CASO: CASE OF S.C. CONTINENTAL HOTELS S.A. v. ROMANIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF S.C. CONTINENTAL HOTELS S.A. v. ROMANIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: P1-1

NUMERO: 36407/12
STATO: Romania
DATA: 08/10/2019
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION








CASE OF S.C. CONTINENTAL HOTELS S.A. v. ROMANIA

(Application no. 36407/12)







JUDGMENT
(Merits)







STRASBOURG

8 October 2019



This judgment is final but it may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of S.C. Continental Hotels S.A. v. Romania,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Committee composed of:
Faris Vehabovi?, President,
Iulia Antoanella Motoc,
Péter Paczolay, judges,
and Andrea Tamietti, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 3 September 2019,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 36407/12) against Romania lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Romanian company, S.C. Continental Hotels S.A. (“the applicant company”), on 5 June 2012.
2. The applicant company was represented by S.C.A. Popovici Ni?u Stoica & Asocia?ii, a law office located in Bucharest. The Romanian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mrs C. Brumar, from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
3. On 9 March 2016 the application was communicated to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
A. Background information concerning the applicant company
4. The applicant, SC Continental Hotels SA, is a company set up in 1990 under Law no. 15/1990 as a State company. The applicant company’s property comprised a hotel and the plot of land on which the hotel was situated. The Ministry of Tourism issued a title of property in this regard.
5. In 1995 the State Property Fund (the “FPS”) sold the company’s shares. The company was transformed from a State company into a private company.
6. On 16 May 1996 the State Construction Inspectorate noted that the hotel was at an advanced degree of degradation because the works needed to render it safe for use as a hotel had not been carried out for some time. The report drafted on that occasion stated that “the building did not satisfy the security standards in respect of its commercial exploitation and structural stability” and therefore “its owner should immediately stop using it.”
7. On 17 September 1996 the authorities granted the applicant company a permit for the demolition of the building. On an unspecified date in the same year the building was demolished.
8. According to the Government the demolition permit was revoked after the demolition had been carried out on account of the pending restitution proceedings between the applicant company and the successors of the former owner. However, none of the parties submitted a copy of the cancellation order or any other documents relating to it.
B. Civil proceedings against the applicant company for the restitution of property
9. In 1994 the legal successors of the former owner of the land and of the hotel, who had been deprived by the State of his property during the communist regime, brought an action against the applicant company for the restitution of the land and of the hotel.
10. By a judgment delivered on 16 November 1995 the Bucharest District Court granted their civil action and ordered the restitution of the hotel and of the appurtenant land to the plaintiffs.
11. The applicant company lodged an appeal on points of law. On 18 December 1996 the Bucharest Court of Appeal allowed the applicant company’s appeal. The case was remitted to the Buz?u County Court.
12. The applicant company asked the court to introduce as a party to the proceedings the FPS which had sold the company’s shares in the privatisation process and which, in its opinion, should guarantee payment of compensation for the hotel and the appurtenant land in the event that the plaintiffs’ claims was allowed. The applicant company based its request on (i) the relevant provisions of the Civil Code concerning the liability of the seller for the quiet possession of the sold assets and the seller’s obligation to compensate the buyer in event of the buyer’s eviction and (ii) the liability clauses in the privatisation contract.
13. On 15 June 1998 the Buz?u County Court dismissed the plaintiffs’ action on the grounds that the hotel and the land had been legally included in the applicant company’s assets.
14. The plaintiffs lodged an appeal with the Ploie?ti Court of Appeal.
15. The appeal court suspended the trial between 10 May 1999 and 22 December 2006 as there were civil proceedings pending between the legal successors of the former owner.
16. On 20 March 2009 the Ploie?ti Court of Appeal allowed the plaintiffs’ action. By the same decision, the Authority for the Recovery of State Assets (Autoritatea pentru Valorificarea Activelor Statului – AVAS), the successor to the FPS, was identified as the State authority responsible for compensating the applicant company for the damage caused to it.
17. The applicant company lodged an appeal on points of law claiming that it had not received any compensation for the lost land. AVAS and the plaintiffs also lodged appeals on points of law.
