CASO: CASE OF GAUCI AND OTHERS v. MALTA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GAUCI AND OTHERS v. MALTA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 57752/16
STATO: Malta
DATA: 08/10/2019
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE


THIRD SECTION

CASE OF GAUCI AND OTHERS v. MALTA
(Application no. 57752/16)







JUDGMENT

STRASBOURG
8 October 2019


This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Gauci and Others v. Malta,
The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Georgios A. Serghides, President,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Helen Keller,
Branko Lubarda,
María Elósegui,
Erik Wennerström, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 10 September 2019,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 57752/16) against the Republic of Malta lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by twenty-six Maltese nationals (one of whom had dual Maltese and American nationality) and two British nationals, whose details are set out in the appendix (“the applicants”), on 29 September 2016.
2. The applicants were represented by Dr J. Gatt and Dr. A Libreri, lawyers practising in Valletta, Malta. The Maltese Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Dr P. Grech, Attorney General.
3. The applicants complained that there had been no public interest behind the taking of their land, and that the measure had failed to respect the proportionality principle as they had received no compensation for the taking.
4. On 28 September 2018 the Government were given notice of the application.
5. The United Kingdom Government did not make use of their right to intervene in the proceedings (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention).
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Background to the case
6. The applicants are all part-owners (in different shares) of a plot of land situated in G?adira Bay, limits of Mellie?a measuring 3,930 square metres.
7. In 1954 part of the applicants’ property was being rented out as a caravan site.
8. By means of a Governor’s declaration of 18 February 1957 it was declared that the property was required for a public purpose and thus was to be expropriated (acquired by title of absolute purchase).
9. At the time, other pieces of land (belonging to other persons) had also been taken under various titles, as part of the “G?adira Scheme” a project aimed at extending the sandy beach to allow for more access to the sea for swimming purposes.
10. As a result of the declaration, the above-mentioned rental arrangement came to an end.
11. Over the years, until 1973, the applicants repeatedly made attempts, to no avail, to recover their property, explaining that they were willing to put in place a beach concession.
12. In 1992 a part of the applicants’ land was given to CS, a private company, under a beach concession allowing for encroachment under specific conditions at the price of 200 Maltese liras (MTL) annually, until 2006. A similar arrangement appears to have existed as from 1974 under a title of emphyteusis.
13. Some of the applicants instituted proceedings requesting an injunction to stop the transfer to third parties, which was refused by a judgment of 24 June 1993.
14. Apart from that, the applicants continued their attempts to recover their property including by means of judicial protests dated 10 April 1989 and 18 April 2008. The latter protest included a list of the owners of the land as well as a request to the authorities to pay compensation for the taking, plus interest due.
15. Following amendments to Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta, on 13 July 2006 a fresh declaration by the President of Malta (under Chapter 88) was issued and published in the Government Gazette confirming the previous declaration. The price for the taking was established at MTL 7,000 (approximately 16,310 euros (EUR)) but no offer was formally notified to the applicants.
16. The same CS continued to use the property after 2006, under a different arrangement with the authorities. The arrangement consisted of an annual encroachment fee of EUR 2.33 and a management contribution of EUR 4.66 per square metre payable to the authorities.
17. The land is currently being used, in part, by private establishments and for its larger part is used for commercial activities connected to the enjoyment of the sea, such as the rental of deckchairs and umbrellas and related accessories.
B. Constitutional redress proceedings
18. On 12 January 2009 the applicants instituted constitutional redress proceedings complaining that the taking and the use of the land (without there having been an official transfer of ownership of the property and payment of compensation) had breached their property rights. They requested that the land be returned to them and that compensation be paid for the years during which they had been denied the use of their property. They pointed out that while they had been deprived of their property it had been awarded to third parties to make commercial profits at their expense, and that there had thus been no public interest in the taking.
19. By a judgment of 14 May 2015 the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional competence, in so far as relevant, found a breach of the applicants’ property rights under the Convention and awarded them EUR 20,000 in non-pecuniary damage. Costs and expenses were to be paid by the defendants.
20. The court found, on the one hand, that the applicants had sufficiently proven their title of ownership of the land. On the other hand, it had not been proven that, as claimed by the applicants, the land had originally been taken to build a road, which plan never came to be. It rather appeared that the plan was to improve bathing facilities in the context of the “G?adira scheme” also for the purpose of attracting tourism which favoured economic development in Malta. The court considered that the fact that the land had then been given for use to a third party did not detract from the public interest of the measure. Similarly, the fact that land had not been built upon did not mean that no use had been made of it, as the concept of public interest included the aim of maintaining the original habitat or keeping a location pristine.
21. As to proportionality, the court noted that compensation terms were relevant. However, the applicants had waited until 2009 to undertake proper judicial proceedings on the matter - a fact which weakened their case. Nevertheless, the fact that fifty-eight years after the applicants’ land had been taken a deed of transfer had not yet been signed, nor compensation paid, resulted in a breach of the applicants’ rights.
22. Bearing in mind that the applicants had not attempted to oblige the Commissioner of Land (CoL) to initiate compensation proceedings, the court awarded EUR 20,000 in non-pecuniary damage, considering that it was not the right forum to determine the pecuniary compensation due for the transfer of the land. It further considered that it should not order the return of the land to the applicants. However, it was for the CoL not to stall any further the process of paying compensation for the taking to allow the expropriation to come to an end, even more so since in the present proceedings sufficient proof of ownership had been put forward. It thus ordered the CoL to take the relevant steps within four months from the date when the judgment became final.
23. On 1 June 2015 both parties appealed.
24. By a judgment of 19 April 2016 the Constitutional Court rejected the appeals and confirmed the first-instance judgment. At appeal stage, costs and expenses incurred by the applicants (EUR 5,716) as well as those incurred by one of the defendants (who had not been the legitimate defendant) were to be paid by the applicants.
25. By 5 September 2018, the CoL had not yet initiated any compensation proceedings.
C. Subsequent events
26. In their observations, the parties did not dispute the facts as set out above.
27. In their last round of observations, the Government brought to the Court’s attention an email exchange of June 2016, according to which, following a telephone conversation, a Government employee contacted one of the applicants’ legal representatives requesting information with a view to proceeding with the expropriation. The representative replied that he was aware that the time-limit for the authorities was 19 August [2016], and stated that the applicants were considering instituting proceedings before the European Court of Human Rights.
28. It appears that, at the date of observations, in 2019, no expropriation contract had been signed.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
29. The relevant domestic law concerning the case is set out in Frendo Randon and Others v. Malta (no. 2226/10, §§ 26-27, 22 November 2011) and Galea and Others v. Malta (no. 68980/13, § 24, 13 February 2018).
30. Article 2 of the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance, in so far as relevant reads as follows:
“ ‘agricultural or rural land’ does not include the domestic garden of a house or building or any other land within the precincts of a house or building nor a building site nor waste land but includes farmhouses, buildings intended mainly for the keeping of store cattle or other domestic animals, and other structures of a kindred nature;”
31. The Government Lands Act, Chapter 573 of the Laws of Malta, entered into force on 25 April 2017. Its Article 64 reads as follows:
“(1) When land is subject to a Declaration which has been issued before the entry into force of this Act and such land is in possession of Government without having issued any notice to treat or without having indicated the compensation offered for its acquisition, anyone who proves to the satisfaction of the Arbitration Board that he is the owner of the land by valid title may demand that the competent authority acquires the land by absolute purchase.
(2) This action shall be done by means of an application filed before the Registry of the Arbitration Board that shall be addressed against the authority who shall have a right of reply within twenty days from when it has been served with the application.
(3) The compensation that shall be paid for the acquisition of the land shall be the value that the land has within the period of publication of the Declaration as updated during the years in accordance to the index of inflation published in the schedule of the Housing (Decontrol) Ordinance.
(4) Apart from the compensation for the acquisition of the land as established in this article, the owner can also make a request to the Arbitration Board to liquidate and order the authority to pay him for material damages and moral damages due to the excessive delay for such acquisition.
(5) The peremptory period referred to in article 63(6) for filing such action shall apply mutatis mutandis to the action under this article.”
32. Article 63 (6) of the Government Lands Act reads as follows:
“Everyone shall forfeit his right of action in accordance with this article if he fails to proceed within thirty years from when the declaration has been issued, provided that if upon the entry into force of this Act, a period of twenty five years already had elapsed from the date of issue of the Declaration, the action shall be filed by not later than five years from the entry into force of this Act. Such periods are peremptory and cannot be renewed.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
33. The applicants complained that there was no public interest behind the taking of their land, which they claimed had not been used, but had been given to a third party, who made substantial profits therefrom. They also considered that the measure had failed to respect the proportionality principle as, to date, they have received no compensation for the taking. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
34. The Government contested that argument.
A. Admissibility
1. The Government’s objection ratione materiae
35. In their last round of observations the Government submitted that the applicants had not proved their title to the property when asked to do so following the Constitutional Court judgment. They relied on an email exchange of June 2016 (see paragraph 27 above). According to the Government, this raised an issue as to whether the applicants had title over the property and therefore a possession in terms of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
36. The Court reiterates that, according to Rule 55 of the Rules of Court, any plea of inadmissibility must, in so far as its character and the circumstances permit, be raised by the respondent Contracting Party in its written or oral observations on the admissibility of the application.
37. The Court notes that the Government first raised this matter in their observations of 30 May 2019 when they had been invited to comment on the claims for just satisfaction and make any further observations - on that same occasion their attention had been drawn to the fact that the Court may consider them estopped from raising new admissibility pleas at that stage.
38. The Court notes that the Government’s objections have been raised at a stage where an applicant has in principle no further opportunity to reply. A further round of observations to allow the applicant a right of reply would lengthen the procedure to the applicant’s detriment as a result of the Government’s untimely actions (see Ramadan v. Malta, no. 76136/12, § 60, 21 June 2016).
39. However, the Court observes that what is at stake in the present case is the applicability of the invoked provision, and, therefore, a matter that goes to the Court’s jurisdiction ratione materiae and which it is not prevented from examining of its own motion, even in the absence of an objection by the Government (see Pasquini v. San Marino, no. 50956/16, § 86, 2 May 2019 and, a contrario, Khlaifia and Others v. Italy [GC], no. 16483/12, §§ 51-54, 15 December 2016 in the context of a late non exhaustion objection).
40. The Court notes that the applicants instituted proceedings before the constitutional jurisdictions at first and second instance. Those courts did not see any obstacle to the applicants bringing their claims, which were moreover allowed. In particular the first-instance constitutional jurisdiction found that the applicants had sufficiently proved their title to the property (see paragraph 20 and 22 above), and allowed their claims awarding the applicants (as persons having title to the land) compensation for non pecuniary damage resulting from the violations they had suffered. That judgment was confirmed by the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 24 above). In that light there is no reason to doubt that the applicants had title to the land in question and thus had a possession for the purposes of the relevant provision.
2. The Government’s objection ratione temporis
41. The Government considered that in relation to the declaration issued in 1957, the complaint was inadmissible as the Convention only became applicable to Malta in 1967.
42. The applicants submitted that their situation had been a continuous one. In particular, they had not yet received compensation for the taking of the property to date, 2019, and because the lack of public interest existed on the issuance of the declaration both in 1957 and again in 2006.
43. The Court notes that the deprivation in the present case occurred in 1957; however, although a deprivation of an individual’s home or property is in principle an instantaneous act and does not produce a continuing situation of “deprivation” in respect of the rights concerned (see, inter alia, Malhous v. the Czech Republic (dec.) [GC], no. 33071/96 ECHR 2000-XII, and Ble?i? v. Croatia [GC], no. 59532/00, § 86, ECHR 2006 III), in the present case the applicants’ complaint extends to the failure to pay them final compensation. Thus, the Court is empowered to examine the matter (see Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão and Others v. Portugal, nos. 29813/96 and 30229/96, § 43, ECHR 2000 I, Vajagi? v. Croatia, no. 30431/03, § 23, 20 July 2006, and more recently Galea and Others v. Malta, no. 68980/13, § 30, 13 February 2018). Moreover, in 2006 a fresh declaration was issued, which shows that the deprivation of property in 1957 was not completed. The Court further notes that as Malta ratified the Convention on 23 January 1967 (including Protocol No. 1), the Court is competent ratione temporis to examine complaints in so far as they relate to events which took place from 23 January 1967 onwards (ibid; see also Bezzina Wettinger and Others v. Malta, no. 15091/06, § 54, 8 April 2008, and Azzopardi v. Malta, no. 28177/12, § 32, 6 November 2014).
44. The Court therefore upholds the Government’s objection in respect of the period until 23 January 1967, and dismisses it for the period after that date.
3. The Government’s objection ratione personae
45. The Government submitted that the applicants had lost their victim status following the Constitutional Court’s finding which acknowledged the violation and awarded EUR 20,000 in non-pecuniary compensation. They noted that the only part of the costs of the proceedings were to be paid by the applicants. Moreover, the Constitutional Court had ordered the CoL to conclude the expropriation within four months, and in absence of such action the applicants could complain before the domestic courts to have the judgment executed.
46. Relying on the Court’s case-law the applicants maintained that they remained victims of the violation upheld by the Constitutional Court. They noted that the sum of EUR 20,000, in non-pecuniary damage, did not redress the upheld violation which they continued to suffer.
47. The Court reiterates that an applicant is deprived of his or her status as a victim if the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded appropriate and sufficient redress for a breach of the Convention (see, for example, Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-193, ECHR 2006-V; Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq v. Malta, no. 26771/07, § 50, 5 April 2011; and B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited v. Malta, nos. 75225/13 and 77311/13, § 55, 11 September 2018).
