CASO: CASE OF BÉLA NÉMETH v. HUNGARY

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF BÉLA NÉMETH v. HUNGARY

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 14,P1-1

NUMERO: 73303/14
STATO: Ungheria
DATA: 17/12/2020
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE


FIRST SECTION

CASE OF BÉLA NÉMETH v. HUNGARY

(Application no. 73303/14)



JUDGMENT


Art 1 P1 • Control of the use of property • Applicant as auction buyer had at least a legitimate expectation of acquiring legal ownership • Lawful and justified interference preventing applicant from taking possession of property bought at auction, in wake of legislative moratorium on evictions during foreign-currency loan crisis • Fair balance struck despite lack of time-limit for moratorium, between the applicant’s interests and public interest in avoiding large parts of society becoming homeless overnight, and to delay evictions until pending legislation passed to settle the crisis • Swift implementation of further legislative measures after moratorium, meaning limited interference and uncertainty and no excessive individual burden for applicant who eventually gained possession of property

Art 14 (+ Art 1 P1) • Discrimination • Wide margin of appreciation for States in field of housing • No discrimination against applicant as a private individual and auction buyer subject to the moratorium, as not in a situation relevantly similar to economic operators wholly owned by the State or local municipalities



STRASBOURG

17 December 2020



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Béla Németh v. Hungary,

The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:

Ksenija Turkovi?, President,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Alena Polá?ková,
Péter Paczolay,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerström,
Raffaele Sabato, judges,
and Abel Campos, Section Registrar,

Having regard to:

the application (no. 73303/14) against Hungary lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Hungarian national, Mr Béla Németh (“the applicant”), on 14 November 2014;

the decision to give notice to the Hungarian Government (“the Government”) of the application;

the parties’ observations;

Having deliberated in private on 25 November 2020,

Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

INTRODUCTION

1. The case concerns a legislative amendment that placed a moratorium on evictions during the crisis in Hungary arising from widespread defaulting on foreign-currency-denominated loans. Within the context of an official auction, this amendment resulted in the applicant not being able to take possession of the property that he had bought at that auction.

THE FACTS

2. The applicant was born in 1948 and lives in Kistarcsa. He was represented by Mr O.V. Tamás, a lawyer practising in Budapest.

3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Mr Z. Tallódi, of the Ministry of Justice.

4. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.

5. On 18 March 2014, the applicant, as a bidder at an official auction held within the framework of judicial enforcement proceedings, submitted a bid for the debtor’s residential property (“the residential property”) – which was put up for official auction owing to the debtor defaulting on a loan agreement denominated in foreign currency (“foreign-currency loan agreement”) – and won the auction.

6. Before the applicant’s title to the residential property could be registered in the land register and before the debtor’s eviction from the residential property could take place, section 303 of Act no. LIII of 1994 (“the Enforcement Act”) was amended. The amendment placed a moratorium on evictions from residential properties affected by enforcement proceedings instituted for the recovery of debts arising from foreign-currency loan agreements until a date to be specified by further supplementary legislation (“the Moratorium”). The Moratorium was not applicable to local governments and economic operators wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities, provided that such legal persons that had bought real property at auction undertook to renovate such property within two years of their taking possession and to lease such property – by way of a public tender and in accordance with local government decrees on leasing – to workers, with the goal of promoting the creation of new jobs through the offering of subsidised housing. The Moratorium entered into force on 16 May 2014.

7. The Moratorium was the first enforcement-related legislative measure taken by the Government to mitigate the detrimental effects of the 2008 financial crisis on debtors who held loans denominated in foreign currency (“foreign-currency loans”) (see also Merkantil Car Zrt. v. Hungary. no. 22853/15, 27 November 2018, §§ 7, 8, 90 and 108). The aim of the Moratorium was to ensure that – prior to the settling of invalidity disputes concerning foreign-currency loan agreements – large parts of society did not lose their homes.

8. Owing to the entry into force of the Moratorium, the bailiffs service was barred from taking measures aimed at the eviction of the debtor from the residential property.

9. On 3 July 2014, shortly after the entry into force of the Moratorium, the Kúria adopted uniformity resolution (jogegységi határozat) no. 2/2014.PJE, which provided guidance on addressing the unfairness of certain contractual clauses in foreign-currency loan agreements. Following that resolution, on 4 July 2014 Parliament adopted Act no. XXXVIII of 2014 (“the Uniformity Act”), which enforced at a statutory level the principles laid down in the Kúria’s uniformity resolution and allowed for the resolution of disputes concerning foreign-currency loan agreements.

10. On 5 October 2014 Parliament also passed Act no. XL of 2014 (“the Settlement Act”), which laid down the conditions for settling foreign-currency loan agreements. Section 17 of the Uniformity Act and section 42(4) of the Settlement Act stipulated that the restrictions imposed by the Moratorium on enforcement proceedings conducted against defaulting debtors were to be lifted once the financial institutions met the settlement obligations, and section 42(4) of the Settlement Act determined that the Moratorium would end on 31 December 2016 at the latest.

11. According to the copy of the title deed attached to the case documents, on 14 November 2014 the debtor (and not the applicant) was still the registered owner of the residential property.

12. The applicant submitted that he had gained possession of and title to the residential property approximately two years after he had purchased it at the public auction.

RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK

13. Decision no. 3021/2017 (II.17.) AB of the Constitutional Court contains the following passage:

“The practice of the Constitutional Court is consistent in that the right to property set out in Article XIII of the Fundamental Law protects property already acquired or, in exceptional cases, property expectations.”

14. Section 5:41 of Act no. V of 2013 on the Civil Code provides as follows:

Acquisition of ownership by an administrative decision or by official auction

“(1) Any person who has acquired a thing [dolog] in good faith by an official resolution or by official auction shall gain ownership, irrespective of who the previous owner was.

(2) Ownership by [acquired by] an administrative decision shall be considered to have been acquired when possession is transferred in the case of movable property, or when the acquisition of title is recorded in the Real Estate Register in the case of real property, unless the [relevant] administrative decision provides otherwise.

(3) In the event of an official auction the auction buyer [árverési vev?] shall acquire ownership when possession of the movable property [in question] is transferred by the auctioneer, or when [in the case of real estate property] the acquisition of title is registered in the Real Estate Register.

(4) Upon the acquisition of ownership of a thing by an official resolution or by official auction, the rights of the third party in respect of that thing shall cease, except when the party acquiring ownership by an official resolution or by official auction has not acted in good faith in respect of those rights.”

15. Section 303 of Act no. LIII of 1994 on Judicial Enforcement provides as follows:

“(1) In enforcement proceedings instituted against a debtor or obligor – as referred to in subsections (2) and (3) (or instituted with the direct involvement of the mortgage holder) – the bailiffs service shall, pursuant to the provisions set out in section 182/A, postpone the evacuation of the residential property in question from the day following the day of its receipt of an order to enforce eviction with police assistance or of a request from the auction buyer (that is to say the party taking over the property) made under section 154/A(10) for a period lasting from the date of the expiry of the eviction moratorium mentioned in this section until the date specified in the separate Act for the resolution of the situation of foreign-currency loan debtors.

...

(10) The provisions of this section shall not apply in the event that the auction buyer or the person taking over the residential property is a local-government [entity] or an economic operator owned, jointly or separately, wholly by the State or local government, and undertakes in writing:

a) to renovate the residential property or have it renovated within two years of its taking possession, and

b) to publish, within two years of its taking possession, a call for tenders for the awarding of a lease agreement, under terms specified in the respective local government decree on leasing in respect of residential property, to prospective workers, with a view to creating new jobs, maintaining existing jobs, and allowing local people [to remain in their respective areas] ...”

16. Section 42(4) of Act no. XL of 2014 on the settlement of certain issues related to Act no. XXXVIII of 2014 on the Kúria’s uniformity resolution on consumer credit agreements made by financial institutions and on statutory settlement rules and certain other provisions provides as follows:

“The execution of eviction from residential property specified in section 303 of the Enforcement Act – with respect to section 182/A of the Enforcement Act – may be resumed after 31 December 2016 at the latest.”

THE LAW

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
17. The applicant complained that his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions had been infringed by the entry into force of the Moratorium, which had barred him for an unspecified time from taking possession of his property. In his view, this state of affairs had amounted to a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which read as follows:

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.

The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”

Submissions of the parties
18. The applicant argued that the two-year delay in his taking possession of the residential property that he had bought at auction had amounted to a violation of his right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. He furthermore complained that the Moratorium had not stipulated any temporary measures providing for the possibility for bidders at an auction to retract their bids in the light of the ex post restrictions imposed on the enforcement process by the Moratorium; he also submitted that the impugned measure had failed to meet the requirements of lawfulness owing to the uncertainty created by the initial enactment of the Moratorium, in that originally the duration of the prohibition of eviction had not been specified, as its length had been left dependent upon the enactment of further legislation within the context of the crisis arising from the widespread defaulting on foreign-currency-denominated loans (“the foreign-currency loan crisis”). Lastly, he argued that the impugned measure had not served the public interest since the issues arising from foreign-currency loan agreements had only affected a small part of society.