18. By a decision of 2 December 2009 the High Court of Cassation and Justice allowed all the appeals on points of law, quashed the decision and remitted the case to the Ploie?ti Court of Appeal.
19. During the fresh appeal proceedings, the applicant company lodged a request for the Ministry of Finance to be introduced as party to the proceedings.
20. By a decision of 16 December 2010 the Ploie?ti Court of Appeal allowed the civil action lodged by the plaintiffs and dismissed the request lodged by the applicant company for the Ministry of Finance to be named as guarantor. The applicant company was obliged to restore the title to the land and to pay the plaintiffs compensation of 11,138,275 Romanian lei (RON – approximately 2,600,000 euros (EUR)) for the demolished hotel. The Court of Appeal also ordered AVAS to pay to the applicant company the amount it had to pay for the demolished hotel and RON 2,209,200 (approximately EUR 515,000) for the land it had lost, as well as all court expenses that it had incurred.
21. All the parties lodged appeals on points of law.
22. By a decision of 6 December 2011 the High Court of Cassation and Justice dismissed the applicant company’s appeal. It allowed the appeal lodged by AVAS and rejected the applicant company’s request to be compensated by AVAS as having been lodged by a person not having locus standi. In this respect, the court held that the applicant company hadn’t been party to the transaction concerning the sale of its shares.
C. Civil proceedings for compensation
23. After lodging its application with the Court, the applicant company brought new civil proceedings for compensation against (i) the Authority for the Administration of the State’s Assets (Autoritatea pentru Administrarea Activelor Statului – AAAS) (the successor to AVAS) and (ii) the Romanian State (through the Ministry of Public Finance). Relying on Article 324 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997 (see paragraph 34 below) the applicant company claimed RON 16,141,398 (approximately EUR 3,766,000 EUR) as compensation for the damage caused as a result of (i) the restitution of the land, whose book value amounted to RON 5,003,123 (approximately EUR 1,166,000 EUR), and (ii) the payment to the former owners the sum of RON 11,138,275 (approximately EUR 2,600,000), representing the monetary equivalent of the demolished hotel building.
24. By a judgment of 7 June 2013 the Bucharest District Court allowed the applicant company’s claim in part. It ordered AAAS to pay the applicant company RON 5,003,123 as compensation for the restitution of the land, but declined to order AAAS to pay it compensation for its payment of the monetary equivalent of the demolished hotel to the former owners.
25. The applicant company appealed against that judgment. On 16 April 2014 the Bucharest Court of Appeal allowed the appeal. It quashed the judgment of the first-instance court and allowed the applicant company’s claims.
26. On 27 January 2015 the High Court of Cassation and Justice allowed the appeal on points of law lodged by AAAS. It quashed the decision given on appeal and upheld the judgment of the first-instance court.
27. The High Court of Cassation ruled that under Article 324 §§ 1 and 2 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997 (see paragraph 34 below), on which the applicant relied by way of legal grounds, a privatised company was entitled to compensation only in the event that the damage incurred was the result of the restitution of its real estate to the former owners. In this respect, the court held that compelling the applicant company to pay the monetary equivalent of the building (instead of restoring title to the actual building) was the result of the fact that the building had been demolished, which had placed the applicant company “through its own fault, outside the legal framework stipulated by Article 324 §§ 1 and 2 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997”.
28. Secondly, the High Court held that Article 324 § 5 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997, on which the applicant relied by way of subsidiary legal grounds, was also not applicable because it did “not provide an obligation on the part of the public institution involved to pay compensation for the demolished building”.
29. Thirdly, the High Court held that the applicant company was not entitled to lodge a claim for compensation relying on unjust enrichment on the part of the State (actio de in rem verso) either, since by demolishing the building it “had distanced itself from the benefit of the legal provisions”.
30. Lastly, the High Court dismissed the applicant company’s claim to compel the Romanian State, through the Ministry of Finance to pay the compensation. It held that the obligation to compensate privatised companies for losses caused by the restitution to their former owners of assets taken over by the State applied only to public institutions involved in the privatisation process and not to the State.
D. Enforcement proceedings
31. The applicant company initiated enforcement proceedings against AAAS for the recovery of the amount awarded to it by the judgment of 7 June 2013 (see paragraph 24 below), upheld on appeal by the High Court of Cassation.