48. As regards the first condition, namely the acknowledgment of a violation of the Convention, the Court considers that the Constitutional Court’s findings amounted to an acknowledgment that there had been a breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
49. With regard to the second condition, namely appropriate and sufficient redress, the Court must ascertain whether the measures taken by the authorities in the particular circumstances of the instant case afforded the applicants appropriate redress in such a way as to deprive them of victim status (ibid. § 57).
50. The Court notes that the Constitutional Court awarded the applicants EUR 20,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage and that they had to pay part judicial costs amounting to approximately EUR 5,000. The Court considers that the remaining amount was a reasonable amount of non-pecuniary damage for the violation suffered. However, after fifty years the Constitutional Court – having established that there had been a violation of the applicants’ rights – did not determine the amount of pecuniary compensation due, opting instead to order the authorities to finalise the expropriation within four months from the date of its judgment. The Court also notes that that judgment has not been executed by the authorities.
51. No explanation has been given as to why the expropriation was not finalised. It is true that, at the end of the exchange of pleadings before the Court, the Government stated that the applicants had failed to prove ownership. However, the Court notes that the email of June 2016 (see paragraph 27 above), relied on by the Government, does not refer to proof of ownership, nor does it indicate, or even less prove, the reason why the expropriation contract was not finalised by 19 August 2016, as ordered by the Constitutional Court. Moreover, ownership had already been proved before the courts of constitutional competence. It follows that the authorities failed to fulfil the order of the Constitutional Court, and in such context the applicants could not have been expected to undertake new proceedings to enforce that final decision.
52. Given that in the present case the violation under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, upheld by the Constitutional Court, persisted for more than fifty years after the entry into force of the Convention and the relevant Protocol in respect of Malta, and that during that time the applicants received no compensation for the taking of their property, the Court considers that the Constitutional Court’s judgment, which was not enforced by the authorities, did not offer sufficient relief to the applicants.
53. Consequently, the Government’s objection in this respect is dismissed.
4. Conclusion
54. The Court notes that the application in so far as it refers to the period after 23 January 1967 is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
55. The applicants complained that there had been no public interest for the taking of their land, which, moreover, remained unused for several years, and in respect of which they received no compensation.
56. The applicants submitted that while the Government alleged that the property had been taken for the purpose of the “G?adira Scheme”, this purpose had not been mentioned in either of the declarations. They considered that during the domestic proceedings the implementation of the scheme had not been proved as documentation related to it could not be traced. In reality the use made of it was a concession granted by the State to a third party for private commercial purposes. Indeed such third party had generated considerable profits of which the applicants had been deprived.
57. Moreover, the applicants had not been awarded compensation for the taking, despite a delay of more than fifty years, which compensation should have moreover taken account of the fact that the property was allocated to a third party for private commercial interests. They relied on Arsovski v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (no. 30206/06, §§ 60-61, 15 January 2013) and Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão and Others, (cited above, § 52-55).
58. Lastly, in reply to the Government’s submissions, the applicants noted that Chapter 573 of the Laws of Malta promulgated in 2017 was not applicable to their case. They also considered that the applicability of Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta to their case was also doubtful. In this respect, they noted that their property had been considered agricultural land in terms of Chapter 88, however, in view of its definition of agricultural land (see paragraph 30 above), the applicants considered that it could not include a sandy beach area by the shoreline.
(b) The Government
59. The Government submitted that the declaration of 6 February 1957 was issued under Article 3 of the then Chapter 136 of the Laws of Malta while that of 2006 was issued under Article 3 of Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta and thus the deprivation of possessions was lawful. It also pursued a legitimate aim in so far as the property was taken for the purpose of the “G?adira Scheme”, which was aimed at extending the sandy beach to guarantee better accessibility and facilities to the beach for the general public, as part of the Government’s initiative to embellish Malta and attract more tourism. In the Government’s view the fact that on a parcel of the land encroachment (a concession given by the CoL on a tolerance basis, that is not considered to be a proper title at law) was allowed by third parties in order to erect umbrellas and place deckchairs did not detract from that public interest, as such facilities benefitted the public and concessions were precisely a tool for beach management.
60. As to proportionality, the Government submitted that the Constitutional Court had already held that the applicants had suffered a violation from 1967 to 2006 due to the delay in the payment of compensation. After 2006 the applicants were offered EUR 16,310 for what was considered as agricultural land – an amount the applicants could have withdrawn or contested before the Land Arbitration Board, and thus the Government were not responsible for any delay after that date. Moreover, the Government noted that as of 2017 the applicants have had a new remedy to pursue under Article 64 of the Government Lands Act (see paragraph 31 above), which also established that the value of the property was to be that of the land on the date of the publication of the declaration, updated over the years according to the index of inflation. The provision also allowed the applicants to request material and moral damage due to the excessive delay in concluding the acquisition.
2. The Court’s assessment
61. The Court refers to its general principles as set out in Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited (cited above, § 67-69).
62. The Court considers that given the findings of the domestic courts as to a violation of the invoked provision it does not need to examine the questions whether there was a deprivation of property and whether it was in accordance with the law.
63. However, the Court finds it pertinent to express itself in particular on the public interest requirement contested by the applicants, especially given that the finding concerning the public interest has an impact on the compensation due (ibid. § 74).
64. The Court reiterates that, while deprivation of property effected for no reason other than to confer a private benefit on a private party cannot be “in the public interest”, the compulsory transfer of property from one individual to another may, depending on the circumstances, constitute a legitimate means of promoting the public interest (see James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 40, Series A no. 98). Moreover, the taking of property effected in pursuance of legitimate social, economic or other policies may be in “in the public interest”, even if the community at large has no direct use or enjoyment of the property taken (ibid., § 45).
65. The Court considers that, as accepted by the domestic courts at two instances, the taking of the property for the purposes of the “G?adira Scheme” in order to embellish the area and ensure relevant facilities to enhance tourism, was a measure in the public interest. In the Court’s view such a measure, in the context of economic reform, cannot be considered unreasonable, particularly given the wide margin of appreciation when implementing economic policies. The fact that a part of that land (around one tenth according to the architect’s report submitted by the applicants) was given on concession to a third party, does not detract from that interest. That public interest persisted from 1967 (date of ratification) to date.
66. As to proportionality, the Court notes that, in the present case, the applicants have never received any compensation for the taking of the property in 1957, despite an alleged offer in 2006, and an order by the Constitutional Court in 2016. In this connection it is noted that the Government did not contest the facts as set out above, which stated that the applicants had not been formally notified of such an offer (see paragraphs 15 and 26 above). It is thus unclear in what way the applicants could have withdrawn or contested such sums, after 2006, even more so given that the Government was to date contesting their title to the property. It is also undisputed that no payment was ever made after the order of the Constitutional Court. Thus, the Court considers that the Government have not provided any justification for the failure of the authorities to pay such compensation to the applicants over time.
67. The Court is of the opinion that (quite apart from the adequacy of the compensation) the above delay in the payment of compensation as a result of which the applicants are still without any compensation more than five decades after the Convention and the relevant Protocol came into force in respect of Malta, fails to meet the requirements of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
68. There has accordingly been a violation of that provision.
II. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
69. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
1. The parties’ submissions
70. The applicants submitted that since no actual use was made of the property, the State should be made to return such property according to the principle of restitutio in integrum.
71. In the absence of that, they claimed a value commensurate to the commercial legitimate expectations in relation to the land. Thus, they considered it legitimate for the Court to award the value of the land plus loss of opportunities. In that light they claimed 1,391,551 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage, according to an expert report which covered their loss of income over sixty-two years as well as the non-payment of the pecuniary compensation for the taking. According to the valuation, the area could take up 270 beach beds a day, at a daily income of EUR 2,700, for 168 days a year (summer period) at 80% occupancy, meaning it had an annual potential income of EUR 362,880, from which had to be deducted the beach concession (EUR 18,313.80) and labour costs (EUR 30,000), resulting in a net rental income of EUR 314,567 annually. On that basis (capitalizing the net rental income by 7.5%) the value of the land was estimated at EUR 4,194,226, which when backdated gave a value of EUR 35,512 in 1957.
72. They further claimed non-pecuniary damage.
73. The Government submitted that the expropriation had been lawful and so there was no reason to return the property. As to the loss of income alleged by the applicants, they considered that the property could not be considered as a going concern as at the time of the taking, in 1957, the land had been agricultural in nature and the applicants had not proved otherwise. No expected income could thus be calculated for the state of the land before development took place. The Government submitted a valuation which showed that the value of the land in 2019 was either EUR 139,000 or EUR 185,000 depending on which rate of interest was applied, while the value in 2006 excluding interest amounted to EUR 61,740. Bearing in mind the public interest of the measure the Government considered that an award in pecuniary damage should not exceed EUR 70,000 jointly (over and above the damage awarded by the Constitutional Court). They also considered that, given the Constitutional Court’s award, no further non-pecuniary damage should be awarded and that in any event a further award should not exceed EUR 2,000 jointly.
2. The Court’s assessment
74. As the Court has held on a number of occasions, a judgment in which the Court finds a breach imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation to put an end to the breach and make reparation for its consequences in such a way as to restore as far as possible the situation existing before the breach (see Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96 § 32, ECHR 2000-XI, and Guiso-Gallisay v. Italy (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 58858/00, § 90, 22 December 2009). The Contracting States that are parties to a case are in principle free to choose the means whereby they will comply with a judgment in which the Court has found a breach. This discretion as to the manner of execution of a judgment reflects the freedom of choice attached to the primary obligation of the Contracting States under the Convention to secure the rights and freedoms guaranteed (Article 1). If the nature of the violation allows of restitutio in integrum it is the duty of the State held liable to effect it, the Court having neither the power nor the practical possibility of doing so itself. If, however, national law does not allow – or allows only partial – reparation to be made for the consequences of the breach, Article 41 empowers the Court to afford the injured party such satisfaction as appears to it to be appropriate (ibid.). The Court notes that while restitution of the property does not appear impossible given that no use has been made of it, the Government have not offered to return it, nor indicated that they were interested in doing so, maintaining solely that such action was not called for (see paragraph 73 above).
75. In the absence of such action, it is thus for the Court to award compensation noting that there is no risk that the applicants will receive pecuniary compensation twice, as the national authorities will inevitably take note of this Court’s award when finalising the contract of expropriation (see, mutatis mutandis, Frendo Randon and Others, cited above, §77).
76. As the Court has already noted the taking in the applicant’s case did not lack public interest. In this connection the Court reiterates that legitimate objectives in the “public interest”, such as those pursued in measures of economic reform or measures designed to achieve greater social justice, may warrant reimbursement of less than the full market value (see Urbárska Obec Tren?ianske Biskupice v. Slovakia, no. 74258/01, § 115, ECHR 2007-XIII).
77. The source of the violation was the delay in instituting the relevant proceedings and the fact that to date – more than sixty years after the taking of the land (and more than fifty from when the relevant provision became applicable to Malta) – the applicants have still not been awarded any compensation for their property.
78. The Court notes that in similar cases (see, for example, Frendo Randon and Others v. Malta, (just satisfaction), no. 2226/10, § 20, 9 July 2013 and Azzopardi v. Malta, no. 28177/12, § 66, 6 November 2014) the sum to be awarded to the applicants was calculated on the basis of the value of the land at the time of the taking, converted to the current value to offset the effects of inflation, plus simple statutory interest applied to the capital progressively adjusted. However, in the present case the Court does not lose site of the fact that in 2006 a fresh declaration had been issued, in the absence of any conclusion to the declaration issued in 1957. The Court will also take account, to the extent necessary, of the location of the property and the possibilities it could have had over the years because of such location, bearing in mind however that when it was taken it was solely used as a caravan site.
79. Having regard to the above the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicants EUR 150,000, jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable on that amount, in compensation for the expropriation.
80. Bearing in mind the award of EUR 20,000 granted by the domestic courts, which remains payable, the Court does not find it necessary to make an award in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
B. Costs and expenses
81. The applicants also claimed the costs and expenses incurred before the constitutional jurisdictions as per taxed bill of costs (which showed EUR 5,716 incurred by the actor and EUR 4,147 incurred by the defendant), and EUR 99.26 for the courier expenses related to the proceedings before this Court.
82. The Government submitted that the applicants did not quantify their claim but simply relied on a taxed bill of costs. Moreover they noted that the applicants did not procure evidence of those costs having been paid. In the Government’s view the costs of the entirety of proceedings should in any event not exceed EUR 1,500.
83. Regard being had to the documents in its possession and to its case law, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 5,815 covering costs under all heads.
C. Default interest
84. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the application admissible in so far as it refers to the period after 23 January 1967 and the remainder inadmissible;
2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
3. Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, jointly, within three months the following amounts:
(i) EUR 150,000 (one hundred and fifty thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage;
(ii) EUR 5,815 (five thousand eight hundred and fifteen euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
4. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 8 October 2019, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Stephen Phillips Georgios A. Serghides
Registrar President