19. The Government disagreed. They did not dispute that by acquiring the status of “auction buyer” the applicant had had an asset in expectancy (váromány) that was recognised under Hungarian law. However, in their view this was insufficient to trigger the application of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as the applicant’s ownership title was not recorded in the land register; rather, he merely had the title of “auction buyer”, which in itself did not constitute ownership under Hungarian law. Therefore, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was not applicable. In any event, the enactment of the Moratorium had served a legitimate aim: firstly, it had been one of the first measures aimed at combating the effects of the foreign-currency loan crisis; secondly, its goal had been the protection of the public interest – namely the protection of a large group of consumers by means of ensuring that they would not suffer irreversible loss of ownership of moveable and immoveable property owing to (i) the uncertain situation surrounding the lawfulness of foreign-currency loan agreements and (ii) the temporary maintenance of the status quo pending the enactment of statutory provisions aimed at redressing unfair contract terms.

Admissibility
20. To ascertain whether the complaint is compatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention and its Protocols, the Court must first determine whether the applicant had a “possession” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and whether that Article is consequently applicable in the instant case.

21. The Government submitted that upon the completion of the auction, the applicant had merely acquired the legal status of “auction buyer”, which – under section 5:41 (3) of Act no. V of 2013 on the Civil Code – did not result automatically in the registration of the ownership title in the land register (which is necessary for the legal transfer of ownership). The Government furthermore submitted that according to the title deed dated 14 November 2014, the applicant was not the owner of the property and that he therefore had had no legally recognised ownership title in respect of the property in question at the time of the submission of the application to the Court.

22. The applicant contested the Government’s argument and submitted that although he was not the owner of the residential property according to the land register, the residential property nevertheless constituted part of his assets.

23. The Court reiterates that the concept of “possessions” in the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 has an autonomous meaning that is not limited to the ownership of material goods and is independent from the formal classification in domestic law. In the same way as material goods, certain other rights and interests constituting assets can also be regarded as “property rights”, and thus as “possessions” for the purposes of this provision. In each case the issue that needs to be examined is whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 1999-II; Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, ECHR 2000-I; and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 129, ECHR 2004-V).

24. Although Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 applies only to a person’s existing possessions and does not create a right to acquire property (see Stummer v. Austria [GC], no. 37452/02, § 82, ECHR 2011), in certain circumstances a “legitimate expectation” of obtaining an asset may also enjoy the protection of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, among many authorities, Anheuser-Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 65, ECHR 2007-I). Thus, where a proprietary interest is in the nature of a claim, the person in whom it is vested may be regarded as having a “legitimate expectation” if there is a sufficient basis for that interest in national law – for example, where there is settled case-law of the domestic courts confirming its existence. However, no “legitimate expectation” can be said to arise where there is a dispute as to the correct interpretation and application of domestic law, and the applicant’s submissions are subsequently rejected by the national courts (see Kopecký v. Slovakia [GC], no. 44912/98, § 50, ECHR 2004-IX).

25. A “legitimate expectation” must be of a nature more concrete than a mere hope and be based on a legal provision or a legal act, such as a judicial decision. The hope that a long-extinguished property right may be revived cannot be regarded as a “possession”; nor can a conditional claim that has lapsed as a result of a failure to fulfil the condition (see Gratzinger and Gratzingerova v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, §§ 69 and 73, ECHR 2002-VII).

26. In cases concerning Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the issue that needs to be examined is normally whether the circumstances of the case, considered as a whole, conferred on the applicant title to a substantive interest protected by that provision (see the above-cited cases of Iatridis, § 54, and Beyeler, § 100).

27. In the present case, the Court notes that on 18 March 2014 the applicant acquired the legal status of auction buyer with respect to the residential property in question. The Government did not dispute that by acquiring the status of auction buyer the applicant at least had an asset in expectancy, which is recognised under Hungarian law. In that regard, the Court observes that the Constitutional Court, in its decision no. 3021/2017. (II. 17.) AB, recognised that the right to property can extend to an asset in expectancy (see paragraph 13 above).

28. The Court also notes that it was not in dispute between the parties that – despite the fact that the applicant’s ownership title to the residential property was not recorded in the land register and he could not take possession of it – he had a legitimate expectation that such procedure would be carried out following the payment of the purchase price within the confines of the ensuing enforcement proceedings.

29. In the Court’s view, these elements demonstrate that the applicant had at least a legitimate expectation of acquiring legal ownership (that is to say recognised under Hungarian law) of the residential property – even if that was barred for a period by subsequent legislation – from the moment that he won the auction. This legitimate expectation therefore constitutes a “possession” for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Pine Valley Developments Ltd and Others v. Ireland, 29 November 1991, § 51, Series A no. 222; Asito v. Moldova, no. 40663/98, § 61, 8 November 2005). The Court furthermore notes that in this case there was neither a de facto expropriation nor a transfer of property, and the applicant retained at all times the possibility of taking possession of the property once the Moratorium was lifted. As the implementation of the measures in question meant that the previous owners continued to possess (that is to say, to occupy) the property, the measures undoubtedly amounted to control of the use of property. Accordingly, the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is applicable.

30. The Court further notes that this complaint is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
General principles
31. The first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law”, and the second paragraph recognises that States have the right to control the use of property by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the rule of law, one of the fundamental principles of a democratic society, is inherent in all the Articles of the Convention. The principle of lawfulness also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see Broniowski, cited above, § 147), in order to avoid all risk of arbitrariness and enable individuals to foresee the consequences of their actions (see Žaja v. Croatia, no. 37462/09, § 103, 4 October 2016).

32. Any interference with the enjoyment of a Convention right must pursue a legitimate aim. The principle of a “fair balance” inherent in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 itself presupposes the existence of a general interest of the community. Moreover, it should be reiterated that the various rules incorporated in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 are not distinct, in the sense of being unconnected, and that the second and third rules are concerned only with particular instances of interference with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of property. One of the effects of this is that the existence of the “public interest” (required under the second sentence) or the “general interest” referred to in the second paragraph are corollaries of the principle set forth in the first sentence, so that an interference with the exercise of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the first sentence of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 must also pursue an aim in the public interest (see Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, § 105, ECHR 2014).

33. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is “in the public interest”. Under the system of protection established by the Convention, it is thus for the national authorities to make the initial assessment as to the existence of a problem of public concern warranting measures to be applied in the sphere of the exercise of the right of property. Since the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies is wide, the Court will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is in the public interest, unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Béláné Nagy v. Hungary [GC], no. 53080/13, § 113, 13 December 2016).

34. Furthermore, an interference, particularly one falling to be considered under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, must strike a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 as a whole, and therefore also in its second paragraph. There must be a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim pursued. In determining whether this requirement is met, the Court recognises that the State enjoys a wide margin of appreciation with regard both to choosing the means of enforcement and to ascertaining whether the consequences of enforcement are justified in the general interest for the purpose of achieving the object of the law in question. In spheres such as housing, which plays a central role in the welfare and economic policies of modern societies, the Court will respect the legislature’s judgment as to what is in the general interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Immobiliare Saffi v. Italy [GC], no. 22774/93, § 49, ECHR 1999-V).

35. Within this context the Court must stress its fundamentally subsidiary role. The Contracting Parties, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity, have the primary responsibility to secure the rights and freedoms defined in the Convention and the Protocols thereto, and in doing so they enjoy a margin of appreciation, subject to the supervisory jurisdiction of the Court. The national authorities have direct democratic legitimation and are, as the Court has held on many occasions, in principle better placed than an international court to evaluate local needs and conditions. In matters of general policy, on which opinions within a democratic society may reasonably differ widely, the role of the domestic policy-maker should be given special weight (see Zelenchuk and Tsytsyura v. Ukraine, nos. 846/16 and 1075/16, § 111, 22 May 2018).

36. In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. That assessment may involve not only the relevant compensation terms – if the situation is akin to the taking of property – but also the conduct of the parties, including the means employed by the State and their implementation. In that regard, it should be stressed that uncertainty – be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State’s conduct. Indeed, where an issue in the general interest is at stake, it is incumbent on the public authorities to act in good time, and in an appropriate and consistent manner (see Broniowski, cited above, § 151).

Application of the above principles in the instant case
(a) Whether there has been an interference

37. The Court notes that it was not in dispute between the parties that the applicant was subject to the “control of use” of his possession, within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 of the Convention, by virtue of the contested legislation. The Court sees no reason to hold otherwise.

