CASO: CASE OF MIFSUD AND OTHERS v. MALTA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MIFSUD AND OTHERS v. MALTA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 38770/17
STATO: Malta
DATA: 13/10/2020
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

THIRD SECTION
CASE OF MIFSUD AND OTHERS v. MALTA
(Application no. 38770/17)




JUDGMENT
(Merits)

Art 1 P1 • Peaceful enjoyment of possessions • De facto expropriation • No compensation received in over forty years • Disproportionate burden
Art 1 P1 • Deprivation of property • No reasonable foundation for domestic court findings that expropriation in the public interest • Principle of good governance in the context of property rights • Manifestly unreasonable sums of compensation • Excessive burden

STRASBOURG
13 October 2020
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Mifsud and Others v. Malta,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Paul Lemmens, President,
Alena Polá?ková,
María Elósegui,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerström,
Lorraine Schembri Orland,
Ana Maria Guerra Martins, judges,
and Olga Chernishova, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having regard to:
the application (no. 38770/17) against the Republic of Malta lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by twenty-one Maltese nationals, three British nationals and five Australian nationals (see Annex for details) (“the applicants”), on 23 May 2017;
the decision to give notice to the Maltese Government (“the Government”) of the complaints concerning Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
the choice of the Government of the United Kingdom not to make use of their right to intervene in the proceedings (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention).
the parties’ observations;
Having deliberated in private on 22 September 2020,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
INTRODUCTION
1. The case concerns the taking and, in connection with certain parts of the land, the eventual expropriation of the applicants’ land, which was originally used for a gas collection plant that was later dismantled, and in respect of which issues have arisen in relation to the public interest and the compensation. It raises various complaints under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
THE FACTS
2. The applicants’ details are set out in the Annex. The applicants were represented by Dr T. Abela, Dr I. Refalo, Dr S. Grech and Dr M. Refalo, lawyers practising in Valletta.
3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Dr P. Grech, Attorney General.
4. The facts of the case, as submitted by the parties, may be summarised as follows.
II. BACKGROUND TO THE CASE
5. The applicants are the owners of land in Qajjenza, Birzebbu?ia, Malta.
6. By means of a Presidential Declaration of 16 August 1978, published in the Government Gazette on 25 August 1978, the Government expropriated a parcel of land measuring 5,349 sq.m. owned by the applicants (or their predecessors) (hereinafter ‘Land A’). This expropriation was intended for the site to serve as an extension of the LPG filling plant or gas bottling plant (hereinafter referred to as ‘the plant’) operated by Enemalta Corporation - a Government owned entity having a monopoly over the energy provision service in Malta - whose successor is now Enemalta plc.
7. By means of another Presidential Declaration of 16 May 1984, published in the Government Gazette of 25 of May 1984, the Government expropriated another parcel of land, owned by the applicants (or their predecessors), measuring 3,985 sq.m. (hereinafter ‘Land B’) adjacent to Land A. This land was intended to provide a buffer zone for the plant.
8. The Government offered 713.75 Maltese lira (MTL) for Land A and MTL 610 for Land B, by way of compensation. The applicants did not accept this amount and therefore proceedings were initiated before the Land Arbitration Board (LAB) for it to determine the compensation due.
9. By means of two judgments of 22 January 1990 the LAB established the compensation for Land A at MTL 952 (approximately 2,218 euros (EUR)) and for Land B at MTL 800 (approximately EUR 1,863) both being considered as agricultural land. The LAB ordered that the final deeds of transfer be concluded.
10. Nevertheless, while such judgments became final, no such deed was ever concluded and the Government never acquired the land or paid the price determined by the LAB, despite the authorities having started to use the land since its de facto taking. Under Maltese law, at the time, until the price established is actually paid and the deed of transfer formally published, the expropriation is not considered to have been finalised.
11. Eventually, the Government announced that the plant in Qajjenza would be phased out and another plant set up in a completely different zone. Given that the applicants’ land had not been formally transferred to the Government and that the expropriation had not been concluded, and in the light of Government’s intention to dismantle the plant in Qajjenza, the applicants took the view that there was no longer any public purpose to be served by the 1978 and 1984 expropriations.
12. Accordingly, on 1 December 2006 the applicants wrote to the Commissioner of Land, through their lawyer, requesting the land to be returned to them. This letter having remained unanswered, the applicants filed a judicial letter on 27 November 2008 requesting compensation for the occupation of their property during all those years, as well as the return of the property.
13. As no action was taken in this regard, another letter was sent on 28 July 2009 reiterating the same requests. No reply ensued and no compensation was paid.
14. Following a notification to the applicants to this effect, received on 18 April 2012, by means of a Presidential Declaration published in the Government Gazette of 6 June 2012, the Government expropriated two small parcels of the applicants’ land in Qajjenza, namely a parcel measuring 509 sq.m., and a parcel measuring 139 sq.m., both of which formed part of the larger tract of land (B) which was the subject of the original expropriations. The taking was made in pursuance of Section 22 (8) of the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance, Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta, following the 2002 amendments (see Relevant domestic law), in the light of which ownership of the land was transferred to the State on the day of the declaration. According to the facts set out in the domestic judgments the smaller of those parcels was still being used as a sub-station which served residential and commercial buildings in the area, and on the part measuring 509 sq.m. there was some kind of installation of the plant (kien hemm xi installazzjoni tal-impjant tal-Enemalta).
15. When “re-expropriating” these two parcels of land in 2012, the Government offered EUR 205 for the parcel measuring 509 sq.m., and EUR 58.50 for the parcel measuring 139 sq.m. These values were based on the figures given in 1990 by the LAB which in turn had based itself on the value of the land at the time of the 1978 and 1984 expropriations respectively. According to the Government other considerations also came into play.
16. The applicants did not accept these amounts by way of compensation. In particular they considered that the two small parcels taken in 2012 had greatly reduced the value of the remaining land given that those parcels cut right across the applicants’ land so that a wedge was taken out of its middle, leaving smaller, irregular, parcels on either side of the expropriated parcels. Thus, the one large and continuous parcel of land owned by the applicants was disrupted. Therefore, in the applicants’ view, it was as though the entire area had been de facto expropriated.
17. According to the applicants architect’s (C.C.) valuations commissioned by the applicants in 2009, Land A was valued at EUR 4,400,000 (this land was valued as being within the development scheme and as used for industrial purposes) whereas Land B was valued at EUR 970,000 (this land was valued as being partly – a small portion – within the development zone); the loss of rent covering the period from the date of taking to August 2009 was calculated as amounting to EUR 2,140,000 for Land A and EUR 437,000 for Land B.
18. The plant stopped being in operation in July 2012 and was officially decommissioned in 2013 and dismantled in September 2013.
IV. CONSTITUTIONAL REDRESS PROCEEDINGS
I. First-instance
19. The applicants filed constitutional redress proceedings on 20 March 2013 asking the court to declare that their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their property had been violated since the taking of all their land was not in the public interest and the compensation offered to them was disproportionate, given the damage suffered, as it did not reflect the market value of the property. The applicants requested the court to grant all those remedies it deemed necessary and effective in order to redress the violation, and among those remedies the applicants specifically asked the court to annul the judgments given by the LAB on 22 January 1990; to liquidate the proper compensation due to the applicants; or to order the return of the property to the applicants.
20. During the course of these proceedings, M.F., a representative of the Commissioner of Lands (hereinafter CoL) testified, on 27 June 2014, that the technical experts showed “them” which areas they were referring to but that Enemalta had not informed “them” of any specific reason as to why they needed the land which was to be the subject of the 2012 declaration. She also confirmed that when the CoL had filed the cases before the LAB (in 1984), to her understanding, in the CoL’s view, the defendants in those cases were the owners of the land or their successor in title. D.A. a representative of Enemalta plc (the user of the land) testified, on 18 October 2013, that he was not aware of the use to be made of the parcel measuring 509 sq.m. which was again expropriated in 2012; he testified that he was only told that Enemalta would proceed to purchase the land, and every time he asked about it he was told that no definitive decision had been taken. J.C., an ex employee of Enemalta plc (before being succeeded by D.A.), testified on 22 November 2013 that until 2010, when he left his employment, no decision had yet been taken as to what would be the future of the site, and he did not know whether a decision had been taken as to its use at that point (2013).
21. Pending these proceedings the Government also brought forward a valuation of the properties in question dated June 2014 which took into consideration the locality, size, state and potential in line with local plans as well as other factors likely to affect its value. According to that report, by the Government’s architect (M.S.), the parcel measuring 509 sq.m. (valued at EUR 205 in the 2012 notice to treat) was worth EUR 14,000 when valued as agricultural land; the parcel measuring 139 sq.m. (valued at EUR 58.50 in the 2012 notice to treat) was worth EUR 4,000 when valued as agricultural land; the remaining parcel measuring 3,337 sq.m. (i.e. Land B, less the two parcels measuring 139 and 509 sq.m.) was worth EUR 97,000 when valued as agricultural land; a parcel measuring 5,213 sq.m. was valued at EUR 140,000 taken as land used for an LPG filling plant; and a parcel measuring 137 sq.m. was valued at EUR 4,000 when valued as barren land. The two latter parcels formed Land A, which was the subject of the declaration of 1978. The report also stated that all the land was being considered as agricultural in terms of law, both on the date when they were taken and on the date of the report (2014). It further specified that on the part measuring 509 sq.m. and the part measuring 5,213 sq.m. (most of Land A) there was part of the complex that had previously been used for the gas plant (hemm parti mill-kumpless li kien jintuza b?ala impjant tal gass).
22. According to an architect’s (J.S.) valuation prepared on 21 July 2009 for Enemalta plc the total value of land measuring 6,873 sq.m., where part of the Qajjenza plant was located (which measurement excludes the buffer zone), would be worth EUR 900,000 if all the equipment of the plant were to be removed from the site.
23. According to an architect’s (M.S.) valuation prepared in October 2008, and according to the testimony of the same architect, the total value of the land (measuring 21,828 sq.m.) originally occupied by the plant (excluding the buffer zone) was EUR 16,830,500. The estimate was based on the potential use of the site and similar land value, as sold at the time. According to his report the area which was marked as a white area was within the boundary for development (building scheme) with two policies directly effecting it, the first concerning the relocation of the plant and the second the use of the land thereafter, which was to be predominantly residential.
24. By a judgment of 29 April 2016 the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional competence, found that the applicants had shown that they were the owners of the land, and that the plant had been dismantled and Enemalta, who was operating from elsewhere, did not know what to do with its site in Qajjenza. It considered that it had to examine separately the expropriations of 1973 and 1984 on the one hand and those of 2012 on the other hand, as they had been taken under different laws.
25. It held that the takings in 1978 and 1984 (excluding the two small parcels which were the subject of the 2012 re-expropriations) were in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention because no public purpose subsisted once the plant had been dismantled and the authorities never actually expropriated the land (since they had not paid the applicants, nor signed the relevant deed). Thus, the decisions of the LAB had been superseded by the fact that this property was no longer needed. It therefore declared the 1978 and 1984 expropriations (except insofar as they affected those parcels of land re-expropriated in 2012) without effect (but not null) and it ordered the return of the land to the applicants.
26. The position was not the same for the two parcels of land expropriated in 2012 under Section 22 (8) of the Ordinance which were being used by Enemalta “for its purposes” (g?all-iskopijiet tag?ha) and which therefore had to be transferred to the Government. The court noted that the public interest behind this expropriation had not been contested within the 21-day limit stipulated in law (Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance). Moreover, the smaller of those parcels was still being used as a sub-station which served residential and commercial buildings in the area, thus these two parcels of land were to be transferred to the Government without prejudice to the applicants’ rights to contest the compensation offered.
27. It rejected the Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of ordinary remedies which had referred to an application for retrial and an application for fixing a time-limit for the performance of an obligation which were not relevant to the present case.
28. The court also held that the delay in finalising the 1978 and 1984 expropriations had resulted in a breach of the applicants’ rights under Article 6 of the Convention.
29. It ordered the Government to pay EUR 15,000 to the applicants by way of compensation for the violation of their rights. No costs were to be paid by the applicants.
V. Appeal
30. Both the Government and the applicants appealed. In particular the applicants complained about the low award of compensation in view of the amount of years during which the deprivation persisted; and that the expropriation of the smaller parcel of land in 2012, measuring 509 sq.m., had not pursued any public interest, and thus should have also been released together with the rest of the property, as its taking solely served to diminish the value of their entire property. It had also not been correct to find that they could not complain about the latter because they had failed to do so under Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance, since the latter did not provide that the time limit was to run from the date of notification.
31. By a judgment of 25 November 2016 the Constitutional Court held that it was not open to the first court to find a breach of Section 6 as the applicants had not complained about that and therefore it revoked that part of the first-instance judgment. It confirmed the remainder.
32. In relation to the upheld violation concerning the larger area of land, in so far as relevant, in dismissing the appeal plea by the Commissioner of Land to the effect that the first court had been wrong in finding that no public interest existed once the plant had been dismantled (in relation to Lands A and B), the Constitutional Court reiterated its case-law to the effect that public interest had to persist until the finalisation of the procedure of expropriation. Once it had been established that the land had been taken for the purposes of the gas plant, which was no longer there, it was for the Commissioner of Land to prove that there was still some other public interest. No such proof had been submitted.
33. In connection with the same tract of land, it also noted, inter alia, that the establishment of compensation by the LAB did not necessarily satisfy the proportionality requirement. Moreover, the LAB’s order to proceed to transfer the property was not followed and the deed was never signed, with the result that the applicants were still without compensation thirty four years after the taking. Those facts together with the uncertainty within which the applicants found themselves led to a violation of theirproperty rights.
34. As to the award of compensation of EUR 15,000, which it considered as non-pecuniary damage, and which it confirmed, the Constitutional Court noted that one had to take into consideration the uncertainty in which the applicants had been left over a prolonged period of time, the size of the land and the years during which they had been deprived of it; and also, the fact that the takings of 1978 and 1984 had originally been in the public interest, that the land had been agricultural, as well as the fact that it was now being returned to them. It also noted that in their original application the applicants had requested compensation for the taking or the return of the land. It followed that since the land was returned to them no pecuniary damage was due.
35. As to the two smaller portions of land, only one of which had been the subject of the applicants’ appeal, the Constitutional Court held that on the relevant date, in 2012 (since these lands were expropriated under a different law), these were still occupied by Enemalta, in particular on the land measuring 509 sq.m. there was “part of the complex which was previously used as the gas plant” (based on the report of an architect M.S. see paragraph 21 above) and the applicants had not substantiated any abuse by the authorities. The first-court’s decision had therefore been correct. The first-instance court was also correct to find that the applicants had failed to make use of the procedure under Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance, despite being notified two months before the Presidential Declaration of 2012, as admitted in the testimony of T.G. The applicants had thus, at the time, failed to make use of a legitimate remedy to claim that there had been no public interest in accordance with Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance – a choice for which they were responsible.
36. The Constitutional Court apportioned costs as follows: costs of first-instance were to remain as they had been decided; 4/5 of the costs of the CoL’s appeal were to be borne by the latter and 1/5 by the applicants; costs of the appeal of the applicants were to be borne entirely by them; and 3/4 of the costs of the cross appeal of Enemalta plc were to be borne by the latter and 1/4 by the applicants.
III. INFORMATION RELATED TO ENEMALTA
37. On 6 May 1987 Enemalta Corporation (the predecessor in title of Enemalta plc) purchased from Laylay Company Limited a parcel of land measuring 46,201 sq.m. for the sum of MTL 105,878 (approximately EUR 246,629) the price being established at a rate of MTL 2,576.12 for every 1,124 sq.m. This land was in close vicinity to the land belonging to the applicants.
IV. THE SITUATION AFTER THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT JUDGMENT
38. The land belonging to the applicants was completely abandoned and in a state of dereliction; however all traces of the gas tanks had been removed. Another parcel of land belonging exclusively to Enemalta plc, which is adjacent to the applicants’ land, was also abandoned; only a few dilapidated structures remained and the area was not being used in any manner. No equipment belonging to the original plant remained.
39. The plant in the new location had been in operation since July 2013 and was being run by a private company (Liquigas) - not Enemalta plc.
40. According to the applicants, until the time of the lodging of the application, despite the Constitutional Court judgment, the applicants had not obtained repossession of their land as they had not been granted access to the land which was still sealed off.
41. An architect’s (P.B.) valuation, carried out on behalf of the applicants, assessed the value of the applicants’ land in 2017 reflecting the loss for the applicants resulting from the 2012 re-expropriations (according to which the expropriation of the triangular parcel of land measuring 509 sq.m. in 2012 adversely affected the remainder of the applicants’ land) in the amount of EUR 1,153,500, based particularly on a projection for development of built up plots on Land A which was within a development zone (according to the Local Plans of 1995). According to the same valuation, the accumulated rental yield from 1978 to 2017 for the land which had been the subject of the 1978 expropriation was EUR 3,476,942 which with a conservative rate of interest of 2.5% amounted to a total loss of EUR 4,248,223.
42. According to the Government on 6 July 2018 part of Lands A and B (excluding the properties measuring 509 sq.m and 139 sq.m.) was returned to the applicants. In this connection they submitted a copy of a letter from the Board of Governors of the Lands Authority to the Chairman of the Lands Authority confirming that on 6 July 2018 the former had decided to release the property, as well as a declaration, by the Lands Authority, of 7 August 2018, issued in the Government Gazette concerning the release of the land.
RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK
III. THE LAND ACQUISITION (PUBLIC PURPOSES) ORDINANCE
43. Following amendments in 2002, Sections 6 and 22 (8) of the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance, Chapter 88 of the laws of Malta, in so far as relevant, read as follows:
Section 2
“"agricultural or rural land" does not include the domestic garden of a house or building or any other land within the precincts of a house or building nor a building site nor waste land but includes farmhouses, buildings intended mainly for the keeping of store cattle or other domestic animals, and other structures of a kindred nature;”
Section 6
“(2) Any person who has an interest in land, in respect of which a declaration of the President as is referred to in subarticle (1) is made, may contest the public purpose of the said declaration before the Land Arbitration Board by means of an application to be filed in the registry of the said Board within twenty-one days from the publication of the said declaration and the provisions of the Code of Organization and Civil Procedure applicable to the hearing of causes before the Civil Court, First Hall, including the provisions regarding appeals from such decisions, shall, mutatis mutandis, apply to the determination of the said application:
Provided that the filing of an application in terms of this subarticle shall not hinder the continuance of the expropriation proceedings or the doing of anything that may be done in respect of the land as provided in this Ordinance during the time when the application is still not determined, without prejudice to the right of the applicant to seek compensation in the event that the declaration of the President is found to be without public purpose.”
Section 17
“Any land which is not a building site shall be valued for the purpose of determining the compensation payable in the case of compulsory acquisition as rural land or as wasteland, as the case may be:
Provided that in determining such compensation, consideration shall be given to the value of any structures existing thereon and whether such structures are covered by a permit according to law.”
Section 18
“(1) Land, other than a historical building, shall be deemed to be a building site if it falls within the limits of a building scheme or as indicated and approved for development in a Structure Plan or subsidiary plan which has been adopted for the time being in force under any law relating to planning.