?

APPENDIX

1. Bernard GAUCI is a Maltese and American national who was born in 1950, and lives in San ?iljan, Malta
2. Emanuela BONNICI is a Maltese national who was born in 1948, and lives in Kent, England
3. Norah CORCORAN is a Maltese national who was born in 1930, and lives in Somerset, England
4. Sharon Marie CUTAJAR is a Maltese national who was born in 1970, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
5. Susan ELLUL SULLIVAN is a Maltese national who was born in 1957, and lives in Swieqi, Malta
6. Mary Rose FARRUGIA is a Maltese national who was born in 1966, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
7. Doris FENECH is a Maltese national who was born in 1952, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
8. Gothard GAUCI is a Maltese national who was born in 1962, and lives in Plymouth, England
9. Maria Sylvia GAUCI is a Maltese national who was born in 1954, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
10. Anthony GRIMA is a Maltese national who was born in 1964, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
11. John GRIMA is a Maltese national who was born in 1955, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
12. Joseph GRIMA is a Maltese national who was born in 1944, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
13. Joseph GRIMA is a Maltese national who was born in 1970, and lives in Cork, England
14. Marianne GRIMA is a Maltese national who was born in 1976, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
15. Sarah GRIMA is a Maltese national who was born in 1979, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
16. Therese GRIMA is a Maltese national who was born in 1943, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
17. Elizabeth MORRIS is a British national who was born in 1944, and lives in Ba?ar i?-?ag?aq, Malta
18. Mary MUSCAT is a Maltese national who was born in 1941, and lives in Paola, Malta
19. Mary PARKER is a Maltese national who was born in 1929, and lives in Sliema, Malta
20. Sonia STEWART is a Maltese national who was born in 1972, and lives in Mellie?a, Malta
21. Victoria Stella STURCKE is a Maltese national who was born in 1944, and lives in Middlesex, England
22. Anne TABONE is a British national who was born in 1932, and lives in Sliema, Malta
23. Edmond TABONE is a Maltese national who was born in 1975, and lives in Ba?ar i?-?ag?aq, Malta
24. Jane TABONE is a Maltese national who was born in 1966, and lives in Swieqi, Malta
25. John TABONE is a Maltese national who was born in 1935, and lives in Sliema, Malta
26. Joseph TABONE is a Maltese national who was born in 1936, and lives in Sliema, Malta
27. Rebecca TABONE is a Maltese national who was born in 1974, and lives in San ?iljan, Malta
28. Josephine XUEREB is a Maltese national who was born in 1947, and lives in Sliema, Malta