38. However, such interference must comply with the principle of lawfulness, pursue a legitimate aim and be reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Fábián v. Hungary [GC], no. 78117/13, § 65, 5 September 2017, and Béláné Nagy, cited above, §§ 112-15).

(b) Lawfulness

39. The Court observes that the Moratorium had a basis in domestic law that has never been declared unconstitutional (contrast Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, § 172, ECHR 2006?VIII).

40. The Court notes the applicant’s argument that uncertainty was created by the initial enactment of the Moratorium – namely, that originally there was no time-limit set for the end of the Moratorium and that its length was dependent upon the enactment of further legislation in respect of the foreign-currency loan crisis. However, it considers that this argument is relevant in respect of determining whether the authorities struck a fair balance between the interests involved (see Zelenchuk and Tsytsyura, cited above, § 106).

41. Therefore, it considers that the restrictions imposed on the exercise of the applicant’s rights complied with the requirement of “lawfulness” inherent in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

(c) Public interest

42. The applicant submitted that the Moratorium had not served the public interest, as the issues arising from foreign-currency loan agreements had only affected a small section of society.

43. The Government argued that the Moratorium had constituted the first measure in a chain of legislative measures aimed at combating the effects of the foreign-currency loan crisis and in particular that its aim had been to protect the public interest. In the Government’s view it had been necessary to maintain a moratorium on evictions, on the one hand in order to ensure that members of large parts of society did not lose their homes, and on the other hand to prevent irreversible harm being done to consumers while waiting for the adoption of statutory measures that would settle foreign-currency loan agreements governed by unfair contract terms.

44. The Court has assessed the aims (as cited by the Government) of the impugned measure – notably that of protecting the public interest by ensuring that large parts of society did not become homeless overnight, and also the desire to delay evictions until pending legislation aimed at the settling of foreign-currency loan agreements was adopted.

45. Although the applicant challenged the legitimacy of that aim, relying on the argument that only a part of society had been affected by issues arising from the foreign-currency loan agreements, the Court – finding it natural that the margin of appreciation available to the legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one – will respect the legislature’s judgment regarding what is “in the public interest”, unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 87, ECHR 2000?XII; James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 46, Series A no. 98; and Beyeler, cited above, § 112). The Court therefore considers that the goals of the Moratorium, as cited by the Government, cannot be said to be “manifestly without reasonable foundation”.

(d) Proportionality

46. The applicant argued the balance between the protection of the applicant’s rights and the general interest had been upset by (a) the legislative uncertainty resulting from (i) the enactment of the Moratorium (the terms of which stated that it would remain in place until a separate law governing the settlement of foreign-currency loans was enacted), and (ii) the lack of any transitional rules allowing auction bidders to revoke their respective bids in the light of the Moratorium, and (b) the absence of a compensation regime; moreover, the applicant argued that those factors had imposed an excessive individual burden on him (see paragraph 18 above).

47. The Government disagreed, submitting that the duration of the Moratorium had not been uncertain, given the fact that legislation regarding the settlement of foreign-currency loans had been swiftly adopted after the Moratorium had come into effect and that those further legislative measures had provided strict time-limits for the settlement of such loans.

48. The Court has previously held that, in principle, a system involving the temporary suspension or staggering of the enforcement of court orders followed by the reinstatement of a landlord in his property is not in itself open to criticism, having regard in particular to the margin of appreciation permitted under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No.1 (see Immobiliare Saffi, cited above, § 54); it considers that this approach is also applicable in the present case.

49. The Court notes that the impugned measure was implemented amid the foreign-currency loan crisis in Hungary (see paragraph 7 above). It also observes that the State had to implement an emergency measure in order to circumvent the possibility of large numbers of its population going homeless owing to the pending enforcement proceedings resulting from the widespread defaulting on foreign-currency loans (see paragraph 7 above).

50. It is also important to note that the Moratorium did not deprive the applicant of his legitimate expectation of acquiring title to the property that he had bought during the auction process; rather, it only delayed his taking possession of that property (see paragraphs 8 and 12 above).

51. It is true that at the time that the Moratorium entered into force on 16 May 2014 no end date had been specified, it having been stipulated that it would be in force until further legislation had been adopted regarding the settlement of foreign-currency loans (see paragraph 6 above). However, shortly after its entry into force, those further legislative measures were indeed adopted – namely the Uniformity Act and the Settlement Act (see paragraph 9 above).

52. The Settlement Act, which came into effect on 6 October 2014, laid down strict time-limits for the settlement of foreign-currency loan agreements in order to ensure the speedy resolution of outstanding issues concerning the settlements; furthermore, it stipulated in section 42(2) that the emergency rules in the form of the Moratorium would not be applicable from 31 December 2016 (see paragraph 10 above). Thus, the uncertain legal situation ceased on 6 October 2014, when the Settlement Act came into effect, allowing the applicant to rely on a final deadline for his taking possession of the property that he had bought at the auction. Therefore, from 6 October 2014 onwards, it cannot be said that there was any legal uncertainty regarding when the Moratorium would end.

53. The interference of the Moratorium with the applicant’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions was therefore limited, time-wise; moreover, the period of uncertainty – in the light of the swift implementation of the relevant legislative measures (see paragraph 9 above) – lasted for less than seven months in total (see paragraph 9 above), after which time the applicant was aware that the Moratorium would end on 31 December 2016 at the latest. Furthermore, the applicant eventually did gain possession of the property (see paragraph 12 above); therefore, the Court does not consider that the Moratorium caused the applicant to bear an excessive individual burden.

54. Given these circumstances, the Court finds that it was not disproportionate to freeze the enforcement of evictions with respect to property that was under enforcement owing to a default on a foreign-currency loan.

55. There has accordingly been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONVENTION, READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
56. The applicant complained that Article 14 of the Convention, read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, had been breached by the legislation in issue, in so far as it had protected economic operators wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities, to the detriment of private individuals, since the same restrictions under the Moratorium had not applied to the former.

57. Article 14 of the Convention provides as follows:

“The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in [the] Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status.”

Admissibility
58. The Court notes that this complaint is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
Submissions of the parties
59. The applicant argued that he had been in a situation comparable with that of legal entities wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities because, hypothetically, he could also have undertaken obligations similar to those of State- or municipality-owned economic operators in respect of promoting the creation of workforces by offering public housing. He submitted that the removal from the scope of the Moratorium of economic operators wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities had therefore amounted to discrimination against private individuals.

60. The Government argued that the differential treatment afforded to economic operators wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities had been justified in view of the function fulfilled in the public interest by such entities – namely that of promoting the creation of workplaces by offering housing for reduced fees and thereby preserving rural communities. Furthermore, the Government submitted that given the public functions that they fulfilled, the above-mentioned economic operators had not been in a situation comparable with that of private individuals.

The Court’s assessment
61. The relevant principles have been recently laid down in the case of Fábián, cited above, §§ 112 to 115.

62. In the present case, the Court is satisfied that the applicant’s complaint concerning property rights clearly falls within the ambit of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and that Article 14 is therefore applicable. Indeed, this was not in dispute between the parties.

63. The Court will next ascertain whether the applicant, as both a private person and an auction buyer falling under the scope of the Moratorium, was in a situation that was analogous or relevantly similar to that of economic operators wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities.

64. The Court reiterates at the outset that a difference in treatment may raise an issue from the point of view of the prohibition of discrimination, as provided in Article 14 of the Convention, only if the persons subjected to different treatment are in a relevantly similar situation, taking into account the elements that characterise their circumstances within the particular context. The Court notes that the elements which characterise different situations, and determine their comparability, must be assessed in the light of the subject matter and purpose of the measure which makes the distinction in question (see Fábián, cited above, § 121).

65. The Court has acknowledged that areas such as housing may often call for some form of regulation by the State. Decisions as to whether (and if so when) it may fully be left to the play of free-market forces or whether it should be subject to State control – as well as the choice of measures for securing the housing needs of the community and of the timing for their implementation – necessarily involve the consideration of complex social, economic and political issues. Acknowledging that the margin of appreciation available to a legislature in implementing social and economic policies should be a wide one, the Court has declared that it will respect a legislature’s judgment as to what is in the “public” or “general” interest unless that judgment is manifestly without reasonable foundation (see Bittó and Others v. Slovakia, no. 30255/09, § 96, 28 January 2014).

66. Secondly, for institutional and functional reasons, services provided by the public sector compared to those provided by the private sector may typically be subject to substantial legal and factual differences, not least in fields involving the exercise of sovereign State power and the provision of essential public services. Legal entities wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities, unlike private individuals, may be engaged in the exercise of the State’s sovereign power, and their functions may therefore be of a different nature, although the extent to which this is the case may depend on the specific functions that they have to perform (see, mutatis mutandis, Fábián, cited above, § 122).

