28. Nelle cause riguardanti i ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 66249/16 e 77309/16 , il giudice, richiamandosi agli artt. da 66 , comma 1 a 66 , comma 3 , della legge sugli espropri , ha altresì aggiunto che, in ogni caso, il termine per l'azione di tale legge era scaduto, essendo trascorsi quattro anni da quando i ricorrenti si erano trasferiti dalla zona in questione dopo la vendita dei loro appartamenti.
2. Applicazione numero. 66271/16
29. Il 26 Gennaio 2016 la Corte d'Appello di Baku ha confermato la sentenza del Tribunale di primo grado che respingeva la domanda del ricorrente, ribadendo il suo ragionamento.
3. Applicazione numero. 75978/16
30. Il 27 ottobre 2015 il giudice d'appello ha annullato la sentenza del giudice di primo grado in parte, trovando che la ricorrente non aveva di presentare la sua domanda di risarcimento del disagio “entro un anno solare”, come previsto dall'articolo 66.3 della legge sulla espropriazione (senza specificare la data a partire dalla quale doveva essere calcolato il periodo di un anno solare). Ha respinto il resto dei ricorsi della BCEA e del Ministero delle finanze e ha confermato la sentenza del tribunale di primo grado nella parte che accoglie la domanda relativa all'ulteriore risarcimento del 20%.
4. Applicazione numero. 1038/17
31. Il 21 settembre 2015 la corte d'appello ha annullato la sentenza del tribunale di grado inferiore e ha accolto la domanda della ricorrente in relazione all'ulteriore risarcimento del 20% ai sensi del decreto presidenziale del 2007, rilevando che la sua proprietà era stata demolita per la costruzione di una nuova autostrada, che era un Bisogno di Stato. Riferendosi all'articolo 157.9 del codice civile, il tribunale ha concluso che il bene in questione era stato espropriato per esigenze dello Stato. Ha rilevato che il fatto che, in termini procedurali, la decisione di espropriazione fosse stata presa dal BCEA (che non aveva competenza ai sensi del diritto nazionale ad avviare l' espropriazione ) e non il Gabinetto dei ministri (che aveva tale competenza) non ha intaccato o modificato la sostanza effettiva dell'operazione e lo scopo dell'acquisto della proprietà del ricorrente.
32. Tuttavia, il giudice ha respinto la domanda del ricorrente a titolo di risarcimento per il disagio ai sensi della legge sulla espropriazione , scoprendo che non era riuscita a fornire alcuna prova che aveva risieduto in casa in questione per più di anni dieci e che lei aveva incontrato difficoltà in relazione al suo trasloco.
33. Il 21 settembre 2015 il Corte Suprema ha annullato la suddetta sentenza ritenendo errata la motivazione relativa all'ulteriore risarcimento del 20%. Ha rinviato la causa alla corte d'appello per un nuovo esame.
34. Il 25 maggio 2016 la Corte d'Appello di Baku, dopo aver riesaminato il caso, ha respinto il ricorso della ricorrente, ritenendo che la sua proprietà non fosse stata espropriata per esigenze dello Stato e rilevando che nessuna decisione era stata presa dal Consiglio dei ministri, organo competente a questo proposito. Aggiunse anche che la ricorrente aveva presentato tardivamente la sua richiesta di risarcimento per le difficoltà.
5. Applicazione numero. 52821/17
35. Il 30 settembre 2015 la corte d'appello ha confermato la sentenza del tribunale di grado inferiore accogliendo la domanda del ricorrente nella parte relativa al risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% e respingendola nella parte relativa al risarcimento per disagio. La corte ha osservato che anche se l'imputato non aveva rispettato la procedura di espropriazione prevista dal diritto interno (senza fare riferimento ad alcuna disposizione specifica), ciò non poteva essere motivo per privare le persone la cui proprietà era stata espropriata dei loro diritti sanciti dalla legislazione. Per quanto riguarda l'altra parte della domanda, ha ritenuto che il ricorrente non aveva presentato la sua richiesta a titolo di risarcimento per disagi alla BCEA fino al 2015 e avrebbe quindi omesso di rispettare il termine stabilito dall'articolo 66.3 della legge sulla espropriazione.
36. Il 22 dicembre 2016, a seguito di un ricorso del Ministero delle Finanze, la Suprema Corte ha annullato la suddetta sentenza e l'ha rimessa alla corte d'appello per un nuovo esame.
37. Dopo aver riesaminato il ricorso, il 28 febbraio 2017 la corte d'appello ha respinto il ricorso della ricorrente, argomentando che non vi era stata espropriazione per esigenze dello Stato e che l'acquisto della sua proprietà aveva costituito un'operazione contrattuale volontaria. Reiterò anche la sua precedente conclusione che la richiesta del richiedente per il risarcimento per difficoltà era stata depositata tardivamente.
E. Ricorso per cassazione
38. Tutti i ricorrenti hanno presentato ricorso per cassazione, eccetto il ricorrente nel ricorso n. 75978/16 , nel cui caso il ricorso è stato proposto dall'opponente (si veda il successivo paragrafo 40 per i dettagli). I ricorrenti sostenevano che lo scopo principale dell'acquisto della loro proprietà era l'ampliamento dell'autostrada, che aveva un'importanza economica e strategica per lo Stato, e che ai sensi dell'articolo 157.9 del codice civile e dell'articolo 3.1.1 della legge sugli espropri , la costruzione di strade e altre linee di comunicazione costituivano esigenze statali.
39. Inoltre, i ricorrenti hanno fatto riferimento a diversi casi in cui richieste simili di altri individui residenti nella stessa zona che avevano concluso contratti simili con la BCEA a seguito della sua ordinanza del 31 maggio 2011 erano state accolte dalla Corte Suprema in tutto o in parte (cfr. paragrafi 72-87 di seguito).
40. Nel caso del richiedente nella domanda n. 75978/16 , il Ministero delle Finanze ha proposto ricorso per cassazione proponendo gli stessi argomenti dei ricorsi dinanzi alla Corte d'Appello nelle predette cause.
F. Decisioni finali della Corte Suprema
41. Nelle varie date indicate in Appendice, la Corte Suprema si è pronunciata contro i ricorrenti, annullando la sentenza della corte d'appello che accoglieva la domanda del ricorrente nel ricorso n. 75978/16 in parte, e confermando le sentenze del giudice a quo che rigettano le pretese dei ricorrenti negli altri ricorsi. Di seguito si riportano le sintesi delle decisioni della Suprema Corte, raggruppate secondo la somiglianza del ragionamento giuridico.
1. Casi riguardanti i ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 66249/16 , 66271/16 , 1038/17 e 52821/17
42. Nelle sue decisioni relative a queste cause, la Corte Suprema ha in primo luogo fatto riferimento ai relativi contratti di compravendita tra le parti, rilevando che la validità dei contratti e il prezzo di acquisto determinato non erano stati contestati.
43. La corte notò inoltre che nei casi interessati non c'era stata espropriazione per esigenze statali e che la decisione sul trasferimento non era stata presa dal Gabinetto dei ministri. Ha ritenuto che, come concordato con il Ministero delle finanze e il Comitato statale per le questioni immobiliari, ai proprietari delle proprietà erano stati pagati 1.500 AZN per mq e non era stata presa alcuna decisione in merito al pagamento di alcun risarcimento aggiuntivo. La Corte Suprema ha quindi concluso che i ricorrenti non avevano diritto al risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% ai sensi del decreto presidenziale del 2007.
44. Per quanto riguarda la domanda dei ricorrenti relativa al risarcimento di disagio, la Corte ha un riferimento generale agli articoli 66.1 a 66.3 della legge sulla espropriazione (vedi paragrafo 69 di seguito), senza fornire ulteriori ragionamenti. In relazione alle domande nn. 66249/16 e 52821/17 , oltre alla sua conclusione che la proprietà dei richiedenti non era stata espropriata per esigenze statali, notò anche che i richiedenti avevano presentato tardivamente le loro richieste di risarcimento per le difficoltà.
2. Casi riguardanti i ricorrenti nei ricorsi nn. 75978/16 , 77309/16 e 77691/16
45. Nelle sue decisioni riguardo a queste cause, la Corte Suprema ha anche fatto riferimento ai contratti di vendita e acquisto, notando che i ricorrenti avevano venduto volontariamente i loro appartamenti alla BCEA ad un prezzo concordato da entrambe le parti. La corte ha inoltre osservato che i contratti non contenevano alcuna disposizione che affermasse che gli appartamenti o il terreno su cui erano situati erano stati espropriati per esigenze statali o che determinavano il pagamento di qualsiasi indennizzo aggiuntivo. Pertanto concluse che gli appartamenti non erano stati espropriati per esigenze statali.
46. Nei ricorsi nn. 77309/16 e 77691/16 , la Suprema Corte ha inoltre aggiunto la seguente motivazione:
“D'altra parte, dagli atti di causa risulta che non vi era stata alcuna decisione da parte dell'autorità esecutiva competente (il Consiglio dei Ministri della Repubblica di Azerbaigian) sull’ espropriazione dell'area in questione per esigenze dello Stato [legge sulla espropriazione ].
Anche se così fosse, ai sensi dell'articolo 30.1 dello [legge sulla Espropriazione ], l'autorità espropriante può acquisire i diritti sulla terra dalle persone colpite dal espropriazione ... mediante negoziazione (di vendita e di acquisto volontaria).