TESTO TRADOTTO

TERZA SEZIONE

CASO DI GAUCI E ALTRI v. MALTA (Applicazione n. 57752/16)
GIUDICE

STRASBURGO
8 ottobre 2019
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Essa può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.
Nel caso di Gauci e altri contro Malta,
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Terza Sezione), che si riunisce come Sezione composta da:
Georgios A. Serghides, Presidente,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque,
Helen Keller,
Branko Lubarda,
María Elósegui,
Erik Wennerström, giudici,
e Stephen Phillips, cancelliere di sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 10 settembre 2019,
Emette la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in tale data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa ha avuto origine in un ricorso (n. 57752/16) contro la Repubblica di Malta presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da ventisei cittadini maltesi (uno dei quali aveva la doppia cittadinanza maltese e americana) e due cittadini britannici, i cui dettagli sono riportati in appendice ("i richiedenti"), il 29 settembre 2016.
2. I ricorrenti erano rappresentati dal Dr. J. Gatt e dal Dr. A Libreri, avvocati che esercitano a La Valletta, Malta. Il Governo Maltese ("il Governo") era rappresentato dal loro agente, Dr. P. Grech, Procuratore Generale.
3. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato che non vi era stato alcun interesse pubblico dietro la presa dei loro terreni e che il provvedimento non aveva rispettato il principio di proporzionalità in quanto non avevano ricevuto alcun risarcimento per la presa.
4. Il 28 settembre 2018 il governo è stato informato della domanda.
5. Il governo del Regno Unito non si è avvalso del diritto di intervenire nel procedimento (articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione).
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
A. Contesto del caso
6. I richiedenti sono tutti comproprietari (in quote diverse) di un terreno situato nella Baia di G?adira, limiti di Mellie?a di 3.930 metri quadrati.
7. Nel 1954 una parte della proprietà dei ricorrenti è stata affittata come terreno per roulotte.
8. Con una dichiarazione del Governatore del 18 febbraio 1957 è stato dichiarato che la proprietà era necessaria per uno scopo pubblico e quindi doveva essere espropriata (acquisita con titolo di acquisto assoluto).
9. All'epoca, anche altri terreni (appartenenti ad altre persone) erano stati acquisiti con vari titoli, nell'ambito dello "Schema G?adira" un progetto volto ad ampliare la spiaggia sabbiosa per consentire un maggiore accesso al mare a scopo balneare.
10. In seguito alla dichiarazione, il suddetto contratto di locazione è giunto a termine.
11. Nel corso degli anni, fino al 1973, i richiedenti hanno ripetutamente tentato, senza successo, di recuperare la loro proprietà, spiegando che erano disposti a mettere in atto una concessione per la spiaggia.
12. Nel 1992 una parte dei terreni dei richiedenti è stata data in concessione alla CS, una società privata, in base ad una concessione per la spiaggia che permetteva l'invasione a specifiche condizioni al prezzo di 200 lire maltesi (MTL) all'anno, fino al 2006. Un accordo simile sembra esistere dal 1974 con un titolo di enfiteusi.
13. Alcuni dei ricorrenti hanno avviato un procedimento per chiedere l'ingiunzione di interrompere il trasferimento a terzi, che è stato rifiutato con sentenza del 24 giugno 1993.
14. A parte questo, i ricorrenti hanno continuato i loro tentativi di recuperare i loro beni anche con proteste giudiziarie del 10 aprile 1989 e del 18 aprile 2008. Quest'ultima protesta comprendeva un elenco dei proprietari del terreno, nonché la richiesta alle autorità di pagare un risarcimento per il prelievo, più gli interessi dovuti.
15. A seguito di modifiche al Capitolo 88 delle Leggi di Malta, il 13 luglio 2006 è stata rilasciata una nuova dichiarazione del Presidente di Malta (ai sensi del Capitolo 88), pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del Governo, che conferma la precedente dichiarazione. Il prezzo per l'assunzione è stato fissato in 7.000 MTL (circa 16.310 euro (EUR)), ma nessuna offerta è stata formalmente notificata ai richiedenti.
16. Lo stesso CS ha continuato ad utilizzare l'immobile anche dopo il 2006, in base ad un diverso accordo con le autorità. L'accordo consisteva in una tassa annuale di invasione di 2,33 euro e in un contributo di gestione di 4,66 euro al metro quadro da versare alle autorità.
17. Il terreno è attualmente utilizzato, in parte, da stabilimenti privati e per la maggior parte viene utilizzato per attività commerciali legate alla fruizione del mare, come l'affitto di sdraio e ombrelloni e relativi accessori.
B. Procedimento di ricorso costituzionale
18. Il 12 gennaio 2009 i ricorrenti hanno avviato un procedimento di ricorso costituzionale lamentando che la presa e l'uso del terreno (senza che vi fosse stato un trasferimento ufficiale della proprietà della proprietà e il pagamento di un indennizzo) aveva violato i loro diritti di proprietà. Hanno chiesto la restituzione del terreno e il pagamento di un indennizzo per gli anni durante i quali era stato loro negato l'uso della proprietà. Hanno sottolineato che, pur essendo stati privati della loro proprietà, essa era stata concessa a terzi per realizzare profitti commerciali a loro spese, e che quindi non vi era stato alcun interesse pubblico a prenderla.
19. Con sentenza del 14 maggio 2015 il Tribunale Civile (Prima Sala) nella sua competenza costituzionale, per quanto pertinente, ha constatato una violazione dei diritti di proprietà dei ricorrenti ai sensi della Convenzione e ha assegnato loro 20.000 euro di danni non pecuniari. I costi e le spese erano a carico dei convenuti.
20. Il tribunale ha ritenuto, da un lato, che i ricorrenti avessero sufficientemente provato il loro titolo di proprietà del terreno. Dall'altro lato, non era stato dimostrato che, come sostenuto dai ricorrenti, il terreno era stato originariamente preso per costruire una strada, cosa che non è mai avvenuta. Sembrava piuttosto che il piano fosse volto a migliorare le strutture balneari nel contesto dello "schema G?adira" anche allo scopo di attirare il turismo che favorisce lo sviluppo economico di Malta. Il tribunale ha ritenuto che il fatto che il terreno fosse stato poi dato in uso a terzi non pregiudicava l'interesse pubblico della misura. Analogamente, il fatto che il terreno non fosse stato costruito non significava che non ne fosse stato fatto alcun uso, in quanto il concetto di interesse pubblico comprendeva lo scopo di mantenere l'habitat originale o di mantenere un luogo incontaminato.
21. Per quanto riguarda la proporzionalità, il giudice ha osservato che le condizioni di compensazione erano rilevanti. Tuttavia, le ricorrenti hanno aspettato fino al 2009 per avviare un adeguato procedimento giudiziario in materia, il che ha indebolito il loro caso. Ciononostante, il fatto che cinquantotto anni dopo che il terreno dei ricorrenti era stato preso un atto di cessione non era ancora stato firmato, né era stato pagato un risarcimento, ha comportato una violazione dei diritti dei ricorrenti.
22. Tenendo presente che i ricorrenti non avevano tentato di obbligare il Commissario del Land (CoL) ad avviare un procedimento di risarcimento, il tribunale ha concesso 20.000 euro di danni non pecuniari, considerando che non era il foro giusto per determinare il risarcimento pecuniario dovuto per la cessione del terreno. Ha inoltre ritenuto di non dover ordinare la restituzione del terreno ai ricorrenti. Tuttavia, spettava al CoL non bloccare ulteriormente il processo di pagamento del risarcimento per la presa in consegna per consentire la fine dell'esproprio, tanto più che nel presente procedimento erano state presentate prove sufficienti della proprietà. Essa ha quindi ordinato al CdL di adottare le misure necessarie entro quattro mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza è divenuta definitiva.
23. Il 1° giugno 2015 entrambe le parti hanno presentato ricorso in appello.
24. Con sentenza del 19 aprile 2016 la Corte costituzionale ha respinto i ricorsi e ha confermato la sentenza di primo grado. Nella fase di appello, le spese sostenute dalle ricorrenti (EUR 5.716) e quelle sostenute da uno dei convenuti (che non era stato il legittimo convenuto) dovevano essere pagate dalle ricorrenti.
25. Al 5 settembre 2018, il CdL non aveva ancora avviato alcun procedimento di risarcimento.
C. Eventi successivi
26. Nelle loro osservazioni, le parti non hanno contestato i fatti come sopra esposto.
27. Nell'ultima tornata di osservazioni, il Governo ha portato all'attenzione della Corte uno scambio di e-mail del giugno 2016, secondo il quale, a seguito di una conversazione telefonica, un dipendente del Governo ha contattato uno dei rappresentanti legali dei ricorrenti per chiedere informazioni al fine di procedere all'esproprio. Il rappresentante ha risposto di essere a conoscenza del fatto che il termine ultimo per le autorità era il 19 agosto [2016], e ha dichiarato che i ricorrenti stavano considerando di avviare un procedimento dinanzi alla Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo.
28. Sembra che, alla data delle osservazioni, nel 2019, non fosse stato firmato alcun contratto di esproprio.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE PERTINENTE
29. Il diritto nazionale applicabile alla causa è quello di Frendo Randon e altri contro Malta (n. 2226/10, §§ 26-27, 22 novembre 2011) e Galea e altri contro Malta (n. 68980/13, § 24, 13 febbraio 2018).
30. L'articolo 2 dell'Ordinanza sull'acquisto di terreni (OPAc), nella misura in cui è pertinente, recita come segue:
"I "terreni agricoli o rurali" non comprendono l'orto domestico di una casa o di un edificio o qualsiasi altro terreno all'interno dei recinti di una casa o di un edificio, né un cantiere o un terreno di scarico, ma comprendono le fattorie, i fabbricati destinati principalmente all'allevamento di bestiame da riporto o di altri animali domestici e altre strutture di natura affine;".
31. Il Government Lands Act, capitolo 573 delle leggi di Malta, è entrato in vigore il 25 aprile 2017. Il suo articolo 64 recita come segue:
"(1) Quando un terreno è soggetto a una Dichiarazione che è stata rilasciata prima dell'entrata in vigore della presente legge e tale terreno è in possesso del Governo senza aver emesso alcun avviso di trattamento o senza aver indicato il compenso offerto per la sua acquisizione, chiunque dimostri in modo soddisfacente per il Collegio Arbitrale di essere il proprietario del terreno con titolo di proprietà valido può chiedere che l'autorità competente acquisti il terreno con l'acquisto assoluto.
(2) Tale azione deve essere esercitata mediante domanda presentata alla cancelleria del Collegio Arbitrale che deve essere rivolta contro l'autorità che ha diritto di replica entro venti giorni dalla notifica della domanda.
(3) Il risarcimento da versare per l'acquisto del terreno è pari al valore che il terreno ha nel periodo di pubblicazione della Dichiarazione aggiornato nel corso degli anni in base all'indice di inflazione pubblicato nel prospetto dell'ordinanza sull'edilizia abitativa (Decontrol).
(4) Oltre al risarcimento per l'acquisto del terreno come stabilito nel presente articolo, il proprietario può anche presentare una richiesta al Collegio Arbitrale per la liquidazione e ordinare all'autorità di pagarlo per i danni materiali e morali dovuti all'eccessivo ritardo di tale acquisto.
(5) Il termine perentorio di cui all'articolo 63, paragrafo 6, per il deposito di tale azione si applica, mutatis mutandis, all'azione di cui al presente articolo".
32. L'articolo 63, paragrafo 6, della legge sulle terre del governo recita come segue:
"Ogni individuo perde il diritto di agire in conformità al presente articolo se non procede entro trenta anni dall'emissione della dichiarazione, a condizione che, se al momento dell'entrata in vigore del presente Atto, un periodo di venticinque anni era già trascorso dalla data di emissione della dichiarazione, l'azione sia presentata entro e non oltre cinque anni dall'entrata in vigore del presente Atto. Tali periodi sono perentori e non possono essere rinnovati".
LA LEGGE
I. ALLEGATO VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1
33. I ricorrenti si sono lamentati del fatto che non vi era alcun interesse pubblico dietro la presa dei loro terreni, che secondo loro non erano stati utilizzati, ma che erano stati ceduti a terzi, i quali ne hanno tratto notevoli profitti. Ritengono inoltre che la misura non abbia rispettato il principio di proporzionalità in quanto, a tutt'oggi, non hanno ricevuto alcun indennizzo per la presa. Esse si sono basate sull'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni che precedono non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni".
34. Il governo ha contestato tale argomentazione.
A. Ammissibilità
1. L'obiezione del Governo ratione materiae
35. Nell'ultima tornata di osservazioni, il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non hanno dimostrato la loro proprietà della proprietà quando gli è stato chiesto di farlo a seguito della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale. Si sono basati su uno scambio di e-mail del giugno 2016 (cfr. paragrafo 27). Secondo il Governo, ciò ha sollevato la questione se i ricorrenti avessero un titolo di proprietà sulla proprietà e quindi un possesso ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
36. La Corte ribadisce che, ai sensi dell'articolo 55 del Regolamento del Tribunale, qualsiasi eccezione di irricevibilità deve, nella misura in cui il suo carattere e le circostanze lo consentano, essere sollevata dalla parte contraente convenuta nelle sue osservazioni scritte o orali sulla ricevibilità della domanda.
37. La Corte rileva che il Governo ha sollevato la questione per la prima volta nelle sue osservazioni del 30 maggio 2019, quando era stato invitato a commentare le richieste di giusta soddisfazione e a presentare ulteriori osservazioni - nella stessa occasione era stata richiamata la loro attenzione sul fatto che la Corte può ritenere che, in quella fase, non sia più possibile sollevare nuove eccezioni di irricevibilità.
38. La Corte rileva che le obiezioni del governo sono state sollevate in una fase in cui un richiedente non ha, in linea di principio, alcuna ulteriore possibilità di rispondere. Un'ulteriore serie di osservazioni per concedere al richiedente il diritto di replica prolungherebbe la procedura a danno del richiedente a causa delle azioni intempestive del governo (cfr. Ramadan c. Malta, n. 76136/12, § 60, 21 giugno 2016).
39. Tuttavia, la Corte osserva che ciò che è in gioco nella presente causa è l'applicabilità della disposizione invocata, e, quindi, una questione che spetta alla giurisdizione della Corte ratione materiae e che non le è impedito di esaminare d'ufficio, anche in assenza di un'obiezione da parte del Governo (v. Pasquini c. San Marino, n. 50956/16, § 86, 2 maggio 2019 e, al contrario, Khlaifia e altri c. Italia [GC], n. 16483/12, §§ 51-54, 15 dicembre 2016 nell'ambito di un'obiezione di non esaurimento tardivo).
40. La Corte rileva che i ricorrenti hanno avviato un procedimento dinanzi alle giurisdizioni costituzionali in primo e secondo grado. Tali tribunali non hanno visto alcun ostacolo alla presentazione delle richieste da parte dei ricorrenti, che sono state inoltre ammesse. In particolare, la giurisdizione costituzionale di primo grado ha ritenuto che i ricorrenti avessero sufficientemente provato la loro titolarità della proprietà (cfr. paragrafi 20 e 22), e ha permesso che le loro pretese concedessero ai ricorrenti (in qualità di aventi diritto al terreno) il risarcimento dei danni non pecuniari derivanti dalle violazioni subite. Tale sentenza è stata confermata dalla Corte costituzionale (cfr. paragrafo 24). Alla luce di ciò, non c'è motivo di dubitare che i ricorrenti avessero la proprietà del terreno in questione e quindi ne avessero il possesso ai fini della relativa disposizione.
2. L'obiezione del Governo ratione temporis
41. Il Governo ha ritenuto che, in relazione alla dichiarazione emessa nel 1957, il reclamo fosse inammissibile in quanto la Convenzione è diventata applicabile a Malta solo nel 1967.
42. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che la loro situazione era stata continua. In particolare, essi non avevano ancora ricevuto il risarcimento per la presa della proprietà fino ad oggi, 2019, e perché la mancanza di interesse pubblico esisteva al momento dell'emissione della dichiarazione sia nel 1957 che nel 2006.
43. La Corte rileva che la privazione nella presente causa si è verificata nel 1957; tuttavia, sebbene la privazione della casa o della proprietà di un individuo sia in linea di principio un atto istantaneo e non produca una situazione continuativa di "privazione" rispetto ai diritti in questione (cfr., tra l'altro, Malhous c. Repubblica Ceca (dec.) [GC], n. 33071/96 CEDU 2000-XII, e Ble?i? c. Croazia [GC], n. 59532/00, § 86, CEDU 2006 III), nella fattispecie la denuncia dei ricorrenti si estende al mancato pagamento di un risarcimento definitivo. Pertanto, la Corte ha il potere di esaminare la questione (cfr. Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão e altri c. Portogallo, n. 29813/96 e 30229/96, § 43, CEDU 2000 I, Vajagi? c. Croazia, n. 30431/03, § 23, 20 luglio 2006, e più recentemente Galea e altri c. Malta, n. 68980/13, § 30, 13 febbraio 2018). Inoltre, nel 2006 è stata rilasciata una nuova dichiarazione che dimostra che la privazione dei beni nel 1957 non è stata completata. La Corte rileva inoltre che, poiché Malta ha ratificato la Convenzione il 23 gennaio 1967 (compreso il Protocollo n. 1), la Corte è competente ratione temporis ad esaminare le denunce nella misura in cui si riferiscono a fatti avvenuti dal 23 gennaio 1967 in poi (ibidem; cfr. anche Bezzina Wettinger e altri c. Malta, n. 15091/06, § 54, 8 aprile 2008, e Azzopardi c. Malta, n. 28177/12, § 32, 6 novembre 2014).
44. La Corte accoglie pertanto l'obiezione del Governo per il periodo fino al 23 gennaio 1967 e la respinge per il periodo successivo a tale data.
3. L'obiezione del Governo ratione personae
45. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti avevano perso il loro status di vittime a seguito della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale che ha riconosciuto la violazione e ha concesso 20.000 euro di risarcimento non pecuniario. Essi hanno osservato che l'unica parte delle spese del procedimento doveva essere pagata dai ricorrenti. Inoltre, la Corte Costituzionale aveva ordinato alla CoL di concludere l'esproprio entro quattro mesi, e in assenza di tale azione i ricorrenti potevano lamentarsi davanti ai tribunali nazionali per far eseguire la sentenza.
46. Basandosi sulla giurisprudenza della Corte i ricorrenti hanno sostenuto di essere rimasti vittime della violazione confermata dalla Corte Costituzionale. Essi hanno osservato che la somma di EUR 20.000, in danno non pecuniario, non ha rimediato alla violazione confermata che hanno continuato a subire.
47. La Corte ribadisce che un richiedente è privato della sua condizione di vittima se le autorità nazionali hanno riconosciuto, espressamente o in sostanza, e quindi concesso un adeguato e sufficiente risarcimento per una violazione della Convenzione (si veda, ad esempio, Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-193, CEDU 2006-V; Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq c. Malta, n. 26771/07, § 50, 5 aprile 2011; e B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited c. Malta, n. 75225/13 e 77311/13, § 55, 11 settembre 2018).
48. Per quanto riguarda la prima condizione, ossia il riconoscimento di una violazione della Convenzione, la Corte ritiene che le conclusioni della Corte costituzionale equivalgano al riconoscimento di una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
49. Per quanto riguarda la seconda condizione, vale a dire un risarcimento adeguato e sufficiente, la Corte deve accertare se le misure adottate dalle autorità nelle particolari circostanze del caso in questione hanno consentito ai ricorrenti di ottenere un risarcimento adeguato in modo tale da privarli dello status di vittima (ibidem § 57).