67. Thirdly, as a result of the above, it cannot be assumed that the terms and conditions regarding the offering of subsidised housing will be similar for public and quasi-public entities as for private individuals, and nor can it therefore be presumed that they will be in relevantly similar situations in this regard (see, mutatis mutandis, Fábián, cited above, § 122).

68. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court observes that the impugned provision of the Moratorium on evictions (see paragraphs 5 and 14 above) was adopted in order to promote the creation of workforces by offering subsidised housing to prospective workers in order to preserve rural communities by enabling people to continue to live locally (see paragraphs 6 and 15 above). The impugned provision provided that the Moratorium would not apply to economic operators owned wholly by the State or by local municipalities, provided that such economic operators would undertake in writing (i) to renovate the residential property in question or have it renovated within two years of the economic operator taking possession of it, and (ii) to issue a public tender, within two years of it taking possession, for the awarding of a lease agreement under the terms specified in the respective local government decree on leasing (see paragraph 15 above).

69. The Court notes that the matter concerned in the present case is that of housing, where the choice of measures to be implemented is an area in which the State has a wide margin of appreciation (see Bittó, cited above, § 96). The Court also notes that the impugned provision sets out conditions – such as the obligation to issue a tender for the leasing of renovated residential properties and to issue (or respect existing) local-government decrees on leasing (see paragraph 15 above) – which, in general, are conditions that are typically observed by economic operators in the public sector and usually apply to such entities, rather than private ones.

70. Taking all these aspects of the present case into account, the Court finds that the applicant has not demonstrated that he, as a private individual, was in a situation relevantly similar to that of economic operators wholly owned by the State or by local municipalities.

71. It follows that there has been no discrimination and, therefore, no violation of Article 14, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Fábián, cited above, §§ 133-34).

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,

Declares the application admissible;
Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds that there has been no violation of Article 14 of the Convention read in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 17 December 2020, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.

Abel Campos Ksenija Turkovi?
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE

CASO DI BÉLA NÉMETH c. UNGHERIA

(Applicazione n. 73303/14)



SENTENZA


Art 1 P1 - Controllo dell'uso della proprietà - Il ricorrente, in quanto acquirente all'asta, aveva almeno una legittima aspettativa di acquisire la proprietà legale - Interferenza legittima e giustificata che impedisce al ricorrente di prendere possesso della proprietà acquistata all'asta, sulla scia della moratoria legislativa sugli sfratti durante la crisi dei prestiti in valuta estera - Equilibrio raggiunto nonostante la mancanza di un termine per la moratoria, tra gli interessi del richiedente e l'interesse pubblico di evitare che ampie parti della società diventino improvvisamente senza casa, e di ritardare gli sfratti fino all'approvazione di una legge per risolvere la crisi - Rapida attuazione di ulteriori misure legislative dopo la moratoria, il che significa interferenze e incertezze limitate e nessun eccessivo onere individuale per il richiedente che alla fine ha ottenuto il possesso della proprietà

Art 14 (+ Art 1 P1) - Discriminazione - Ampio margine di apprezzamento per gli Stati nel campo degli alloggi - Nessuna discriminazione nei confronti del richiedente in quanto privato e acquirente all'asta soggetto alla moratoria, in quanto non in una situazione rilevante simile a quella degli operatori economici interamente di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni



STRASBURGO

17 dicembre 2020



La presente sentenza diventerà definitiva nelle circostanze di cui all'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Essa può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.


Nella causa Béla Németh c. Ungheria,

La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (prima sezione), riunita in sezione composta da:

Ksenija Turkovi?, presidente,
Krzysztof Wojtyczek,
Alena Polá?ková,
Péter Paczolay,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerström,
Raffaele Sabato, giudici,
e Abel Campos, cancelliere di sezione,

visto:

il ricorso (n. 73303/14) contro l'Ungheria presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da un cittadino ungherese, il sig. Béla Németh ("il ricorrente"), il 14 novembre 2014

la decisione di notificare il ricorso al governo ungherese ("il governo");

le osservazioni delle parti;

avendo deliberato in privato il 25 novembre 2020,

pronuncia la seguente sentenza, adottata in tale data:

INTRODUZIONE

1. Il caso riguarda una modifica legislativa che ha posto una moratoria sugli sfratti durante la crisi in Ungheria derivante da un diffuso inadempimento dei prestiti denominati in valuta estera. Nell'ambito di un'asta ufficiale, questo emendamento ha fatto sì che il ricorrente non potesse prendere possesso dell'immobile che aveva acquistato all'asta.

I FATTI

2. Il ricorrente è nato nel 1948 e vive a Kistarcsa. Era rappresentato dall'avvocato O.V. Tamás, che esercita a Budapest.

3. Il governo era rappresentato dal suo agente, il signor Z. Tallódi, del ministero della Giustizia.

4.I fatti della causa, come presentati dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.
5. Il 18 marzo 2014, la ricorrente, in qualità di offerente ad un'asta ufficiale tenutasi nell'ambito di un procedimento di esecuzione giudiziaria, ha presentato un'offerta per la proprietà residenziale del debitore ("la proprietà residenziale") - messa all'asta ufficiale a causa dell'inadempienza del debitore su un contratto di mutuo denominato in valuta estera ("contratto di mutuo in valuta estera") - e ha vinto l'asta.

6. Prima che il titolo di proprietà della ricorrente sulla proprietà residenziale potesse essere registrato nel registro fondiario e prima che lo sfratto del debitore dalla proprietà residenziale potesse avere luogo, l'articolo 303 della legge n. LIII del 1994 ("la legge sull'esecuzione") è stata modificata. L'emendamento ha disposto una moratoria sugli sfratti dalle proprietà residenziali interessate da procedimenti esecutivi avviati per il recupero dei crediti derivanti da contratti di mutuo in valuta estera fino a una data da specificare con ulteriore legislazione supplementare ("la moratoria"). La moratoria non era applicabile agli enti locali e agli operatori economici interamente di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni, a condizione che tali persone giuridiche che avessero acquistato immobili all'asta si impegnassero a ristrutturarli entro due anni dalla loro entrata in possesso e a dare in locazione tali immobili - tramite una gara pubblica e in conformità con i decreti degli enti locali sulla locazione - ai lavoratori, allo scopo di promuovere la creazione di nuovi posti di lavoro attraverso l'offerta di alloggi sovvenzionati. La moratoria è entrata in vigore il 16 maggio 2014.

7. La moratoria è stata la prima misura legislativa esecutiva adottata dal Governo per mitigare gli effetti dannosi della crisi finanziaria del 2008 sui debitori che detenevano prestiti denominati in valuta estera ("prestiti in valuta estera") (cfr. anche Merkantil Car Zrt. c. Ungheria. n. 22853/15, 27 novembre 2018, §§ 7, 8, 90 e 108). L'obiettivo della moratoria era quello di garantire che - prima della risoluzione delle controversie di invalidità riguardanti i contratti di prestito in valuta estera - ampie parti della società non perdessero le loro case.

8. A causa dell'entrata in vigore della moratoria, al servizio degli ufficiali giudiziari era vietato adottare misure volte allo sfratto del debitore dalla proprietà residenziale.

9. Il 3 luglio 2014, poco dopo l'entrata in vigore della moratoria, la Kúria ha adottato la risoluzione di uniformità (jogegységi határozat) n. 2/2014.PJE, che ha fornito indicazioni per affrontare l'iniquità di alcune clausole contrattuali nei contratti di mutuo in valuta estera. A seguito di tale risoluzione, il 4 luglio 2014 il Parlamento ha adottato la legge n. XXXVIII del 2014 ("la legge sull'uniformità"), che ha applicato a livello legislativo i principi stabiliti nella risoluzione di uniformità della Kúria e ha consentito la risoluzione delle controversie relative ai contratti di prestito in valuta estera.

10. Il 5 ottobre 2014 il Parlamento ha inoltre approvato la legge n. XL del 2014 ("la legge sull'uniformità"), che ha stabilito le condizioni per la risoluzione dei contratti di prestito in valuta estera. L'articolo 17 della legge sull'uniformità e l'articolo 42(4) della legge sul regolamento stabilivano che le restrizioni imposte dalla moratoria sui procedimenti esecutivi condotti contro i debitori inadempienti sarebbero state revocate una volta che le istituzioni finanziarie avessero soddisfatto gli obblighi di regolamento, e l'articolo 42(4) della legge sul regolamento stabiliva che la moratoria sarebbe finita al più tardi il 31 dicembre 2016.
11. Secondo la copia dell'atto di proprietà allegata agli atti di causa, il 14 novembre 2014 il debitore (e non la ricorrente) era ancora il proprietario registrato dell'immobile residenziale.
12. Il ricorrente ha dichiarato di aver acquisito il possesso e la proprietà dell'immobile residenziale circa due anni dopo averla acquistata all'asta pubblica.