32. On 27 May 2014 the Bucharest District Court agreed that enforcement proceedings could be initiated. The applicant company informed the Court that the enforcement agent had managed to recover only RON 69,747 (approximately EUR 15,661), representing just 1.39% of RON 5,003,123, the amount granted by the final judgment of the High Court.
33. By a letter of 19 August 2014 the Bucharest Municipality Treasury informed the applicant company that AAAS was insolvent. It also informed the applicant company that it was registered as occupying position 3,462 in the list of AAAS’s creditors.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
A. Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997 concerning the privatisation of commercial companies, approved by Law no. 44/1998 and amended by Law no. 99/1999
34. In so far as relevant, Article 324 of the ordinance reads as follows:
“(1) The designated public institutions shall ensure that compensation [is paid] for damage caused to privatised companies or companies undergoing privatisation by the restitution to former owners of property taken over by the State;
(2) The designated public institutions shall pay to the companies referred to in paragraph (1) compensation representing the monetary equivalent of the damage caused by the restitution to former owners, under a final and irrevocable court judgment, of the real estate owned by the company.
(3) The compensation provided under paragraph (2) shall be mutually agreed upon with the companies, and in case of disagreement, it shall be decided by the courts.
...
(5) In case that the companies are ordered, by final and irrevocable court judgment to pay the monetary equivalent of the property, the designated public institutions shall directly pay the amount established by the judgment to the former owner.
(6) The State shall guarantee the fulfilment by the public institutions of the obligations set forth herein.”
35. Article 324 of the ordinance was repealed by Article 56 of Law no. 137/2002 on Measures for the Acceleration of the Privatisation Process. Article 30 § 3 of the law expressly stipulated that Article 324 of the ordinance remained applicable to all sale-purchase agreements of shares already concluded when the law entered into force in 2002.
B. The Civil Code
36. The relevant provisions of the Civil Code read as follows:
Article 1345
“A person, who, through no fault of his own, has unjustly enriched himself/herself to the detriment of a third party, is obliged to make restitution for the loss of assets incurred by that third party, but without being held liable beyond the limits of his/her own enrichment.”
Article 1346
“Enrichment is justified when it derives from:
a) the performance of a valid obligation;
b) the injured party’s failure to exercise a right against the enriched party;
c) a deed undertaken by the injured party in his/her personal interest and at its own exclusive risk or, as the case may be, with the intention to gratify.”
C. Decision no. 18/2011 of the High Court of Cassation and Justice
37. In a decision delivered on 17 October 2011 and published in the Official Gazette on 16 December 2011, the High Court of Cassation and Justice confirmed that Article 324 of the Emergency Government Ordinance continued to apply (even after the repeal of the Emergency Government Ordinance) to sale-purchase agreements concluded before the entry into force of Law no. 137/2002 (see paragraph 35 above).
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
38. The applicant company complained that the decision delivered by the High Court of Cassation and Justice on 6 December 2011 rejecting its request to be compensated by the competent State authority on the grounds that it lacked locus standi (see paragraph 22 above) had been in breach of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a fair ... hearing ... by [a] ... tribunal ...”
A. The parties’ submissions
39. The Government raised two preliminary objections: one concerned the allegedly abusive character of the complaint, and the other concerned the loss by the applicant company of its “victim status”.
40. As to the first objection, the Government pointed out that after lodging its application in Strasbourg, the applicant company had brought new civil proceedings seeking compensation for the damage sustained. The applicant company had not informed the Court that by a judgment of 7 June 2013 (see paragraph 24 above), upheld on appeal by a judgment of 27 January 2015 (see paragraph 26 above), the domestic courts had partly allowed its claims for compensation. Accordingly, relying on a decision rendered by the Court in the case of Ibri? v. Romania ((dec.), no. 15193/12, 21 June 2016), the Government asked the Court to declare the complaint abusive as the applicant company had failed provide information about aspects of the case that in their opinion were essential for its assessment.
41. Moreover, for the same reasons – namely, because the domestic courts had assessed and allowed the applicant company’s claims in part – the Government submitted that the applicant company was no longer a “victim” and asked the Court to declare the complaint inadmissible ratione personae.