(2) In determining the compensation due for a building site, consideration shall be given to the use or development that can be made thereof or thereon in accordance with the provisions of subarticle (1).”
Section 18A
“Notwithstanding the provisions of this or any other law, the value of any land -
(a) still in the course of acquisition on the 1st January 2005;
(b) in respect of which a declaration under article 3 was issued before the 5th March 2003, and
(c) in respect of which a notice to treat was not issued before the 1st January 2005 under the provisions of this Ordinance as in force before the date mentioned in this paragraph,
shall, saving any interests due until payment is made under article 12(3), be its value as on the 1st January 2005.”
Section 22
“(8) Upon the making of a Declaration by the President in accordance with this Ordinance that any land is to be acquired by the absolute purchase thereof, the absolute ownership of the land to which the declaration refers shall be deemed to be a registration area for the purposes of the Land Registry Act and the absolute ownership thereof shall by virtue of this Ordinance and without any further assurance or formality be transferred to and be acquired by the competent authority free and unencumbered from any charge, hypothec or privilege and with all the appurtenances thereof, and the competent authority shall cause such land to be registered in the Land Registry in its name in accordance with the Land Registry Act within three months from the issue of the Declaration of the President.”
Section 27
“(1) Without prejudice to any special provision contained in this Ordinance, in assessing compensation the Board shall act in accordance with the following rules:
(a) no allowance shall be made on account of the acquisition being compulsory;
(b) the value of the land shall, subject as hereinafter provided, be taken to be the amount which the land if sold in the open market by a willing seller might be expected to realize:
Provided that -
(i) the value of the land shall be the value as at the time when the President’s Declaration was served, without regard to any improvements or works made or constructed thereafter on the said land and where the land was in the possession of the competent authority immediately prior to the service of the President’s Declaration no regard shall be had, in assessing the value of the land, to any improvements or works made or constructed by the competent authority while in possession of the land;
(ii) where a part only of the land belonging to any person is taken under this Ordinance, any enhancement of the value of the residue of the land by reason of the proximity of any improvements or works made or constructed by the competent authority within eighteen months before the publication of the President’s Declaration, or to be made or constructed by the competent authority within eighteen months after the publication of the President’s Declaration shall be taken into consideration;
(iii) the damage, if any, sustained by the owner by reason of the severance of the land from other land belonging to such owner or other injurious effect upon such other land by reason of the exercise of the powers conferred by this Ordinance, shall be taken into consideration;
(iv) where damage has been sustained by reason of any works done in or upon the land, regard shall be had to any increase in the value of the land by reason of any improved drainage and any other advantage derived from any such works; ...”
IV. THE GOVERNMENT LANDS ACT
44. Section 43 of the Government Lands Act, Chapter 573 of the Laws of Malta, of 25 April 2017, reads as follows:
“The Chairperson of the Board of Governors of the Lands Authority may at any time revoke any Declaration issued under this Act or before by means of a notice in the Gazette and at least once in two daily or Sunday local newspapers, provided that any revocation shall be registered with the Land Registry and the Public Registry.”
THE LAW
C. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
45. The applicants complained that part of their property (measuring 509 sq.m.) had been expropriated without there being a public interest and they had not been compensated adequately for the 2012 expropriation. The applicants also complained that no compensation had been received for the occupation of the other land which had been given back to them. They thus considered that they remained victims of the violation despite the Constitutional Court judgment in their favour. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
4. The taking from 1978 and 1984 respectively, until 2012, of Land A and most of Land B (excluding the properties measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m.)
1. The parties’ submissions
46. The Government submitted that the applicants were no longer victims of the violation as the domestic courts had upheld the violation and ordered the return of theproperty, which was subsequently released on 6 July 2018. They noted that according to Section 43 of the Government Lands Act (see Relevant domestic law above) there was no obligation to notify the owners other than by publication in the Government Gazette and newspapers. The Government further pointed out that the applicants had asked the domestic courts for compensation or alternatively for the return of the property, and the domestic courts having determined that there was no longer any public interest for the taking of that land, had awarded the latter form of redress, together with an award of EUR 15,000 in non-pecuniary damage.
47. The applicants complained that they had not been compensated for the use from 1978 and 1984 respectively, until 2012, of most of Land A and B (excluding the properties measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m.). Moreover, that property had not been effectively released (until the date of lodging the application with the Court) despite the order to that effect by the Constitutional Court which upheld a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In their submissions they further challenged the Government’s contention that the property was returned to them in 2018, that is, two years after the Constitutional Court judgment, which itself was not a timely reaction. They noted that they had not been informed of any decision to release the property or of any announcement in the Government Gazette, and that as at the date of submissions (6 November 2019) the land was still sealed off and the boundary walls erected by the authorities had not been dismantled, thus the applicants still did not have access to it. In consequence the applicants considered that they were owed compensation for this ulterior period after 2013 during which the land was held on to despite no use being made of it.
48. In particular the applicants considered that their claims to the domestic court did not rule out the possibility of obtaining both the return of the property and compensation for its use until then, as they concerned two different scenarios, depending on whether the domestic court considered there was or not a public interest. Moreover, they had requested the court to give any effective and appropriate remedy. Thus, in the applicants’ view the fact that they made no specific reference to compensation for loss of use did not mean that they were not entitled to it.
D. The Court’s assessment
49. The Court reiterates that an applicant is deprived of his or her status as a victim if the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded appropriate and sufficient redress for a breach of the Convention (see, for example, Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-93, ECHR 2006-V;and B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited v. Malta, nos. 75225/13 and 77311/13, § 55, 11 September 2018).
50. As regards the first condition, namely the acknowledgment of a violation of the Convention, the Court considers that the Constitutional Court’s findings (see paragraphs 31-33 above) amounted to an acknowledgment that there had been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
51. With regard to the second condition, namely appropriate and sufficient redress, the Court must ascertain whether the measures taken by the authorities in the particular circumstances of the instant case afforded the applicants appropriate redress in such a way as to deprive them of victim status (ibid. § 57). The Court notes that the Constitutional Court awarded the applicants EUR 15,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage (from which they had to pay part judicial costs which in the present case were reasonably justified). Moreover, the Constitutional Court ordered the release of the property, namely Land A and the most part of Land B (excluding the properties measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m.) as requested by the applicants. In the present circumstances and in the light of the documents in the Court’s possession, the Court shares the interpretation of the constitutional jurisdictions that the applicants’ request to release the property was their main request and only alternatively would compensation be required for the use of such land. Indeed, no conditions had been put in relation to this latter alternative. It follows that on the basis of their request, the Constitutional Court awarded adequate redress for the upheld violation and the Constitutional Court’s judgment offered sufficient relief to the applicants.
52. In so far as the applicants argued that the property had not been released, the Court notes that the Government have substantiated their claim that the property has in fact been released albeit with a significant delay of more than eighteen months. While the applicants had not been served with a notice of release, regrettably the law in force at the time of the release did not require such a notification, nor has it been shown that this was a requirement in the law applicable at the time that the release was ordered by the Constitutional Court. Lastly, in so far as the applicants argue that access is still sealed off as the boundary walls are still in place, the Court observes that, as noted by the applicants, these are only boundary walls and no other installations remain. Moreover, from the aerial photographs submitted by the applicants the boundary walls are in place in only limited parts of the property subject to the return order. Lastly, the applicants being the owners in law, there seems to be no obstacle in them taking any measures necessary to access the land including availing themselves of any ordinary remedies in this respect.
53. Bearing in mind the above, the Court considers that the second criterion has also been met and the applicants are not continuing to suffer the consequences of the breach upheld by the domestic courts and therefore they have lost victim status in respect of this part of the application.
54. This part of the application is therefore incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) and must be declared inadmissible in accordance with Article 35 § 4 of the Convention.
4. The taking lasting from 1978 and 1984 respectively, until 2012, of the applicants’ properties measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m.
1. The parties’ submissions
55. The applicants complained in particular that no compensation has ever been awarded in respect of the use of this portion of land for the period until 2012, nor had its return been ordered. They further considered that since the use of the land was for industrial purposes, it should not be valued as agricultural land for the purposes of compensation. In reply to the Government’s allegations, they submitted that all the domestic proceedings had shown that they had title to the property and that they had not been paid over the years for other reasons.
56. The Government referred overall to the general principles relating to the invoked provision and made submissions concerning the taking of Lands A and B but made no specific submissions related to these two parcels of land save that they were covered by the expropriations of 1978 and 1984 and the respective decisions of the LAB delivered in 1990, which had not been executed because, according to the Government, the applicants had resisted providing proof of title.
V. The Court’s assessment
57. The Court notes that the domestic courts did not deal with this aspect of the complaint despite the fact that the applicants raised their complaint concerning all theproperty (see paragraph 19 above), thus the applicants remain victims in this respect. The Court further notes that the Government have not made any relevant submissions in respect of this part of the complaint. The Court finds that this complaint is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.
58. The Court observes that the aim of the presidential declarations of 1978 and 1984 was clearly to deprive the applicants of their property. In practice while the Government took possession of the property, they did not finalise the deeds of transfer despite an order to so do by the LAB in 1990. It was only in 2012, following a new declaration under different legislative provisions, that the transfer took place. In that light, it is possible to consider that the interference over the period 1990-2012 went beyond State control of the use of property, verging on what could be equated to a de facto expropriation.
59. It is not necessary for the Court to decide whether the interference falls under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, first paragraph, second sentence (deprivation of possessions), or under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, second paragraph (control of the use of property). Indeed, the applicable principles are similar for both types of interferences: in addition to being lawful, a deprivation of possessions or an interference such as the control of use of property must also satisfy the requirement of proportionality (see, with respect to a deprivation of possessions, Scordino, cited above, §§ 81 and 93; Kozac?o?lu v. Turkey [GC], no. 2334/03, §§ 51, 52 and 63,19 February 2009; Visti?š and Perepjolkins v. Latvia [GC], no. 71243/01, § 94, 25 October 2012; and with respect to the control of the use of property Hutten-Czapska v. Poland [GC], no. 35014/97, §§ 163, 164 and 167, ECHR 2006 VIII, and G.I.E.M. S.R.L. and Others v. Italy [GC], nos. 1828/06 and 2 others, §§ 292-93, 28 June 2018). As the Court has repeatedly stated, a fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, the search for such a fair balance being inherent in the whole of the Convention. The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Brum?rescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999 VII; Depalle v. France [GC], no. 34044/02, § 83, ECHR 2010; G.I.E.M. S.R.L. and Others, cited above, §§ 293 and 300; and Saliba and Others v. Malta, no. 20287/10, §§ 54-55, 22 November 2011).
60. It is not disputed that the taking of these parcels of land in 1978 and 1984 respectively was lawful; the Court will therefore not elaborate on the matter. Further, the Court can accept that the taking of this part of the property was in the public interest which persisted until the plant was in place. It remains to be determined whether the requisite fair balance was reached and in particular whether the applicants suffered an excessive burden.
61. The Court notes that there appears to be no doubt that the applicants received no compensation whatsoever for the Government’s use of this land from 1978/1984 to the date of the transfer of property to the Government in 2012. The mere fact that these two parcels had been considered as part of Land B in the determination of compensation in the LAB decisions delivered in 1990 is of no relevance. Indeed the Court notes that – as stated by the Constitutional Court – these LAB decisions were superseded, and they were never executed. It follows that the applicants did not receive any compensation to date, in over forty years, and thus they were made to bear a disproportionate burden.
62. Accordingly there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in this respect.
VI. The deprivation, in 2012, of the applicants’ properties measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m. respectively
92. The scope of the complaint
63. The Court notes that, despite certain statements in their submissions after communication of the application to the respondent Government, it is clear from the application submitted to the Court, as well as from the proceedings before the domestic courts, that the applicants’ complaint concerning a lack of public interest relates solely to the parcel of land measuring 509 sq.m. However, the applicants’ complaint concerning compensation refers to both parcels of land.
C. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
64. The applicants complained that there had been no public interest behind the taking of the property measuring 509 sq.m. which had not been used since 2012, and that the amount of compensation awarded for the expropriation of both parcels of land had been inadequate. They were thus made to suffer a disproportionate burden. They noted that the Constitutional Court had considered that the public purpose behind the 2012 expropriation consisted in housing Enemalta’s gas plant but had ignored the fact that Enemalta had abandoned the site at around the same time. The applicants considered, in particular, that once the plant had been transferred in 2013 there was no valid reason to continue to hold on to the land. They considered that the Government had kept hold of it merely to reduce the value of the adjacent property and reduce the compensation due to the applicants.
65. As to the remedy under Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance, the applicants submitted that, according to a first-instance judgment by the constitutional jurisdiction in the case of Mark Refalo on behalf of Cane` brothers vs. the Director of Land and the Attorney General, that remedy was in breach of the Convention as the relevant time-limit started to run from the publication in the Government Gazette and not the notification of the owners. In that case, on appeal, the Constitutional Court on 30 September 2016 did not decide the matter considering it was premature, and eventually by a judgment of 28 June 2019 the Court of Appeal (Civil) found that the twenty one day period within which to lodge such a claim was to run from the day when various criteria were fulfilled, namely, publication of the notice of expropriation in the Government Gazette, as well as in two newspapers and on the notice board of the local council responsible for the locality where the land is situated; and registration of all the details with the LAB and notification to all the persons having an interest in the land. The applicants submitted that as the plant was only transferred in 2013, they could not have raised the issue within twenty-one days of the publication in the Government Gazette.
66. As to the Government’s contention that the applicants could still contest the compensation offered before the LAB, the applicants noted that the Court had previously awarded compensation in cases where the applicants had been awaiting compensation for a long number of years.
67. On the matter of compensation, they submitted firstly that the offers made were based on values which were even lower than those established by the Government’s own architect (see paragraph 21 above). More importantly, the applicants noted that the announcement in the Government Gazette of 6 June 2012 had specifically indicated the sums of EUR 58.50 and EUR 205 “as valued by decision dated 22 January 1990 by the LAB” and in fact such sums reflected the price offered in 1990 adjusted to the size of the land. However, the value of the land on the date of expropriation was much higher.
68. The applicants submitted that the land measuring 139 sq.m. occupied a substation even before 2012, thus it could certainly not be considered as agricultural land – their architect’s report had also established that it was on developable land, since it was within a developable boundary and just a few metres away from a zone falling under a scheme. As to the portion of land measuring 509 sq.m., the applicants noted that the return of the property would be the appropriate remedy since no use was being made of it, but if not, compensation had to take account of the fact that this triangular piece of land stretched along the entire frontage of the applicants’ remaining land (which was meant to be returned) which was situated in a developable area as of 1995, hampering its development and causing a devaluation of the entire site. Thus, compensation had to take account of that loss, which according to an architects’ report amounted to EUR 1,508,000.
(b) The Government
69. The Government submitted that the expropriation was lawful, and that under domestic law no proof of a public purpose was required. They considered that a declaration of the President of Malta was in itself adequate evidence of a public interest. In any event, the public interest behind an expropriation could be challenged by lodging proceedings before the LAB within twenty-one days of the President’s Declaration - a remedy which the domestic courts had considered effective and of which the applicants did not avail themselves without substantiating the reasons for such a failure. In any event, the Government noted that the Constitutional Court had held that such a public interest did exist. In the Government’s view, the 2012 expropriations were grounded on the expropriations of Lands A and B many years earlier to assist the Enemalta. While some of that land was no longer needed, this was not the case with the parcels of land at issue which were therefore expropriated in 2012 and were being used, as noted by the first instance court (see paragraph 26 above). Thus, the public interest requirement was satisfied in 2012 and surely continued to be so until the operations of the plant ceased, the area was decontaminated and the infrastructure dismantled.
70. The Government submitted that the compensation offered had also been adequate, and in their view it had not only been based on the value of the land in 1990, since the architect had also taken account of “the locality, size, contours, state and potential, in terms of the plans and boundaries of the development zone as officially published by the Malta Environment and Planning authority, as well as the value of other similar property in the vicinity, as well as other matters which may affect the value of the property.” The Government also considered that the valuations relied on by the applicants were flawed and were based on the assumption that the land was developable. However, the applicants did not have a right to full compensation given the public interest at issue, and compensation had to be calculated based on the value of the property at the date on which ownership thereof was lost, i.e. 2012 when it was considered as agricultural land. The Government further referred to the valuations made by their architect (see paragraph 21 above) and was of the view that the compensation for these two parcels should not exceed EUR 18,000. They further considered that procedural safeguards had been available to the applicants as they could still contest the amount of compensation offered before the LAB, and they had also availed themselves of constitutional redress proceedings. Moreover, the applicants were not vulnerable, they were not of old age nor had they been disabled for a number of years. Thus, in the Government’s view they did not suffer an excessive burden.
4. Admissibility
71. The Court notes that the Government did not specifically raise an objection to the effect that the complaint is inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies. However, the Court considers that the reference in their submissions on the merits to the fact that the applicants failed to undertake the remedy under Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance in relation to the public interest requirement and that before the LAB in relation to the amount of compensation, amount in substance to such an objection.
(a) General principles
72. The Court reiterates that according to Article 35 § 1 of the Convention it may deal with an issue only after all domestic remedies have been exhausted. The purpose of this rule is to afford the Contracting States the opportunity of preventing or putting right the violations alleged against them before those allegations are submitted to the Court (see, among other authorities, Selmouni v. France [GC], no. 25803/94, § 74, ECHR 1999-V). Article 35 § 1 is based on the assumption, reflected in Article 13 (with which it has a close affinity), that there is an effective domestic remedy available in respect of the alleged breach of an individual’s Convention rights (see Kud?a v. Poland[GC], no. 30210/96, § 152, ECHR 2000 XI).
73. Thus, the complaint submitted to the Court must first have been made to the appropriate national courts, at least in substance, in accordance with the formal requirements of domestic law and within the prescribed time-limits. Nevertheless, the obligation to exhaust domestic remedies only requires that an applicant make normal use of remedies which are effective, sufficient and accessible in respect of his Convention grievances (see Balogh v. Hungary, no. 47940/99, § 30, 20 July 2004). The existence of such remedies must be sufficiently certain not only in theory but also in practice, failing which they will lack the requisite accessibility and effectiveness (seeMifsud v. France (dec.), [GC], no. 57220/00, ECHR 2002 VIII).
74. The Court would emphasise that the application of the rule of exhaustion must make due allowance for the fact that it is being applied in the context of machinery for the protection of human rights that the Contracting Parties have agreed to set up. Accordingly, it has recognised that Article 35 must be applied with some degree of flexibility and without excessive formalism. It has further recognised that this rule is neither absolute nor capable of being applied automatically; in reviewing whether it has been observed it is essential to have regard to the particular circumstances of each individual case (see Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, § 69, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 IV, and Sammut and Visa Investments Ltd v. Malta (dec.), no. 27023/03, 28 June 2005).
75. As regards the burden of proof, it is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one, available in theory and in practice at the relevant time. Once this burden has been satisfied, it falls to the applicant to establish that the remedy advanced by the Government was in fact exhausted, or was for some reason inadequate and ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case, or that there existed special circumstances absolving him or her from this requirement (see Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia (preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, § 77, 25 March 2014, and McFarlane v. Ireland [GC],no. 31333/06, § 107, 10 September 2010).