QUADRO GIURIDICO PERTINENTE

13. La decisione n. 3021/2017 (II.17.) AB della Corte costituzionale contiene il seguente passaggio:

"La prassi della Corte costituzionale è coerente nel senso che il diritto di proprietà di cui all'articolo XIII della Legge fondamentale protegge la proprietà già acquisita o, in casi eccezionali, le aspettative di proprietà."
14. La sezione 5:41 della legge n. V del 2013 sul codice civile prevede quanto segue:
Acquisizione della proprietà per decisione amministrativa o per asta ufficiale

"(1) Chiunque abbia acquisito una cosa [dolog] in buona fede con una delibera ufficiale o con un'asta ufficiale ne acquisisce la proprietà, indipendentemente da chi fosse il precedente proprietario.

(2) La proprietà per [acquisita da] una decisione amministrativa è considerata acquisita quando il possesso è trasferito nel caso di beni mobili, o quando l'acquisizione del titolo è registrata nel Registro Immobiliare nel caso di beni immobili, a meno che la[relativa] decisione amministrativa non disponga diversamente.
(3) In caso di asta ufficiale, l'acquirente dell'asta [árverési vev?] acquisisce la proprietà quando il possesso del bene mobile [in questione] è trasferito dal banditore, o quando [nel caso di beni immobili] l'acquisizione della proprietà è registrata nel registro immobiliare.

(4) Con l'acquisizione della proprietà di una cosa mediante una risoluzione ufficiale o un'asta ufficiale, i diritti del terzo su quella cosa cessano, tranne quando la parte che acquisisce la proprietà mediante una risoluzione ufficiale o un'asta ufficiale non ha agito in buona fede rispetto a tali diritti."

15. La sezione 303 della legge n. LIII del 1994 sull'esecuzione forzata giudiziaria prevede quanto segue:

"(1) Nei procedimenti esecutivi avviati nei confronti di un debitore o di un obbligato - di cui ai commi (2) e (3) (o avviati con il coinvolgimento diretto del titolare dell'ipoteca) - il servizio degli ufficiali giudiziari, ai sensi delle disposizioni di cui all'articolo 182/A, posticipa lo sgombero dell'immobile residenziale in questione dal giorno successivo a quello in cui ha ricevuto un'ordinanza di sfratto con assistenza di polizia o una richiesta dell'acquirente dell'asta (cioè di chi prende in consegna l'immobile) ai sensi dell'articolo 154/A, paragrafo 10, per un periodo che dura dalla data di scadenza della moratoria di sfratto di cui al presente articolo fino alla data indicata nella legge separata per la risoluzione della situazione dei debitori di prestiti in valuta estera.
(10) Le disposizioni del presente articolo non si applicano nel caso in cui l'acquirente all'asta o la persona che rileva la proprietà residenziale sia un [ente] governativo locale o un operatore economico di proprietà, congiuntamente o separatamente, interamente dello Stato o del governo locale, e si impegna per iscritto

a) a ristrutturare o a far ristrutturare l'immobile residenziale entro due anni dalla sua presa di possesso,
b) a pubblicare, entro due anni dalla sua presa di possesso, un bando di gara per l'assegnazione di un contratto di locazione, alle condizioni specificate nel rispettivo decreto del governo locale sulla locazione di immobili residenziali, a potenziali lavoratori, al fine di creare nuovi posti di lavoro, mantenere i posti di lavoro esistenti e consentire alla popolazione locale [di rimanere nelle loro rispettive zone] ..."
16. La sezione 42 (4) della legge n. XL del 2014 sulla risoluzione di alcune questioni relative alla legge n. XXXVIII del 2014 sulla risoluzione di uniformità della Kúria sui contratti di credito al consumo stipulati da istituti finanziari e sulle norme di regolamento statutario e alcune altre disposizioni prevede quanto segue:
"L'esecuzione di sfratto da immobili residenziali indicati nell'articolo 303 della legge sull'esecuzione - rispetto all'articolo 182/A della legge sull'esecuzione - può essere ripresa al più tardi dopo il 31 dicembre 2016."
LA LEGGE
PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
17. Il ricorrente lamentava che il suo diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni era stato violato dall'entrata in vigore della moratoria, che gli aveva impedito per un tempo imprecisato di prendere possesso dei suoi beni. A suo parere, questo stato di cose aveva comportato una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, che recitava come segue:

"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nel pubblico interesse e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Le disposizioni precedenti non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di applicare le leggi che ritenga necessarie per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità all'interesse generale o per assicurare il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni."

Le osservazioni delle parti
18. Il ricorrente sosteneva che il ritardo di due anni nel prendere possesso della proprietà residenziale che aveva acquistato all'asta aveva costituito una violazione del suo diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Egli lamentava inoltre che la moratoria non aveva stipulato alcuna misura temporanea che prevedesse la possibilità per gli offerenti all'asta di ritirare le loro offerte alla luce delle restrizioni ex post imposte al processo di esecuzione dalla moratoria; Egli sosteneva inoltre che il provvedimento impugnato non soddisfaceva i requisiti di legittimità a causa dell'incertezza creata dall'iniziale emanazione della Moratoria, in quanto originariamente non era stata specificata la durata del divieto di sfratto, essendo stata lasciata la sua durata in funzione dell'emanazione di ulteriori norme nel contesto della crisi derivante dalla diffusa insolvenza dei prestiti in valuta estera ("la crisi dei prestiti in valuta estera"). Infine, egli sosteneva che la misura impugnata non aveva servito l'interesse pubblico poiché le questioni derivanti dai contratti di prestito in valuta estera avevano colpito solo una piccola parte della società.

19. Il governo non era d'accordo. Non hanno contestato che acquisendo lo status di "acquirente all'asta" il ricorrente aveva avuto un bene in aspettativa (váromány) che era riconosciuto dal diritto ungherese. Tuttavia, a loro avviso, ciò non era sufficiente a far scattare l'applicazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, in quanto il titolo di proprietà del ricorrente non era registrato nel registro fondiario; piuttosto, egli aveva semplicemente il titolo di "acquirente all'asta", che di per sé non costituiva proprietà secondo il diritto ungherese. Pertanto, l'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 non era applicabile. In ogni caso, la promulgazione della moratoria aveva servito uno scopo legittimo: in primo luogo, era stata una delle prime misure volte a combattere gli effetti della crisi dei prestiti in valuta estera; in secondo luogo, il suo obiettivo era la protezione dell'interesse pubblico - vale a dire la protezione di un ampio gruppo di consumatori attraverso la garanzia che essi non avrebbero subito una perdita irreversibile della proprietà di beni mobili e immobili a causa (i) della situazione di incertezza sulla legittimità dei contratti di prestito in valuta estera e (ii) il mantenimento temporaneo dello status quo in attesa dell'emanazione di disposizioni di legge volte a rimediare alle clausole contrattuali abusive.

Ammissibilità
20. Per accertare se il reclamo è compatibile ratione materiae con le disposizioni della Convenzione e dei suoi Protocolli, la Corte deve innanzitutto determinare se il ricorrente aveva un "possesso" ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 e se tale articolo è di conseguenza applicabile al caso di specie.

21. Il governo ha sostenuto che al termine dell'asta, la ricorrente aveva semplicemente acquisito lo status giuridico di "acquirente d'asta", che - ai sensi dell'articolo 5:41 (3) della legge n. V del 2013 sul codice civile - non ha portato automaticamente alla registrazione del titolo di proprietà nel registro fondiario (che è necessario per il trasferimento legale della proprietà). Il governo ha inoltre sostenuto che, secondo l'atto di proprietà del 14 novembre 2014, il ricorrente non era il proprietario dell'immobile e che pertanto non aveva avuto alcun titolo di proprietà legalmente riconosciuto in relazione all'immobile in questione al momento della presentazione della domanda alla Corte.

22. Il ricorrente ha contestato l'argomento del governo e ha sostenuto che, sebbene non fosse il proprietario dell'immobile residenziale secondo il catasto, l'immobile residenziale costituiva comunque parte del suo patrimonio.
23. La Corte ribadisce che il concetto di "beni" nel primo paragrafo dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 ha un significato autonomo che non è limitato alla proprietà di beni materiali ed è indipendente dalla classificazione formale nel diritto interno. Allo stesso modo dei beni materiali, anche alcuni altri diritti e interessi che costituiscono il patrimonio possono essere considerati come "diritti di proprietà", e quindi come "beni" ai fini di questa disposizione. In ogni caso la questione che deve essere esaminata è se le circostanze del caso, considerate nel loro insieme, hanno conferito al richiedente la titolarità di un interesse sostanziale protetto dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (vedi Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, CEDU 1999-II; Beyeler c. Italia [GC], no. 33202/96, § 100, CEDU 2000-I; e Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], no. 31443/96, § 129, CEDU 2004-V).