Ai sensi dell'articolo 30.2 di questa legge, l'autorità espropriante, in quanto acquirente, o la persona [interessata dall'espropriazione ] ..., in quanto venditore, possono essere gli iniziatori della vendita volontaria e dell'acquisto mediante negoziazione.
...
Come indicato dalle circostanze della causa, l'acquisto dell'appartamento in questione in conformità al contratto di compravendita concluso volontariamente tra il richiedente e l'autorità convenuta mediante il pagamento del prezzo convenuto è stato conforme a quanto richiesto dagli articoli 646.1 e 648.1 del codice civile e degli articoli 30 e 52.7 della [legge sulla espropriazione ] “.
47. In tutti i casi, la Corte Suprema non ha affrontato le osservazioni dei ricorrenti riguardo a precedenti giudizi in cui erano state ammesse richieste di risarcimento simili (vedere paragrafi 72-87 sotto per un riassunto di queste sentenze).

QUADRO GIURIDICO PERTINENTE
I. DIRITTO E PRATICA NAZIONALE PERTINENTE
A. La Costituzione del 1995
48. L' articolo 13 § I della Costituzione prevede:
"La proprietà nella Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian è inviolabile ed è protetta dallo Stato".
49. L' articolo 29 § IV della Costituzione prevede:
“Nessuno può essere privato della sua proprietà senza una decisione del tribunale. Non è consentita la confisca totale dei beni. L'espropriazione dei beni per esigenze dello Stato può essere consentita solo previo ed equo compenso corrispondente al suo valore”.
50. L'ordinamento legislativo della Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian è composto, in ordine gerarchico, dalla Costituzione, dagli atti referendari, dalle leggi emanate dal Parlamento, dai decreti presidenziali, dalle decisioni del Consiglio dei ministri e dagli atti normativi delle autorità esecutive centrali ( Articoli 148 § I e 149). I trattati internazionali di cui la Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian è parte costituiscono parte integrante del suo sistema legislativo (Articolo 148 § II).
51. Il Presidente della Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian emette decreti quando stabilisce regole generali e ordini presidenziali riguardo ad altre questioni (Articolo 113 § I). I decreti presidenziali non possono contraddire la Costituzione e le leggi. L'applicazione e l'esecuzione dei decreti, solo se pubblicati, sono obbligatori per tutti i cittadini, le autorità esecutive e le persone giuridiche (articolo 149 § IV).
B. Il Codice Civile del 2000
52. L' articolo 43.3 del Codice prevede che la Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian partecipi ai rapporti di diritto civile allo stesso modo delle altre persone giuridiche. In tali casi, i poteri della Repubblica dell'Azerbaigian sono esercitati dai suoi organi che non sono persone giuridiche.
53. L' articolo 157.9 del codice civile, come in vigore all'epoca dei fatti, prevedeva:
“La proprietà privata può essere espropriata dallo Stato, quando richiesto da esigenze statali o pubbliche, solo nei casi consentiti dalla legge, allo scopo di costruire strade o altre vie di comunicazione, delimitare la fascia di confine dello Stato o costruire opere di difesa, con decisione dell'autorità statale competente [il Gabinetto dei ministri], e previo pagamento di un indennizzo per un importo corrispondente al suo valore di mercato”.
54. L' articolo 246 del Codice, come in vigore all'epoca dei fatti, prevedeva:
“246.1. La decisione di espropriare terreni per esigenze statali sarà presa dall'autorità esecutiva pertinente [il Gabinetto dei ministri] ... in conformità con l'articolo 157.9 di questo codice.
...
246.5. Le disposizioni degli articoli da 246 a 249 del presente Codice si applicano, insieme ai terreni espropriati per esigenze dello Stato, anche agli immobili (abitazioni, fabbricati, dispositivi) che si trovano o non si trovano su detti terreni ed espropriati allo stesso scopo”.
55. DPR n. 386 del 25 agosto 2000, che tratta vari aspetti di attuazione del codice civile 2000, come modificato dal DPR n. 78 del 17 giugno 2004, così come in vigore all'epoca dei fatti, ha designato il Gabinetto dei Ministri quale “autorità esecutiva competente” di cui agli articoli 157,9 e 246,1 del codice civile.
56. L' articolo 247 del Codice, come in vigore all'epoca dei fatti, prevedeva:
“247.1. Il prezzo di acquisto dei terreni espropriati per esigenze dello Stato sarà calcolato secondo le modalità determinate dall'autorità esecutiva competente e corrisposto al proprietario non prima di [ottanta] giorni di calendario e non oltre [centoventi] giorni di calendario dalla data in cui egli o riceve notifica ai sensi dell'articolo 246.3.
247.2. Il prezzo di acquisto comprende il prezzo di mercato del terreno e dell'immobile su di esso, nonché tutti i danni subiti dal proprietario a causa dell'espropriazione del terreno, inclusi il lucro cessante e i danni causati dalla cessazione anticipata del suo o i suoi obblighi verso terzi...”
57. Gli articoli 646.1 e 648.1 fanno parte del sottocapitolo 5 (Acquisto e vendita di beni immobili) del capitolo 29 (Acquisto e vendita) della sezione 7 (Obblighi derivanti dai contratti) del Codice.
58. L' articolo 646.1 del Codice prevede che con il contratto di compravendita il venditore si obbliga a trasferire all'acquirente il terreno, la casa, l'edificio, la costruzione, l'appartamento o altro bene immobile.
59. L' articolo 648.1 del Codice prevede che, vendendo e acquistando un bene immobile, ciascuna parte adempie al proprio obbligo di offerta o di accettazione adottando tutte le misure necessarie per registrare il trasferimento dei diritti di proprietà nel registro di Stato dei beni immobili.
C. Legge sulla espropriazione di terreni per Stato Da del 20 aprile 2010 ( “legge sulla espropriazione ”)
60. La legge sulla espropriazione prevede procedure complesse e dettagliate e un certo numero di requisiti sostanziali e procedurali in materia di esproprio di beni immobili. Di seguito una sintesi della procedura espropriativa prevista dalla Legge e il testo delle relative disposizioni.
61. L' articolo 1.1.1 della legge definisce l' espropriazione ( al?nma ) come segue:
“ Espropriazione – acquisto volontario o coatto da parte dello Stato di terreni (o parte di essi) di proprietà privata o comunale mediante cessazione dei diritti di proprietà, uso e locazione, compresi i gravami (restrizioni) sull'uso del terreno, nonché la riappropriazione da parte dell'utente o del locatario di terreni demaniali utilizzati e/o dati in locazione dietro pagamento di un adeguato indennizzo”.
62. Ai sensi dell'articolo 1.1.2, la definizione di "terreno" comprende anche i beni immobili situati su di esso (costruzioni, fabbricati e oggetti simili collegati al terreno).
63. L' articolo 3.1 della legge prevede:
"Le esigenze dello Stato per le quali l' espropriazione [può aver luogo] ai sensi della presente legge sono le seguenti:
3.1.1. costruzione e installazione di strade di rilevanza statale e altre vie di comunicazione (oleodotti e gasdotti principali, fognature, linee elettriche ad alta tensione, opere idrauliche); ...”
64. I terreni espropriati per esigenze dello Stato possono essere espropriati sulla base di un accordo con il proprietario ("vendita e acquisto volontario") o, in mancanza di accordo, in modo obbligatorio con ordinanza del tribunale previo pagamento di un indennizzo (" obbligatoria esproprio “) (articolo 4.1).
65. La Legge e il DPR n. 382 del 15 febbraio 2011 sulla sua attuazione designano le seguenti autorità statali e altri organi come aventi diversi ruoli e poteri nel processo di espropriazione : (a) il Consiglio dei ministri quale organo che, tra l'altro , determina l'esistenza di un bisogno dello Stato, nomina un'“autorità espropriante” ed emette un provvedimento di espropriazione (artt. 9 e 19 e altre disposizioni); (b) l'“autorità espropriativa” nominata dal Consiglio dei ministri, che è responsabile dell'esecuzione dell'espropriazione e ha un'ampia gamma di competenze e obblighi (articolo 6 e altre disposizioni); (c) il Ministero delle Finanze come autorità di controllo, che controlla la conformità dell'autorità espropriante e di altri organi con i requisiti del diritto interno, esamina varie denunce e presenta proposte e relazioni su vari aspetti dell'espropriazione al Consiglio dei ministri ( articolo 8 e altre disposizioni); (d) un " gruppo di espropriazione " istituito dall'autorità espropriante e comprendente rappresentanti di varie autorità statali, che tiene incontri con le persone colpite dall'espropriazionesu varie questioni (articolo 22 e altre disposizioni); (e) una commissione di valutazione istituita dal Consiglio dei ministri (articolo 19 e altre disposizioni); (f) una commissione di ricollocazione istituita dall'autorità di espropriazione, che partecipa all'elaborazione e all'attuazione di un piano di ricollocazione e adotta le misure necessarie per difendere gli interessi delle persone colpite dall'esproprio (articolo 40 e altre disposizioni); (g) altri organismi quali periti indipendenti che collaborano con la commissione di valutazione (articoli 23-24 e altre disposizioni); e (h) i giudici nazionali che, tra l'altro , finalizzano l' espropriazione “obbligatoria” approvando l'acquisto da parte dello Stato di possesso del bene (art. 52 e altre disposizioni).