(b) Application to the present case
(i) In respect of the public interest requirement
76. The Government submitted that the applicants had not undertaken the remedy under Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance to contest the public interest behind the 2012 expropriation.
77. In the present case various considerations come into play. Without prejudice to the evolving interpretation of the applicable time-limit provided under Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance - which was subject to challenges within the domestic judicial system which delivered decisions various years after 2012 (the date relevant to the present case) - the Court notes that the wording of the law in 2012 referred to the time-limit running from the publication in the Government Gazette. In the present case such publication occurred on 6 June 2012 and the applicants were notified of the expropriation even prior to that date, specifically on 18 April 2012, as also confirmed by the Constitutional Court. At the time the applicants failed to institute the relevant proceedings within that time-limit and no relevant justification was given for that omission.
78. However, the Court also notes that apart from their claim that there was no public interest in 2012, the applicants also argued that there was even less public interest behind the expropriation shortly after 2012, i.e. once the plant was decommissioned and dismantled.
79. In particular the Court notes that the Presidential declaration was published in April 2012 and the plant stopped being operational just two months later, in July 2012. It was officially decommissioned and then dismantled in September 2013 at which point the applicants considered there had been absolutely no public purpose behind the taking. In these circumstances the Court cannot see how, at that point, the remedy under Section 6 (2) of the Ordinance whose time-limit expired before these occurrences came to be, could be considered effective in the specific circumstances of the present case. In particular, while a remedy to contest the public interest would not need to be available ad infinitum, in circumstances such as those of the present case, where the use, or lack thereof, of the expropriated property was subject to change in a very short time after the declaration of expropriation, the only remedy available to the applicants in the Maltese domestic system was the institution of constitutional redress proceedings.
80. Indeed, the applicants did raise the issue of the lack of public interest behind the expropriation of the parcel measuring 509 sq.m. both before the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional competence and before the Constitutional Court, on appeal. Both courts noted that the applicants had not made use of the remedy under Section 6 (2), nevertheless they did not reject the complaint on procedural grounds or refuse to make findings in respect of the public interest, on the contrary, the domestic courts pronounced themselves on the matter (as admitted by the Government, see paragraph 69 above) and thus can be said to have in practice examined the merits of the applicants’ complaint (see, mutatis mutandis, Micallef v. Malta [GC], no. 17056/06, § 57, ECHR 2009, and Saliba and Others, cited above, § 29).
81. It follows from all of the above that the non-exhaustion of the ordinary remedy relied on by the Government cannot be held against the applicants. In the circumstances of the present case, the Court considers that in raising their plea before the domestic courts with constitutional jurisdiction, the applicants made normal use of the remedies which were accessible to them and which related, in substance, to the facts complained of at the European level (ibid.)).
82. It follows that this part of the application cannot be rejected for non exhaustion of domestic remedies and that the Government’s objection should be dismissed.
(ii) In respect of compensation
83. The Government submitted that the applicants had not undertaken proceedings before the LAB to contest the amount of compensation offered for the 2012 expropriations. They admitted however that the applicants had availed themselves of constitutional redress proceedings in this regard (see paragraph 70 above).
84. The Court notes that, unlike the position in other cases (see for example, Azzopardi v. Malta, no. 28177/12, § 57, 6 November 2014, and Frendo Randon and Others v. Malta, no. 2226/10, § 73, 22 November 2011), at the time of the present case, domestic law allowed the applicants to bring proceedings before the LAB to contest the amount of compensation awarded. It follows that such a remedy was accessible to the applicants.
85. However, the Government failed to indicate any improvement on the situation concerning proceedings before the LAB, with which the Court has taken issue various times. In particular the Court has repeatedly found a problem concerning the duration of such proceedings (see, for example, Bezzina Wettinger and Others v. Malta, no.15091/06, § 93, 8 April 2008, and Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq v. Malta, no. 26771/07, § 43, 5 April 2011). In addition, in the more recent B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited (cited above, §§ 106 07) the Court also took note of the domestic findings in relation to the composition of the LAB which did not fulfil the independence and impartiality requirements, when finding that the remedies proposed by the Government concerning compensation in relation to expropriations, did not constitute effective remedies available to the applicants in theory and in practice at the relevant time. In that light, the Court considers that the Government have notsatisfied the burden of proof and convinced the Court that the remedy offered by the LAB was an effective one, in theory and in practice at the relevant time.
86. The Court further notes that in their application before the first instance constitutional jurisdiction, the applicants had clearly complained about the compensation for the entirety of the land. However, that court having opted to divide the examination of the case between the early expropriations and those of 2012, it failed to examine the complaint concerning the adequacy of the compensation of the 2012 expropriations “without prejudice to the applicants’ rights to contest the compensation offered” (see paragraph 26 above). It is unclear whether the applicants challenged this, but in any event the Government have not raised a non exhaustion objection in this regard, quite the opposite (see paragraph 70 above).
87. In this connection, the Court notes that the normal practice of the Convention organs where a case has been communicated to the respondent Government has been not to declare the application inadmissible for failure to exhaust domestic remedies unless this matter has been raised by the Government in their observations (see, for example, Dobrev v. Bulgaria, no. 55389/00, § 113, 10 August 2006, and Y v. Latvia, no. 61183/08, § 40, 21 October 2014, and the case-law cited therein). Furthermore,under Rule 55 of the Rules of Court, any plea of inadmissibility must have been raised by the respondent Contracting Party ? in so far as the nature of the objection and the circumstances so allowed ? in its written or oral observations on the admissibility of the application (see N.C. v. Italy [GC], no. 24952/94, § 44, ECHR 2002-X, andSkudayeva v. Russia, no. 24014/07, § 27, 5 March 2019). This rule relates to a specific plea of, for instance, non-exhaustion, including the reasons given for the plea. It is not, therefore, sufficient for the Government to have pleaded non-exhaustion on different grounds within the prescribed time-limit (see Mooren v. Germany [GC], no. 11364/03, § 58, 9 July 2009). The Court cannot discern any exceptional circumstances which could have released the Government from the obligation to raise such a plea in their observations (see, mutatis mutandis, Khlaifia and Others v. Italy [GC], no. 16483/12, § 53, 15 December 2016).
88. This part of the complaint therefore cannot be rejected by the Court on the ground that domestic remedies have not been exhausted and the Government’s objection concerning proceedings before the LAB must be dismissed for the reasons set out at paragraph 85 above.
(c) Conclusion
89. The Court notes that the entirety of the complaint concerning the 2012 expropriations is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.
D. Merits
(a) General principles
90. The Court refers to the applicable general principles set out in paragraph 59 above. It reiterates that because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are, in principle, better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is “in the public interest”. Furthermore, the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99 and 2 others, § 91, ECHR 2005-VI). Nevertheless, in the exercise of its power of review the Court must determine whether the requisite balance was maintained in a manner consonant with the individual’s right of property (see Abdilla v. Malta (dec.), no 38244/03, 3 November 2005).
91. Compensation terms under the relevant legislation are material to the assessment of whether or not the contested measure respects the requisite fair balance and, in particular, whether it imposes a disproportionate burden on the individuals (see Jahn and Others, cited above, § 94). In this connection, the taking of property without payment of an amount proportionate to its value will normally constitute a disproportionate interference, whilst a total lack of compensation can be considered justifiable under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in exceptional circumstances. However, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances(see Scordino, cited above, § 95; Kozac?o?lu cited above, § 64; and Visti?š and Perepjolkins, cited above, § 110). Legitimate objectives in the “public interest”, such as those pursued in measures of economic reform or measures designed to achieve greater social justice, may warrant reimbursement of less than the full market value (seeScordino, cited above, §§ 96-97; Kozac?o?lu cited above, § 64; Visti?š and Perepjolkins, cited above § 112; and Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited, cited above, § 68).
(b) Application to the present case
92. The Court notes that the lawfulness of the measure is not in dispute between the parties, and that the public interest behind the expropriation of the parcel of land measuring 139 sq.m., which remains being used as a sub station, is beyond the scope of the instant case (see paragraph 63 above).
93. The Court further considers that there is no doubt that the expropriation of land for the purposes of a gas plant can in principle be considered as a taking in the public interest. However, there is nothing in the case-file indicating what specific use was made of the parcel of land measuring 509 sq.m. neither in 2012 and even less shortly after its expropriation and the decommissioning of the plant. The applicants submitted that no use of it was made since 2012. The Court notes that despite a specific question to this effect to the Government, no details have been provided, as to its intended use, or its actual use in 2012 or thereafter. Rather, the Government opted to relyad verbatim on the findings of the constitutional jurisdictions and also appear to admit that no use of it was made after the plant was decommissioned (see paragraph 69 in fine above).
94. As to the domestic courts findings, the Court observes that the first-instance constitutional jurisdiction held that the land (in general) expropriated in 2012 was being used by Enemalta “for its purposes” (g?all-iskopijiet tag?ha) (see paragraph 26 above) and in particular in respect of the parcel measuring 509 sq.m. that “there was some kind of installation of the plant” (kien hemm xi installazzjoni tal-impjant tal-Enemalta) (see paragraph 14 above). According to the Constitutional Court - which considered 2012 as the relevant time for the assessment - on the land measuring 509 sq.m., there was “part of the complex which used to be used as the gas plant” “hemm parti mill-kumpless li kien jintuza b?ala impjant tal-gass” (based on the report of an architect M.S. see paragraph 35 above), adding that the applicants had not substantiated any abuse by the authorities. The Court cannot but note the vagueness of these findings and the assumption that it was for the applicants to prove the public interest, thus, reversing the applicable burden of proof (see paragraph 32 above).
95. Furthermore, the Court notes that the report of M.S. - which was the only basis for the Constitutional Court’s findings - solely stated, in relation to that part of the land measuring 509 sq.m. that it “used to be used as the gas plant”. However, the report does not state what use was being made of that land in 2014 when the report was drawn up, or in 2013 after the plant had been decommissioned, nor its use in 2012 when it was expropriated. Furthermore, the same terminology was used by M.S. to describe Land A (see paragraph 21 above) which, as the Constitutional Court itself confirmed, was to be returned to the applicants for lack of public interest. No explanation has been given for this different conclusion in relation to this part of the land. It thus appears that the Constitutional Court made findings which were manifestly incongruous.
96. In particular the Court notes that during the domestic proceedings, none of the witnesses brought forward was aware of the use to be made or being made of the land measuring 509 sq.m. (see paragraph 20) and the defendants failed to present any material evidence or relevant witness capable of attesting the public interest behind the measure. Thus, the Constitutional Court had no basis on which to ground its finding. The Court is disconcerted by the circumstances of the present case which led to an expropriation of property being endorsed without anyone being able to assert the reasons behind such an expropriation.
97. Lastly, the Court notes that from the photographic evidence (dated 2019) submitted to the Court by the applicants, on this parcel of land - which falls within the confines of what used to be the plant (which has now been dismantled) - there is nothing save for a boundary wall.
98. In light of the above, the Court considers that the decision of the domestic courts that the land was being used in 2012 and therefore that the expropriation was in the public interest must be considered to have no reasonable foundation.
99. Moreover, during the proceedings before this Court the Government have not come up with an explanation, even less a shred of evidence, as to any use being made of this parcel of land in 2012 or thereafter. The Court points out that the land consists of a long stretch of land, with the applicants’ remaining property on each side of it.
100. Thus, the Court considers that it has not been shown that there was any public interest in 2012 when the expropriation took place, in relation to the parcel of land measuring 509 sq.m. Moreover, even had such public interest existed at the time, it did not persist for more than a few months after the taking - a consideration which could not have been ignored by the domestic authorities at the time of the expropriation and thereafter. In this connection it is noted that the new plant in another location was already operational in 2013 (see paragraph 39 above).
101. The Court further notes that despite this situation glaring in the face of the authorities over the years and particularly during seven years of judicial proceedings, no action has been taken by the State to correct the situation and revoke the declaration. In this connection the Court reiterates that, in the context of property rights, particular importance must be attached to the principle of good governance. When a mistake is discovered the authorities have a duty to act in good time and in an appropriate and consistent manner (see, mutatis mutandis, Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, § 72, 15 September 2009, and Zhidov and Others v. Russia, nos. 54490/10 and 3 others, § 98, 16 October 2018).
102. As regards compensation, the Court notes that the applicants were offered EUR 205 for the parcel measuring 509 sq.m., and EUR 58.50 for the parcel measuring 139 sq.m., which sums are manifestly unreasonable for a taking which occurred in 2012 i.e. the relevant date for assessing compensation. In this connection the Court notes that even the valuation prepared by the Government’s own architect (which estimated the respective properties as being agricultural land in 2014), valued the land as nearly seventy times the amount offered (i.e. at EUR 14,000 and EUR 4,000 respectively, see paragraph 20 above). It follows that a fair balance has not been reached and the applicants were made to suffer an excessive burden.
103. Accordingly, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 in respect of the expropriation, in 2012, of the applicants’ land measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m.
E. OTHER ALLEGED VIOLATIONS OF THE CONVENTION
104. The applicants also complained under Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 that the Constitutional Court had not been effective given the limited redress it awarded them.
105. The Court notes that the situation in the present case is not one arising from a “structural” issue resulting from a repetitive practice where the Constitutional Court gives inadequate redress (see, a contrario, B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited, cited above, §§ 96-109, in relation to expropriations). In the present case, as noted above, the Constitutional Court gave adequate redress and deprived the applicants of their victim status in relation to the use from 1978 and 1984 respectively, until 2012 of the majority of their land.
106. As to the parts of their complaint which were rejected by the Constitutional Court, it is recalled that the effectiveness of a remedy within the meaning of Article 13 does not depend on the certainty of a favourable outcome for the applicant (see Sürmeli v. Germany [GC], no. 75529/01, § 98, ECHR 2006 VII) and the mere fact that an applicant’s claim fails is not in itself sufficient to render the remedy ineffective (see Amann v. Switzerland, [GC], no. 27798/95 §§ 88-89, ECHR 2002-II). It follows that in the present case, despite the unfavourable outcome in relation to some of the applicants’ claims, no reasons have been brought to the Court’s attention allowing it to consider that the applicants did not have an effective remedy at their disposal.
107. It follows that the complaint must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 §§ 3 (a) and 4 of the Convention as manifestly ill founded.
8. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
108. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
v. Damage
a) The parties’ submissions
109. The applicants requested the return of the property measuring 509 sq.m. and reserved their right to claim damage for the use of that property if returned. The applicants also claimed 6,861,428 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage and EUR 50,000, jointly, in non pecuniary damage. The claim for pecuniary damage included EUR 47,500 for the parcel of land measuring 139 sq.m. which according to their architect was within a “developable boundary” a few metres from a built up “scheme”, EUR 1,508,000 in respect of the land measuring 509 sq.m., if it were not to be returned to the applicants, bearing in mind the effects of this taking on the adjacent land, namely the difference in value between the entirety of the land and that same land if this parcel continues to be retained by the Government (see paragraph 68 above), and EUR 5,305,298 for the loss of use of Lands A and B from 1978 and 1984 respectively, to date. All the valuations are based on an architect’s report submitted to the Court. The legal representatives indicated their firm’s bank account to receive payment of all the sums awarded by the Court.
110. The Government noted that most of the land was given back to the applicants and for the remaining two parcels, they insisted that the applicants had not proved that the land was not agricultural land at the time of taking, thus compensation should not exceed EUR 18,000 (see paragraph 70 above). They further considered that the domestic courts had already awarded EUR 15,000 in non-pecuniary damage and thus they had already adequately redressed the applicants and that in any event any award made by the Court should not exceed EUR 2,000, jointly.
13. The Court’s assessment
111. As the Court has held on a number of occasions, a judgment in which the Court finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96 § 32, ECHR 2000-XI, and Guiso-Gallisay v. Italy (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 58858/00, § 90, 22 December 2009). The Contracting States that are parties to a case are in principle free to choose the means whereby they will comply with a judgment in which the Court has found a breach. This discretion as to the manner of execution of a judgment reflects the freedom of choice attached to the primary obligation of the Contracting States under the Convention to secure the rights and freedoms guaranteed (Article 1). If the nature of the violation allows for restitutio in integrum it is the duty of the State held liable to effect it, the Court having neither the power nor the practical possibility of doing so itself. If, however, national law does not allow or allows only partial reparation to be made for the consequences of the breach, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (ibid.).
112. The Court notes that in line with the upheld violations, the applicants are due just satisfaction solely in connection with:
i) the use of the two smaller parcels of land until 2012,
ii) the expropriation of the two smaller parcels of land in 2012,
but not for the losses in relation to the use of Lands A and B which complaint was declared inadmissible (see paragraph 54 above).
113. As to the use of the two smaller parcels of land until 2012, the applicants having couched their claim for the entirety of the land in line with their complaint, the Court is not in a position to determine the relevant sum in respect of solely the two smaller parcels of land at this stage. In these circumstances, the Court considers that the question of just satisfaction in relation to the two smaller parcels of land is not ready for decision. That question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed, having due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicants (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
114. As to the redress in respect of the land measuring 139 sq.m., the expropriation of which conformed with the public interest requirement, but in respect of which the applicants have not received adequate compensation, the Court considers that the compensation should be based on the lines of Schembri and Others v. Malta ((just satisfaction), no. 42583/06, § 18, 28 September 2010). Thus, the sum to be awarded to the applicants should be calculated on the basis of the value of the land at the time of the taking, and be converted to the current value to offset the effects of inflation, plus simple statutory interest applied to the capital progressively adjusted (see, for example,Curmi v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 2243/10, § 16, 9 July 2013). Since in the present case the applicants have not yet received any payment at the national level, no such deduction is necessary.
115. The applicants considered the value of this land in 2012 to be EUR 47,500, (as developable land) and the Government estimated the value as EUR 4,000 (as agricultural land). The Court notes that, on the one hand, despite the odd terminology used by the applicants’ architect, the plans attached to his evaluation appear to show that (unlike Land A) the land measuring 139 sq.m. is in an Outside Development Zone (ODZ). On the other hand, the valuation of the Government’s architect refers to the confines of the development zone without specifying whether the land was within it or not. Be that as it may, bearing in mind the undisputed fact that even before 2012 a building was and remains erected on such land, which hosts the sub-station, and bearing in mind the definition of agricultural land (see Relevant domestic law above), the Court cannot but consider that the land was in fact a building site in 2012 and compensation should be calculated accordingly for the purposes of the expropriation. However,Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 does not guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances, since legitimate objectives of “public interest” may call for reimbursement of less than the full market value (ibid. § 15).
116. In the light of the above the Court awards EUR 40,000 in respect of the expropriation in 2012 of the land measuring 139 sq.m.
117. As to the redress in respect of the land measuring 509 sq.m., the expropriation of which did not pursue any public interest and in respect of which the applicants obtained no compensation: the Court notes that the restitution of the property is not impossible given that no use has been made of it, and that the adjacent properties (Lands A and B) have also been returned. Also, the applicants have requested its return (see, a contrario, B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited, cited above, § 120).
118. The Court considers that, in the circumstances of the case, the return of the land measuring 509 sq.m. would be the most appropriate redress and would put the applicants as far as possible in a situation equivalent to the one in which they would have been if there had not been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, for example,mutatis mutandis, Ana Ionescu and Others v. Romania, nos. 19788/03 and 18 others, § 38, 26 February 2019).