50. La Corte rileva che la Corte costituzionale ha concesso ai ricorrenti 20.000 euro per danni non patrimoniali e che essi hanno dovuto pagare una parte delle spese giudiziarie pari a circa 5.000 euro. La Corte ritiene che l'importo rimanente fosse un importo ragionevole di danni non pecuniari per la violazione subita. Tuttavia, dopo cinquant'anni la Corte Costituzionale - avendo stabilito che c'era stata una violazione dei diritti dei ricorrenti - non ha determinato l'importo del risarcimento pecuniario dovuto, optando invece per ordinare alle autorità di finalizzare l'esproprio entro quattro mesi dalla data della sua sentenza. La Corte rileva inoltre che tale sentenza non è stata eseguita dalle autorità.
51. Non è stata fornita alcuna spiegazione sul perché l'esproprio non sia stato portato a termine. È vero che, al termine dello scambio di memorie dinanzi alla Corte, il governo ha dichiarato che i ricorrenti non hanno dimostrato la proprietà. Tuttavia, la Corte osserva che il messaggio di posta elettronica del giugno 2016 (cfr. paragrafo 27 sopra), invocato dal Governo, non fa riferimento alla prova della proprietà, né indica, o ancor meno prova, il motivo per cui il contratto di esproprio non è stato finalizzato entro il 19 agosto 2016, come ordinato dalla Corte costituzionale. Inoltre, la proprietà era già stata dimostrata davanti ai tribunali di competenza costituzionale. Ne consegue che le autorità non hanno ottemperato all'ordinanza della Corte Costituzionale e, in tale contesto, non ci si poteva aspettare che le ricorrenti intraprendessero nuovi procedimenti per dare esecuzione a tale decisione definitiva.
52. Dato che nel caso di specie la violazione ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, confermato dalla Corte Costituzionale, è persistita per più di cinquant'anni dopo l'entrata in vigore della Convenzione e del relativo Protocollo per quanto riguarda Malta, e che durante quel periodo i ricorrenti non hanno ricevuto alcun risarcimento per la presa dei loro beni, la Corte ritiene che la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, che non è stata eseguita dalle autorità, non ha offerto sufficiente sollievo ai ricorrenti.
53. Di conseguenza, l'obiezione del Governo a questo proposito è respinta.
4. Conclusione
54. La Corte rileva che la domanda, nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967, non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, lettera a), della Convenzione. Essa rileva inoltre che non è inammissibile per altri motivi. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Osservazioni delle parti
a) I richiedenti
55. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato l'assenza di interesse pubblico per la presa dei loro terreni, che peraltro sono rimasti inutilizzati per diversi anni e per i quali non hanno ricevuto alcun indennizzo.
56. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che, mentre il governo sosteneva che la proprietà era stata presa ai fini del "G?adira Scheme", tale scopo non era stato menzionato in nessuna delle due dichiarazioni. Essi ritengono che durante il procedimento interno non sia stata dimostrata l'attuazione del regime in quanto non è stato possibile rintracciare la documentazione relativa ad esso. In realtà, l'uso che ne è stato fatto era una concessione concessa dallo Stato a terzi per scopi commerciali privati. In effetti, tale terzo aveva generato notevoli profitti di cui i richiedenti erano stati privati.
57. Inoltre, alle ricorrenti non era stato concesso un risarcimento per la presa, nonostante un ritardo di oltre cinquant'anni, risarcimento che avrebbe dovuto inoltre tenere conto del fatto che la proprietà era stata assegnata ad un terzo per interessi commerciali privati. Essi si sono basati su Arsovski c. l'ex Repubblica iugoslava di Macedonia (n. 30206/06, §§ 60-61, 15 gennaio 2013) e Almeida Garrett, Mascarenhas Falcão e altri, (citata, § 52-55).
58. Infine, in risposta alle osservazioni del Governo, i ricorrenti hanno osservato che il capitolo 573 delle Leggi di Malta promulgate nel 2017 non è applicabile al loro caso. Esse hanno anche ritenuto che l'applicabilità del Capitolo 88 delle Leggi di Malta al loro caso fosse anch'essa dubbia. A tale riguardo, essi hanno osservato che la loro proprietà era stata considerata terreno agricolo ai sensi del Capitolo 88, tuttavia, in considerazione della sua definizione di terreno agricolo (cfr. paragrafo 30 di cui sopra), i ricorrenti hanno ritenuto che non potesse includere una zona di spiaggia sabbiosa lungo la costa.
b) Il governo
59. Il Governo ha sostenuto che la dichiarazione del 6 febbraio 1957 è stata emessa ai sensi dell'articolo 3 dell'allora Capitolo 136 delle Leggi di Malta, mentre quella del 2006 è stata emessa ai sensi dell'articolo 3 del Capitolo 88 delle Leggi di Malta e quindi la privazione dei beni era legale. Essa perseguiva inoltre un obiettivo legittimo nella misura in cui la proprietà era stata presa ai fini dello "Schema G?adira", che mirava ad estendere la spiaggia di sabbia per garantire una migliore accessibilità e strutture alla spiaggia per il pubblico in generale, come parte dell'iniziativa del Governo per abbellire Malta e attirare più turismo. Secondo il Governo, il fatto che su un appezzamento di terreno di invasione (una concessione concessa dal CoL su base di tolleranza, che non è considerata un vero e proprio titolo di legge) sia stato permesso da terzi di erigere ombrelloni e posizionare sedie a sdraio non ha sminuito tale interesse pubblico, in quanto tali strutture andavano a beneficio del pubblico e le concessioni erano proprio uno strumento per la gestione della spiaggia.
60. Per quanto riguarda la proporzionalità, il Governo ha sostenuto che la Corte Costituzionale aveva già dichiarato che i ricorrenti avevano subito una violazione dal 1967 al 2006 a causa del ritardo nel pagamento del risarcimento. Dopo il 2006 ai ricorrenti sono stati offerti 16.310 euro per quelli che erano considerati terreni agricoli - un importo che i ricorrenti avrebbero potuto ritirare o contestare davanti al Collegio Arbitrale del Land, e quindi il Governo non era responsabile di alcun ritardo dopo tale data. Inoltre, il Governo ha osservato che a partire dal 2017 i richiedenti hanno avuto un nuovo rimedio da perseguire ai sensi dell'articolo 64 del Government Lands Act (vedi paragrafo 31 sopra), che ha anche stabilito che il valore della proprietà doveva essere quello del terreno alla data della pubblicazione della dichiarazione, aggiornato nel corso degli anni secondo l'indice di inflazione. La disposizione consentiva inoltre ai richiedenti di richiedere danni materiali e morali a causa dell'eccessivo ritardo nella conclusione dell'acquisizione.
2. La valutazione del Tribunale
61. La Corte fa riferimento ai principi generali di cui alle sentenze Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited (sopra citate, § 67-69).
62. La Corte ritiene che, date le conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali in merito alla violazione della disposizione invocata, non è necessario esaminare le questioni se vi sia stata una privazione della proprietà e se essa sia conforme alla legge.
63. Tuttavia, la Corte ritiene pertinente esprimersi in particolare sul requisito dell'interesse pubblico contestato dai ricorrenti, soprattutto in considerazione del fatto che la constatazione relativa all'interesse pubblico ha un impatto sul risarcimento dovuto (ibidem § 74).
64. La Corte ribadisce che, mentre la privazione di proprietà effettuata per nessun altro motivo se non quello di conferire un vantaggio privato ad un privato non può essere "nell'interesse pubblico", il trasferimento obbligatorio di proprietà da un individuo ad un altro può, a seconda delle circostanze, costituire un mezzo legittimo per promuovere l'interesse pubblico (cfr. James e altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 40, Serie A n. 98). Inoltre, la presa di proprietà effettuata in applicazione di legittime politiche sociali, economiche o di altro tipo può essere "nell'interesse pubblico", anche se la comunità in generale non ha un uso o un godimento diretto dei beni presi (ibidem, § 45).
65. La Corte ritiene che, come accettato dai tribunali nazionali in due casi, la presa della proprietà ai fini dello "Schema G?adira" per abbellire la zona e garantire le strutture pertinenti per migliorare il turismo, era una misura di interesse pubblico. Secondo la Corte, tale misura, nel contesto della riforma economica, non può essere considerata irragionevole, soprattutto in considerazione dell'ampio margine di valutazione nell'attuazione delle politiche economiche. Il fatto che una parte di quel terreno (circa un decimo secondo la relazione dell'architetto presentata dai ricorrenti) sia stata data in concessione a terzi non toglie tale interesse. Tale interesse pubblico è rimasto in vigore dal 1967 (data della ratifica) ad oggi.
66. Per quanto riguarda la proporzionalità, la Corte rileva che, nella fattispecie, le ricorrenti non hanno mai ricevuto alcun risarcimento per la presa in consegna dell'immobile nel 1957, nonostante una presunta offerta nel 2006 e un'ordinanza della Corte Costituzionale nel 2016. A questo proposito, si osserva che il Governo non ha contestato i fatti sopra esposti, i quali affermavano che le ricorrenti non erano state formalmente informate di tale offerta (cfr. paragrafi 15 e 26). Non è quindi chiaro in che modo i ricorrenti avrebbero potuto ritirare o contestare tali somme, dopo il 2006, tanto più che il Governo contestava finora il loro titolo di proprietà. E' anche indiscusso che nessun pagamento è mai stato effettuato dopo l'ordinanza della Corte Costituzionale. Pertanto, la Corte ritiene che il Governo non abbia fornito alcuna giustificazione per il mancato pagamento di tali risarcimenti ai ricorrenti da parte delle autorità nel corso del tempo.
67. La Corte è del parere che (a prescindere dall'adeguatezza del risarcimento) il suddetto ritardo nel pagamento del risarcimento, in conseguenza del quale i richiedenti sono ancora senza alcun risarcimento più di cinque decenni dopo l'entrata in vigore della Convenzione e del relativo Protocollo per Malta, non soddisfa i requisiti dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
68. Di conseguenza, si è verificata una violazione di tale disposizione.
II. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
69. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se il Tribunale constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente un risarcimento solo parziale, il Tribunale, se necessario, dà giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".
A. Danni
1. Osservazioni delle parti
70. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che, poiché non è stato fatto alcun uso effettivo della proprietà, lo Stato dovrebbe essere obbligato a restituire tale proprietà secondo il principio della restitutio in integrum.
71. In mancanza di ciò, esse hanno sostenuto un valore commisurato alle legittime aspettative commerciali in relazione al terreno. Pertanto, hanno ritenuto legittimo che la Corte riconosca il valore del terreno più la perdita di opportunità. Alla luce di ciò, essi hanno chiesto 1.391.551 euro (EUR) a titolo di danno patrimoniale, secondo una perizia che ha coperto la loro perdita di reddito per oltre sessantadue anni, nonché il mancato pagamento del risarcimento pecuniario per il prelievo. Secondo la perizia, l'area poteva occupare 270 posti letto al giorno, con un reddito giornaliero di 2.700 euro, per 168 giorni all'anno (periodo estivo) con un'occupazione dell'80%, il che significa che aveva un reddito potenziale annuo di 362.880 euro, da cui si doveva detrarre la concessione della spiaggia (18.313,80 euro) e il costo del lavoro (30.000 euro), con un conseguente reddito netto da locazione di 314.567 euro all'anno. Su tale base (capitalizzando i ricavi netti da locazione del 7,5%) il valore del terreno è stato stimato in 4.194.226 euro, che retrodatato ha dato un valore di 35.512 euro nel 1957.
72. Hanno inoltre rivendicato danni non pecuniari.
73. Il Governo ha sostenuto che l'esproprio era stato legale e quindi non c'era motivo di restituire la proprietà. Per quanto riguarda la perdita di reddito asserita dai ricorrenti, essi hanno ritenuto che la proprietà non poteva essere considerata come un'azienda in attività, in quanto al momento dell'espropriazione, nel 1957, il terreno era di natura agricola e i ricorrenti non avevano dimostrato il contrario. Non è stato quindi possibile calcolare il reddito atteso per lo stato del terreno prima che avvenisse lo sviluppo. Il Governo ha presentato una valutazione che mostrava che il valore del terreno nel 2019 era di 139.000 EUR o 185.000 EUR a seconda del tasso di interesse applicato, mentre il valore nel 2006, esclusi gli interessi, ammontava a 61.740 EUR. Tenuto conto dell'interesse pubblico del provvedimento, il Governo ha ritenuto che il risarcimento dei danni pecuniari non dovesse superare i 70.000 euro in via solidale (oltre al danno riconosciuto dalla Corte Costituzionale). Hanno inoltre ritenuto che, in considerazione della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, non dovrebbero essere concessi ulteriori danni non pecuniari e che in ogni caso un ulteriore risarcimento non dovrebbe superare i 2.000 euro in solido.
2. La valutazione della Corte
74. Come la Corte ha più volte affermato, una sentenza in cui la Corte constata una violazione impone allo Stato convenuto l'obbligo giuridico di porre fine alla violazione e di riparare le sue conseguenze in modo da ripristinare, per quanto possibile, la situazione esistente prima della violazione (cfr. Iatridis c. Grecia (solo soddisfazione) [GC], no. 31107/96 § 32, CEDU 2000-XI, e Guiso-Gallisay c. Italia (solo soddisfazione) [GC], n. 58858/00, § 90, 22 dicembre 2009). Gli Stati contraenti che sono parti in causa sono, in linea di principio, liberi di scegliere i mezzi con cui conformarsi a una sentenza in cui la Corte ha constatato una violazione. Questa discrezionalità in merito alle modalità di esecuzione di una sentenza rispecchia la libertà di scelta connessa all'obbligo primario degli Stati contraenti ai sensi della Convenzione di garantire i diritti e le libertà garantiti (articolo 1). Se la natura della violazione consente la restitutio in integrum è dovere dello Stato ritenuto responsabile della sua esecuzione, la Corte non ha né il potere né la possibilità pratica di farlo essa stessa. Se, tuttavia, il diritto nazionale non consente - o consente solo parzialmente - il risarcimento delle conseguenze della violazione, l'articolo 41 conferisce alla Corte il potere di concedere alla parte lesa la soddisfazione che le sembra opportuna (ibidem). La Corte rileva che, sebbene la restituzione della proprietà non appaia impossibile, dato che non se ne è fatto alcun uso, il Governo non si è offerto di restituirla, né ha indicato di essere interessato a farlo, sostenendo unicamente che tale azione non era richiesta (v. supra, paragrafo 73).
75. In assenza di tale azione, spetta quindi alla Corte di concedere un risarcimento, osservando che non vi è alcun rischio che i ricorrenti ricevano un doppio risarcimento pecuniario, in quanto le autorità nazionali prenderanno inevitabilmente atto dell'aggiudicazione di questa Corte al momento di finalizzare il contratto di espropriazione (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Frendo Randon e altri, citato sopra, §77).
76. Come la Corte ha già rilevato, la presa in considerazione del caso del ricorrente non mancava di interesse pubblico. A questo proposito la Corte ribadisce che obiettivi legittimi di "interesse pubblico", come quelli perseguiti con misure di riforma economica o misure volte a conseguire una maggiore giustizia sociale, possono giustificare il rimborso di un valore inferiore all'intero valore di mercato (cfr. Urbárska Obec Tren?ianske Biskupice c. Slovacchia, n. 74258/01, § 115, CEDU 2007-XIII).
77. La fonte della violazione è stata il ritardo nell'avviare il relativo procedimento e il fatto che ad oggi - più di sessant'anni dopo la presa in consegna del terreno (e più di cinquanta da quando la relativa disposizione è diventata applicabile a Malta) - i ricorrenti non hanno ancora ottenuto alcun risarcimento per le loro proprietà.
78. La Corte osserva che in casi simili (si veda, ad esempio, Frendo Randon e altri c. Malta, (solo soddisfazione), n. 2226/10, § 20, 9 luglio 2013 e Azzopardi c. Malta, n. 28177/12, § 66, 6 novembre 2014) la somma da assegnare ai richiedenti è stata calcolata sulla base del valore del terreno al momento della presa, convertito al valore corrente per compensare gli effetti dell'inflazione, più il semplice interesse legale applicato al capitale progressivamente adeguato. Tuttavia, nel caso di specie, il Tribunale non perde di vista il fatto che nel 2006 era stata emessa una nuova dichiarazione, in assenza di una conclusione della dichiarazione emessa nel 1957. La Corte terrà inoltre conto, nella misura necessaria, dell'ubicazione dell'immobile e delle possibilità che esso avrebbe potuto avere nel corso degli anni a causa di tale ubicazione, tenendo tuttavia presente che al momento della sua presa era utilizzato esclusivamente come sito per roulotte.
79. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte ritiene ragionevole concedere alle ricorrenti la somma di 150.000 euro, in solido, oltre alle imposte eventualmente dovute su tale importo, a titolo di risarcimento per l'esproprio.
80. Tenuto conto della concessione di EUR 20.000 concessa dai tribunali nazionali, che rimane dovuta, la Corte non ritiene necessario effettuare un risarcimento per danni non patrimoniali.
B. Costi e spese
81. Le ricorrenti hanno anche chiesto le spese e i costi sostenuti dinanzi alle giurisdizioni costituzionali come da fattura di spese tassata (che mostrava EUR 5.716 sostenuti dall'attore e EUR 4.147 sostenuti dalla convenuta), e EUR 99,26 per le spese di corriere relative al procedimento dinanzi a questo Tribunale.
82. Il Governo ha sostenuto che le ricorrenti non hanno quantificato la loro richiesta, ma si sono semplicemente basate su una fattura di spese tassata. Inoltre, hanno osservato che le ricorrenti non hanno fornito la prova che tali spese fossero state pagate. Secondo il governo, i costi dell'intero procedimento non dovrebbero in ogni caso superare i 1.500 EUR.
83. Tenuto conto dei documenti in suo possesso e della sua giurisprudenza, la Corte ritiene ragionevole concedere la somma di 5.815 EUR a copertura di tutte le spese.
C. Interessi di mora
84. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale vanno aggiunti tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
1. 2) Il ricorso è dichiarato ricevibile nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967 e per il resto irricevibile;
2. 2. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
3. 3. Dichiara che il ricorso è ricevibile in quanto si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967 e il resto è irricevibile; 2. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione; 3. Dichiara che il ricorso è ricevibile nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967 e il resto è irricevibile; 4. Dichiara che il ricorso è ricevibile nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967 e il resto è irricevibile; 5. Dichiara che il ricorso è ricevibile nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967 e il resto è irricevibile; 6. Dichiara che il ricorso è ricevibile nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967 e il resto è irricevibile; 7. Dichiara che il ricorso è ricevibile nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967 e il resto è irricevibile; 8. Dichiara che il ricorso è ricevibile nella misura in cui si riferisce al periodo successivo al 23 gennaio 1967.
(a) che lo Stato convenuto paghi ai ricorrenti, in solido, entro tre mesi, i seguenti importi:
(i) 150.000 euro (centocinquantamila euro), oltre alle imposte eventualmente dovute, a titolo di danno patrimoniale;
(ii) Euro 5.815 (cinquemilaottocentoquindici euro), oltre alle imposte eventualmente dovute ai ricorrenti, a titolo di costi e spese;
(b) che a partire dalla scadenza dei tre mesi sopra indicati e fino al regolamento saranno dovuti interessi semplici sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Centrale Europea durante il periodo di inadempienza, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;
4) Il resto della domanda delle ricorrenti è respinto per giusta soddisfazione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l'8 ottobre 2019, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.
Stephen Phillips Georgios A. Serghides
Cancelliere Presidente