66. La procedura predefinita di “ espropriazione coatta ” consiste in una serie di misure adottate dal Consiglio dei ministri, dall'“autorità espropriante” e dalle altre autorità sopra menzionate, che comprendono, tra l'altro , la valutazione dei beni, la determinazione del risarcimento e l'assistenza in trasferimento, se necessario (Capitoli II, III e V). L' espropriazione si perfeziona dopo l'approvazione dell'acquisto del bene da parte del tribunale su istanza dell'autorità espropriante. Se le parti non hanno obiezioni ai termini di espropriazione e risarcimento, il tribunale approva l'acquisizione senza esaminarne i termini; in caso contrario, esamina i documenti e le denunce pertinenti (articolo 52). Il richiedente e l'autorità espropriante sono liberi di utilizzare la risoluzione alternativa delle controversie per risolvere le loro controversie (articolo 52.7).
67. Come notato sopra, la Legge consente l'opzione di "vendita e acquisto volontari", che può essere avviata da entrambe le parti (Articolo 30). Il prezzo di acquisto determinato nell'ambito della “vendita e acquisto volontario” è lo stesso per tipo e sostanza dell'indennizzo determinato ai sensi del Capo VII della Legge (si veda il successivo paragrafo 68), tuttavia, tale importo è aumentato del 10% al fine di incoraggiare la persona interessata a vendere volontariamente (articolo 32.3). Una volta che un'offerta contenente, tra l'altro , formulato il prezzo proposto (art. 33), l'interessato può formulare una controfferta, che può essere accolta dall'autorità espropriante previo consenso del Ministero delle finanze (art. 34). L'acquisto del terreno è formalizzato dalla conclusione di un contratto di compravendita tra l'interessato dall'esproprio e l'autorità espropriante che agisce per conto dello Stato (art. 35). Entro novanta giorni di calendario, l'autorità espropriante paga l'intero prezzo al proprietario, sostiene le spese di trasferimento della proprietà allo Stato e assiste il proprietario nello sgombero dell'immobile e nel trasferimento nel nuovo luogo di residenza (articolo 36).
68. capitolo VII della legge sulla espropriazione riguarda la compensazione. A tutte le persone colpite dall'espropriazione deve essere corrisposto un equo compenso in conformità con le disposizioni della Legge. L'indennizzo è calcolato determinando o il prezzo di mercato del terreno o il prezzo di recupero, ove la determinazione del primo sia impossibile (artt. 55 e 58). L'indennizzo può essere corrisposto in diverse forme, compresa l'assegnazione di terreni equiparabili a quelli espropriati per dimensioni, qualità e capacità produttiva paragonabili a quelli espropriati o un'indennità forfettaria (art. 65).
69. L' articolo 66 della legge prevede:
“66.1. In tutti i casi di espropriazione di immobili residenziali ai sensi della presente legge, l'autorità espropriante corrisponde all'avente diritto un'indennità per il disagio in aggiunta ai pagamenti spettanti alle persone colpite dall'espropriazione.
66.2. L'indennità per il disagio è corrisposta alla persona colpita dall'esproprio dietro presentazione di un documento attestante che egli ha abitato nel bene espropriato come [suo] luogo di residenza principale per almeno cinque anni.
66.3. La persona colpita dall'esproprio presenta all'autorità espropriante la domanda di risarcimento del disagio entro un anno solare dal verificarsi dell'evento previsto dall'articolo 66, paragrafo 2, della presente legge.
66.4. L'indennità per il disagio è determinata [come] percentuale dell'indennità totale da corrispondere al ricorrente, a seconda del periodo in cui la persona interessata dall'espropriazione ha vissuto nell'immobile residenziale:
66.4.1. per un periodo da 5 a 6 anni – 5%;
66.4.2. per un periodo da 6 a 7 anni – 6%;
66.4.3. per un periodo da 7 a 8 anni – 7%;
66.4.4. per un periodo da 8 a 9 anni – 8%;
66.4.5. per un periodo da 9 a 10 anni – 9%;
66.4.6. per un periodo superiore a 10 anni – 10%.”
D. DPR n. 689 del 26 dicembre 2007
70. L' articolo 2.3 del Decreto prevede:
“... al proprietario dell'immobile espropriato per esigenze dello Stato è corrisposto, oltre al prezzo di acquisto, l'importo del 20 [%] del prezzo di mercato di tale immobile calcolato secondo la normativa (. .. al proprietario dell'immobile acquistato per esigenze statali sarà corrisposto un canone aggiuntivo pari al 20 per cento del prezzo di mercato dell'immobile calcolato in conformità alla normativa ).”
71. Ai sensi dell'articolo 3 del decreto, l'Amministrazione del Presidente della Repubblica è stato incaricato di preparare e presentare al presidente il progetto di legge sulla espropriazione entro due mesi.
E. Giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema
1. Casi promossi da altri soggetti interessati dall'ordinanza della BCEA del 31 maggio 2011
72. Come menzionato sopra (vedere paragrafo 39 supra), in diversi casi la Corte Suprema ha confermato le sentenze dei tribunali inferiori ammettendo in tutto o in parte domande simili presentate da altri individui che vivono nella stessa zona dei ricorrenti che erano stati colpiti dallo stesso ordine del BCEA.
73. Da quelle decisioni risulta che durante i procedimenti dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali, la BCEA e il Ministero delle Finanze hanno presentato argomenti simili a quelli fatti nelle cause dei ricorrenti.
(un) Sentenza nel caso n. 2-1(102)-739/15
74. Il 14 ottobre 2015 la Corte Suprema ha respinto il ricorso per cassazione della BCEA e ha confermato la sentenza della corte d'appello che concedeva ad AB il risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% e respingeva la sua richiesta di risarcimento per disagio.
75. In primo luogo ha rilevato che l'ordinanza della BCEA del 31 maggio 2011 era stata adottata per l'ampliamento dell'autostrada che collegava la parte centrale della capitale con l'insediamento di Bayil nell'ambito della Via della Seta e fungeva da punto di ingresso-uscita a sud del paese, stabilendo nuove infrastrutture stradali e installando moderni dispositivi di comunicazione di ingegneria. La corte ha concluso che ciò dimostrava che la proprietà di AB era stata espropriata per esigenze dello Stato e che pertanto le sarebbe dovuto essere assegnato l'ulteriore risarcimento del 20% in conformità con il decreto presidenziale del 2007.
76. La corte ha anche aggiunto che poiché il risarcimento era già stato assegnato in precedenti casi simili, la richiesta di AB dovrebbe essere accolta.
(b) Sentenza nel caso n. 2-1(102)-99/2016
77. Il 7 gennaio 2016 la Corte Suprema ha respinto il ricorso per cassazione del Ministero delle Finanze e ha confermato la sentenza della corte d'appello che concedeva a LK il risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% e respingeva la sua richiesta di risarcimento per disagio. Il giudice ha ritenuto che LK aveva il diritto di risarcimento ulteriore 20% ai sensi del decreto del Presidente della Repubblica del 2007 e che il fatto che la decisione di esproprio non fosse stata presa dall'autorità competente non ha escluso il suo diritto di rivendicare questa compensazione. Per quanto riguarda la domanda di risarcimento per il disagio, essa ha richiamato gli artt. 66,1 66,3 della legge sull'espropriazione senza fornire alcuna motivazione specifica.
(c) Sentenza nel caso n. 2-1(102)-102/2016
78. Il 13 gennaio 2016 la Corte Suprema ha respinto i ricorsi per cassazione della BCEA e del Ministero delle Finanze e ha confermato la sentenza della corte d'appello che concedeva a PA l'ulteriore risarcimento del 20% e respingeva la sua richiesta di risarcimento per disagio.
79. La corte ha notato che poiché lo scopo del trasferimento era quello di espandere l'autostrada, stabilire nuove infrastrutture stradali e installare moderni dispositivi di comunicazione di ingegneria, l'appartamento di PA era stato demolito per esigenze statali.
80. Riteneva che l'assenza di un ordine di espropriazione da parte del Consiglio dei ministri non modificasse il fatto che il bene in questione fosse stato espropriato per esigenze dello Stato e che il fatto che non vi fosse stata decisione incideva solo sulla questione della legittimità del esproprio.
81. Infine, affrontando la tesi del Ministero delle Finanze circa l'esistenza di un contratto di compravendita tra le parti, la Corte ha osservato che sebbene la BCEA avesse già emesso un ordine di esproprio e demolizione della sua proprietà, erano iniziati i lavori di demolizione e il prezzo di acquisto per l' espropriazione era stato determinato, PA si era trovata di fronte a una situazione in cui non aveva altra scelta che accettare di firmare il contratto e quindi non aveva venduto il suo appartamento volontariamente.
(d) Sentenza nel caso n. 2-1(102)-201/16
82. Il 19 gennaio 2016 la Corte Suprema ha respinto i ricorsi per cassazione della BCEA e del Ministero delle finanze e ha confermato la sentenza della corte d'appello che assegnava a ZA il risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% e il risarcimento per le difficoltà.
83. La corte ha ritenuto che l'affidamento del Ministero delle Finanze alle disposizioni generali di diritto civile sui contratti fosse errato perché ZA non aveva deciso di vendere il suo appartamento volontariamente, ma lo aveva fatto a causa dell'ordine del BCEA. In altre parole, poiché si era trovata in una situazione di disparità nei rapporti di diritto pubblico con un ente statale, ZA non aveva avuto scelta di agire diversamente.
84. La Corte ha rilevato anche che il fallimento dell'autorità dello Stato di rispettare i requisiti della legge sulla espropriazione non ha privato la persona colpita da esproprio del diritto di avvalersi delle disposizioni di questa legge per difendere i propri diritti di proprietà. Quanto all'assenza di una previsione contrattuale sull'obbligo di risarcimento aggiuntivo, il giudice ha osservato che l'obbligo di corrispondere tale risarcimento non derivava da un contratto, ma dalla legge.