42. The applicant company submitted that the civil proceedings lodged after the dismissal of its first claim by the High Court of Cassation and Justice on 6 December 2011 had concerned two different claims: one relating to the damage caused by the restitution of the land in question and the other one to the payment of the monetary equivalent of the demolished building. By the decision of 27 January 2015 the High Court of Cassation and Justice had allowed only the claim concerning the land-related damage and had dismissed the other one.
43. Moreover, its prospects of recovering compensation for the land were quite reduced owing to the difficulties it had encountered in the enforcement of the judgement of 7 June 2013. It therefore considered that it could still claim to be a “victim” under Article 6 of the Convention, as the final domestic judgment had only provided partial redress.
44. The applicant company also argued that there had been, on its part, no attempt to mislead the Court.
B. The Court’s assessment
1. Whether there has been an abuse of the right of individual application
45. The Court reiterates that an application may be rejected as an abuse of the right of application if it was knowingly based on untrue facts with the intention of misleading the Court (see Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. and Di Stefano v. Italy [GC], no. 38433/09, § 97, ECHR 2012). The submission of incomplete (and thus misleading) information may also amount to an abuse of the right of application, especially if the information in question concerns the very core of the case and no sufficient explanation has been provided for the failure to disclose that information. The same applies where new, significant developments arise during proceedings before the Court and where – despite being expressly required to do so by Rule 47 § 6 of the Rules of Court – the applicant fails to disclose that information to the Court, thereby preventing it from ruling on the case in full knowledge of the facts. However, even in such cases, the applicant’s intention to mislead the Court must always be established with sufficient certainty (see Gross v. Switzerland [GC], no. 67810/10, § 28, ECHR 2014).
46. The Court notes that the applicant company acknowledged that it had pursued its case for compensation before the civil courts and had not informed the Court of that fact after it had lodged its application with the Strasbourg Court. Having regard to the explanation provided by the applicant – namely, that only a part of its claim had been allowed and that in so far as the allowed part of the claim was concerned it had had difficulties in obtaining the enforcement thereof (see paragraphs 42 and 43 above) – the Court considers that the omission in question cannot be seen as an attempt to conceal from the Court any essential information.
47. In addition, in its written observations the applicant provided all relevant information and documents relating to the new set of proceedings that it instituted after lodging its application with the Court.
48. In conclusion, not having found any fraudulent intent on the part of the applicant company, the Court dismisses the objection that there has been an abuse of the right of application.
2. Whether the applicant company lost its victim status
49. The Court reiterates that a decision or measure favourable to an applicant is not in principle sufficient to deprive him of his status as a “victim” unless the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded redress for, the breach of the Convention (see, among other authorities, Dalban v. Romania [GC], no. 28114/95, § 44, ECHR 1999 VI).
50. In the present case the applicant company complained that in its decision of 6 December 2011, the High Court of Cassation and Justice had not examined its claims to be compensated for the damage it had incurred; it had simply rejected them on the grounds that the applicant company lacked locus standi (see paragraph 38 above).
51. The Court notes that in a new set of civil proceedings brought by the applicant company, the domestic courts examined its claims on the merits and allowed them in part (see paragraph 24 above).
52. In the Court’s view, this deprived the applicant company of its victim status in respect of its complaint of lack of access to court. The fact that its claims for reimbursement were allowed only in part by the domestic courts cannot change this conclusion.
53. It follows that the applicant company can no longer claim to be the victim of a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. Accordingly, its complaint is incompatible rationae personae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) and must be rejected in accordance with Article 35 § 4.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
54. The applicant company submitted that being deprived of its property followed by the failure of the State to provide it with compensation had been in breach of its right to the peaceful enjoyment of its possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which provides:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
55. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It furthermore notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicant company
56. The applicant company alleged that the deprivation of its property in the absence of any actions on the part of the State aimed at granting just and effective compensation amounted to expropriation.
57. In the applicant company’s view, there had been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. on account of the fact that in the first set of civil proceedings, the High Court of Cassation and Justice had rejected its claims for compensation (see paragraph 22 above). The applicant company pointed out that the reasoning of the decision of the High Court of Cassation had been inappropriate and had been excessively formalistic in its interpretation of the law.
58. The applicant company also contended that the second set of civil proceedings of which it had made use in seeking to obtain compensation proved to be ineffective.