119. Failing such restitution by the respondent State, the latter would have to pay the applicants, in respect of pecuniary damage, an amount corresponding to the current value of the land (see B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited, cited above, § 122), to which may be added relevant losses as a result of the devaluation of the remainder of the applicants’ land.
120. In this connection, the Court observes that the applicants’ architect estimated the losses, in terms of the financial set back on the remaining land, at EUR 1,508,000and this calculation has not been contested by the Government at this stage.
121. As to the value of the land, the Court observes that, on the one hand, the Government valued the parcel of land measuring 509 sq.m. at EUR 14,000 as agricultural land, in 2014, without specifying whether it was or not within a development zone. On the other hand, the applicants’ valuation does not refer to the value of this parcel of land nor to its classification but seems to consider it as falling within the development zone. In such circumstances, on the basis of the material in its possession, the Court is not able to determine the value of the land today.
122. The Court considers that the question of just satisfaction in relation to the expropriation of the parcel of land measuring 509 sq.m. is not ready for decision. That question must accordingly be reserved and the subsequent procedure fixed, having due regard to any agreement which might be reached between the respondent Government and the applicants (Rule 75 § 1 of the Rules of Court).
123. As to non-pecuniary damage, the sum awarded by the Constitutional Court concerned violations different to the ones upheld by this Court. Considering that the applicants must have experienced frustration and stress having regard to the nature of the further breaches found by this judgment, the Court awards the applicants EUR 10,000, jointly, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable.
124. As requested, the amount awarded is to be paid directly into the bank account designated by the applicants’ representatives (see, for example, Denisov v. Ukraine[GC], no. 76639/11, § 148, 25 September 2018 and the Practice Directions to the Rules of Court concerning just satisfaction claims, under the heading payment information).
IV. Costs and expenses
125. The applicants also claimed EUR 13,778.99 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and those incurred before the Court. Part of the costs relative to domestic proceedings arise out of the taxed bill of costs submitted, while others are supplementary fees to their lawyers substantiated by the relevant invoices.The legal representatives indicated their firm’s bank account to receive payment of all the sums awarded by the Court.
126. The Government did not contest the amount relative to the payment of the costs of Enemalta, nor the lawyers’ fees as calculated in accordance with the taxed bill of costs, and they considered that costs of proceedings before this Court should not exceed EUR 2,500.
127. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these were actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 10,000 covering costs under all heads, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants.
128. As requested, the amount awarded is to be paid directly into the bank account designated by the applicants’ representatives.
IV. Default interest
129. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
IV. Declares the complaints concerning the two parcels of land measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m. admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;
V. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of the taking lasting from 1978 and 1984 respectively, until 2012, of theapplicants’ land measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m.;
VI. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention in respect of the expropriation, in 2012, of the applicants’ land measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m.;
VII. Holds that, as far as the awards resulting from the violations found in the present case concerning i) the taking lasting from 1978 and 1984 respectively until 2012 of the applicants’ land measuring 509 sq.m. and 139 sq.m. and ii) the expropriation of the parcel of land measuring 509 sq.m. are concerned, the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision and accordingly,
(i) reserves the said question;
(ii) invites the Government and the applicants to submit, within three months from the date on which this judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(iii) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Section the power to fix the same if need be;
II. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date when the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 40,000 (forty thousand euros), jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage in relation to the parcel of land measuring 139 sq.m.;
(ii) EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros), jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
(iii) EUR 10,000 (ten thousand euros), jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 13 October 2020, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Olga ChernishovaPaul Lemmens
Deputy RegistrarPresident


APPENDIX
List of applicants
No. Firstname LASTNAME Birth year Nationality Place of residence
B. Paul MIFSUD 1948 Maltese ?abbar, Malta
3. Rebecca AINSBURY 1976 British Cumbria, United Kingdom
C. Paul ALEXANDER 1941 Australian Cowandilla, Australia
3. Bernarda BALZAN 1933 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
III. Carmen BUTTIGIEG 1941 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
B. Daniela COOMBE 1979 British Cumbria, United Kingdom
3. Mary DAVIES 1950 Maltese Peverell, United Kingdom
C. Lourdes FARUGGIA 1944 Australian Glenelg, Australia
3. Mary FELICE 1952 Maltese St Albans, United Kingdom
IV. Catherine FSADNI 1943 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
5. Angela GAUCI 1945 Maltese G?ira, Malta
• Anthony GAUCI 1946 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
II. Charmaine GAUCI 1976 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
B. Paul GAUCI 1985 Maltese G?ira, Malta
3. Saviour GAUCI 1948 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
C. Maria MATHEWS 1961 Australian Highbury, United Kingdom
3. Alfred MIFSUD 1938 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
III. Carmel MIFSUD 1949 Maltese Luqa, Malta
B. George MIFSUD 1955 Australian Baulkham Hills, Australia
C. Paoline MIFSUD 1961 Maltese Peverell, United Kingdom
D. Vivienne MIFSUD 1944 Maltese ?ebbug, Malta
E. Marcia Martha SCIBERRAS 1946 Australian Grange, Australia
4. Victoria STAINER 1954 Maltese Melksham, United Kingdom
5. Catherine VELLA 1941 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
II. Joseph VELLA 1963 Maltese Solihull, United Kingdom
II. Paul VELLA 1938 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
C. Renato VELLA 1981 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
D. Vincent VELLA 1941 Maltese Gozo, Malta
III. Melanie WHILE 1975 British Cumbria, United Kingdom

TESTO TRADOTTO

TERZA SEZIONE

CASO DI MIFSUD E ALTRI v. MALTA

(Applicazione n. 38770/17)
GIUDICE
(Meriti)
Art. 1 P1 - Godimento pacifico dei beni - Espropriazione di fatto - Nessun risarcimento ricevuto in oltre quarant'anni - Onere sproporzionato
Art. 1 P1 - Privazione della proprietà - Assenza di un fondamento ragionevole per l'accertamento giudiziale nazionale che l'espropriazione nell'interesse pubblico - Principio di buon governo nell'ambito dei diritti di proprietà - Importi di indennizzo manifestamente irragionevoli - Onere eccessivo
STRASBURGO
13 ottobre 2020
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Essa può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.
Nel caso di Mifsud e altri contro Malta,
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Terza Sezione), che si riunisce come Sezione composta da:
Paul Lemmens, Presidente,
Alena Polá?ková,
María Elósegui,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerström,
Lorraine Schembri Orland,
Ana Maria Guerra Martins, giudici,
e Olga Chernishova, vice cancelliere della sezione,
Considerando:
il ricorso (n. 38770/17) contro la Repubblica di Malta presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da ventuno cittadini maltesi, tre cittadini britannici e cinque australiani (vedi allegato per i dettagli) ("i richiedenti"), il 23 maggio 2017;
la decisione di notificare al Governo maltese ("il Governo") le denunce relative all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
la scelta del Governo del Regno Unito di non avvalersi del loro diritto di intervenire nel procedimento (articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione).
le osservazioni delle parti;
dopo aver deliberato in privato il 22 settembre 2020,
Emette la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in tale data:
INTRODUZIONE
1. Il caso riguarda la presa e, in relazione ad alcune parti del terreno, l'eventuale esproprio del terreno dei ricorrenti, originariamente utilizzato per un impianto di raccolta del gas che è stato successivamente smantellato, e per il quale sono sorti problemi in relazione all'interesse pubblico e al risarcimento. Essa solleva vari reclami ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
I FATTI
2. I dati dei richiedenti sono riportati nell'allegato. I ricorrenti erano rappresentati dal Dr. T. Abela, dal Dr. I. Refalo, dal Dr. S. Grech e dal Dr. M. Refalo, avvocati che esercitano a La Valletta.
3. Il Governo era rappresentato dal loro agente, Dr. P. Grech, Procuratore Generale.
4. I fatti del caso, così come presentati dalle parti, possono essere riassunti come segue.
CONTESTO DEL CASO
5. I richiedenti sono i proprietari di terreni a Qajjenza, Birzebbu?ia, Malta.
6. Con una dichiarazione presidenziale del 16 agosto 1978, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo il 25 agosto 1978, il Governo ha espropriato un appezzamento di terreno di 5.349 mq. di proprietà dei richiedenti (o dei loro predecessori) (di seguito "Terreno A"). Tale esproprio era destinato a servire come estensione dell'impianto di riempimento di GPL o di imbottigliamento del gas (di seguito "l'impianto") gestito da Enemalta Corporation - un ente di proprietà del governo che ha il monopolio del servizio di fornitura di energia a Malta - il cui successore è ora Enemalta plc.
7. Con un'altra dichiarazione presidenziale del 16 maggio 1984, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo del 25 maggio 1984, il Governo ha espropriato un altro appezzamento di terreno, di proprietà dei richiedenti (o dei loro predecessori), di 3.985 mq (di seguito "Terreno B") adiacente al Terreno A. Tale terreno era destinato a fornire una zona cuscinetto per l'impianto.
8. 8. Il Governo ha offerto 713,75 lire maltesi (MTL) per il Land A e 610 MTL per il Land B, a titolo di compensazione. I ricorrenti non hanno accettato tale importo e pertanto è stato avviato un procedimento dinanzi al Collegio Arbitrale del Land (LAB) per la determinazione del risarcimento dovuto.
9. Con due sentenze del 22 gennaio 1990, la LAB ha stabilito l'indennizzo per il Land A a 952 MTL (circa 2.218 euro (EUR)) e per il Land B a 800 MTL (circa 1.863 euro), entrambi considerati come terreni agricoli. La LAB ha ordinato la stipula degli atti finali di cessione.
10. Tuttavia, sebbene tali sentenze siano diventate definitive, nessun atto di questo tipo è mai stato concluso e il governo non ha mai acquistato il terreno né ha mai pagato il prezzo stabilito dalla LAB, nonostante le autorità abbiano iniziato ad utilizzare il terreno dal momento della sua presa di fatto. Secondo la legge maltese, all'epoca, fino a quando il prezzo stabilito non è stato effettivamente pagato e l'atto di trasferimento non è stato formalmente pubblicato, l'esproprio non è considerato definitivo.
11.Alla fine, il governo ha annunciato che l'impianto di Qajjenza sarebbe stato gradualmente eliminato e che un altro impianto sarebbe stato installato in una zona completamente diversa. Dato che i terreni dei ricorrenti non erano stati formalmente trasferiti al Governo e che l'esproprio non era stato concluso, e alla luce dell'intenzione del Governo di smantellare lo stabilimento di Qajjenza, i ricorrenti hanno ritenuto che non vi fosse più alcuno scopo pubblico da raggiungere con gli espropri del 1978 e del 1984.
12. Di conseguenza, il 1° dicembre 2006 i ricorrenti hanno scritto al Commissario del Land, tramite il loro avvocato, chiedendo la restituzione del terreno. Poiché tale lettera è rimasta senza risposta, il 27 novembre 2008 i ricorrenti hanno presentato una lettera giudiziale in cui chiedevano un risarcimento per l'occupazione della loro proprietà durante tutti quegli anni, nonché la restituzione della proprietà.
13. Non essendo stata intrapresa alcuna azione al riguardo, il 28 luglio 2009 è stata inviata un'altra lettera in cui si ripetevano le stesse richieste. Non è stata data alcuna risposta e non è stato versato alcun indennizzo.
14. A seguito di una notifica ai richiedenti in tal senso, ricevuta il 18 aprile 2012, con una dichiarazione presidenziale pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo del 6 giugno 2012, il Governo ha espropriato due piccoli appezzamenti di terreno dei richiedenti a Qajjenza, ossia un appezzamento di 509 mq, e un appezzamento di 139 mq, entrambi facenti parte del tratto di terreno più ampio (B) oggetto delle espropriazioni originarie. L'espropriazione è stata effettuata ai sensi della Sezione 22 (8) dell'Ordinanza sull'acquisizione di terreni (Public Purposes), Capitolo 88 delle Leggi di Malta, a seguito delle modifiche del 2002 (vedi Legge nazionale pertinente), alla luce della quale la proprietà dei terreni è stata trasferita allo Stato il giorno della dichiarazione. Secondo i fatti esposti nelle sentenze nazionali, il più piccolo di questi appezzamenti era ancora utilizzato come sottostazione che serviva gli edifici residenziali e commerciali della zona, e nella parte di 509 mq c'era una sorta di installazione dell'impianto (kien hemm xi installazzjoni tal-impjant tal-Enemalta).
15. In occasione della "ri-esportazione" di questi due appezzamenti di terreno nel 2012, il Governo ha offerto 205 euro per l'appezzamento di 509 mq, e 58,50 euro per l'appezzamento di 139 mq. Questi valori si sono basati sulle cifre fornite nel 1990 dal LAB che a sua volta si era basato sul valore del terreno al momento degli espropri del 1978 e del 1984 rispettivamente. Secondo il governo sono entrate in gioco anche altre considerazioni.
16. I ricorrenti non hanno accettato tali importi a titolo di risarcimento. In particolare, hanno ritenuto che i due piccoli appezzamenti presi nel 2012 avessero notevolmente ridotto il valore del terreno rimanente, dato che tali appezzamenti tagliavano proprio attraverso il terreno dei ricorrenti in modo che un cuneo fosse stato tolto dal suo centro, lasciando appezzamenti più piccoli, irregolari, su entrambi i lati degli appezzamenti espropriati. Così, l'unico grande e continuo appezzamento di terreno di proprietà dei richiedenti è stato perturbato. Pertanto, secondo i ricorrenti, era come se l'intera area fosse stata di fatto espropriata.
17. Secondo le perizie dell'architetto (C.C.) commissionate dalle ricorrenti nel 2009, il Land A è stato valutato a EUR 4.400.000 (questo terreno è stato valutato come rientrante nel piano di sviluppo e utilizzato per scopi industriali), mentre il Land B è stato valutato a EUR 970.000 (questo terreno è stato valutato come parzialmente - una piccola parte - all'interno della zona di sviluppo); la perdita del canone di locazione che copre il periodo dalla data di presa fino ad agosto 2009 è stata calcolata come pari a EUR 2.140.000 per il Land A e a EUR 437.000 per il Land B.
18. L'impianto ha cessato l'attività nel luglio 2012 ed è stato ufficialmente disattivato nel 2013 e smantellato nel settembre 2013.
PROCEDURA DI RICORSO COSTITUZIONALE
Prima istanza
19. Il 20 marzo 2013 le ricorrenti hanno presentato un ricorso costituzionale chiedendo al tribunale di dichiarare che il loro diritto al pacifico godimento della loro proprietà era stato violato in quanto la presa di tutti i loro terreni non era di pubblico interesse e il risarcimento loro offerto era sproporzionato, dato il danno subito, in quanto non rifletteva il valore di mercato della proprietà. I ricorrenti hanno chiesto al tribunale di concedere tutti i rimedi ritenuti necessari ed efficaci per rimediare alla violazione, e tra questi i ricorrenti hanno chiesto specificamente al tribunale di annullare le sentenze emesse dal LAB il 22 gennaio 1990; di liquidare il giusto risarcimento dovuto ai ricorrenti; o di ordinare la restituzione della proprietà ai ricorrenti.
20. Nel corso del presente procedimento, M.F., un rappresentante del Commissario dei Terreni (di seguito CoL) ha testimoniato, in data 27 giugno 2014, che i periti tecnici hanno indicato "loro" a quali aree si riferivano, ma che Enemalta non ha informato "loro" di alcun motivo specifico in merito alla necessità del terreno oggetto della dichiarazione del 2012. Ha inoltre confermato che quando il CdL aveva presentato le cause dinanzi al LAB (nel 1984), a suo parere, gli imputati in quelle cause erano, secondo il CdL, i proprietari del terreno o il loro successore di diritto. Il 18 ottobre 2013 il D.A. un rappresentante di Enemalta plc (l'utilizzatore del terreno) ha testimoniato di non essere a conoscenza dell'uso che doveva essere fatto del terreno di 509 mq. che è stato nuovamente espropriato nel 2012; ha testimoniato che gli era stato detto solo che Enemalta avrebbe proceduto all'acquisto del terreno, e ogni volta che ne ha fatto richiesta gli è stato detto che non era stata presa una decisione definitiva. J.C., ex dipendente di Enemalta plc (prima di essere sostituito dal D.A.), ha testimoniato il 22 novembre 2013 che fino al 2010, anno in cui ha lasciato il suo posto di lavoro, non era ancora stata presa alcuna decisione su quello che sarebbe stato il futuro del sito, e non sapeva se a quel punto (2013) era stata presa una decisione sul suo utilizzo.
21. In attesa del presente procedimento, il Governo ha inoltre presentato una valutazione degli immobili in questione, datata giugno 2014, che ha preso in considerazione la località, le dimensioni, lo stato e il potenziale in linea con i piani locali, nonché altri fattori suscettibili di influire sul suo valore. Secondo tale perizia, secondo l'architetto del Governo (M.S.), l'appezzamento di 509 mq (valutato 205 euro nel bando 2012) valeva 14.000 euro se valutato come terreno agricolo; l'appezzamento di 139 mq (valutato 58,50 euro nel bando 2012) valeva 4.000 euro se valutato come terreno agricolo; il rimanente appezzamento di 3.337 mq. (cioè il terreno B, meno i due appezzamenti di 139 e 509 mq) valeva 97.000 euro se valutato come terreno agricolo; un appezzamento di 5.213 mq è stato valutato 140.000 euro come terreno utilizzato per un impianto di riempimento GPL; e un appezzamento di 137 mq è stato valutato 4.000 euro se valutato come terreno arido. Questi ultimi due ultimi appezzamenti costituivano il Terreno A, oggetto della dichiarazione del 1978. Nella relazione si affermava inoltre che tutti i terreni erano considerati agricoli dal punto di vista giuridico, sia alla data in cui sono stati prelevati che alla data della relazione (2014). Si specificava inoltre che nella parte di 509 mq. e nella parte di 5.213 mq. (la maggior parte del Terreno A) c'era una parte del complesso che in precedenza era stato utilizzato per l'impianto a gas (hemm parti mill-kumpless li kien jintuza b?ala impjant tal-gass).
22. Secondo la perizia di un architetto (J.S.) redatta il 21 luglio 2009 per Enemalta plc il valore totale del terreno di 6.873 mq, dove si trovava parte dello stabilimento di Qajjenza (la cui misurazione esclude la zona tampone), varrebbe 900.000 euro se tutte le attrezzature dello stabilimento fossero state rimosse dal sito.
23. Secondo una perizia di un architetto (M.S.) redatta nell'ottobre 2008, e secondo la testimonianza dello stesso architetto, il valore totale del terreno (di 21.828 mq) originariamente occupato dallo stabilimento (esclusa la zona tampone) ammontava a 16.830.500 euro. La stima si è basata sulla potenziale destinazione d'uso del sito e su un analogo valore del terreno, così come venduto all'epoca. Secondo la sua relazione, l'area contrassegnata come zona bianca rientrava nel perimetro di sviluppo (schema edilizio) con due politiche che la attuavano direttamente, la prima riguardante il trasferimento dello stabilimento e la seconda l'uso del terreno successivamente, che doveva essere prevalentemente residenziale.