85. Infine, in risposta all'argomento del Ministero delle Finanze di che ZA aveva presentato la sua richiesta di risarcimento per disagi alla BCEA quattro anni dopo l'alienazione della sua proprietà ed aveva quindi perso il termine di cui all'articolo 66.3 della legge sulla espropriazione , il tribunale ha osservato che la stessa BCEA aveva dovuto applicare tale termine nel rispondere alla lettera di ZA che chiedeva il risarcimento di cui sopra prima di avviare il procedimento giudiziario. Ha aggiunto che, a seguito del rifiuto del BCEA, la ZA si era rivolta al tribunale entro il termine prescritto.
(e) Sentenza nel caso n. 2-1(102)-198/2017
86. Il 24 gennaio 2017 la Corte Suprema ha respinto i ricorsi per cassazione della BCEA e del Ministero delle finanze e ha confermato la sentenza della corte d'appello che concedeva a RJ l'ulteriore risarcimento del 20% e il risarcimento per le difficoltà.
87. La Corte ha rilevato che non è stato contestato che i fondi fossero stati stanziati dallo Stato al BCEA per eseguire i lavori di demolizione ai sensi dell'ordinanza del BCEA del 31 maggio 2011. Facendo riferimento alle pertinenti disposizioni del DPR 2007 e della Legge su espropriazione e tenendo conto del fatto che RJ aveva vissuto in casa espropriata per più di dieci anni prima della esproprio , la Corte Suprema ha concluso che la decisione della Corte d'appello di lei assegna la compensazione aggiuntiva era stata giustificata.
2. Casi promossi da persone interessate dagli altri ordini del BCEA
88. . In una serie di decisioni (ad esempio, nelle cause n 2-2 (102) -948 / 13 del 18 settembre 2013, 2-2 (102) -1204 / 13 del 21 novembre, 2013 2 - 2 (102 ) 43/14 del 9 gennaio 2014, 2-1(102)-543/14 del 30 aprile 2014, 2 1(102)-1130/14 del 10 ottobre 2014, 2-1(102)-1399/2014 del 4 dicembre 2014, 2-1(102)-649/2015 del 23 luglio 2015, 2-1(102)- 1011/15 del 5 agosto 2015, 2-1(102)-1203/15, e 2-1(102)-1233/2015 del 19 novembre 2015) che riguardavano le richieste di risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20%, e in alcuni casi, anche al risarcimento del disagio da parte di alcuni soggetti colpiti da altre ordinanze della BCEA, la Suprema Corte ha accolto le domande di ulteriore risarcimento del 20% o ha confermato le sentenze dei tribunali inferiori che accolgono tali pretese, ritenendo che i loro beni fossero stati espropriati per esigenze dello Stato. Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento per le difficoltà, i tribunali nazionali hanno accolto la richiesta in un caso osservando che la denunciante aveva vissuto nel suo appartamento per più di dieci anni prima della sua demolizione. Negli altri casi,
II. STRUMENTI E RELAZIONI INTERNAZIONALI RILEVANTI
89. I rapporti pertinenti del Comitato delle Nazioni Unite sui diritti economici, sociali e culturali e del Comitato del Consiglio d'Europa sul rispetto degli obblighi e degli impegni da parte degli Stati membri sono riassunti e citati in Khalikova c. Azerbaigian (n. 42883/11 , § § 90-91, 22 ottobre 2015).
90. Nel febbraio 2012 Human Rights Watch ha pubblicato un rapporto dettagliato sugli sgomberi forzati e gli espropri in corso a Baku, intitolato "Mi hanno preso tutto: sfratti forzati, espropri illegali e demolizioni di case nella capitale dell'Azerbaigian". La relazione è stata basata su visite di Human Rights Watch ricercatori a Baku nel mese di giugno, settembre e dicembre 2011 e nel gennaio 2012, durante il quale sessanta - sono state effettuate interviste sette con i proprietari di immobili, avvocati e rappresentanti delle ONG. Il relativo estratto del rapporto recita:
“Dal 2008, il governo dell'Azerbaigian ha intrapreso un vasto programma di rinnovamento urbano a Baku... Nel corso di questo programma, le autorità hanno espropriato illegalmente centinaia di proprietà, principalmente appartamenti e case nei quartieri della classe media, per essere demolite per far posto a parchi, strade, un [centro commerciale] ed edifici residenziali di lusso. Il governo ha sfrattato con la forza i proprietari di case, spesso senza preavviso o nel cuore della notte, ea volte in evidente disprezzo per la salute e la sicurezza dei residenti, al fine di demolire le loro case. Si è rifiutata di fornire ai proprietari di case un equo compenso basato sui valori di mercato delle proprietà, molte delle quali si trovano in luoghi e quartieri altamente desiderabili.
...
L'Autorità esecutiva della città di Baku e il Comitato statale per la proprietà dell'Azerbaigian sovrintendono agli espropri e agli sgomberi forzati documentati in questo rapporto. Una volta che le autorità hanno identificato una proprietà da espropriare e demolire, il governo offre in genere un risarcimento monetario o il reinsediamento ai residenti. Tuttavia, non tutti i proprietari di case ricevono offerte di compensazione o reinsediamento o accettano le offerte del governo. Rimangono quindi nelle loro case. Quando le autorità arrivano per demolire le case, sfrattano con la forza i restanti proprietari e le loro famiglie.
...
Quando i governi espropriano la proprietà privata per esigenze [dello Stato], devono fornire un processo equo e trasparente per il risarcimento che rifletta il valore di mercato della proprietà, nonché il risarcimento per il trasferimento e altre spese. Tuttavia, le autorità azere hanno offerto ad alcuni proprietari di case, in genere quelli con case di dimensioni inferiori a 60 [metri quadrati], un risarcimento monetario a un tasso fisso governativo di 1.500 manat [s] (US $ 1.900) per metro quadrato, senza riguardo alla posizione, all'età, alle condizioni, all'uso o ad altri fattori della proprietà. I proprietari di case non erano a conoscenza di alcuna valutazione indipendente delle loro case ordinata dal governo, e il governo non ha risposto a diverse indagini di Human Rights Watch per verificare se avesse condotto valutazioni indipendenti delle case...”
91. Il capitolo del rapporto intitolato "Vendita forzata a prezzo arbitrario" conteneva quanto segue:
“I proprietari di case del quartiere dietro la Heydar Aliyev Hall e del quartiere di Bayil vicino alla National Flag Square hanno descritto il processo di risarcimento del governo a Human Rights Watch. Per gli appartamenti e le case di dimensioni inferiori a 60 [metri quadrati], il meccanismo di compensazione del governo richiede ai proprietari di abitazione di concludere una transazione immobiliare con un privato a un prezzo fisso, fissato dal governo, al fine di ricevere un risarcimento monetario per le loro case. Questo meccanismo equivale a una vendita forzata da parte dei proprietari poiché, per ordine dell'Autorità esecutiva della città di Baku, i proprietari non hanno l'opportunità di vendere le loro proprietà con altri mezzi.
Secondo una lettera del febbraio 2011 emessa dal Comitato statale sulla proprietà [Issues], il tasso di risarcimento è di 1.500 manat[s] (US $ 1.900) per metro quadrato, indipendentemente dall'ubicazione della proprietà, dall'età, dalle condizioni, dalla qualità della ristrutturazione, o qualsiasi altro fattore. Le autorità non hanno pubblicizzato né spiegato come è stato determinato questo tasso e da chi, o come è stato stabilito lo stesso tasso per le case espropriate prima della lettera del Comitato del febbraio 2011. In nessun caso noto a Human Rights Watch, il governo ha condotto valutazioni per determinare il valore di mercato delle proprietà, né ha considerato nell'assegnazione del risarcimento eventuali perizie indipendenti ordinate dai proprietari di case.
...
Analogo sistema di indennizzo esiste per le case espropriate e demolite accanto alla National Flag Square nel quartiere di Bayil dove, per ricevere un risarcimento monetario, i proprietari di appartamenti inferiori a 60 metri quadrati sono tenuti anche a concludere immobili transazioni con un privato al tasso fisso di 1.500 manat[s] (US $ 1.900) per metro quadrato”.
LA LEGGE
I. UNIONE DELLE DOMANDA
92. Considerato l'analogo oggetto dei ricorsi, la Corte ritiene opportuno esaminarli congiuntamente in un'unica sentenza.
II. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N o . 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
93. I ricorrenti lamentavano che c'era stata un'interferenza illegittima con il loro diritto di proprietà a causa dell'incapacità dei tribunali nazionali di concedere loro gli ulteriori aumenti del risarcimento a cui avevano diritto in base al diritto nazionale. Si sono appellati all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione, che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le precedenti disposizioni non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far applicare le leggi che ritenga necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni secondo l'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni. "
A. Ambito della censura sollevata dal ricorrente con ricorso n. 52821/17
94. Nelle sue osservazioni presentate alla Corte dopo che il ricorso era stato notificato al Governo, la ricorrente nel ricorso di cui sopra si riferiva anche all'aumento aggiuntivo del 10% dell'indennizzo come "incoraggiamento alla vendita volontaria" come previsto dall'articolo 32.3. della legge sulla espropriazione (vedi punto 67 di cui sopra).