24. Sebbene l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 si applichi solo ai beni esistenti di una persona e non crei un diritto ad acquisire la proprietà (si veda Stummer c. Austria [GC], n. 37452/02, § 82, CEDU 2011), in alcune circostanze una "legittima aspettativa" di ottenere un bene può anche godere della protezione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda, tra le molte autorità, Anheuser-Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], no. 73049/01, § 65, CEDU 2007-I). Pertanto, quando un interesse proprietario ha la natura di un credito, si può ritenere che la persona che lo detiene abbia una "legittima aspettativa" se esiste una base sufficiente per tale interesse nel diritto nazionale - ad esempio, se esiste una giurisprudenza consolidata dei tribunali nazionali che ne conferma l'esistenza. Tuttavia, non si può dire che sorga un "legittimo affidamento" quando vi è una controversia sulla corretta interpretazione e applicazione del diritto interno e le richieste del richiedente sono successivamente respinte dai giudici nazionali (cfr. Kopecký c. Slovacchia [GC], n. 44912/98, § 50, CEDU 2004-IX).

25. Una "legittima aspettativa" deve avere una natura più concreta di una semplice speranza ed essere basata su una disposizione giuridica o su un atto giuridico, come una decisione giudiziaria. La speranza che un diritto di proprietà da tempo estinto possa essere fatto rivivere non può essere considerato un "possesso"; né può esserlo un diritto condizionato che è decaduto a causa del mancato adempimento della condizione (si veda Gratzinger e Gratzingerova c. Repubblica Ceca (dec.) [GC], no. 39794/98, §§ 69 e 73, CEDU 2002-VII).

26. Nelle cause riguardanti l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la questione che deve essere esaminata è normalmente se le circostanze del caso, considerate nel loro insieme, hanno conferito al richiedente la titolarità di un interesse sostanziale protetto da tale disposizione (si vedano i casi sopra citati di Iatridis, § 54, e Beyeler, § 100).

27. Nel caso di specie, la Corte osserva che il 18 marzo 2014 il ricorrente ha acquisito lo status giuridico di acquirente all'asta rispetto alla proprietà residenziale in questione. Il Governo non ha contestato che, acquisendo lo status di acquirente all'asta, la ricorrente aveva almeno un bene in aspettativa, riconosciuto dal diritto ungherese. A tal proposito, la Corte osserva che la Corte costituzionale, nella decisione n. 3021/2017. (II. 17.) AB, ha riconosciuto che il diritto di proprietà può estendersi a un bene in aspettativa (si veda il precedente paragrafo 13).

28. La Corte osserva inoltre che non era in discussione tra le parti che - nonostante il fatto che il titolo di proprietà del ricorrente sull'immobile residenziale non fosse iscritto nel registro fondiario e non potesse prenderne possesso - egli nutriva un legittimo affidamento che tale procedura sarebbe stata effettuata a seguito del pagamento del prezzo di acquisto entro i confini del successivo procedimento esecutivo.

29. Secondo la Corte, questi elementi dimostrano che il ricorrente aveva almeno una legittima aspettativa di acquisire la proprietà legale (cioè riconosciuta dal diritto ungherese) dell'immobile residenziale - anche se ciò è stato impedito per un periodo dalla legislazione successiva - dal momento in cui si è aggiudicato l'asta. Questa legittima aspettativa costituisce pertanto un "possesso" ai fini dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Pine Valley Developments Ltd e altri c. Irlanda, 29 novembre 1991, § 51, serie A n. 222; Asito c. Moldova, no. 40663/98, § 61, 8 novembre 2005). La Corte osserva inoltre che in questo caso non c'è stata né un'espropriazione di fatto né un trasferimento di proprietà, e il richiedente ha mantenuto in ogni momento la possibilità di prendere possesso della proprietà una volta che la moratoria è stata revocata. Poiché l'attuazione delle misure in questione significava che i precedenti proprietari continuavano a possedere (cioè ad occupare) la proprietà, le misure equivalevano senza dubbio ad un controllo dell'uso della proprietà. Di conseguenza, il secondo paragrafo dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è applicabile.
30. La Corte osserva inoltre che questo reclamo non è manifestamente infondato né inammissibile per altri motivi elencati all'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ricevibile.

Merito
Principi generali
31. Il primo e più importante requisito dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è che ogni interferenza di un'autorità pubblica nel pacifico godimento dei beni deve essere legittima: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione dei beni solo "alle condizioni previste dalla legge", e il secondo paragrafo riconosce agli Stati il diritto di controllare l'uso della proprietà facendo rispettare "le leggi". Inoltre, lo stato di diritto, uno dei principi fondamentali di una società democratica, è insito in tutti gli articoli della Convenzione. Il principio di legalità presuppone anche che le disposizioni applicabili del diritto interno siano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione (si veda Broniowski, sopra citata, § 147), al fine di evitare ogni rischio di arbitrarietà e consentire agli individui di prevedere le conseguenze delle loro azioni (si veda Žaja c. Croazia, no. 37462/09, § 103, 4 ottobre 2016).

32. Qualsiasi interferenza con il godimento di un diritto della Convenzione deve perseguire uno scopo legittimo. Lo stesso principio del "giusto equilibrio" insito nell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 presuppone l'esistenza di un interesse generale della collettività. Inoltre, occorre ribadire che le varie norme incorporate nell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 non sono distinte, nel senso di essere slegate, e che la seconda e la terza norma riguardano solo casi particolari di interferenza con il diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà. Uno degli effetti di ciò è che l'esistenza dell'"interesse pubblico" (richiesto dalla seconda frase) o dell'"interesse generale" di cui al secondo paragrafo sono corollari del principio enunciato nella prima frase, così che un'ingerenza nell'esercizio del diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà ai sensi della prima frase dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 deve anche perseguire uno scopo di interesse pubblico (si veda Ališi? e altri c. Bosnia-Erzegovina, Croazia, Serbia, Slovenia ed ex Repubblica jugoslava di Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, § 105, CEDU 2014).

33. A causa della conoscenza diretta della loro società e dei suoi bisogni, le autorità nazionali sono in linea di principio in una posizione migliore rispetto al giudice internazionale per apprezzare ciò che è "nell'interesse pubblico". Nel sistema di protezione istituito dalla Convenzione, spetta dunque alle autorità nazionali effettuare la valutazione iniziale circa l'esistenza di un problema di interesse pubblico che giustifichi l'applicazione di misure nell'ambito dell'esercizio del diritto di proprietà. Poiché il margine di apprezzamento a disposizione del legislatore nell'attuazione delle politiche sociali ed economiche è ampio, la Corte rispetterà il giudizio del legislatore su ciò che è di interesse pubblico, a meno che tale giudizio non sia manifestamente privo di ragionevole fondamento (si veda Béláné Nagy c. Ungheria [GC], no. 53080/13, § 113, 13 dicembre 2016).

34. Inoltre, un'ingerenza, in particolare quella che cade sotto il secondo paragrafo dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, deve trovare un "giusto equilibrio" tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale e quelle della protezione dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo. La preoccupazione di raggiungere questo equilibrio si riflette nella struttura dell'articolo 1 nel suo complesso, e quindi anche nel suo secondo paragrafo. Ci deve essere un ragionevole rapporto di proporzionalità tra i mezzi impiegati e lo scopo perseguito. Nel determinare se questo requisito è soddisfatto, la Corte riconosce che lo Stato gode di un ampio margine di apprezzamento sia per quanto riguarda la scelta dei mezzi di esecuzione sia per verificare se le conseguenze dell'esecuzione sono giustificate dall'interesse generale al fine di raggiungere l'oggetto della legge in questione. In ambiti come quello degli alloggi, che svolgono un ruolo centrale nelle politiche economiche e di benessere delle società moderne, la Corte rispetterà il giudizio del legislatore su ciò che è nell'interesse generale, a meno che tale giudizio non sia manifestamente privo di ragionevole fondamento (si veda Immobiliare Saffi c. Italia [GC], no. 22774/93, § 49, CEDU 1999-V).
35. In questo contesto, la Corte deve sottolineare il suo ruolo fondamentalmente sussidiario. Le parti contraenti, conformemente al principio di sussidiarietà, hanno la responsabilità primaria di garantire i diritti e le libertà definiti nella Convenzione e nei suoi protocolli, e nel fare ciò godono di un margine di apprezzamento, soggetto alla giurisdizione di controllo della Corte. Le autorità nazionali hanno una legittimazione democratica diretta e sono, come la Corte ha affermato in molte occasioni, in linea di principio meglio posizionate di un tribunale internazionale per valutare le esigenze e le condizioni locali. In questioni di politica generale, sulle quali le opinioni all'interno di una società democratica possono ragionevolmente differire ampiamente, si dovrebbe dare particolare peso al ruolo del policy-maker nazionale (si veda Zelenchuk e Tsytsyura c. Ucraina, nn. 846/16 e 1075/16, § 111, 22 maggio 2018).