24. Con sentenza del 29 aprile 2016 il Tribunale Civile (Prima Sala), nella sua competenza costituzionale, ha ritenuto che i ricorrenti avevano dimostrato di essere i proprietari del terreno, e che lo stabilimento era stato smantellato e Enemalta, che operava da altre parti, non sapeva cosa fare del suo sito a Qajjenza. Ha ritenuto di dover esaminare separatamente gli espropri del 1973 e del 1984 da un lato e quelli del 2012 dall'altro, poiché erano stati presi in base a leggi diverse.
25. Essa ha ritenuto che gli incassi del 1978 e del 1984 (esclusi i due piccoli appezzamenti oggetto delle espropriazioni del 2012) fossero in violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, in quanto, una volta smantellato l'impianto, non sussisteva alcun fine pubblico e le autorità non avevano mai effettivamente espropriato il terreno (non avendo pagato i ricorrenti, né firmato il relativo atto di espropriazione). Pertanto, le decisioni del LAB erano state sostituite dal fatto che tale proprietà non era più necessaria. Pertanto, ha dichiarato gli espropri del 1978 e del 1984 (tranne nella misura in cui riguardavano quei terreni riappropriati nel 2012) senza effetto (ma non nulli) e ha ordinato la restituzione del terreno ai ricorrenti.
26. La posizione non era la stessa per i due appezzamenti di terreno espropriati nel 2012 ai sensi dell'articolo 22, paragrafo 8, dell'ordinanza, che erano utilizzati da Enemalta "per i suoi scopi" (g?all-iskopijiet tag?ha) e che quindi dovevano essere trasferiti al Governo. Il tribunale ha osservato che l'interesse pubblico dietro questo esproprio non era stato contestato entro il limite di 21 giorni previsto dalla legge (sezione 6 (2) dell'ordinanza). Inoltre, il più piccolo di tali appezzamenti era ancora utilizzato come sottostazione che serviva gli edifici residenziali e commerciali della zona, pertanto questi due appezzamenti di terreno dovevano essere trasferiti al governo, fatti salvi i diritti dei ricorrenti di contestare l'indennizzo offerto. 27. Essa ha respinto l'obiezione del governo di non aver esaurito i mezzi di ricorso ordinari che aveva fatto riferimento ad una domanda di nuovo processo e ad una domanda di fissazione di un termine per l'esecuzione di un obbligo che non erano rilevanti nel caso di specie.
28. Il tribunale ha inoltre ritenuto che il ritardo nella finalizzazione degli espropri del 1978 e del 1984 aveva comportato una violazione dei diritti dei ricorrenti ai sensi dell'art. 6 della Convenzione.
29. Ha condannato il Governo a pagare 15.000 euro ai ricorrenti a titolo di risarcimento per la violazione dei loro diritti. Nessuna spesa doveva essere pagata dai ricorrenti.
Appello
30. Sia il Governo che i ricorrenti hanno presentato ricorso. In particolare i ricorrenti hanno lamentato il basso livello di risarcimento in considerazione della quantità di anni durante i quali la privazione persisteva; e che l'espropriazione del più piccolo appezzamento di terreno nel 2012, di 509 mq, non aveva perseguito alcun interesse pubblico, e quindi avrebbe dovuto anche essere rilasciato insieme al resto della proprietà, in quanto la sua presa serviva solo a diminuire il valore della loro intera proprietà. Inoltre, non era stato corretto constatare che non potevano reclamare quest'ultimo perché non lo avevano fatto ai sensi dell'articolo 6, comma 2, dell'ordinanza, in quanto quest'ultima non prevedeva che il termine decorreva dalla data della notifica.
31. Con sentenza del 25 novembre 2016, la Corte costituzionale ha dichiarato che non era possibile per il primo tribunale constatare una violazione dell'articolo 6, in quanto le ricorrenti non avevano presentato reclamo in merito e ha quindi revocato quella parte della sentenza di primo grado. Ha confermato il resto.
32. In relazione alla confermata violazione relativa alla più ampia area di terreno, per quanto rilevante, nel respingere l'appello del Commissario del Land secondo cui il primo tribunale aveva sbagliato a dichiarare che non esisteva alcun interesse pubblico una volta che l'impianto era stato smantellato (in relazione ai terreni A e B), la Corte Costituzionale ha ribadito la sua giurisprudenza secondo cui l'interesse pubblico doveva persistere fino al completamento della procedura di espropriazione. Una volta accertato che il terreno era stato sottratto ai fini dell'impianto di gas, che non esisteva più, spettava al commissario del Land dimostrare che esisteva ancora qualche altro interesse pubblico. Non era stata presentata alcuna prova in tal senso.
33. In relazione allo stesso appezzamento di terreno, la Commissione ha anche rilevato, tra l'altro, che l'istituzione di una compensazione da parte della LAB non soddisfaceva necessariamente il requisito della proporzionalità. Inoltre, l'ordine della LAB di procedere al trasferimento della proprietà non è stato seguito e l'atto non è mai stato firmato, con la conseguenza che i ricorrenti erano ancora privi di compensazione trentaquattro anni dopo l'acquisizione. Questi fatti, insieme all'incertezza entro la quale i ricorrenti si sono trovati, hanno portato ad una violazione dei loro diritti di proprietà.
34. Per quanto riguarda la concessione di un risarcimento di 15.000 euro, che considerava come un danno non pecuniario, e che ha confermato, la Corte Costituzionale ha osservato che si doveva prendere in considerazione l'incertezza in cui i ricorrenti erano stati lasciati per un periodo di tempo prolungato, le dimensioni del terreno e gli anni durante i quali erano stati privati di esso; e anche, il fatto che gli incassi del 1978 e del 1984 erano stati originariamente nell'interesse pubblico, che il terreno era stato agricolo, così come il fatto che ora era stato restituito a loro. Ha inoltre rilevato che nella loro domanda iniziale i ricorrenti avevano chiesto un risarcimento per il ritiro o la restituzione dei terreni. Ne consegue che, da quando la terra è stata restituita, non è dovuto alcun danno pecuniario.
35. Per quanto riguarda le due porzioni di terreno minori, solo una delle quali era stata oggetto del ricorso delle ricorrenti, la Corte Costituzionale ha ritenuto che alla data di riferimento, nel 2012 (essendo questi terreni espropriati secondo una legge diversa), essi erano ancora occupati da Enemalta, in particolare sul terreno di 509 mq, vi era "parte del complesso precedentemente utilizzato come impianto a gas" (sulla base della relazione di un architetto M.S. vedi paragrafo 21) e le ricorrenti non avevano dimostrato alcun abuso da parte delle autorità. La decisione del primo tribunale era stata quindi corretta. Il tribunale di primo grado ha inoltre ritenuto corretto che le ricorrenti non si siano avvalse della procedura di cui all'articolo 6, comma 2, dell'ordinanza, nonostante la notifica due mesi prima della dichiarazione presidenziale del 2012, come ammesso nella testimonianza di T.G. Le ricorrenti non hanno quindi fatto ricorso a un rimedio legittimo per sostenere che non vi era stato alcun interesse pubblico ai sensi dell'articolo 6, comma 2, dell'ordinanza, scelta di loro competenza.
36. La Corte Costituzionale ha ripartito i costi come segue: i costi di prima istanza dovevano rimanere come erano stati decisi; 4/5 dei costi del ricorso del CdL dovevano essere sostenuti da quest'ultimo e 1/5 dalle ricorrenti; i costi del ricorso delle ricorrenti dovevano essere interamente a loro carico; e 3/4 dei costi del ricorso incidentale di Enemalta plc dovevano essere sostenuti da quest'ultima e 1/4 dalle ricorrenti.
INFORMAZIONI RELATIVE A ENEMALTA
37. Il 6 maggio 1987 Enemalta Corporation (il predecessore di Enemalta plc) ha acquistato da Laylay Company Limited un terreno di 46.201 mq. per la somma di 105.878 MTL (circa 246.629 EUR), il cui prezzo è stato fissato a 2.576,12 MTL ogni 1.124 mq.
LA SITUAZIONE DOPO LA SENTENZA DELLA CORTE COSTITUZIONALE
38. Il terreno di proprietà dei richiedenti era completamente abbandonato e in stato di abbandono; tuttavia tutte le tracce dei serbatoi di gas erano state rimosse. Anche un altro appezzamento di terreno di proprietà esclusiva di Enemalta plc, adiacente al terreno dei richiedenti, è stato abbandonato; sono rimaste solo poche strutture fatiscenti e l'area non è stata utilizzata in alcun modo. Non sono rimaste attrezzature appartenenti all'impianto originario.
39. L'impianto nella nuova sede era in funzione dal luglio 2013 ed era gestito da una società privata (Liquigas) - non Enemalta plc.
40. Secondo le ricorrenti, fino al momento della presentazione del ricorso, nonostante la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, le ricorrenti non avevano ottenuto il riappropriazione del loro terreno in quanto non avevano ottenuto l'accesso al terreno ancora sigillato.
41. Una perizia di un architetto (P.B.), effettuata per conto dei ricorrenti, ha valutato il valore del terreno dei ricorrenti nel 2017, che rifletteva la perdita per i ricorrenti derivante dalle ri-esportazioni del 2012 (secondo la quale l'espropriazione della parcella triangolare di terreno di 509 mq nel 2012 ha influito negativamente sul resto del terreno dei ricorrenti) per un importo di EUR 1.153.500, basato in particolare su una proiezione per lo sviluppo di lotti edificati sul terreno A che si trovava all'interno di una zona di sviluppo (secondo i piani locali del 1995). Secondo la stessa valutazione, il rendimento locativo cumulato dal 1978 al 2017 per i terreni oggetto dell'esproprio del 1978 è stato di EUR 3.476.942, con un tasso di interesse conservativo del 2,5%, pari ad una perdita complessiva di EUR 4.248.223.
42. Secondo il Governo il 6 luglio 2018 una parte dei terreni A e B (escluse le proprietà di 509 mq e 139 mq) è stata restituita ai richiedenti. A questo proposito, essi hanno presentato al presidente dell'Autorità fondiaria una copia di una lettera del Consiglio dei governatori dell'Autorità fondiaria che confermava che il 6 luglio 2018 il primo aveva deciso di liberare la proprietà, nonché una dichiarazione, da parte dell'Autorità fondiaria, del 7 agosto 2018, pubblicata nella Gazzetta ufficiale del governo, relativa alla liberazione del terreno.
QUADRO GIURIDICO PERTINENTE
L'ORDINANZA SULL'ACQUISTO DI TERRENI (SCOPI PUBBLICI)
43.A seguito delle modifiche apportate nel 2002, le sezioni 6 e 22 (8) dell'ordinanza sull'acquisizione di terreni (scopi pubblici), capitolo 88 delle leggi di Malta, nella misura in cui sono rilevanti, si leggono come segue:
Sezione 2
"i "terreni agricoli o rurali" non comprendono l'orto domestico di una casa o di un edificio o qualsiasi altro terreno all'interno dei recinti di una casa o di un edificio, né un cantiere o un terreno adibito a rifiuti, ma comprendono le fattorie, i fabbricati destinati principalmente all'allevamento di bestiame da riporto o di altri animali domestici e altre strutture di natura affine;".
Sezione 6
"(2) Chiunque abbia un interesse fondiario, in relazione al quale sia resa una dichiarazione del Presidente di cui al comma (1), può contestare l'oggetto pubblico di detta dichiarazione dinanzi al Collegio Arbitrale Fondiario mediante istanza da depositare presso la cancelleria di detto Collegio entro ventuno giorni dalla pubblicazione della suddetta dichiarazione e delle disposizioni del Codice di Organizzazione e di Procedura Civile applicabili all'udienza delle cause dinanzi al Tribunale Civile, Per la determinazione di tale domanda si applica, mutatis mutandis, la First Hall, comprese le disposizioni relative ai ricorsi derivanti da tali decisioni:
A condizione che il deposito di una domanda ai sensi del presente articolo non ostacoli la prosecuzione del procedimento di espropriazione o l'esecuzione di qualsiasi azione che possa essere intrapresa nei confronti del terreno come previsto dalla presente ordinanza durante il periodo in cui la domanda non è ancora stata determinata, fatto salvo il diritto del richiedente di chiedere un risarcimento nel caso in cui la dichiarazione del Presidente si riveli priva di oggetto pubblico".
Sezione 17
"Ogni terreno che non sia un terreno edificabile è valutato ai fini della determinazione dell'indennizzo da corrispondere in caso di acquisto obbligatorio come terreno rurale o come terreno incolto, a seconda dei casi:
A condizione che, nel determinare tale compensazione, si tenga conto del valore delle strutture esistenti e se tali strutture sono coperte da un permesso ai sensi di legge".
Sezione 18
"(1) Un terreno, diverso da un edificio storico, è considerato un cantiere se rientra nei limiti di un piano di costruzione o come indicato e approvato per lo sviluppo in un Piano di Struttura o in un piano sussidiario che è stato adottato per il momento in vigore ai sensi di qualsiasi legge relativa alla pianificazione.
(2) Nel determinare il compenso dovuto per un cantiere, si terrà conto dell'uso o dello sviluppo che può essere fatto o che può essere fatto in conformità con le disposizioni del sottoarticolo (1)".
Sezione 18A
"Nonostante le disposizioni di questa o di qualsiasi altra legge, il valore di qualsiasi terreno -
(a) ancora in corso di acquisizione al 1° gennaio 2005;
(b) per la quale è stata rilasciata una dichiarazione ai sensi dell'articolo 3 prima del 5 marzo 2003, e
c) per i quali non è stato emesso un avviso di trattamento prima del 1° gennaio 2005 secondo le disposizioni della presente ordinanza in vigore prima della data indicata nel presente paragrafo,
Il valore degli interessi dovuti fino al momento del pagamento ai sensi dell'articolo 12, paragrafo 3, sarà pari al valore del 1° gennaio 2005".
Sezione 22
"(8) Con la dichiarazione del Presidente in conformità alla presente ordinanza, secondo la quale ogni terreno deve essere acquistato con l'acquisto assoluto, la proprietà assoluta del terreno a cui si riferisce la dichiarazione è considerata un'area di registrazione ai fini della legge sul registro fondiario e la proprietà assoluta dello stesso è trasferita all'autorità competente, senza ulteriori garanzie o formalità, gratuitamente e senza alcun onere per l'autorità competente e da essa acquistata, L'autorità competente farà sì che tali terreni siano iscritti nel registro fondiario a suo nome in conformità con la legge sul registro fondiario entro tre mesi dall'emissione della dichiarazione del presidente. ”
Sezione 27
"(1) Fatte salve eventuali disposizioni speciali contenute nella presente ordinanza, nella valutazione dei compensi il Consiglio di amministrazione agisce secondo le seguenti regole:
(a) non è prevista alcuna indennità in quanto l'acquisizione è obbligatoria;
(b) il valore del terreno, fatto salvo quanto qui di seguito previsto, è considerato l'importo che il terreno, se venduto sul mercato aperto da un venditore disposto, potrebbe presumibilmente realizzare:
A condizione che -
(i) il valore del terreno corrisponde al valore al momento della notifica della Dichiarazione del Presidente, senza tener conto di eventuali miglioramenti o lavori effettuati o costruiti successivamente su detto terreno e nel caso in cui il terreno fosse in possesso dell'autorità competente immediatamente prima della notifica della Dichiarazione del Presidente non si terrà conto, nella valutazione del valore del terreno, di eventuali miglioramenti o lavori effettuati o costruiti dall'autorità competente mentre era in possesso del terreno;
ii) nel caso in cui una parte del terreno appartenente a qualsiasi persona sia stata presa in possesso ai sensi della presente ordinanza, qualsiasi aumento del valore del residuo del terreno a causa della vicinanza di eventuali miglioramenti o lavori effettuati o costruiti dall'autorità competente entro l'ottavo giorno lavorativo successivo alla notifica della dichiarazione del presidente, non si tiene conto di eventuali miglioramenti o lavori effettuati o costruiti dall'autorità competente immediatamente prima della notifica della Dichiarazione del Presidente non si terrà conto, nella valutazione del valore del terreno, di eventuali miglioramenti o opere realizzate o costruite dall'autorità competente durante il possesso del terreno;
ii) nel caso in cui una parte del terreno appartenente ad una qualsiasi persona venga sottratta in virtù della presente ordinanza, si terrà conto di qualsiasi aumento del valore del residuo del terreno in ragione della vicinanza di eventuali miglioramenti o lavori realizzati o costruiti dall'autorità competente nei diciotto mesi precedenti la pubblicazione della Dichiarazione del Presidente, o che saranno realizzati o costruiti dall'autorità competente nei diciotto mesi successivi alla pubblicazione della Dichiarazione del Presidente;
(iii) si terrà conto degli eventuali danni subiti dal proprietario a causa della separazione del terreno da altri terreni appartenenti a tale proprietario o di altri effetti pregiudizievoli per tali altri terreni a causa dell'esercizio dei poteri conferiti dalla presente ordinanza;
(iv) qualora il danno sia stato subito a causa di lavori effettuati sul o nel terreno, si terrà conto dell'eventuale aumento di valore del terreno a causa di un miglioramento del drenaggio e di qualsiasi altro vantaggio derivante da tali lavori; ...".
LA LEGGE SUI TERRENI DEL GOVERNO
44. La sezione 43 del Government Lands Act, capitolo 573 delle leggi di Malta, del 25 aprile 2017, recita come segue:
"Il Presidente del Consiglio dei Governatori dell'Autorità del Territorio può revocare in qualsiasi momento qualsiasi dichiarazione emessa ai sensi del presente atto o prima mediante un avviso nella Gazzetta e almeno una volta in due giornali locali giornali quotidiani o domenicali, a condizione che qualsiasi revoca sia registrata presso il Catasto e il Registro Pubblico".
LA LEGGE
ALLEGATO VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
45. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato che una parte della loro proprietà (di 509 mq) era stata espropriata senza che vi fosse un interesse pubblico e non erano stati adeguatamente indennizzati per l'esproprio del 2012. I ricorrenti hanno anche lamentato che non era stato ricevuto alcun risarcimento per l'occupazione degli altri terreni che erano stati loro restituiti. Hanno quindi ritenuto di essere rimasti vittime della violazione nonostante la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale a loro favore. Si sono basati sull'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 che recita come segue:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni che precedono non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni".
Il prelievo, rispettivamente dal 1978 e dal 1984, fino al 2012, dei terreni A e della maggior parte dei terreni B (esclusi gli immobili di 509 mq. e 139 mq.)
Le dichiarazioni delle parti
46. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non erano più vittime della violazione in quanto i tribunali nazionali avevano confermato la violazione e ordinato la restituzione della proprietà, che è stata successivamente rilasciata il 6 luglio 2018. Essi hanno osservato che, ai sensi dell'articolo 43 del Government Lands Act (cfr. la legge nazionale pertinente di cui sopra), non vi era alcun obbligo di notifica ai proprietari se non attraverso la pubblicazione nella Gazzetta ufficiale del governo e nei giornali. Il Governo ha inoltre sottolineato che i ricorrenti avevano chiesto ai tribunali nazionali un risarcimento o, in alternativa, la restituzione della proprietà, e i tribunali nazionali, avendo stabilito che non vi era più alcun interesse pubblico per la presa di quel terreno, avevano concesso quest'ultima forma di risarcimento, insieme a un premio di 15.000 euro di danni non pecuniari.
47. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato di non essere stati risarciti per l'utilizzo, rispettivamente dal 1978 e dal 1984, fino al 2012, della maggior parte dei terreni A e B (esclusi gli immobili di 509 mq. e 139 mq.) Inoltre, tale proprietà non era stata effettivamente liberata (fino alla data di presentazione del ricorso alla Corte) nonostante l'ordinanza in tal senso della Corte Costituzionale che ha confermato la violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. Nelle loro osservazioni, essi hanno inoltre contestato l'affermazione del Governo secondo cui i beni sarebbero stati restituiti nel 2018, cioè due anni dopo la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, che di per sé non è stata una reazione tempestiva. Essi hanno osservato di non essere stati informati di alcuna decisione di rilascio della proprietà o di alcun annuncio nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo, e che alla data delle richieste (6 novembre 2019) il terreno era ancora sigillato e i muri di confine eretti dalle autorità non erano stati smantellati, quindi i ricorrenti non avevano ancora accesso ad esso. Di conseguenza, i ricorrenti hanno ritenuto di essere tenuti al risarcimento per questo ulteriore periodo successivo al 2013, durante il quale il terreno è stato trattenuto nonostante non se ne sia fatto alcun uso.
48. In particolare, le ricorrenti hanno ritenuto che le loro richieste al tribunale nazionale non escludevano la possibilità di ottenere sia la restituzione del bene che il risarcimento per il suo utilizzo fino a quel momento, in quanto riguardavano due diversi scenari, a seconda che il tribunale nazionale ritenesse che vi fosse o meno un interesse pubblico. Inoltre, avevano chiesto al giudice di fornire qualsiasi rimedio efficace e appropriato. Pertanto, secondo le ricorrenti, il fatto che non abbiano fatto specifico riferimento al risarcimento per la perdita dell'uso non significa che non ne avessero diritto.
La valutazione del Tribunale
49. La Corte ribadisce che un richiedente è privato della sua condizione di vittima se le autorità nazionali hanno riconosciuto, espressamente o in sostanza, e quindi concesso un adeguato e sufficiente risarcimento per una violazione della Convenzione (si veda, ad esempio, Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-93, CEDU 2006-V; e B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited c. Malta, n. 75225/13 e 77311/13, § 55, 11 settembre 2018).
50. Per quanto riguarda la prima condizione, ossia il riconoscimento di una violazione della Convenzione, la Corte ritiene che le conclusioni della Corte costituzionale (cfr. paragrafi 31-33) equivalgano al riconoscimento di una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
51. Per quanto riguarda la seconda condizione, vale a dire un risarcimento adeguato e sufficiente, la Corte deve accertare se le misure adottate dalle autorità nelle particolari circostanze del caso in questione hanno consentito ai ricorrenti di ottenere un risarcimento adeguato in modo tale da privarli dello status di vittima (ibidem § 57). La Corte osserva che la Corte costituzionale ha concesso ai ricorrenti EUR 15.000 per danni non patrimoniali (dai quali hanno dovuto pagare parte delle spese giudiziarie che nel caso di specie erano ragionevolmente giustificate). Inoltre, la Corte Costituzionale ha ordinato la liberazione della proprietà, vale a dire il terreno A e la maggior parte del terreno B (escluse le proprietà di 509 mq e 139 mq), come richiesto dai ricorrenti. Nelle circostanze attuali e alla luce dei documenti in possesso della Corte, la Corte condivide l'interpretazione delle giurisdizioni costituzionali secondo cui la richiesta dei ricorrenti di liberare la proprietà era la loro richiesta principale e solo in alternativa sarebbe stato necessario un risarcimento per l'uso di tali terreni. In effetti, non era stata posta alcuna condizione in relazione a quest'ultima alternativa. Ne consegue che, sulla base della loro richiesta, la Corte Costituzionale ha concesso un adeguato risarcimento per la violazione accertata e la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale ha offerto un sufficiente sollievo ai ricorrenti.
52. Nella misura in cui i ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che la proprietà non era stata rilasciata, la Corte osserva che il governo ha dimostrato la loro affermazione che la proprietà è stata effettivamente rilasciata, anche se con un ritardo significativo di oltre diciotto mesi. Mentre ai ricorrenti non era stata notificata una notifica di rilascio, purtroppo la legge in vigore al momento del rilascio non richiedeva tale notifica, né è stato dimostrato che ciò fosse un requisito della legge applicabile al momento in cui il rilascio è stato ordinato dalla Corte costituzionale. Infine, nella misura in cui i ricorrenti sostengono che l'accesso è ancora sigillato in quanto le mura di cinta sono ancora in posizione, la Corte osserva che, come rilevato dai ricorrenti, si tratta solo di mura di cinta e non rimangono altri impianti. Inoltre, dalle fotografie aeree presentate dalle ricorrenti le mura di cinta sono presenti solo in alcune parti limitate della proprietà oggetto dell'ordine di restituzione. Infine, essendo i richiedenti i proprietari in diritto, non sembra esserci alcun ostacolo a che essi adottino le misure necessarie per accedere al terreno, compreso il ricorso ad eventuali rimedi ordinari a tale riguardo.
53. Alla luce di quanto sopra, il Tribunale ritiene che anche il secondo criterio sia stato soddisfatto e che i ricorrenti non continuino a subire le conseguenze della violazione sostenuta dai tribunali nazionali e quindi abbiano perso lo status di vittima in questa parte del ricorso.
54. Questa parte della domanda è quindi incompatibile ratione personae con le disposizioni della Convenzione ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 3 (a) e deve essere dichiarata inammissibile ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 4 della Convenzione.
La presa di durata dal 1978 e 1984, rispettivamente, fino al 2012, delle proprietà dei richiedenti di 509 mq e 139 mq.
Le dichiarazioni delle parti
55. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato, in particolare, che non è mai stato concesso alcun risarcimento per l'utilizzo di questa porzione di terreno fino al 2012, né è stata ordinata la sua restituzione. Hanno inoltre ritenuto che, poiché l'uso del terreno era destinato a scopi industriali, esso non dovesse essere valutato come terreno agricolo ai fini del risarcimento. In risposta alle accuse del Governo, essi hanno sostenuto che tutti i procedimenti nazionali avevano dimostrato di essere titolari della proprietà e che non erano stati pagati nel corso degli anni per altri motivi.
56. Il Governo ha fatto riferimento, nel complesso, ai principi generali relativi alla disposizione invocata e ha presentato osservazioni relative all'acquisizione dei terreni A e B, ma non ha presentato osservazioni specifiche relative a questi due appezzamenti di terreno, ad eccezione del fatto che essi erano coperti dalle espropriazioni del 1978 e del 1984 e dalle rispettive decisioni del LAB emesse nel 1990, che non erano state eseguite perché, secondo il Governo, i ricorrenti si erano opposti a fornire la prova del titolo di proprietà.
La valutazione della Corte
57. La Corte osserva che i tribunali nazionali non si sono occupati di questo aspetto della denuncia, nonostante il fatto che i ricorrenti abbiano presentato la loro denuncia relativa a tutti i beni (cfr. paragrafo 19), pertanto i ricorrenti rimangono vittime a tale riguardo. La Corte osserva inoltre che il Governo non ha fatto alcuna osservazione rilevante in merito a questa parte della denuncia. La Corte ritiene che questa denuncia non sia né manifestamente infondata né inammissibile per qualsiasi altro motivo elencato nell'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
58. La Corte osserva che lo scopo delle dichiarazioni presidenziali del 1978 e del 1984 era chiaramente quello di privare i ricorrenti dei loro beni. In pratica, mentre il Governo si è impossessato dei beni, non ha perfezionato gli atti di trasferimento nonostante un ordine in tal senso emanato dal LAB nel 1990. Solo nel 2012, a seguito di una nuova dichiarazione in base a diverse disposizioni legislative, il trasferimento ha avuto luogo. Alla luce di ciò, si può ritenere che l'interferenza nel periodo 1990-2012 sia andata oltre il controllo statale sull'uso dei beni, sfiorando quello che potrebbe essere equiparato a un esproprio di fatto.
59. Non è necessario che la Corte decida se l'ingerenza ricada nell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, primo comma, secondo periodo (privazione di beni), o nell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, secondo comma (controllo dell'uso dei beni). In effetti, i principi applicabili sono simili per entrambi i tipi di interferenze: oltre ad essere legittima, una privazione di beni o un'interferenza come il controllo dell'uso della proprietà deve anche soddisfare il requisito della proporzionalità (si veda, per quanto riguarda una privazione di beni, Scordino, citato sopra, §§ 81 e 93; Kozac?o?lu v. Turchia [GC], n. 2334/03, §§ 51, 52 e 63, 19 febbraio 2009; Visti?š e Perepjolkins c. Lettonia [GC], n. 71243/01, § 94, 25 ottobre 2012; e, per quanto riguarda il controllo dell'uso della proprietà Hutten-Czapska c. Polonia [GC], n. 35014/97, §§ 163, 164 e 167, CEDU 2006-VIII, e G.I.E.M. S.R.L. e altri c. Italia [GC], nn. 1828/06 e altri 2, §§ 292-93, 28 giugno 2018). Come la Corte ha ripetutamente affermato, occorre trovare un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della comunità e le esigenze della tutela dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo, essendo la ricerca di tale giusto equilibrio insita in tutta la Convenzione. L'equilibrio richiesto non sarà raggiunto quando la persona interessata sopporta un onere individuale ed eccessivo (cfr. Brum?rescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 78, CEDU 1999-VII; Depalle c. Francia [GC], n. 34044/02, § 83, CEDU 2010; G.I.E.M. S.R.L. e altri, citata, §§ 293 e 300; e Saliba e altri c. Malta, n. 20287/10, §§ 54-55, 22 novembre 2011).
60. Non è contestato che la presa di questi appezzamenti di terreno rispettivamente nel 1978 e nel 1984 sia stata legittima; la Corte non si pronuncerà pertanto sulla questione. Inoltre, la Corte può accettare che la presa di questa parte di proprietà era nell'interesse pubblico che persisteva fino alla realizzazione dell'impianto. Resta da determinare se sia stato raggiunto il giusto equilibrio richiesto e, in particolare, se le ricorrenti abbiano subito un onere eccessivo.
61. La Corte rileva che non sembra sussistere alcun dubbio sul fatto che le ricorrenti non hanno ricevuto alcun tipo di compensazione per l'utilizzo di questo terreno da parte del Governo dal 1978/1984 fino alla data del trasferimento della proprietà al Governo nel 2012. Il semplice fatto che questi due appezzamenti fossero stati considerati come parte del Land B nella determinazione del risarcimento nelle decisioni della LAB emesse nel 1990 non è rilevante. La Corte rileva infatti che - come affermato dalla Corte costituzionale - tali decisioni dei LAB sono state sostituite e non sono mai state eseguite. Ne consegue che i ricorrenti non hanno ricevuto alcun indennizzo fino ad oggi, in oltre quarant'anni, e quindi sono stati costretti a sostenere un onere sproporzionato.
62. Di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 a questo proposito.
La privazione, nel 2012, delle proprietà dei ricorrenti di 509 mq. e 139 mq. rispettivamente
La portata del reclamo
63. La Corte rileva che, nonostante alcune dichiarazioni nelle loro osservazioni dopo la comunicazione dell'istanza al governo convenuto, risulta chiaramente dall'istanza presentata alla Corte, nonché dal procedimento dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali, che la denuncia dei ricorrenti relativa alla mancanza di interesse pubblico si riferisce esclusivamente alla parcella di terreno di 509 mq.
Osservazioni delle parti
a) I richiedenti
64. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato che non vi era stato alcun interesse pubblico dietro la presa della proprietà di 509 mq che non era stata utilizzata dal 2012, e che l'importo del risarcimento concesso per l'esproprio di entrambi i terreni era stato inadeguato. Essi sono stati quindi sottoposti a un onere sproporzionato. Hanno rilevato che la Corte Costituzionale aveva ritenuto che la finalità pubblica dietro l'esproprio del 2012 consistesse nell'ospitare l'impianto del gas di Enemalta, ma aveva ignorato il fatto che Enemalta aveva abbandonato il sito più o meno nello stesso periodo. I ricorrenti hanno ritenuto, in particolare, che una volta che l'impianto era stato trasferito nel 2013 non c'era più alcun motivo valido per continuare a tenere il terreno. Essi hanno ritenuto che il Governo lo avesse mantenuto solo per ridurre il valore della proprietà adiacente e per ridurre il risarcimento dovuto ai ricorrenti.
65. Per quanto riguarda il rimedio di cui all'articolo 6, paragrafo 2, dell'ordinanza, i ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che, secondo una sentenza di primo grado della giurisdizione costituzionale nel caso di Mark Refalo per conto dei fratelli Cane contro il direttore del terreno e il procuratore generale, tale rimedio era in violazione della Convenzione, in quanto il relativo termine iniziava a decorrere dalla pubblicazione nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo e non dalla notifica dei proprietari. In quella causa, in appello, la Corte Costituzionale del 30 settembre 2016 non ha deciso la questione ritenendola prematura e, infine, con sentenza del 28 giugno 2019, la Corte d'Appello (Civile) ha stabilito che il termine di ventuno giorni per la presentazione di tale ricorso decorreva dal giorno in cui erano soddisfatti vari criteri, ossia la pubblicazione dell'avviso di esproprio sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo, nonché su due giornali e sulla bacheca del consiglio comunale competente per la località in cui si trova il terreno; e la registrazione di tutti i dettagli presso il LAB e la notifica a tutte le persone che hanno un interesse nel terreno. I richiedenti hanno sostenuto che, poiché l'impianto è stato trasferito solo nel 2013, non avrebbero potuto sollevare la questione entro ventuno giorni dalla pubblicazione sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo.
66. Per quanto riguarda l'affermazione del Governo secondo cui i ricorrenti potrebbero ancora contestare il risarcimento offerto prima della LAB, i ricorrenti hanno osservato che la Corte aveva precedentemente concesso un risarcimento nei casi in cui i ricorrenti erano in attesa di un risarcimento per un lungo numero di anni.
67. Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento, essi hanno sostenuto in primo luogo che le offerte fatte si basavano su valori ancora più bassi di quelli stabiliti dall'architetto del Governo (si veda il precedente paragrafo 21). Ancora più importante, i ricorrenti hanno osservato che l'annuncio nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del 6 giugno 2012 aveva indicato specificamente le somme di 58,50 e 205 euro "valutate con decisione del LAB del 22 gennaio 1990" e di fatto tali somme riflettevano il prezzo offerto nel 1990 adeguato alle dimensioni del terreno. Tuttavia, il valore del terreno alla data dell'esproprio era molto più elevato.
68. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che il terreno di 139 mq. occupava una sottostazione già prima del 2012, quindi non poteva certamente essere considerato come terreno agricolo - la perizia del loro architetto aveva anche stabilito che si trattava di un terreno edificabile, poiché si trovava all'interno di un confine edificabile e a pochi metri di distanza da una zona che rientrava in uno schema. Per quanto riguarda la porzione di terreno di 509 mq, i ricorrenti hanno osservato che la restituzione della proprietà sarebbe stata il rimedio appropriato, poiché non se ne faceva alcun uso, ma in caso contrario, il risarcimento doveva tener conto del fatto che questo terreno triangolare si estendeva lungo tutta la facciata del terreno rimanente dei ricorrenti (che doveva essere restituito), che a partire dal 1995 si trovava in una zona edificabile, ostacolandone lo sviluppo e causando una svalutazione dell'intero sito. Il risarcimento doveva quindi tenere conto di tale perdita, che secondo una perizia degli architetti ammontava a 1.508.000 euro.
b) Il governo
69. Il Governo ha sostenuto che l'esproprio era legale e che, secondo la legge nazionale, non era richiesta alcuna prova di uno scopo pubblico. Hanno ritenuto che una dichiarazione del Presidente di Malta fosse di per sé una prova adeguata di un interesse pubblico. In ogni caso, l'interesse pubblico dietro un esproprio poteva essere contestato presentando un procedimento dinanzi al LAB entro ventuno giorni dalla dichiarazione del Presidente - un rimedio che i tribunali nazionali hanno considerato efficace e di cui le ricorrenti non si sono avvalse senza dimostrare le ragioni di tale inadempienza. In ogni caso, il Governo ha osservato che la Corte Costituzionale aveva ritenuto che tale interesse pubblico esistesse. A parere del Governo, gli espropri del 2012 sono stati fondati sugli espropri delle Terre A e B molti anni prima per assistere l'Enemalta. Mentre una parte di quei terreni non era più necessaria, non è stato così per i terreni in questione, che sono stati quindi espropriati nel 2012 e sono stati utilizzati, come rilevato dal tribunale di primo grado (cfr. paragrafo 26). Pertanto, il requisito dell'interesse pubblico è stato soddisfatto nel 2012 e sicuramente continuerà ad esserlo fino alla cessazione dell'attività dell'impianto, alla decontaminazione dell'area e allo smantellamento delle infrastrutture.
70. Il Governo ha sostenuto che anche il risarcimento offerto era stato adeguato, e a loro avviso non si era basato solo sul valore del terreno nel 1990, poiché l'architetto aveva anche tenuto conto "della località, delle dimensioni, dei contorni, dello stato e del potenziale, in termini di piani e dei confini della zona di sviluppo, come ufficialmente pubblicato dall'autorità maltese per l'ambiente e la pianificazione, nonché del valore di altre proprietà simili nelle vicinanze, così come di altre questioni che possono influenzare il valore della proprietà". Il Governo ha anche considerato che le valutazioni su cui si sono basati i richiedenti erano errate e si basavano sul presupposto che il terreno fosse edificabile. Tuttavia, i ricorrenti non avevano diritto ad un pieno risarcimento, dato l'interesse pubblico in questione, e il risarcimento doveva essere calcolato sulla base del valore della proprietà alla data in cui la proprietà è stata persa, cioè nel 2012, quando è stata considerata come terreno agricolo. Il Governo ha inoltre fatto riferimento alle valutazioni effettuate dal suo architetto (cfr. paragrafo 21) e ha ritenuto che il risarcimento per questi due appezzamenti non dovesse superare i 18.000 euro. Essi hanno inoltre ritenuto che i richiedenti avessero avuto a disposizione garanzie procedurali in quanto potevano ancora contestare l'importo del risarcimento offerto prima del LAB, e si erano anche avvalsi di procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale. Inoltre, i richiedenti non erano vulnerabili, non erano anziani e non erano disabili da diversi anni. Pertanto, secondo il Governo, non hanno subito un onere eccessivo.