95. Nelle sue denunce dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e nel ricorso iniziale alla Corte, la ricorrente si è lamentata solo della mancata concessione da parte delle autorità nazionali del suo risarcimento per le difficoltà ai sensi dell'articolo 66 della Legge sull'espropriazione e dell'ulteriore risarcimento del 20% ai sensi della Presidenza presidenziale del 2007 Decreto, e non ha mai avanzato pretese o denunce in relazione all'aumento dell'indennizzo previsto dall'art. 32, comma 3, della Legge sugli espropri .
96. Tenuto conto del fatto che tale questione non faceva parte del ricorso di cui è stato notificato al Governo il 7 novembre 2018, la Corte limiterà la sua considerazione al ricorso iniziale del ricorrente ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, vale a dire il denuncia per quanto riguarda il fallimento delle autorità nazionali a pagare il suo compenso del 20% aggiuntivo ai sensi del decreto del Presidente della Repubblica del 2007 e un risarcimento per le difficoltà di cui all'articolo 66 della legge sulla espropriazione (confrontare, ad esempio, Khizanishvili e Kandelaki v. Georgia , n. 25601/12 , § 42, 17 dicembre 2019).
B. Ammissibilità
1. Applicabilità dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1
(un) Le argomentazioni delle parti
(io) Il governo
97. Con riferimento alle domande nn. 66249/16 , 66271/16 , 75978/16 , 77309/16 , 77691/16 e 1038/17 , il Governo, riferendosi alle conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali, ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti avevano venduto i loro appartamenti alla BCEA al prezzo concordato tra le parti e non era riuscito a dimostrare che i loro appartamenti erano stati espropriati per esigenze dello Stato. Non avevano quindi diritto ad alcun indennizzo relativo all'espropriazione .
98. Con riferimento alla domanda n. 52821/17 , il Governo ha sostenuto che per l' espropriazione del bene per esigenze dello Stato era stato richiesto un provvedimento di espropriazione da parte del Consiglio dei ministri e che, non essendo stata adottata tale decisione, l'alienazione del bene doveva essere considerata come un « acquisto” piuttosto che “ esproprio ”. Hanno aggiunto che la BCEA aveva agito come "una parte indipendente" piuttosto che un ente statale al momento della firma del contratto. Il governo ha anche notato che il calcolo era stato basato sul prezzo di mercato e non su un prezzo fisso. Per quanto riguarda la compensazione per le difficoltà di cui all'articolo 66 della legge sulla espropriazione , hanno sostenuto che i diritti di proprietà della ricorrente erano stati registrati il 18 gennaio 2012 (appena prima della vendita del suo appartamento) e che pertanto non era riuscita a soddisfare il requisito di residenza minima ai sensi di tale disposizione.
(ii) I ricorrenti
99. I richiedenti dibatterono che i loro appartamenti erano stati espropriati per necessità statali e che quindi erano stati idonei a ricevere un risarcimento addizionale ai sensi del diritto nazionale.
100. Hanno anche affermato di aver accettato di vendere i loro appartamenti allo Stato con l'aspettativa che avrebbero beneficiato delle garanzie aggiuntive previste dalla legislazione nazionale, ovvero l'indennità aggiuntiva del 20% e l'indennizzo per le difficoltà. Secondo loro, le autorità statali li avevano informati che il pagamento del risarcimento aggiuntivo sarebbe stato possibile solo dopo la conclusione del contratto di compravendita e che, tenuto conto di tale promessa, avevano accettato di firmare i relativi contratti.
101. I ricorrenti hanno inoltre sostenuto che le autorità li avevano essenzialmente obbligati a firmare i contratti di vendita e acquisto e che avevano accettato di firmarli a causa della loro difficile situazione finanziaria e dell'insistenza del BCEA.
(b) La valutazione della Corte
(io) Principi generali
102. La Corte ribadisce che, secondo la sua giurisprudenza, un ricorrente può addurre una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 solo nella misura in cui le decisioni impugnate riguardano i suoi "beni" ai sensi di tale disposizione . I "beni" possono essere "beni esistenti" o crediti che sono sufficientemente stabiliti per essere considerati "attività".
103. In alcune circostanze, una "legittima aspettativa" di ottenere un "bene" può anche godere della protezione dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1. Così, quando un diritto di proprietà ha la natura di un credito, si può ritenere che la persona che lo detiene abbia una "legittima aspettativa" se esiste una base sufficiente per il diritto nazionale, ad esempio quando esiste una giurisprudenza consolidata dei tribunali nazionali che conferma la sua esistenza (si veda Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 52, CEDU 2004-IX; Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 65, CEDU 2007-I; e Radomilja e altri c. Croazia [GC], nn. 37685/10 e 22768/12, § 142, 20 marzo 2018).
104. Al contrario, la speranza del riconoscimento di un diritto di proprietà che è stato impossibile esercitare efficacemente non può essere considerata un "possesso" ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, né può un credito condizionale che si estingue come conseguenza dell'inadempimento della condizione (si veda, inter alia , Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. Repubblica ceca (dec.) [GC], n. 39794/98 , § 69, CEDU 2002-VII, e Kopecký , cit. sopra, § 35).
(ii) Applicazione di questi principi ai casi in esame
105. La Corte nota che la doglianza dei ricorrenti riguarda due diverse rivendicazioni monetarie: un credito per la compensazione del 20% aggiuntivo sulla base del DPR 2007 e una richiesta di risarcimento per il disagio ai sensi dell'articolo 66 della legge sulla espropriazione . La Corte determinerà l'applicabilità dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 a ciascuna di queste rivendicazioni separatamente.
(un) Compenso aggiuntivo del 20% ai sensi del DPR 2007
106. L' articolo 2.3 del DPR 2007 autorizzava una persona la cui proprietà era stata espropriata per necessità dello Stato a un risarcimento aggiuntivo. Tale indennizzo risultava essere essenzialmente un premio fisso calcolato al tasso del 20% del prezzo di mercato del bene espropriato. Dal testo del DPR 2007 risulta che l'unico requisito per avere diritto all'indennizzo era l'espropriazione del bene per esigenze dello Stato. In essa non erano previste altre condizioni (quali termini e requisiti procedurali specifici). Inoltre non risulta dal testo del decreto che il diritto a tale compensazione era subordinato all’espropriazione condotta in conformità con le procedure stabilite dalla legge sulle espropriazione (che non era ancora stato emanato al momento dell'entrata in vigore del Decreto) o di qualsiasi altro atto legislativo.
107. Nelle presenti cause, gli appartamenti dei ricorrenti sono stati trasferiti in proprietà dello Stato nel 2011 e all'inizio del 2012 in base ai contratti di vendita e acquisto che hanno concluso con ZI, che ha agito sulla base dell'autorità conferitagli dal BCEA. L'operazione di compravendita è stata avviata ai sensi delle ordinanze BCEA del 22 febbraio e 31 maggio 2011 relative alla ricollocazione di immobili residenziali e non residenziali nell'area interessata. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che queste operazioni avevano, di fatto, costituito espropriazione dei loro beni per esigenze dello Stato e che avevano quindi diritto all'indennità aggiuntiva del 20% ai sensi del DPR 2007. Il Governo, d'altra parte, ha sostenuto che il Decreto era stato inapplicabile alla loro situazione perché le operazioni avevano costituito operazioni civili volontarie in cui la persona delegata dalla BCEA aveva agito come parte privata.
108. La Corte osserva che mentre le richieste dei ricorrenti per un risarcimento aggiuntivo sono state respinte dalle decisioni finali della Corte Suprema sulla base della conclusione che le loro proprietà non erano state espropriate per esigenze dello Stato, in una serie di altri casi, la Corte Suprema ha accolto le sentenze dei tribunali inferiori che autorizzano richieste di risarcimento aggiuntive presentate da altri individui che vivono nello stesso quartiere dei ricorrenti che erano stati similmente colpiti dall'ordinanza del BCEA del 31 maggio 2011 e avevano chiesto lo stesso risarcimento basandosi sugli stessi motivi. In questi ultimi casi, la Corte Suprema ha concluso che, nonostante il mancato rispetto da parte delle autorità della relativa procedura di espropriazione e, in particolare, l'assenza di un’ordinanza di espropriazione del Consiglio dei ministri, l'immobile in questione era stato infatti espropriato per esigenze dello Stato. Inoltre, nella sua decisione del 14 ottobre 2015 la Corte Suprema ha anche fatto riferimento all'esistenza di precedenti casi analoghi in cui erano state ammesse richieste di risarcimento (paragrafo 76 supra). Non è stato sostenuto dal governo che tale approccio, che sembra riconoscere l'esistenza di un legittimo affidamento per i ricorrenti di ottenere il risarcimento del 20% da essi richiesto, fosse il risultato di un errore giudiziario isolato o che fosse per qualche motivo irrilevante per i casi dei ricorrenti. Sebbene casi simili pertinenti sembrino essere stati decisi in modo diverso dai tribunali nazionali, la richiesta dei ricorrenti di un risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% è stata sostenuta da una linea chiaramente identificabile della giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema.