36. Nel valutare il rispetto dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la Corte deve effettuare un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in gioco, tenendo presente che la Convenzione è intesa a salvaguardare diritti "concreti ed effettivi". Essa deve guardare dietro le apparenze e indagare la realtà della situazione denunciata. Questa valutazione può riguardare non solo le condizioni di risarcimento pertinenti - se la situazione è simile alla presa di proprietà - ma anche il comportamento delle parti, compresi i mezzi impiegati dallo Stato e la loro attuazione. A questo proposito, va sottolineato che l'incertezza - sia essa legislativa, amministrativa o derivante da pratiche applicate dalle autorità - è un fattore da prendere in considerazione per valutare il comportamento dello Stato. Infatti, quando è in gioco una questione di interesse generale, spetta alle autorità pubbliche agire in tempo utile e in modo adeguato e coerente (si veda Broniowski, sopra citata, § 151).

Applicazione dei principi di cui sopra nel caso di specie
(a) Se c'è stata un'interferenza

37. La Corte osserva che non era in discussione tra le parti che il ricorrente era soggetto al "controllo dell'uso" del suo possesso, ai sensi dell'articolo 1, secondo comma, del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, in virtù della legislazione contestata. La Corte non vede alcuna ragione per ritenere il contrario.

38. Tuttavia, tale ingerenza deve rispettare il principio di legalità, perseguire uno scopo legittimo ed essere ragionevolmente proporzionata allo scopo perseguito (si veda Fábián c. Ungheria [GC], n. 78117/13, § 65, 5 settembre 2017, e Béláné Nagy, sopra citata, §§ 112-15).

(b) Legalità

39. La Corte osserva che la moratoria aveva una base nel diritto interno che non è mai stata dichiarata incostituzionale (contrasto Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC], no. 35014/97, § 172, CEDU 2006-VIII).

40. La Corte prende atto dell'argomento del ricorrente secondo cui l'incertezza è stata creata dalla promulgazione iniziale della moratoria, vale a dire che originariamente non era stato fissato alcun termine per la fine della moratoria e che la sua durata dipendeva dalla promulgazione di ulteriori leggi in materia di crisi dei prestiti in valuta estera. Tuttavia, essa ritiene che questo argomento sia rilevante per determinare se le autorità abbiano trovato un giusto equilibrio tra gli interessi in gioco (si veda Zelenchuk e Tsytsyura, sopra citata, § 106).

41. Pertanto, essa ritiene che le restrizioni imposte all'esercizio dei diritti del ricorrente abbiano rispettato il requisito di "legalità" insito nell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.

(c) Interesse pubblico

42. La ricorrente ha sostenuto che la moratoria non aveva servito l'interesse pubblico, in quanto le questioni derivanti dai contratti di prestito in valuta estera avevano interessato solo una piccola parte della società.

43. Il Governo sosteneva che la moratoria aveva costituito la prima misura di una catena di misure legislative volte a combattere gli effetti della crisi dei prestiti in valuta estera e in particolare che il suo scopo era stato quello di proteggere l'interesse pubblico. Secondo il governo, era stato necessario mantenere una moratoria sugli sfratti, da un lato per garantire che i membri di ampi settori della società non perdessero le loro case, e dall'altro per evitare che i consumatori subissero danni irreversibili in attesa dell'adozione di misure legislative che regolassero i contratti di prestito in valuta estera regolati da clausole contrattuali inique.
44. La Corte ha valutato gli obiettivi (citati dal governo) della misura impugnata - in particolare quello di proteggere l'interesse pubblico assicurando che ampi settori della società non diventino improvvisamente dei senzatetto, e anche la volontà di ritardare gli sfratti fino all'adozione di una legislazione pendente volta a regolare i contratti di prestito in valuta estera.

45. Sebbene il ricorrente abbia contestato la legittimità di tale obiettivo, basandosi sull'argomento che solo una parte della società era stata colpita dalle questioni derivanti dagli accordi di prestito in valuta estera, la Corte - ritenendo naturale che il margine di apprezzamento a disposizione del legislatore nell'attuazione delle politiche sociali ed economiche debba essere ampio - rispetterà il giudizio del legislatore su ciò che è "nell'interesse pubblico", a meno che tale giudizio sia manifestamente privo di ragionevole fondamento (si veda Ex Re di Grecia e altri c. Grecia [GC], n. 25701/94, § 87, CEDU 2000-XII; James e altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 46, serie A n. 98; e Beyeler, già citato, § 112). La Corte ritiene pertanto che gli obiettivi della moratoria, come citato dal governo, non si può dire che siano "manifestamente senza ragionevole fondamento".

(d) Proporzionalità

46. La ricorrente ha sostenuto che l'equilibrio tra la protezione dei diritti della ricorrente e l'interesse generale era stato turbato da (a) l'incertezza legislativa risultante da (i) l'emanazione della moratoria (i cui termini affermavano che sarebbe rimasta in vigore fino all'emanazione di una legge separata che disciplinasse il regolamento dei prestiti in valuta estera), e (ii) la mancanza di qualsiasi norma transitoria che consentisse agli offerenti dell'asta di revocare le rispettive offerte alla luce della moratoria, e (b) l'assenza di un regime di compensazione; Inoltre, il ricorrente sosteneva che tali fattori gli avevano imposto un onere individuale eccessivo (si veda il precedente paragrafo 18).

47. Il Governo non era d'accordo, sostenendo che la durata della moratoria non era stata incerta, dato che la legislazione relativa al regolamento dei prestiti in valuta estera era stata rapidamente adottata dopo l'entrata in vigore della moratoria e che queste ulteriori misure legislative avevano previsto termini rigorosi per il regolamento di tali prestiti.

48. La Corte ha precedentemente affermato che, in linea di principio, un sistema che prevede la sospensione temporanea o lo scaglionamento dell'esecuzione dei provvedimenti giudiziari seguito dalla reintegrazione di un locatore nella sua proprietà non è di per sé criticabile, tenuto conto in particolare del margine di apprezzamento consentito dall'articolo 1, secondo comma, del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda Immobiliare Saffi, sopra citata, § 54); essa ritiene che tale approccio sia applicabile anche nel caso di specie.

49. La Corte osserva che la misura impugnata è stata attuata in mezzo alla crisi dei prestiti in valuta estera in Ungheria (si veda il paragrafo 7 sopra). Osserva inoltre che lo Stato ha dovuto attuare una misura d'emergenza al fine di evitare che un gran numero di persone rimanesse senza casa a causa delle procedure esecutive in corso derivanti dalla diffusa inadempienza dei prestiti in valuta estera (si veda il paragrafo 7).

50. È altresì importante notare che la moratoria non ha privato il ricorrente della sua legittima aspettativa di acquisire la proprietà che aveva acquistato durante il processo d'asta; piuttosto, ha solo ritardato la sua presa di possesso di tale proprietà (si vedano i paragrafi 8 e 12 sopra).

51. È vero che al momento dell'entrata in vigore della moratoria, il 16 maggio 2014, non era stata specificata alcuna data di fine, essendo stato stabilito che essa sarebbe rimasta in vigore fino all'adozione di un'ulteriore normativa relativa al regolamento dei prestiti in valuta estera (cfr. paragrafo 6 supra). Tuttavia, poco dopo la sua entrata in vigore, queste ulteriori misure legislative sono state effettivamente adottate - vale a dire la legge sull'uniformità e la legge sul regolamento (cfr. paragrafo 9 sopra).
52. La Settlement Act, entrata in vigore il 6 ottobre 2014, ha stabilito termini rigorosi per il regolamento dei contratti di mutuo in valuta estera al fine di garantire la rapida risoluzione delle questioni in sospeso relative ai regolamenti; inoltre, ha stabilito all'articolo 42(2) che le norme di emergenza sotto forma di moratoria non sarebbero state applicabili a partire dal 31 dicembre 2016 (cfr. paragrafo 10 supra). Così, la situazione giuridica incerta è cessata il 6 ottobre 2014, quando la legge sulla transazione è entrata in vigore, permettendo al ricorrente di contare su un termine finale per la sua presa di possesso della proprietà che aveva acquistato all'asta. Pertanto, dal 6 ottobre 2014 in poi, non si può dire che vi fosse alcuna incertezza giuridica su quando la moratoria sarebbe terminata.