Ammissibilità
71. La Corte rileva che il governo non ha sollevato un'obiezione specifica in merito all'inammissibilità della denuncia per non esaurimento dei rimedi interni. Tuttavia, la Corte ritiene che il riferimento, nelle loro osservazioni di merito, al fatto che le ricorrenti non hanno intrapreso il rimedio di cui all'articolo 6, paragrafo 2, dell'ordinanza in relazione al requisito dell'interesse pubblico e che dinanzi al LAB in relazione all'importo del risarcimento, equivale in sostanza a una tale obiezione.
a) Principi generali
72. La Corte ribadisce che, ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione, essa può trattare una questione solo dopo aver esaurito tutti i rimedi interni. Lo scopo di questa norma è quello di dare agli Stati contraenti la possibilità di prevenire o porre rimedio alle violazioni contestate prima che tali accuse siano presentate alla Corte (si veda, tra le altre autorità, Selmouni c. Francia [GC], n. 25803/94, § 74, CEDU 1999-V). L'articolo 35 § 1 si basa sul presupposto, riflesso nell'articolo 13 (con il quale ha una stretta affinità), che vi sia un effettivo rimedio interno disponibile per quanto riguarda la presunta violazione dei diritti di una persona (cfr. Kud?a c. Polonia [GC], n. 30210/96, § 152, CEDU 2000 XI).
73. Pertanto, la denuncia presentata alla Corte deve essere stata presentata prima ai giudici nazionali competenti, almeno nel merito, conformemente ai requisiti formali del diritto interno ed entro i termini prescritti. Tuttavia, l'obbligo di esaurire i rimedi nazionali richiede solo che il richiedente faccia un uso normale di rimedi che siano efficaci, sufficienti e accessibili per quanto riguarda le sue rimostranze ai sensi della Convenzione (cfr. Balogh c. Ungheria, n. 47940/99, § 30, 20 luglio 2004). L'esistenza di tali rimedi deve essere sufficientemente certa non solo in teoria, ma anche nella pratica, altrimenti essi non avranno la necessaria accessibilità ed efficacia (cfr. Mifsud c. Francia (dic.), [GC], n. 57220/00, ECHR 2002 VIII).
74. 74. La Corte sottolinea che l'applicazione della regola dell'esaurimento deve tenere in debito conto il fatto che essa viene applicata nell'ambito di un meccanismo di tutela dei diritti dell'uomo che le parti contraenti hanno convenuto di istituire. Di conseguenza, essa ha riconosciuto che l'articolo 35 deve essere applicato con una certa flessibilità e senza eccessivo formalismo. Ha inoltre riconosciuto che questa norma non è né assoluta né applicabile in modo automatico; nel verificare se è stata osservata, è essenziale tenere conto delle disposizioni dell'art. 35. deve essere applicato con una certa flessibilità e senza eccessivo formalismo. Ha inoltre riconosciuto che questa regola non è né assoluta né applicabile in modo automatico; nel verificare se è stata osservata è essenziale tenere conto delle circostanze particolari di ogni singolo caso (cfr. Akdivar e altri c. Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, § 69, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996 IV, e Sammut and Visa Investments Ltd c. Malta (dic.), n. 27023/03, 28 giugno 2005).
75. Per quanto riguarda l'onere della prova, spetta al Governo che si appella alla non esaustività dimostrare alla Corte che il rimedio era efficace, disponibile in teoria e in pratica nel momento in questione. Una volta soddisfatto tale onere, spetta al richiedente stabilire che il rimedio proposto dal Governo era in realtà esaurito, o era per qualche ragione inadeguato e inefficace nelle particolari circostanze del caso, o che esistevano circostanze particolari che lo esoneravano da tale requisito (v. Vu?kovi? e altri c. Serbia (obiezione preliminare) [GC], nn. 17153/11 e 29 altri, § 77, 25 marzo 2014, e McFarlane c. Irlanda [GC], no. 31333/06, § 107, 10 settembre 2010).
b) Applicazione al caso di specie
i) Per quanto riguarda il requisito dell'interesse pubblico
76. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non hanno intrapreso il rimedio di cui all'articolo 6, paragrafo 2, dell'ordinanza per contestare l'interesse pubblico dietro l'esproprio del 2012.
77. Nel caso di specie entrano in gioco varie considerazioni. Fatta salva l'interpretazione evolutiva del termine applicabile di cui all'articolo 6, paragrafo 2, dell'ordinanza - che è stato oggetto di contestazioni nell'ambito del sistema giudiziario nazionale che ha emesso decisioni diversi anni dopo il 2012 (data rilevante per il presente caso) - la Corte rileva che il testo di legge del 2012 si riferiva al termine che decorreva dalla pubblicazione nella Gazzetta ufficiale del governo. Nel caso di specie tale pubblicazione è avvenuta il 6 giugno 2012 e le ricorrenti sono state informate dell'esproprio anche prima di tale data, in particolare il 18 aprile 2012, come confermato anche dalla Corte Costituzionale. All'epoca le ricorrenti non hanno avviato il relativo procedimento entro tale termine e non è stata fornita alcuna giustificazione rilevante per tale omissione.
78. Tuttavia, la Corte rileva anche che, a parte la loro affermazione che non vi era alcun interesse pubblico nel 2012, le ricorrenti hanno anche sostenuto che vi era ancora meno interesse pubblico dietro l'esproprio poco dopo il 2012, cioè una volta che l'impianto è stato disattivato e smantellato.
79. In particolare, il Tribunale rileva che la dichiarazione presidenziale è stata pubblicata nell'aprile 2012 e che l'impianto ha smesso di essere operativo solo due mesi dopo, nel luglio 2012. È stato ufficialmente disattivato e poi smantellato nel settembre 2013, a quel punto i richiedenti hanno ritenuto che non vi fosse assolutamente alcuna finalità pubblica dietro la presa. In tali circostanze, il Tribunale non vede come, a quel punto, il rimedio di cui all'articolo 6, comma 2, dell'ordinanza, il cui termine è scaduto prima che tali eventi si verificassero, possa essere considerato efficace nelle circostanze specifiche del caso di specie. In particolare, mentre un rimedio per contestare l'interesse pubblico non dovrebbe essere disponibile all'infinito, in circostanze come quelle del presente caso, in cui l'uso, o la mancanza di esso, dei beni espropriati è stato soggetto a cambiamenti in un tempo molto breve dopo la dichiarazione di esproprio, l'unico rimedio a disposizione dei ricorrenti nel sistema nazionale maltese era l'istituzione di un procedimento di ricorso costituzionale.
80. Infatti, i ricorrenti hanno sollevato la questione della mancanza di interesse pubblico dietro l'esproprio del lotto di 509 mq sia davanti al Tribunale Civile (Prima Sala) nella sua competenza costituzionale e davanti alla Corte Costituzionale, in appello. Entrambi i tribunali hanno osservato che i ricorrenti non si sono avvalsi del rimedio di cui alla sezione 6 (2), tuttavia non hanno respinto la denuncia per motivi procedurali o si sono rifiutati di fare accertamenti per quanto riguarda l'interesse pubblico, al contrario, i tribunali nazionali si sono pronunciati in merito (come ammesso dal governo, si veda il paragrafo 69 di cui sopra) e quindi si può dire che in pratica hanno esaminato la fondatezza della denuncia dei ricorrenti (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Micallef v. Malta [GC], n. 17056/06, § 57, CEDU 2009, e Saliba e altri, citata, § 29).
81. Da tutto quanto sopra consegue che la non esaurimento del rimedio ordinario invocato dal Governo non può essere ritenuto contro i ricorrenti. Nelle circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte ritiene che, nel sollevare il loro ricorso dinanzi ai giudici nazionali competenti in materia costituzionale, le ricorrenti hanno fatto un uso normale dei rimedi che erano loro accessibili e che si riferivano, in sostanza, ai fatti contestati a livello europeo (ibidem).
82. Ne consegue che questa parte della domanda non può essere respinta per non esaurimento dei rimedi nazionali e l'obiezione del Governo deve essere respinta.
ii) Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento
83. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non hanno intrapreso un procedimento dinanzi al LAB per contestare l'importo del risarcimento offerto per gli espropri del 2012. Hanno tuttavia ammesso che i ricorrenti si sono avvalsi di un procedimento di ricorso costituzionale a tale riguardo (cfr. paragrafo 70).
84. La Corte osserva che, a differenza di quanto avvenuto in altri casi (cfr. ad esempio, Azzopardi c. Malta, n. 28177/12, § 57, 6 novembre 2014, e Frendo Randon e altri c. Malta, n. 2226/10, § 73, 22 novembre 2011), al momento del presente caso, il diritto nazionale consentiva ai ricorrenti di adire il LAB per contestare l'importo del risarcimento concesso. Ne consegue che tale rimedio era accessibile ai ricorrenti.
85. Tuttavia, il governo non ha indicato alcun miglioramento della situazione relativa ai procedimenti dinanzi al LAB, con cui la Corte ha preso in considerazione diverse volte. In particolare, la Corte ha ripetutamente riscontrato un problema relativo alla durata di tali procedimenti (cfr., ad esempio, Bezzina Wettinger e altri c. Malta, n. 15091/06, § 93, 8 aprile 2008, e Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq c. Malta, n. 26771/07, § 43, 5 aprile 2011). Inoltre, nei più recenti B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited (citati sopra, §§ 106-07) la Corte ha anche preso atto delle constatazioni nazionali in relazione alla composizione del LAB che non soddisfacevano i requisiti di indipendenza e imparzialità, quando ha ritenuto che i rimedi proposti dal Governo in materia di risarcimento in relazione alle espropriazioni non costituivano rimedi efficaci a disposizione dei ricorrenti in teoria e in pratica al momento in questione. Alla luce di ciò, la Corte ritiene che il Governo non abbia soddisfatto l'onere della prova e ha convinto la Corte che il rimedio offerto dal LAB fosse efficace, in teoria e in pratica, al momento rilevante.
86. La Corte rileva inoltre che, nella loro domanda dinanzi alla giurisdizione costituzionale di primo grado, i ricorrenti avevano chiaramente lamentato il risarcimento per l'intero terreno. Tuttavia, tale tribunale, avendo scelto di dividere l'esame del caso tra le espropriazioni anticipate e quelle del 2012, non ha esaminato la denuncia relativa all'adeguatezza del risarcimento degli espropri del 2012 "fatti salvi i diritti dei ricorrenti a contestare il risarcimento offerto" (si veda il precedente paragrafo 26). Non è chiaro se i ricorrenti abbiano contestato tale affermazione, ma in ogni caso il Governo non ha sollevato un'obiezione non esaustiva al riguardo, al contrario (si veda il precedente paragrafo 70).
87. A questo proposito, la Corte osserva che la prassi normale degli organi della Convenzione, quando un caso è stato comunicato al Governo convenuto, è stata quella di non dichiarare la domanda inammissibile per il mancato esaurimento dei rimedi nazionali, a meno che tale questione non sia stata sollevata dal Governo nelle loro osservazioni (si veda, ad esempio, Dobrev c. Bulgaria, no. 55389/00, § 113, 10 agosto 2006, e Y c. Lettonia, n. 61183/08, § 40, 21 ottobre 2014, e la giurisprudenza ivi citata). Inoltre, ai sensi dell'articolo 55 del Regolamento della Corte, qualsiasi eccezione di irricevibilità deve essere stata sollevata dalla parte contraente convenuta - nella misura in cui la natura dell'obiezione e le circostanze lo consentano - nelle sue osservazioni scritte o orali sulla ricevibilità del ricorso (cfr. N.C. c. Italia [GC], n. 24952/94, § 44, CEDU 2002-X, e Skudayeva c. Russia, n. 24014/07, § 27, 5 marzo 2019). Tale norma si riferisce ad una specifica eccezione, ad esempio, di non esaurimento, inclusa la motivazione. Non è pertanto sufficiente che il Governo abbia invocato la non esaustività per motivi diversi entro il termine prescritto (cfr. Mooren c. Germania [GC], n. 11364/03, § 58, 9 luglio 2009). La Corte non può discernere alcuna circostanza eccezionale che avrebbe potuto esonerare il Governo dall'obbligo di sollevare tale motivo nelle sue osservazioni (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Khlaifia e altri c. Italia [GC], n. 16483/12, § 53, 15 dicembre 2016).
88. Questa parte del ricorso non può pertanto essere respinta dalla Corte per il fatto che i rimedi interni non sono stati esauriti e l'obiezione del Governo relativa ai procedimenti dinanzi al LAB deve essere respinta per i motivi di cui al precedente paragrafo 85.
c) Conclusione
89. La Corte rileva che l'intera denuncia relativa alle espropriazioni del 2012 non è manifestamente infondata né inammissibile per altri motivi elencati all'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
Merits
a) Principi generali
90. La Corte fa riferimento ai principi generali applicabili di cui al precedente paragrafo 59. Ribadisce che, per la loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue esigenze, le autorità nazionali sono, in linea di principio, in una posizione migliore rispetto al giudice internazionale per apprezzare ciò che è "nell'interesse pubblico". Inoltre, la nozione di "interesse pubblico" è necessariamente ampia (cfr. Jahn e altri contro la Germania [GC], nn. 46720/99 e altri 2, § 91, CEDU 2005-VI). Tuttavia, nell'esercizio del suo potere di controllo, la Corte deve determinare se l'equilibrio richiesto è stato mantenuto in modo conforme al diritto di proprietà dell'individuo (cfr. Abdilla c. Malta (dic.), n. 38244/03, 3 novembre 2005).
91. Le condizioni di compensazione previste dalla legislazione pertinente sono rilevanti per valutare se la misura controversa rispetta o meno il giusto equilibrio richiesto e, in particolare, se impone un onere sproporzionato ai singoli (cfr. Jahn e altri, citato, § 94). A tale riguardo, la presa in consegna di un bene senza il pagamento di un importo proporzionale al suo valore costituirà di norma un'ingerenza sproporzionata, mentre una totale mancanza di compensazione può essere considerata giustificabile ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 solo in circostanze eccezionali. Tuttavia, l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 non garantisce il diritto al pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze (si veda Scordino, sopra citato, § 95; Kozac?o?lu, sopra citato, § 64; e Visti?š e Perepjolkins, sopra citato, § 110). Obiettivi legittimi di "interesse pubblico", come quelli perseguiti con misure di riforma economica o misure volte a conseguire una maggiore giustizia sociale, possono giustificare un rimborso inferiore all'intero valore di mercato (v. Scordino, citata, §§ 96-97; Kozac?o?lu, citata, § 64; Visti?š e Perepjolkins, citata, § 112; e Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited, citata, § 68).
b) Applicazione al caso di specie
92. La Corte rileva che la legittimità del provvedimento non è oggetto di contestazione tra le parti e che l'interesse pubblico che si cela dietro l'esproprio del terreno di 139 mq, che rimane utilizzato come sottostazione, è al di fuori dell'ambito del caso di specie (si veda il precedente punto 63).
93. La Corte ritiene inoltre che non vi sia alcun dubbio che l'esproprio di un terreno ai fini di una centrale a gas possa essere considerato, in linea di principio, come una presa in carico dell'interesse pubblico. Tuttavia, non vi è nulla nel fascicolo che indichi quale uso specifico sia stato fatto della particella di terreno di 509 mq. né nel 2012 né poco dopo l'esproprio e lo smantellamento dell'impianto. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che dal 2012 non è stato fatto alcun uso della stessa. La Corte rileva che, nonostante una specifica domanda in tal senso rivolta al Governo, non sono stati forniti dettagli in merito alla sua destinazione d'uso, né al suo effettivo utilizzo nel 2012 o successivamente. Piuttosto, il Governo ha scelto di basarsi alla lettera sulle conclusioni delle giurisdizioni costituzionali e sembra anche ammettere che non è stato fatto alcun uso dopo la disattivazione dell'impianto (si veda il paragrafo 69 dell'ammenda di cui sopra).
94. Per quanto riguarda le constatazioni dei tribunali nazionali, la Corte osserva che la prima giurisdizione costituzionale ha ritenuto che il terreno (in generale) espropriato nel 2012 fosse utilizzato da Enemalta "per i suoi scopi" (g?all-iskopijiet tag?ha) (si veda il precedente paragrafo 26) e in particolare per quanto riguarda la parcella di 509 mq che "c'era una sorta di installazione dell'impianto" (kien hemm xi installazzjoni tal-impjant tal-Enemalta) (si veda il precedente paragrafo 14). Secondo la Corte Costituzionale - che ha considerato il 2012 come il momento rilevante per la valutazione - sul terreno di 509 mq, c'era "una parte del complesso che era utilizzato come impianto a gas" "hemm parti mill-kumpless li kien jintuza b?ala impjant tal-gass" (sulla base della relazione di un architetto M.S. vedi paragrafo 35 sopra), aggiungendo che i richiedenti non avevano dimostrato alcun abuso da parte delle autorità. La Corte non può fare a meno di notare la vaghezza di queste conclusioni e il presupposto che spettava ai ricorrenti dimostrare l'interesse pubblico, invertendo così l'onere della prova applicabile (si veda il precedente paragrafo 32).
95. Inoltre, la Corte rileva che la relazione della M.S. - che è stata l'unica base per le constatazioni della Corte Costituzionale - ha affermato, in relazione alla sola parte di terreno di 509 mq, che essa "era utilizzata come impianto a gas". Tuttavia, la relazione non indica l'uso che si stava facendo di quel terreno nel 2014 al momento della redazione della relazione, o nel 2013 dopo che l'impianto era stato dismesso, né il suo uso nel 2012 quando è stato espropriato. Inoltre, la stessa terminologia è stata utilizzata dalla M.S. per descrivere il terreno A (cfr. paragrafo 21) che, come confermato dalla stessa Corte costituzionale, doveva essere restituito ai richiedenti per mancanza di interesse pubblico. Non è stata fornita alcuna spiegazione per questa diversa conclusione in relazione a questa parte del terreno. Sembra quindi che la Corte Costituzionale abbia formulato conclusioni manifestamente incongrue.
96. In particolare, la Corte rileva che durante il procedimento interno, nessuno dei testimoni presentati era a conoscenza dell'uso che doveva essere fatto o che veniva fatto del terreno di 509 mq (cfr. paragrafo 20) e gli imputati non hanno presentato alcuna prova materiale o testimone rilevante in grado di attestare l'interesse pubblico dietro il provvedimento. Pertanto, la Corte Costituzionale non aveva alcuna base su cui fondare la sua constatazione. La Corte è sconcertata dalle circostanze del caso in esame che hanno portato ad un'espropriazione di beni, senza che nessuno sia in grado di affermare le ragioni di tale espropriazione.
97. Infine, la Corte rileva che dalle prove fotografiche (datate 2019) presentate alla Corte dai ricorrenti, su questo appezzamento di terreno - che rientra nei confini di quello che era l'impianto (ora smantellato) - non vi è nulla se non un muro di cinta.
98. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte ritiene che la decisione dei tribunali nazionali che il terreno è stato utilizzato nel 2012 e quindi che l'esproprio era nell'interesse pubblico debba essere considerato privo di fondamento ragionevole.
99. Inoltre, nel corso del procedimento dinanzi a questa Corte, il Governo non ha fornito alcuna spiegazione, ancor meno uno straccio di prova, in merito all'utilizzo di questo appezzamento di terreno nel 2012 o successivamente. La Corte sottolinea che il terreno è costituito da un lungo tratto di terreno, con le proprietà rimanenti dei ricorrenti su ciascun lato.
100. Pertanto, la Corte ritiene che non è stato dimostrato che vi fosse alcun interesse pubblico nel 2012 quando ha avuto luogo l'esproprio, in relazione al lotto di terreno di 509 mq. Inoltre, anche se tale interesse pubblico esisteva all'epoca, esso non è durato per più di pochi mesi dopo la presa in considerazione - una considerazione che non poteva essere ignorata dalle autorità nazionali al momento dell'esproprio e successivamente. A questo proposito si osserva che il nuovo impianto in un'altra località era già operativo nel 2013 (cfr. paragrafo 39).