109. La Corte rileva inoltre che nei casi di Akhverdiyev (n. 76254/11 , 29 gennaio 2015) e Khalikova (cit.) la casa e l'appartamento dei ricorrenti sono stati demoliti rispettivamente a seguito di ordini simili emessi dalla BCEA, che si basavano su il Piano Generale della città di Baku. Nel caso di Akhverdiyev , al ricorrente sono stati offerti, a titolo di risarcimento, dei buoni per due appartamenti di proprietà dello Stato, mentre a Khalikova alla ricorrente sono stati offerti 1.500 AZN per mq del suo appartamento. In entrambi i casi, i ricorrenti hanno rifiutato di accettare le offerte del BCEA e di lasciare le loro proprietà. Entrambi i ricorrenti hanno contestato la legittimità delle azioni della BCEA dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali, sebbene senza successo, e le loro proprietà sono state demolite. Nel caso di Khalikova , la ricorrente ha successivamente concluso un contratto di compravendita con il rappresentante della BCEA, più di due mesi dopo la demolizione del suo appartamento (si veda Khalikova , sopra citata, § 65). La Corte ha rilevato che, in entrambi i casi, la privazione dei beni dei ricorrenti non era stata effettuata nel rispetto delle condizioni previste dal diritto nazionale applicabile, e più specificamente dalla legislazione applicabile in materia di esproprio . In particolare, non è stato dimostrato che, ai sensi del diritto interno, la BCEA avesse la competenza per espropriare i beni di proprietà privata (si vedano Akhverdiyev , § 92, e Khalikova , § 138, entrambi citati sopra). Nelle presenti cause, a differenza di quelle menzionate sopra, i ricorrenti non hanno contestato la legittimità delle azioni della BCEA dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e le loro doglianze non riguardano l' espropriazione in quanto tale. Tuttavia, ciò che è rilevante per la denuncia nelle presenti cause è che, in particolare nella causa Akhverdiyev , il governo ha espressamente sostenuto dinanzi alla Corte che le proprietà dei ricorrenti erano state legittimamente "espropriate ... per esigenze pubbliche" dal BCEA (vedi Akhverdiyev, sopra citata, § 63). Considerato che le circostanze in cui si è verificata l'alienazione di beni di proprietà privata in quei casi e nei presenti casi erano in larga misura simili (cioè l'alienazione e la privazione della proprietà sono state avviate su ordine della BCEA e in Khalikova è stato infine firmato un contratto di compravendita), la Corte osserva che la posizione del governo sulla questione se l'alienazione potesse essere caratterizzata secondo il diritto interno come espropriazione per esigenze statali o pubbliche era incoerente.
110. In considerazione di quanto sopra, la Corte nota anche che il rifiuto di concedere un risarcimento ai ricorrenti non era dovuto a una divergenza di lunga data della giurisprudenza nazionale risultante da interpretazioni diverse da parte dei tribunali nazionali della disposizione legale relativa al pagamento dell'indennità aggiuntiva del 20% prevista dal DPR 2007, non essendo dimostrata l'esistenza di interpretazioni contrastanti di tale disposizione (contrasta, ad esempio, Albu e altri c. Romania , n. 34796/09 e 63 altri, §§ 35 e segg. e 47, 10 maggio 2012). Il rifiuto derivava dalle conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali, e in particolare dalle conclusioni della Corte Suprema in questi casi particolari, discostandosi dalle sue conclusioni in precedenti casi simili, secondo cui il Decreto era inapplicabile nella situazione dei ricorrenti perché tale situazione non equivaleva a un'espropriazione per esigenze dello Stato (si veda il paragrafo 108 supra).
111. Alla luce delle considerazioni di cui sopra, la Corte conclude, ai fini della presente denuncia, che la posizione dei ricorrenti secondo cui i loro appartamenti erano stati, di fatto, espropriati per esigenze statali dalla BCEA, che agisce per conto dello Stato, e che quindi avessero diritto al risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% si basava su una chiara linea della giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema e, nonostante le contraddizioni esistenti nell'approccio dei tribunali nazionali, costituiva una "legittima aspettativa" che era sufficientemente consolidata nel diritto interno e un corpus di giurisprudenza nazionale sufficiente per dar luogo alla nozione di "possesso" ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione (confrontare Brezovec c. Croazia , n. 13488/07 , §§ 42-43 e 45, 29 marzo 2011).
112. Ne segue che l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è applicabile a riguardo della richiesta dei richiedenti riguardo al risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% sotto il Decreto Presidenziale del 2007.
(B) Compensazione per le difficoltà ai sensi della legge sulla espropriazione
113. La Corte reitera che una domanda condizionata che decade a causa del mancato adempimento della condizione non può essere considerata un "possesso" ai sensi dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (vedere paragrafo 104 supra).
114. Sembra che, a norma dell'articolo 66 della legge sulla espropriazione , le persone che desideravano ottenere un risarcimento per il disagio dovevano soddisfare le seguenti condizioni: (i) presentazione di un documento attestante di aver vissuto nel bene espropriato come luogo di residenza principale per almeno cinque anni (articolo 66.2), (ii) le richieste di tale risarcimento dovevano essere presentate all'autorità espropriante e (iii) tali richieste dovevano essere presentate entro un anno solare dal verificarsi dell'evento previsto dall'articolo 66, paragrafo 2, della legge (articolo 66, paragrafo 3). A seconda della durata del periodo di soggiorno, l'importo del risarcimento variava tra il 5 e il 10% (paragrafo 69 supra). Pertanto, a differenza del DPR 2007, che prevedeva il diritto a percepire un indennizzo aggiuntivo senza limiti di tempo né altre condizioni per richiederlo, l'articolo 66 della legge sugli espropri prevedeva un limite temporale sotto forma di termine di richiesta e specificava l'autorità ("l'autorità espropriante") alla quale tale richiesta doveva essere presentata.
115. La Corte nota che, ai sensi degli articoli 6 e 9 della legge sulla espropriazione , l ' “autorità espropriante” era un'autorità nominata dal Consiglio dei Ministri nel suo ordine di espropriazione (vedi punto 65 di cui sopra). Come già notato, nessun ordine di questo tipo è stato emesso nelle presenti cause e i ricorrenti alla fine hanno presentato le loro richieste alla BCEA, che, come notato sopra, non aveva la competenza per espropriare la proprietà privata d'ufficio.
116. Tuttavia, anche ammettendo che i ricorrenti possano aver soddisfatto la prima condizione che impone loro di dimostrare la durata minima del soggiorno di, a seconda del ricorrente, otto o dieci anni e oltre (si veda il paragrafo 13 supra) e che hanno presentato la loro domanda a competente, vi sono altri elementi che rendono difficile accettare che i ricorrenti avessero una “legittima aspettativa”.
117. In particolare, i ricorrenti hanno ceduto il titolo alle loro proprietà in varie date tra il 21 luglio 2011 e l'11 febbraio 2012. A quel tempo, nessuno dei ricorrenti ha avviato alcun procedimento giudiziario che contestasse la legittimità della procedura di espropriazione a causa dell'incapacità delle autorità di soddisfare i requisiti della legge sulla espropriazione . Da allora in poi, tre o quattro anni dopo la perdita del titolo per loro appartamenti, i ricorrenti hanno proposto reclami contro la BCEA ai sensi dell'articolo 66 della legge sulla espropriazione . Tuttavia, a quel punto, anche se l' espropriazione fosse stata eseguita in conformità a quella legge, qualsiasi periodo per chiedere un risarcimento ai sensi di essa sarebbe scaduto da tempo.
118. Infine, mentre è possibile concludere dal materiale sottoposto alla Corte che esisteva un corpus sufficiente di giurisprudenza nazionale che, insieme alle disposizioni legali nazionali applicabili, costituiva una base sufficiente per le rivendicazioni dei ricorrenti riguardo al ulteriore risarcimento del 20% ai sensi del DPR 2007, lo stesso non si può dire per quanto riguarda le loro richieste di risarcimento del disagio ai sensi dell'articolo 66 della legge sugli espropri . Infatti, solo in tre cause promosse da altri soggetti interessati dagli ordini del BCEA sono state infine ammesse rivendicazioni simili (vedere paragrafi 82, 86 e 88 supra).
119. In sintesi, la Corte ritiene che i ricorrenti non hanno dimostrato in modo convincente che, al momento della presentazione loro crediti avrebbero potuto avere un “legittimo affidamento” ottenere il risarcimento del disagio ai sensi dell'articolo 66 della legge sulla espropriazione . Di conseguenza, rispetto a tale pretesa, non si può ritenere che i ricorrenti abbiano avuto un "possesso" ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n . 1.
120. Ne consegue che l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 non è applicabile a questa parte della denuncia.
2. Conclusione sull'ammissibilità
121. La Corte reitera la sua conclusione che l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 è inapplicabile alla parte della doglianza riguardante le richieste dei richiedenti riguardo al risarcimento per difficoltà sotto l'Articolo 66 della Legge sull'Esproprio (vedere paragrafo 120 sopra). Ne consegue che questa parte del ricorso è incompatibile ratione materiae e deve essere respinta ai sensi dell'articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
122. Per quanto riguarda la parte della doglianza relativa alle rivendicazioni dei ricorrenti in relazione all'indennità aggiuntiva del 20% ai sensi del decreto presidenziale del 2007, la Corte reitera la sua conclusione che l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è applicabile (vedere paragrafo 112 supra) e nota inoltre che questa parte della doglianza non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione e non è inammissibile per nessun altro motivo. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ammissibile.
C. meriti
1. Le argomentazioni delle parti
123. I richiedenti dibatterono che c'era stata un'interferenza illecita con il loro diritto alla proprietà a causa del rifiuto delle autorità nazionali di accogliere le loro richieste di risarcimento addizionale.