59. As regards the dismissal by the domestic courts of the applicant company’s compensation claim pertaining to the payment it had made to the legal successors of the former owner of the hotel building, the applicant company maintained that it had taken the demolition measure because of the building’s advanced state of deterioration, as acknowledged by the State Inspectorate for Construction (see paragraphs 6 et 7 above). By demolishing the building it had only acted in accordance with its rights as an owner.
60. Moreover, the applicant company maintained that the decision setting the amount of compensation for the returned land had been only partially enforced to date (see paragraphs 32 et 33 above).
(b) The Government
61. The Government submitted that the domestic courts had allowed the applicant company’s claim for compensation in relation to the land it had returned to the legal successors of the former owner but had rightfully dismissed its claim for compensation in respect of the hotel building that it had demolished in 1996.
62. The Government argued that the only partly responsible for the dismissal of the latter claim was the applicant company, which had demolished the hotel building on the basis of a permit that had subsequently been cancelled (see paragraph 8 above).
63. In addition, by demolishing the building the applicant company had placed itself outside the legal framework set out by Article 324 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997, under which it had been entitled to be compensated only for the restitution of the actual building (see paragraph 27 above).
64. According to the Government, Article 324 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997 (see paragraph 34 above) satisfied the requirements of accessibility, accuracy and foreseeability under the Convention. The decisions rendered by the domestic courts had therefore had a legal basis as required under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
65. In so far as the proportionality of the domestic courts’ decisions is concerned, the Government noted that the State enjoyed a wide margin of appreciation when regulating matters such as compensation for abuses committed by the State authorities under the communist regime.
2. The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles
66. The Court refers to its established case-law on the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and the manner in which the three rules contained in that provision are to be applied (see, among many other authorities, J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd and J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd v. the United Kingdom [GC], no. 44302/02, § 52, ECHR 2007-III, and Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 134, ECHR 2004-V).
67. The Court reiterates that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful, must be in the public interest, and must pursue a legitimate aim by means reasonably proportionate to the aim sought to be realised (see Moskal v. Poland, no. 10373/05, §§ 49-50, 15 September 2009).
(b) Application of the above principles in the present case
i. Whether there has been an interference with the applicant’s possessions
68. The Court notes that the applicant company was the legal owner of the hotel and the appurtenant land which were transferred to private ownership during the privatisation process that took place after the fall of the communist regime (see paragraphs 4 and 5 above). The Government did not contest that the obligation to return the property amounts to interference with the applicant company’s right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions within the meaning of the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. The Courts sees no reason to find otherwise.
ii. Lawfulness of the interference
69. The Court recalls that the first and most important requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions should be lawful: the second sentence of the first paragraph authorises a deprivation of possessions only “subject to the conditions provided for by law”. The principle of lawfulness also presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see Broniowski, cited above, § 147).
70. Turning to the present case the Court notes that Romania enacted legislation on the restoration of property confiscated from owners under the communist regime (see Maria Atanasiu and Others v. Romania, nos. 30767/05 and 33800/06, § 44, 12 October 2010). The Court notes that the parties do not dispute that that legislation allowed the legal successors of the former owner of the land and of the hotel to recover their property rights. The deprivation of possessions was thus provided for by law.
iii. Legitimate aim
71. The Court must determine whether this deprivation of property pursued a legitimate aim – that is to say whether it was “in the public interest”. To this end it notes that the domestic courts invalidated the applicant company’s title to the property in question in order to satisfy the restitution claims of persons from whom that property had been expropriated by the State under the communist regime.
72. The Court accepts that the general objective of restitution laws – namely, to mitigate the consequences of certain infringements of property rights committed by the communist regime – is a legitimate aim and a means of securing the rights of former owners. In such circumstances, the Court accepts that the deprivation of property experienced by the applicant served not only the interests of the original owners of the land in question, but also the general interests of society as a whole (see, mutatis mutandis, Be?vá? and Be?vá?ová v. the Czech Republic, no. 58358/00, § 67, 14 December 2004).
iv. Proportionality
73. The Court reiterates that any interference with property must, in addition to being lawful and having a legitimate aim, also satisfy the requirement of proportionality. A fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, the search for such a fair balance being inherent in the whole of the Convention. The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, 23 September 1982, §§ 69-74, Series A no. 52; Brum?rescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999 VII; and see Do?rusöz and Aslan v. Turkey, no. 1262/02, § 27, 30 May 2006).