?

APPENDICE

1. Bernard GAUCI è un cittadino maltese e americano nato nel 1950 e vive a San ?iljan, Malta.
2. Emanuela BONNICI è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1948 e vive nel Kent, in Inghilterra.
3. Norah CORCORAN è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1930 e vive nel Somerset, in Inghilterra.
4. Sharon Marie CUTAJAR è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1970 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
5. Susan ELLUL SULLIVAN è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1957 e vive a Swieqi, Malta.
6. Mary Rose FARRUGIA è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1966 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
7. Doris FENECH è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1952 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
8. Il Gothard GAUCI è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1962 e vive a Plymouth, in Inghilterra.
9. Maria Sylvia GAUCI è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1954 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
10. Anthony GRIMA è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1964 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
11. John GRIMA è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1955 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
12. Joseph GRIMA è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1944 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
13. Joseph GRIMA è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1970 e vive a Cork, in Inghilterra.
14. Marianne GRIMA è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1976 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
15. Sarah GRIMA è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1979 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
16. Therese GRIMA è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1943 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
17. Elizabeth MORRIS è una cittadina britannica nata nel 1944 e vive a Ba?ar i?-?ag?aq, Malta.
18. Mary MUSCAT è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1941 e vive a Paola, Malta.
19. Mary PARKER è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1929 e vive a Sliema, Malta.
20. Sonia STEWART è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1972 e vive a Mellie?a, Malta.
21. Victoria Stella STURCKE è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1944 e vive a Middlesex, Inghilterra.
22. Anne TABONE è una cittadina britannica nata nel 1932 e vive a Sliema, Malta.
23. Edmond TABONE è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1975 e vive a Ba?ar i?-?ag?aq, Malta.
24. Jane TABONE è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1966 e vive a Swieqi, Malta.
25. John TABONE è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1935 e vive a Sliema, Malta.
26. Joseph TABONE è un cittadino maltese nato nel 1936 e vive a Sliema, Malta.
27. Rebecca TABONE è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1974 e vive a San ?iljan, Malta.
28. Josephine XUEREB è una cittadina maltese nata nel 1947 e vive a Sliema, Malta.


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 23/05/2022.