53. L'interferenza della moratoria con il diritto del ricorrente al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni era quindi limitata, dal punto di vista temporale; inoltre, il periodo di incertezza - alla luce della rapida attuazione delle misure legislative pertinenti (cfr. paragrafo 9 supra) - è durato in totale meno di sette mesi (cfr. paragrafo 9 supra), dopo di che il ricorrente era consapevole che la moratoria sarebbe finita al più tardi il 31 dicembre 2016. Inoltre, il ricorrente alla fine ha ottenuto il possesso della proprietà (cfr. paragrafo 12 supra); pertanto, la Corte non ritiene che la moratoria abbia causato al ricorrente un onere individuale eccessivo.

54. Date queste circostanze, la Corte ritiene che non fosse sproporzionato congelare l'esecuzione degli sfratti rispetto a una proprietà che era in esecuzione a causa di un'inadempienza su un prestito in valuta estera.

55. Di conseguenza, non vi è stata alcuna violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 14 DELLA CONVENZIONE, IN COMBINATO DISPOSTO CON L'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
56. La ricorrente lamentava che l'articolo 14 della Convenzione, letto in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, era stato violato dalla legislazione in questione, nella misura in cui essa aveva protetto gli operatori economici interamente di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni, a scapito dei privati, poiché le stesse restrizioni previste dalla moratoria non si erano applicate ai primi.

57. L'articolo 14 della Convenzione prevede quanto segue:

"Il godimento dei diritti e delle libertà enunciati nella [Convenzione] deve essere assicurato senza alcuna discriminazione per ragioni di sesso, razza, colore, lingua, religione, opinione politica o di altro genere, origine nazionale o sociale, associazione a una minoranza nazionale, proprietà, nascita o altra condizione."

Ammissibilità
58. La Corte osserva che questo reclamo non è manifestamente infondato né inammissibile per altri motivi elencati all'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Deve pertanto essere dichiarato ricevibile.

Merito
Le osservazioni delle parti
59.Il ricorrente ha sostenuto di essersi trovato in una situazione paragonabile a quella delle persone giuridiche interamente possedute dallo Stato o dai comuni perché, ipoteticamente, avrebbe anche potuto assumere obblighi simili a quelli degli operatori economici di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni per quanto riguarda la promozione della creazione di forza lavoro attraverso l'offerta di alloggi pubblici. Egli sosteneva che l'esclusione dall'ambito di applicazione della moratoria degli operatori economici interamente di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni aveva quindi comportato una discriminazione nei confronti dei privati.
60. Il governo ha sostenuto che il trattamento differenziato riservato agli operatori economici interamente di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni era giustificato in considerazione della funzione svolta nell'interesse pubblico da tali entità, ossia quella di promuovere la creazione di posti di lavoro offrendo alloggi a prezzi ridotti e preservando così le comunità rurali. Inoltre, il governo ha sostenuto che, date le funzioni pubbliche che svolgevano, i suddetti operatori economici non si erano trovati in una situazione paragonabile a quella dei privati.

La valutazione della Corte
61. I principi pertinenti sono stati recentemente stabiliti nella causa Fábián, già citata, §§ 112-115.

62. Nel caso di specie, la Corte è convinta che la denuncia del ricorrente relativa ai diritti di proprietà rientri chiaramente nell'ambito dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 e che l'articolo 14 sia quindi applicabile. In effetti, ciò non era in discussione tra le parti.

63. La Corte verificherà poi se la ricorrente, in quanto persona privata e al tempo stesso acquirente all'asta rientrante nell'ambito di applicazione della moratoria, si trovasse in una situazione analoga o pertinentemente simile a quella degli operatori economici interamente di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni.

64. La Corte ribadisce innanzitutto che una differenza di trattamento può sollevare un problema dal punto di vista del divieto di discriminazione, come previsto dall'articolo 14 della Convenzione, solo se le persone sottoposte a un trattamento diverso si trovano in una situazione pertinentemente simile, tenuto conto degli elementi che caratterizzano la loro situazione nel contesto particolare. La Corte osserva che gli elementi che caratterizzano situazioni diverse, e che determinano la loro comparabilità, devono essere valutati alla luce dell'oggetto e dello scopo della misura che opera la distinzione in questione (si veda Fábián, sopra citata, § 121).

65. La Corte ha riconosciuto che settori come quello degli alloggi possono spesso richiedere una qualche forma di regolamentazione da parte dello Stato. Le decisioni se (ed eventualmente quando) possa essere completamente lasciato al gioco delle forze del libero mercato o se debba essere soggetto al controllo dello Stato - così come la scelta delle misure per garantire le esigenze abitative della comunità e dei tempi per la loro attuazione - comportano necessariamente la considerazione di complesse questioni sociali, economiche e politiche. Riconoscendo che il margine di apprezzamento a disposizione di un legislatore nell'attuazione delle politiche sociali ed economiche dovrebbe essere ampio, la Corte ha dichiarato che rispetterà il giudizio di un legislatore su ciò che è nell'interesse "pubblico" o "generale" a meno che tale giudizio sia manifestamente privo di ragionevole fondamento (si veda Bittó e altri c. Slovacchia, n. 30255/09, § 96, 28 gennaio 2014).

66. In secondo luogo, per ragioni istituzionali e funzionali, i servizi forniti dal settore pubblico rispetto a quelli forniti dal settore privato possono tipicamente essere soggetti a sostanziali differenze giuridiche e fattuali, non da ultimo nei settori che riguardano l'esercizio del potere sovrano dello Stato e la fornitura di servizi pubblici essenziali. Le persone giuridiche interamente possedute dallo Stato o dai comuni, a differenza dei privati, possono essere impegnate nell'esercizio del potere sovrano dello Stato, e le loro funzioni possono quindi essere di natura diversa, anche se la misura in cui ciò avviene può dipendere dalle funzioni specifiche che esse devono svolgere (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Fábián, già citato, § 122).

67. In terzo luogo, in conseguenza di quanto precede, non si può presumere che le condizioni relative all'offerta di alloggi sovvenzionati siano simili per gli enti pubblici e parapubblici come per i privati, né si può quindi presumere che essi si trovino in situazioni rilevanti simili al riguardo (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Fábián, sopra citato, § 122).

68. Passando alle circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte osserva che la disposizione impugnata della moratoria sugli sfratti (si vedano i paragrafi 5 e 14 supra) è stata adottata al fine di promuovere la creazione di forza lavoro offrendo alloggi sovvenzionati ai futuri lavoratori al fine di preservare le comunità rurali permettendo alle persone di continuare a vivere in loco (si vedano i paragrafi 6 e 15 supra). La disposizione impugnata prevedeva che la moratoria non si applicasse agli operatori economici posseduti interamente dallo Stato o dai comuni, a condizione che tali operatori economici si impegnassero per iscritto (i) a ristrutturare o a far ristrutturare l'immobile residenziale in questione entro due anni dalla presa di possesso da parte dell'operatore economico, e (ii) ad indire una gara pubblica, entro due anni dalla presa di possesso, per l'assegnazione di un contratto di locazione alle condizioni specificate nel rispettivo decreto governativo locale sulla locazione (si veda il paragrafo 15 supra).
69. La Corte osserva che la materia interessata nel presente caso è quella degli alloggi, dove la scelta delle misure da attuare è un settore in cui lo Stato ha un ampio margine di discrezionalità (si veda Bittó, sopra citato, § 96). La Corte osserva inoltre che la disposizione impugnata stabilisce condizioni - come l'obbligo di indire una gara d'appalto per la locazione di immobili residenziali ristrutturati e di emanare (o rispettare i decreti governativi locali esistenti in materia di locazione (si veda il precedente paragrafo 15) - che, in generale, sono condizioni tipicamente osservate dagli operatori economici del settore pubblico e solitamente applicate a tali soggetti, piuttosto che a quelli privati.

70. Tenendo conto di tutti questi aspetti del caso di specie, la Corte ritiene che il ricorrente non abbia dimostrato che egli, in quanto privato, si trovava in una situazione pertinentemente simile a quella degli operatori economici interamente di proprietà dello Stato o dei comuni.

71. Ne consegue che non vi è stata alcuna discriminazione e, pertanto, nessuna violazione dell'articolo 14, in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Fábián, già citato, §§ 133-34).

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ

Dichiara il ricorso ammissibile;
Dichiara che non vi è stata alcuna violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
Dichiara che non vi è stata alcuna violazione dell'articolo 14 della Convenzione in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 17 dicembre 2020, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.

Abel Campos Ksenija Turkovi?
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è venerdì 10/09/2021.