101. La Corte rileva, inoltre, che, nonostante questa situazione sia stata evidente di fronte alle autorità nel corso degli anni e in particolare durante sette anni di procedimenti giudiziari, non è stata intrapresa alcuna azione da parte dello Stato per correggere la situazione e revocare la dichiarazione. A questo proposito la Corte ribadisce che, nell'ambito dei diritti di proprietà, particolare importanza deve essere attribuita al principio del buon governo. Quando viene scoperto un errore, le autorità hanno il dovere di agire tempestivamente e in modo adeguato e coerente (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Moskal c. Polonia, n. 10373/05, § 72, 15 settembre 2009, e Zhidov e altri c. Russia, n. 54490/10 e altri 3, § 98, 16 ottobre 2018).
102. Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento, la Corte rileva che ai ricorrenti sono stati offerti 205 euro per il lotto di 509 mq, e 58,50 euro per il lotto di 139 mq, somme manifestamente irragionevoli per un incasso avvenuto nel 2012, ovvero la data rilevante per la valutazione del risarcimento. A tale proposito la Corte rileva che anche la valutazione predisposta dall'architetto del Governo (che ha stimato le rispettive proprietà come terreni agricoli nel 2014), ha valutato i terreni come quasi settanta volte l'importo offerto (rispettivamente 14.000 e 4.000 euro, si veda il precedente paragrafo 20). Ne consegue che non è stato raggiunto un giusto equilibrio e che i richiedenti hanno subito un onere eccessivo.
103. Di conseguenza, la Corte ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 in relazione all'esproprio, nel 2012, dei terreni dei ricorrenti di 509 mq. e 139 mq.
ALTRE PRESUNTE VIOLAZIONI DELLA CONVENZIONE
105.Le ricorrenti hanno anche lamentato, ai sensi dell'articolo 13 in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, che la Corte Costituzionale non è stata efficace, tenuto conto dei limitati mezzi di ricorso che ha concesso loro.
105. La Corte rileva che la situazione nel caso di specie non è quella derivante da una questione "strutturale" derivante da una pratica ripetitiva in cui la Corte Costituzionale dà un risarcimento inadeguato (cfr., al contrario, B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited, citata, §§ 96-109, in relazione alle espropriazioni). Nel caso di specie, come sopra rilevato, la Corte Costituzionale ha dato un adeguato risarcimento e ha privato i ricorrenti della loro condizione di vittime in relazione all'uso della maggior parte dei loro terreni, rispettivamente dal 1978 e dal 1984, fino al 2012.
106. Per quanto riguarda le parti della loro denuncia che sono state respinte dalla Corte Costituzionale, si ricorda che l'efficacia di un rimedio ai sensi dell'articolo 13 non dipende dalla certezza di un esito favorevole per l'attore (cfr. Sürmeli v. Sürmeli v. Sürmeli. Germania [GC], n. 75529/01, § 98, CEDU 2006-VII) e il semplice fatto che la richiesta di un ricorrente fallisca non è di per sé sufficiente a rendere il rimedio inefficace (cfr. Amann c. Svizzera, [GC], n. 27798/95 §§ 88-89, CEDU 2002-II). Ne consegue che nel caso di specie, nonostante l'esito sfavorevole in relazione ad alcune delle richieste delle ricorrenti, non sono stati portati all'attenzione della Corte motivi che permettano di ritenere che le ricorrenti non disponessero di un rimedio efficace.
107. Ne consegue che la denuncia deve essere respinta ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § §§ 3 (a) e 4 della Convenzione in quanto manifestamente infondata.
APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
108. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se il Tribunale constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente un risarcimento solo parziale, il Tribunale, se necessario, dà giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".
Danni
Le osservazioni delle parti
109. I richiedenti hanno chiesto la restituzione dell'immobile di 509 mq e si sono riservati il diritto di chiedere il risarcimento dei danni per l'uso di tale immobile se restituito. I ricorrenti hanno inoltre chiesto 6.861.428 euro (EUR) per danni pecuniari e 50.000 euro, in solido, per danni non pecuniari. La richiesta di risarcimento del danno pecuniario comprendeva EUR 47.500 per il lotto di terreno di 139 mq che, secondo il loro architetto, si trovava all'interno di un "confine edificabile" a pochi metri da uno "schema" edificato, EUR 1.508.000 per il terreno di 509 mq, se non dovesse essere restituito ai richiedenti, tenendo conto degli effetti di tale presa in carico del terreno adiacente, ovvero la differenza di valore tra la totalità del terreno e quello stesso terreno se tale appezzamento continua ad essere trattenuto dal Governo (cfr. paragrafo 68), ed Euro 5.305.298 per la perdita dell'uso dei terreni A e B rispettivamente dal 1978 e dal 1984 ad oggi. Tutte le valutazioni si basano su una relazione dell'architetto presentata alla Corte. I legali rappresentanti hanno indicato il conto bancario del loro studio per ricevere il pagamento di tutte le somme concesse dal Tribunale.
110. Il Governo ha osservato che la maggior parte dei terreni è stata restituita ai richiedenti e per i restanti due appezzamenti, ha insistito sul fatto che i richiedenti non hanno dimostrato che il terreno non era agricolo al momento della presa, quindi il risarcimento non dovrebbe superare i 18.000 euro (cfr. paragrafo 70 sopra). Hanno inoltre ritenuto che i tribunali nazionali avessero già concesso 15.000 euro di danni non pecuniari e quindi avevano già adeguatamente risarcito i ricorrenti e che in ogni caso qualsiasi concessione fatta dalla Corte non avrebbe dovuto superare i 2.000 euro, congiuntamente.
La valutazione della Corte
111. Come la Corte ha più volte affermato, una sentenza in cui la Corte constata una violazione impone allo Stato convenuto l'obbligo giuridico di porre fine alla violazione e di riparare le sue conseguenze in modo da ripristinare, per quanto possibile, la situazione esistente prima della violazione (cfr. Iatridis c. Grecia (solo soddisfazione) [GC], no. 31107/96 § 32, CEDU 2000-XI, e Guiso-Gallisay c. Italia (solo soddisfazione) [GC], n. 58858/00, § 90, 22 dicembre 2009). Gli Stati contraenti che sono parti in causa sono, in linea di principio, liberi di scegliere i mezzi con cui conformarsi a una sentenza in cui la Corte ha constatato una violazione. Questa discrezionalità in merito alle modalità di esecuzione di una sentenza rispecchia la libertà di scelta connessa all'obbligo primario degli Stati contraenti ai sensi della Convenzione di garantire i diritti e le libertà garantiti (articolo 1). Se la natura della violazione consente la restitutio in integrum è dovere dello Stato ritenuto responsabile della sua esecuzione, la Corte non ha né il potere né la possibilità pratica di farlo essa stessa. Se, tuttavia, il diritto nazionale non consente - o consente solo parzialmente - il risarcimento delle conseguenze della violazione, l'articolo 41 conferisce alla Corte il potere di concedere alla parte lesa la soddisfazione che le sembra opportuna (ibidem).
112. La Corte rileva che, in linea con le violazioni accertate, le ricorrenti sono dovuto solo la soddisfazione solo in relazione a:
i) l'utilizzo dei due piccoli appezzamenti di terreno fino al 2012,
ii) l'esproprio dei due appezzamenti più piccoli nel 2012,
ma non per le perdite relative all'utilizzo delle Terreni A e B il cui reclamo è stato dichiarato inammissibile (cfr. paragrafo 54).
113. Per quanto riguarda l'utilizzo dei due appezzamenti più piccoli fino al 2012, avendo le ricorrenti presentato la loro domanda per l'intero terreno in linea con il loro reclamo, il Tribunale non è in grado di determinare la somma rilevante in relazione ai soli due appezzamenti più piccoli in questa fase. In tali circostanze, il Tribunale ritiene che la questione della giusta soddisfazione in relazione ai due appezzamenti più piccoli non sia pronta per la decisione. Tale questione deve pertanto essere riservata e la successiva procedura deve essere fissata, tenendo in debita considerazione qualsiasi accordo che potrebbe essere raggiunto tra il governo convenuto e i ricorrenti (articolo 75 § 1 del regolamento della Corte).
114. Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento per il terreno di 139 mq, il cui esproprio è conforme al requisito dell'interesse pubblico, ma per il quale i ricorrenti non hanno ricevuto un adeguato risarcimento, la Corte ritiene che il risarcimento dovrebbe essere basato sulle linee di Schembri e altri v. Malta ((solo soddisfazione), no. 42583/06, § 18, 28 settembre 2010). Pertanto, la somma da assegnare ai richiedenti dovrebbe essere calcolata sulla base del valore del terreno al momento della presa, ed essere convertita al valore attuale per compensare gli effetti dell'inflazione, più il semplice interesse legale applicato al capitale progressivamente adeguato (si veda, ad esempio, Curmi c. Malta (solo soddisfazione), n. 2243/10, § 16, 9 luglio 2013). Poiché nel caso in esame i richiedenti non hanno ancora ricevuto alcun pagamento a livello nazionale, tale deduzione non è necessaria.
115. I richiedenti hanno considerato il valore di questo terreno nel 2012 pari a 47.500 EUR (come terreno edificabile) e il Governo ha stimato il valore di 4.000 EUR (come terreno agricolo). La Corte osserva che, da un lato, nonostante la strana terminologia utilizzata dall'architetto dei richiedenti, i piani allegati alla sua valutazione sembrano dimostrare che (a differenza del terreno A) il terreno di 139 mq si trova in una zona di sviluppo esterno (ODZ). D'altra parte, la valutazione dell'architetto del governo si riferisce ai confini della zona di sviluppo senza specificare se il terreno si trovava o meno all'interno di essa. Comunque sia, tenendo presente il fatto incontestabile che già prima del 2012 un edificio era e rimane edificato su tale terreno, che ospita la sottostazione, e tenendo presente la definizione di terreno agricolo (cfr. Legge nazionale pertinente di cui sopra), la Corte non può non considerare che il terreno era in realtà un cantiere nel 2012 e il risarcimento dovrebbe essere calcolato di conseguenza ai fini dell'esproprio. Tuttavia, l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 non garantisce in ogni circostanza il diritto ad un risarcimento completo, in quanto obiettivi legittimi di "interesse pubblico" possono richiedere un rimborso inferiore all'intero valore di mercato (ibidem § 15).
116. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte assegna 40.000 euro per l'esproprio nel 2012 del terreno di 139 mq.
117. Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento per il terreno di 509 mq, il cui esproprio non ha perseguito alcun interesse pubblico e per il quale i ricorrenti non hanno ottenuto alcun risarcimento: la Corte rileva che la restituzione della proprietà non è impossibile, dato che non ne è stato fatto alcun uso, e che anche le proprietà adiacenti (Terreni A e B) sono state restituite. Inoltre, i ricorrenti ne hanno chiesto la restituzione (si veda, al contrario, B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited, citata, § 120).
118. La Corte ritiene che, nelle circostanze del caso, la restituzione del terreno di 509 mq sarebbe il rimedio più appropriato e metterebbe i ricorrenti, per quanto possibile, in una situazione equivalente a quella in cui si sarebbero trovati se non ci fosse stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si veda, ad esempio, mutatis mutandis, Ana Ionescu e altri contro la Romania, n. 19788/03 e altri 18, § 38, 26 febbraio 2019).
119. In mancanza di tale restituzione da parte dello Stato convenuto, quest'ultimo dovrebbe pagare ai ricorrenti, a titolo di danno pecuniario, un importo corrispondente al valore corrente del terreno (cfr. B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited, citata, § 122), a cui possono essere aggiunte le perdite rilevanti a seguito della svalutazione del resto del terreno dei ricorrenti.
120. A questo proposito, la Corte osserva che l'architetto dei ricorrenti ha stimato le perdite, in termini di compensazione finanziaria per i terreni rimanenti, in EUR 1.508.000 e questo calcolo non è stato contestato dal Governo in questa fase.
121. Per quanto riguarda il valore dei terreni, la Corte osserva che, da un lato, il Governo ha valutato la parcella di terreno di 509 mq. a 14.000 euro come terreno agricolo, nel 2014, senza specificare se si trovava o meno all'interno di una zona di sviluppo. Dall'altro lato, la valutazione dei ricorrenti non si riferisce al valore di questo appezzamento di terreno né alla sua classificazione, ma sembra considerarlo come rientrante nella zona di sviluppo. In tali circostanze, sulla base del materiale in suo possesso, il Tribunale non è oggi in grado di determinare il valore del terreno.
122. La Corte ritiene che la questione della giusta soddisfazione in relazione all'espropriazione della parcella di 509 mq non sia pronta per la decisione. Tale questione deve pertanto essere riservata e la successiva procedura deve essere fissata, tenendo conto di qualsiasi accordo che potrebbe essere raggiunto tra il governo convenuto e le ricorrenti (articolo 75 § 1 del Regolamento del Tribunale).
123. Per quanto riguarda i danni non pecuniari, la somma concessa dalla Corte Costituzionale riguardava violazioni diverse da quelle sostenute da questa Corte. Considerando che i ricorrenti devono aver sperimentato frustrazione e stress in considerazione della natura delle ulteriori violazioni riscontrate da questa sentenza, la Corte assegna ai ricorrenti EUR 10.000, congiuntamente, per quanto riguarda i danni non pecuniari, più eventuali tasse che possono essere addebitate.
124. Come richiesto, l'importo assegnato deve essere versato direttamente sul conto bancario designato dai rappresentanti dei ricorrenti (si veda, ad esempio, Denisov c. Ucraina [GC], n. 76639/11, § 148, 25 settembre 2018 e le Istruzioni pratiche al Regolamento della Corte relative alle richieste di giusta soddisfazione, alla voce informazioni sul pagamento).
Costi e spese
125. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre chiesto EUR 13.778,99 per i costi e le spese sostenute dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e quelle sostenute dinanzi al Tribunale. Una parte delle spese relative ai procedimenti nazionali derivano dalla fattura delle spese presentate, tassata, mentre altre sono spese supplementari per i loro avvocati, comprovate dalle relative fatture. I legali rappresentanti hanno indicato il conto bancario del loro studio per ricevere il pagamento di tutte le somme concesse dal Tribunale.
126. Il Governo non ha contestato l'importo relativo al pagamento delle spese di Enemalta, né gli onorari degli avvocati calcolati in base al conto spese tassato, ed ha ritenuto che le spese del procedimento dinanzi a questo Tribunale non dovessero superare i 2.500 euro.
127. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente ha diritto al rimborso delle spese solo nella misura in cui sia stato dimostrato che queste sono state effettivamente e necessariamente sostenute e che sono ragionevoli quanto al loro ammontare. Nel caso di specie, tenuto conto dei documenti in suo possesso e dei criteri di cui sopra, la Corte ritiene ragionevole concedere la somma di 10.000 euro a copertura delle spese in tutti i capi, più l'eventuale imposta a carico dei ricorrenti.
128. Come richiesto, l'importo assegnato dovrà essere versato direttamente sul conto corrente bancario designato dai rappresentanti dei ricorrenti.
Interessi di mora
129. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale vanno aggiunti tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
2. Dichiara ammissibili i reclami relativi ai due appezzamenti di terreno di 509 mq. e 139 mq. e il resto del ricorso inammissibile;
2. Dichiara la violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione per il prelievo, rispettivamente dal 1978 e dal 1984 fino al 2012, dei terreni dei ricorrenti di 509 e 139 mq;
Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione per quanto riguarda l'espropriazione, nel 2012, dei terreni dei ricorrenti di 509 mq e 139 mq;
2. Dichiara che, per quanto riguarda i premi risultanti dalle violazioni riscontrate nel presente caso riguardanti i) l'espropriazione, rispettivamente dal 1978 e dal 1984 fino al 2012, dei terreni dei ricorrenti di 509 e 139 mq e ii) l'espropriazione della particella di 509 mq, la questione dell'applicazione dell'articolo 41 non è pronta per la decisione e, di conseguenza, la questione dell'applicazione dell'articolo 41 non è pronta per la decisione,
(i) si riserva la suddetta domanda;
(ii) invita il Governo e i richiedenti a presentare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la presente sentenza diventa definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, le loro osservazioni scritte in merito e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo che possano raggiungere;
(iii) si riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente della Sezione il potere di fissare la stessa, se necessario;
detiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare ai ricorrenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, i seguenti importi:
(i) 40.000 euro (quarantamila euro) in solido, più l'imposta eventualmente dovuta, per il danno patrimoniale relativo alla parcella di 139 mq;
(ii) 10.000 euro (diecimila euro), in solido, più l'imposta eventualmente dovuta, a titolo di risarcimento del danno non patrimoniale;
(iii) Euro 10.000 (diecimila euro), in solido, oltre alle imposte eventualmente dovute ai ricorrenti, per costi e spese;
(b) che a partire dalla scadenza dei tre mesi sopra indicati e fino al regolamento saranno dovuti interessi semplici sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Centrale Europea durante il periodo di inadempienza, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 13 ottobre 2020, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.

Olga Chernishova Paul Lemmens
Cancelliere Presidente

APPENDIX
List of applicants
No. Firstname LASTNAME Birth year Nationality Place of residence
C. Paul MIFSUD 1948 Maltese ?abbar, Malta
4. Rebecca AINSBURY 1976 British Cumbria, United Kingdom
D. Paul ALEXANDER 1941 Australian Cowandilla, Australia
4. Bernarda BALZAN 1933 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
IV. Carmen BUTTIGIEG 1941 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
C. Daniela COOMBE 1979 British Cumbria, United Kingdom
4. Mary DAVIES 1950 Maltese Peverell, United Kingdom
D. Lourdes FARUGGIA 1944 Australian Glenelg, Australia
4. Mary FELICE 1952 Maltese St Albans, United Kingdom
V. Catherine FSADNI 1943 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
6. Angela GAUCI 1945 Maltese G?ira, Malta
• Anthony GAUCI 1946 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
III. Charmaine GAUCI 1976 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
C. Paul GAUCI 1985 Maltese G?ira, Malta
4. Saviour GAUCI 1948 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
D. Maria MATHEWS 1961 Australian Highbury, United Kingdom
4. Alfred MIFSUD 1938 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
IV. Carmel MIFSUD 1949 Maltese Luqa, Malta
C. George MIFSUD 1955 Australian Baulkham Hills, Australia
D. Paoline MIFSUD 1961 Maltese Peverell, United Kingdom
E. Vivienne MIFSUD 1944 Maltese ?ebbug, Malta
F. Marcia Martha SCIBERRAS 1946 Australian Grange, Australia
5. Victoria STAINER 1954 Maltese Melksham, United Kingdom
6. Catherine VELLA 1941 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
III. Joseph VELLA 1963 Maltese Solihull, United Kingdom
III. Paul VELLA 1938 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
D. Renato VELLA 1981 Maltese ?ejtun, Malta
E. Vincent VELLA 1941 Maltese Gozo, Malta
IV. Melanie WHILE 1975 British Cumbria, United Kingdom



DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è venerdì 10/09/2021.