124. Il Governo ha sostenuto che l'ingerenza dell'autorità pubblica nel diritto di proprietà dei ricorrenti era stata necessaria in una società democratica nell'interesse del benessere economico del paese (più precisamente per il miglioramento dell'aspetto della città) ed era stata in linea con la normativa nazionale.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(un) Se c'è stata un'interferenza
125. L'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 contiene tre norme distinte: la prima norma, enunciata nella prima frase del primo comma, è di carattere generale ed enuncia il principio del pacifico godimento dei beni; la seconda norma, contenuta nella seconda frase del primo comma, riguarda la privazione dei beni e la sottopone a determinate condizioni; la terza norma, enunciata al secondo comma, riconosce allo Stato il diritto, tra l'altro, di controllare l'uso dei beni secondo l'interesse generale. Tali norme non sono però disgiunte: la seconda e la terza norma riguardano casi particolari di ingerenza nel diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà e vanno quindi interpretate alla luce del principio enunciato nella prima norma (cfr. Per esempio,Kozac?o?lu c. Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03 , § 48, 19 febbraio 2009, e Visti?š e Perepjolkins c. Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01 , § 93, 25 ottobre 2012).
126. Come notato sopra, nelle presenti cause, i ricorrenti non hanno contestato la legittimità delle azioni del BCEA e la procedura di espropriazione dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e quindi la Corte non si occuperà della legittimità e della proporzionalità dell'interferenza con i ricorrenti diritto alla proprietà dei loro appartamenti. Per tale motivo, a differenza delle ipotesi di espropriazione del bene in cui la questione dell'asserito illegittimo rifiuto del risarcimento sarebbe affrontata nell'ambito della liceità e della proporzionalità dell'espropriazione stessa, qui la Corte deve decidere se il rifiuto di pagare l'ulteriore risarcimento del 20% abbia costituito esso stesso un'interferenza con il diritto dei ricorrenti al pacifico godimento dei loro beni.
127. La Corte osserva che nei casi di controversie tra privati una decisione del tribunale che rigetta una richiesta pecuniaria non equivarrà necessariamente a un'interferenza con il diritto al pacifico godimento dei beni a meno che tale decisione non sia arbitraria o altrimenti manifestamente irragionevole (vedi Anheuser - Busch Inc c. Portogallo [GC], n.73049 / 01 , § 83, CEDU 2007 - I), ma nelle presenti cause i ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che lo Stato aveva rifiutato illegittimamente di pagare loro un risarcimento aggiuntivo. Nondimeno, le loro doglianze ai sensi dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 si concentrano principalmente sull'approccio incoerente delle corti nazionali e sulla presunta arbitrarietà delle loro decisioni. Pertanto, l'esistenza di un'interferenza dipende dal fatto che i tribunali nazionali abbiano effettivamente deciso arbitrariamente. Questa questione è inseparabile dalla questione della liceità dell'ingerenza (si veda Damjanac c. Croazia , n. 52943/10 , §§ 88-89, 24 ottobre 2013) e sarà esaminata di seguito.
(b) Se l'interferenza era lecita
128. La Corte ribadisce che il primo e più importante requisito dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza di un'autorità pubblica con il pacifico godimento dei beni dovrebbe essere lecita (si veda Guiso - Gallisay c. Italia , n. 58858/ 00 , § 82, 8 dicembre 2005, e Leki? c. Slovenia [GC], n.36480 / 07 , § 94, 11 dicembre 2018). Il requisito della legalità, ai sensi della Convenzione, richiede il rispetto delle pertinenti disposizioni del diritto interno e la compatibilità con lo Stato di diritto (si veda Kushoglu c. Bulgaria , n. 48191/99 , § 49, 10 maggio 2007; Parvanov e Altri c. Bulgaria , n. 74787/01 , § 44, 7 gennaio 2010; e Seryavin e altri c. Ucraina , n. 4909/04 , § 40, 10 febbraio 2011).
129. Inoltre, l'esistenza di un fondamento normativo non è di per sé sufficiente a soddisfare il principio di legalità. Quando si parla di "diritto", l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 allude a un concetto che comprende il diritto statutario e la giurisprudenza (vedi Mullai e altri c. Albania , n. 9074/07 , § 113, 23 marzo 2010) .
130. La Corte ribadisce che le parti erano in disaccordo sul fatto che la situazione in questione potesse essere considerata come espropriazione per esigenze statali. La Corte si riferisce a questa connessione alla sua conclusione di cui sopra che l'affermazione dei ricorrenti secondo cui i loro appartamenti erano stati espropriati per esigenze statali era almeno supportata da una linea di giurisprudenza della Corte Suprema (vedere paragrafo 111 supra). In queste circostanze, era essenziale che i tribunali nazionali ai quali i ricorrenti si sono rivolti per la protezione fornissero una risposta chiara ed esauriente riguardo alla questione se i ricorrenti avessero diritto al pagamento di un risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% che chiedevano.
131. Tuttavia, i tribunali nazionali, e più specificamente la Corte Suprema, che è il più alto organo giurisdizionale a cui i ricorrenti hanno fatto ricorso ordinario, hanno emesso sentenze contenenti valutazioni contrastanti della stessa situazione nelle cause dei ricorrenti e nelle cause promosse da altri individui .
132. Inoltre, nonostante i riferimenti diretti dei ricorrenti a precedenti decisioni definitive in cui erano state accolte domande simili, la Corte Suprema è rimasta in silenzio nelle sue decisioni relative alle loro cause e non ha fornito alcun chiarimento sul motivo per cui era giunta a una conclusione diversa nella casi in esame (paragrafo 47 supra).
133. La Corte ha già sottolineato in molte occasioni che il ruolo di una corte suprema è proprio quello di risolvere tali conflitti, e se si sviluppa una pratica conflittuale all'interno di una delle più alte autorità giudiziarie di un paese, quella corte stessa diventa una fonte di incertezza giuridica, minando così il principio della certezza del diritto e indebolendo la fiducia del pubblico nel sistema giudiziario (cfr., mutatis mutandis , Lupeni Greek Catholic Parish e altri c. Romania [GC], n. 76943/11 , § 123, 29 novembre 2016).
134. La Corte ha inoltre ritenuto che laddove tali decisioni manifestamente contrastanti interferiscano con il diritto al pacifico godimento dei beni e non venga fornita alcuna spiegazione ragionevole per la divergenza, tali interferenze non possono essere considerate lecite ai fini dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. la Convenzione perché portano a una giurisprudenza incoerente che manca della precisione richiesta per consentire agli individui di prevedere le conseguenze delle loro azioni (si veda, mutatis mutandis , Jokela c. Finlandia , n. 28856/95 , § 65, CEDU 2002 - IV; vedere anche Saghinadze e altri c. Georgia , n.18768 / 05 , §§ 116-18, 27 maggio 2010 e Brezovec , sopra citata, § 67).
135. Alla luce delle considerazioni di cui sopra, la Corte conclude che le decisioni dei tribunali nazionali, e in particolare le decisioni pertinenti della Corte Suprema, che rigettano le richieste dei ricorrenti, hanno costituito un'interferenza con il loro diritto al pacifico godimento dei loro beni ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. Tale interferenza era incompatibile con il principio di legalità e quindi contravviene all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione. Tale constatazione rende superfluo esaminare se sia stato raggiunto un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della collettività e le esigenze della tutela dei diritti fondamentali dei ricorrenti.
136. C'è stata di conseguenza una violazione dell' Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
III. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE COMBINATO CON L'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N o . 1
137. I ricorrenti si lamentavano di aver subito una discriminazione a causa del rifiuto dei tribunali nazionali di concedere loro un risarcimento aggiuntivo quando altri individui nella stessa situazione avevano ricevuto tale risarcimento. A questo proposito, si sono basati sull'articolo 14 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:
"Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà enunciati nella [la] Convenzione deve essere assicurato senza discriminazioni per nessun motivo come ... la proprietà ... o altro status."
138. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non erano riusciti ad argomentare su quale motivo fossero stati discriminati. Hanno inoltre sostenuto che la denuncia dei ricorrenti a questo riguardo doveva essere respinta in quanto manifestamente infondata.
139. I richiedenti sostennero che mentre i loro vicini nella stessa situazione avevano ricevuto un risarcimento aggiuntivo, le loro richieste erano state respinte senza alcuna giustificazione ragionevole.
140. La Corte reitera che per far sorgere una questione ai sensi dell'articolo 14 ci deve essere una differenza nel trattamento delle persone in situazioni analoghe o in modo pertinente simili. Tale disparità di trattamento è discriminatoria se non ha una giustificazione obiettiva e ragionevole; in altre parole, se non persegue uno scopo legittimo o se non esiste un ragionevole rapporto di proporzionalità tra i mezzi impiegati e lo scopo perseguito. L'articolo 14 non vieta tutte le differenze di trattamento, ma solo quelle differenze basate su una caratteristica identificabile, oggettiva o personale, o "status", per cui individui o gruppi sono distinguibili l'uno dall'altro (vedi Carvalho Pinto de Sousa Morais c. Portogallo , n. 17484/15 , §§ 44-45, 25 luglio 2017).
141. Nelle presenti cause, i ricorrenti si sono basati su sentenze di tribunali nazionali in cui erano state accolte richieste di altre persone similmente colpite dall'ordinanza del BCEA del 31 maggio 2011. Tuttavia, non hanno sostenuto che la differenza di trattamento fosse basata su una caratteristica personale identificabile. In tali circostanze, la Corte ritiene che la denuncia di trattamento discriminatorio sia infondata (confrontare Xuereb c. Malta (dec.), n. 50867/09 , 20 settembre 2011).
142. Ne consegue che questa doglianza è manifestamente infondata e deve essere respinta ai sensi dell'articolo 35 §§ 3 e 4 della Convenzione.