74. On several occasions in respect of similar cases – which, as in the present case, concerned the correction of mistakes made by the State authorities in the process of restitution – the Court has emphasised the necessity of ensuring that the remedying of old injuries does not create disproportionate new wrongs. To that end, the legislation should make it possible to take into account the particular circumstances of each case, so that individuals who have acquired their possessions in good faith are not made to bear the burden of responsibility, which is rightfully that of the State that has confiscated those possessions (see Velikovi and Others v. Bulgaria, nos. 43278/98 and 8 others, § 178, 15 March 2007).
75. In order to assess the burden borne by the applicant, the Court must assess the particular circumstances of each case – namely the conditions under which the disputed property was acquired and the compensation that was received by the applicant in exchange for the property (see, mutatis mutandis, Mohylová v. the Czech Republic (dec.), no. 75115/01, 6 September 2005).
76. In this regard, the Court reiterates that the taking of property without payment of an amount reasonably related to its value will normally constitute a disproportionate interference and a total lack of compensation can be considered justifiable under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 only in exceptional circumstances. This provision does not, however, guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances, since legitimate objectives of “public interest” may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 December 1994, § 71, Series A no. 301 A; Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], no. 25701/94, § 89, ECHR 2000 XII; and Zvolský and Zvolská v. the Czech Republic, no. 46129/99, § 70, ECHR 2002 IX).
77. Turning to the present case, the Court notes that at the relevant time, Article 324 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997 provided the legal framework for the compensation of privatised companies that had incurred damage as a result of the restitution to the former owners of real estate property taken over by the State under the communist regime. Thus, Article 324 §§ 1 and 2 stipulated that public authorities involved in the privatisation process were obliged to give compensation for losses incurred by the restitution of real estate. Under Article 324 §§ 5 and 6 the same public authorities had to guarantee that compensation would be afforded for any damage caused by the payment of the monetary equivalent of the real estate in question (see paragraph 34 above).
78. The Court notes that in spite of those legal provisions, in the civil proceedings initiated by the legal successors of the former owner of the property in question the applicant company’s compensation claims against the State authority (AVAS) were unsuccessful (see paragraph 22 above) and the applicant company was ordered by the domestic courts to return the land and to pay compensation of RON 11,138,275 (approximately EUR 2,600,000) for the hotel building, which the applicant company could not return because it had demolished it (see paragraph 20 above).
79. The fact that the decision rendered by the High Court of Cassation and Justice on 6 December 2011 contradicted both the applicable legal provisions and its own decision of 17 October 2011 on how the applicable law should be interpreted (see paragraph 37 above) was confirmed by the subsequent examination on the merits of the same claims in a new set of civil proceedings initiated by the applicant company. In those proceedings, the domestic courts not only examined the applicant company’s claims but also allowed its claim to be compensated for the land it had returned to the legal successors of the former owners (see paragraph 24 above).
80. The Court also notes that that the applicant company complied with the decision of 16 December 2010 (see paragraph 20 above) and paid the compensation to the legal successors of the former owner, even though under Article 324 § 5 of the Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997 it was the State authority involved in the privatisation of companies that had to directly pay compensation to former owners – not privatised companies.
81. In the present case, what appears crucial in the Court’s view is that after the applicant company’s title to the real estate in question was invalidated, the authorities were under an obligation to compensate it for the loss of its property rights in one of the forms provided by law. However, only the applicant’s claim for compensation for the restitution of the land was allowed (see paragraph 24 above), while the claim for compensation for the amount that it had paid for the hotel building was eventually rejected by the High Court of Cassation and Justice (see paragraph 26 above).
82. As regards the grounds cited in rejecting the applicant company’s claims, the Court notes that the High Court of Cassation and Justice held that by demolishing the building the applicant company placed itself “through its own fault, outside the legal framework stipulated under Article 324 §§ 1 and 2 of Emergency Government Ordinance no. 88/1997” (see paragraph 27 above).