IV. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
143. L' articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
“Se la Corte rileva che vi è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte Contraente interessata consente solo un risarcimento parziale, la Corte, se necessario, accorda un'equa soddisfazione al parte lesa."
A. Danno
1. Danno patrimoniale
144. I ricorrenti hanno chiesto i seguenti importi a riguardo del danno patrimoniale:
(i) il richiedente nella domanda n. 66249/16 ha rivendicato 24.601 manat azeri (AZN) (circa 11.900 euro (EUR) al momento della presentazione del reclamo);
(ii) il richiedente nella domanda n. 66271/16 rivendicato AZN 20.412 (circa EUR 9.870 al momento della presentazione del reclamo);
(iii) il richiedente nella domanda n. 75978/16 rivendicato AZN 18.225 (circa EUR 8.810 al momento della presentazione del reclamo);
(iv) il richiedente nella domanda n. 77309/16 rivendicato AZN 11.295 (circa EUR 5.460 al momento della presentazione del reclamo);
(v) il richiedente nella domanda n. 77691/16 rivendicato AZN 18.306 (circa EUR 8.850 al momento della presentazione del reclamo);
(vi) il richiedente nella domanda n. 1038/17 rivendicava AZN 17.446 (circa EUR 8.840 al momento della presentazione del reclamo);
(vii) il richiedente nella domanda n. 52821/17 rivendicato AZN 21.870 (circa EUR 11.400 al momento della presentazione del reclamo).
145. A sostegno delle loro rivendicazioni, i richiedenti presentarono i contratti di vendita e acquisto dei loro appartamenti. Gli importi rivendicati sono stati calcolati come il 30% (20% + 10%) dell'importo del prezzo di acquisto indicato in detti contratti.
146. Il Governo addusse che i ricorrenti avevano già ricevuto un equo e adeguato risarcimento per i loro appartamenti e chiese alla Corte di respingere le loro rivendicazioni sotto questo capo.
147. Ai sensi dell'articolo 41 della Convenzione, la Corte può concedere un'equa soddisfazione a un ricorrente solo se "accerta che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli" nei confronti di quel ricorrente (vedi Apostolovi c. Bulgaria , n.32644 / 09 , § 116, 7 novembre 2019). Nelle presenti cause, la doglianza dei ricorrenti relativa al risarcimento del disagio è stata dichiarata irricevibile. Ne consegue che le loro domande al riguardo devono essere respinte.
148. Tenuto conto della constatazione della Corte di una violazione dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 in relazione alla doglianza dei ricorrenti relativa al risarcimento aggiuntivo del 20% ai sensi del Decreto Presidenziale del 2007, ritiene che un lodo dovrebbe essere emesso al riguardo. A questo proposito, la Corte nota che le rivendicazioni a questo riguardo sembrano essere state calcolate dai ricorrenti come il 20% dell'importo del prezzo di acquisto effettivamente loro pagato. Come sopra rilevato, ai sensi del DPR 2007, l'importo in questione dovrebbe essere calcolato come percentuale dell'indennizzo complessivo determinato sulla base del prezzo di mercato del bene espropriato (paragrafo 106 supra). Nei casi in esame, tutti i richiedenti hanno ricevuto un compenso standard pari a 1.500 AZN per mq.legislazione sull'espropriazione . Tuttavia, nella misura in cui i ricorrenti non hanno mai contestato la legittimità della procedura di espropriazione stessa e l'importo dell'indennizzo originario da essi percepito (ossia i prezzi di acquisto indicati nei contratti di compravendita), e il Governo non ha contestato la premessa su cui si basava la richiesta dei ricorrenti e non ha mai sostenuto di aver ricevuto importi superiori al valore di mercato delle loro proprietà, la Corte ritiene che, nelle circostanze delle presenti cause, l'importo richiesto dai ricorrenti possa essere calcolato sulla base dei rispettivi prezzi di acquisto.
149. Come notato sopra, le rivendicazioni nelle presenti cause sono state espresse in manat azerbaigiani. Come prassi generale, nei casi in cui le domande di equa soddisfazione (sotto vari capi) sono state presentate nella valuta nazionale, la Corte le ha convertite in euro a partire dalla data di presentazione delle domande (vedere Shukurov c. Azerbaigian , n. 37614/ 11 , § 33, 27 ottobre 2016, con ulteriori rinvii, e Khadija Ismayilova c. Azerbaijan , nn.65286 / 13 e 57270/14 , § 180, 10 gennaio 2019). La Corte ritiene opportuno seguire l'approccio summenzionato nelle presenti cause, e quindi il tasso di conversione da utilizzare nei confronti delle domande di danno patrimoniale dei ricorrenti dovrebbe essere il tasso applicabile alla data in cui è stata presentata la domanda. A questo capo, quindi, assegna le seguenti somme, più qualsiasi imposta che può essere addebitata su tali importi ai ricorrenti:
(i) Euro 7.930 al richiedente nella domanda n. 66249/16;
(ii) Euro 6.580 al richiedente con ricorso n. 66271/16;
(iii) Euro 5.880 al richiedente con ricorso n. 75978/16;
(iv) Euro 3.640 al richiedente con ricorso n. 77309/16;
(v) Euro 5.900 al richiedente con ricorso n. 77691/16;
(vi) Euro 5.500 al richiedente nella domanda n. 1038/17;
(vii) Euro 7.600 al richiedente con ricorso n. 52821/17 .
2. Non-pecuniary damage
150. Ciascun richiedente ha richiesto 10.000 AZN (circa EUR 4.840 al momento della presentazione delle domande da parte dei richiedenti nelle domande n. 66249/16 , 66271/16 , 75978/16 , 77309/16 , 77691/16 e 1038/17 che hanno presentato le loro domande congiuntamente alla stessa data e circa Euro 5.210 al momento della presentazione della domanda da parte dell'istante 52821/17 che ha presentato la sua domanda individualmente in una data diversa) per danno morale.
151. Il Governo reiterò che i richiedenti avevano ricevuto un risarcimento ragionevole per le loro proprietà.
152. La Corte considera che i ricorrenti hanno subito un danno morale che non può essere compensato unicamente dall'accertamento di una violazione dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Decidendo in modo equo, la Corte assegna a ciascuno dei ricorrenti la somma di EUR 3.000 a titolo di danno morale, più qualsiasi imposta che potrebbe essere addebitabile.
B. Costi e spese
153. Ciascun ricorrente ha anche richiesto AZN 5.000 per i costi e le spese sostenute dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e alla Corte.
154. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non avevano presentato alcuna prova che provasse che avevano effettivamente sostenuto costi e spese e ha chiesto alla Corte di respingere le loro richieste sotto questo capo. Nella domanda n. 52821/17 , il governo ha considerato, in alternativa, che la somma di 1.000 AZN costituirebbe un equo compenso sotto questo capo.
155. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un ricorrente ha diritto al rimborso dei costi e delle spese solo nella misura in cui è stato dimostrato che queste sono state effettivamente e necessariamente sostenute e sono ragionevoli in termini di importo. Ai sensi dell'articolo 60 del Regolamento della Corte, tutte le domande di equa soddisfazione devono essere dettagliate e presentate per iscritto insieme a tutti i documenti giustificativi pertinenti, in mancanza della quale la Camera può respingere la domanda in tutto o in parte. Nel caso di specie, le affermazioni non erano né dettagliate né supportate da alcuna prova documentale. La Corte pertanto respinge le richieste dei ricorrenti in merito a costi e spese (confrontare Malik Babayev c. Azerbaijan , n. 30500/11 , § 97, 1 giugno 2017).
C. Interessi di mora
156. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
1. Decide di aderire alle domande;
2. Dichiara ammissibile la parte del ricorso di cui all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione relativa all'ulteriore risarcimento del 20% previsto dal DPR 2007 e irricevibili le restanti domande;
3. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione;
4. tiene
(un) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare ai ricorrenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, i seguenti importi, più ogni imposta che può essere esigibile, da convertire in valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data del regolamento:
(io) EUR 7.930 (settemilanovecentotrenta euro) al ricorrente con ricorso n. 66249/16 in materia di danno patrimoniale;
(ii) EUR 6.580 (seimilacinquecentottanta euro) al ricorrente con ricorso n. 66271/16 in materia di danno patrimoniale;
(iii) EUR 5.880 (cinquemilaottocentottanta euro) al ricorrente con ricorso n. 75978/16 in materia di danno patrimoniale;
(iv) EUR 3.640 (tremilaseicentoquaranta euro) al richiedente con ricorso n. 77309/16 in materia di danno patrimoniale;
(v) EUR 5.900 (cinquemilanovecento euro) al ricorrente con ricorso n. 77691/16 in materia di danno patrimoniale;
(vi) Euro 5.500 (cinquemilacinquecento euro) al richiedente con ricorso n. 1038/17 in materia di danno patrimoniale;
(stai arrivando) euro 7.600 (settemilaseicento euro) al richiedente con ricorso n. 52821/17 in materia di danno patrimoniale;
(viii) 3.000 euro (tremila euro) a ciascun ricorrente, a titolo di danno morale;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei suddetti tre mesi fino al regolamento saranno dovuti interessi semplici sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Centrale Europea durante il periodo di default maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;
5. Respinge il resto delle domande di equa soddisfazione dei ricorrenti.
Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto il 21 settembre 2021, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.
{signature_p_2}
Victor Soloveytchik Siofra O'Leary
Cancelliere Presidente



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 23/05/2022.