83. The Court is not persuaded by that argument. As pointed out by the applicant company (see paragraph 59 above), the hotel building had to be demolished because of its advanced state of deterioration, which had rendered it dangerous. On 16 May 1996 the State Inspectorate for Construction had requested the applicant company to cease using the building, which “did not satisfy security standards in respect of its commercial exploitation and structural stability” (see paragraph 6 above). Accordingly, the applicant company had obtained a demolition permit in September 1996 and had demolished the building in the same year (see paragraph 7 above).
84. The Court points out that until the delivery of the final decision by the High Court of Cassation and Justice on 6 December 2011, the applicant company would have been the owner of the building for more than fifteen years and thus the only party bearing responsibility for any damage caused by the building’s advanced state of degradation.
85. Therefore, the Court considers that no fault or negligence can be imputed to the applicant company for demolishing the building. However, the consequence of the applicant’s legitimate action was the loss of the sum of RON 11,138,275 (approximately EUR 2,600,000), which it had to pay to the former owners and which it could not recover from the State.
86. In addition, the Court notes that all the enforcement proceedings which the applicant company had made use of in order to compensate the loss of the land proved to be ineffective and the applicant company recovered only a small fraction of what the judgement of 7 June 2013 awarded to it (see paragraph 32 above).
87. In this connection the Court reiterates that it has already found a violation of the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions in view of the ineffectiveness of the State’s restitution system and, in particular, of delays in the procedure for payment of compensation to the applicants (see Maria Atanasiu and Others v. Romania, nos. 30767/05 and 33800/06, § 183, 12 October 2010).
88. After examining all the evidence in its possession in the light of the principles articulated in its case-law, the Court considers that the Government have not put forward any fact or argument capable of justifying the failure to secure the applicant company’s right to compensation for the monetary equivalent of the demolished hotel building that it had to pay and the difficulties in enforcing the judgment by which the applicant company had been awarded compensation for the land returned.
89. Having regard to the particular circumstances of the present case, the Court takes the view that the State has imposed on the applicant company a disproportionate and excessive burden, which is incompatible with the right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
90. Accordingly, there has been a violation of that provision in the present case.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
91. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
92. The applicant company requested just satisfaction in respect of pecuniary damage amounting to 3,776,514 euros (EUR). It claimed a further EUR 5,000 in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
93. The Government contested the claims.
94. Given the particular circumstances of the present case, the Court considers that the question of the application of Article 41 is not ready for decision. It is therefore necessary to reserve that matter, due regard being had to the possibility of an agreement being reached between the respondent State and the applicant (Rule 75 §§ 1 and 4 of the Rules of Court).
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
1. Declares the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 admissible, and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

2. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds that the question of just satisfaction under Article 41 of the Convention is not ready for decision, and accordingly:
(a) reserves the said question in whole;
(b) invites the Government and the applicant to submit, within three months, their written observations on the matter and, in particular, to notify the Court of any agreement that they may reach;
(c) reserves the further procedure and delegates to the President of the Committee the power to fix the same if need be.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 8 October 2019, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Andrea Tamietti Faris Vehabovi?
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

QUARTA SEZIONE
CASO DI S.C. CONTINENTAL HOTELS S.A. v. ROMANIA
(Applicazione n. 36407/12)
GIUDICE
(Meriti)
STRASBURGO
8 ottobre 2019
Questo giudizio è definitivo ma può essere soggetto a revisione editoriale.
Nel caso di S.C. Continental Hotels S.A. contro la Romania,
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Quarta Sezione), che si riunisce come comitato composto da:
Faris Vehabovi?, Presidente,
Iulia Antoanella Motoc,
Péter Paczolay, giudici,
e Andrea Tamietti, vice cancelliere della sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 3 settembre 2019,
Emette la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in tale data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa ha avuto origine in un ricorso (n. 36407/12) contro la Romania presentato al Tribunale ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da una società rumena, S.C. Continental Hotels S.A. ("la società richiedente"), il 5 giugno 2012.
2. La società richiedente era rappresentata dalla S.C.A. Popovici Ni?u Stoica & Asocia?ii, uno studio legale con sede a Bucarest. Il governo rumeno ("il Governo") era rappresentato dal suo agente, la sig.ra C. Brumar, del Ministero degli Affari Esteri.
3. Il 9 marzo 2016 la domanda è stata comunicata al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
A. Informazioni generali sulla società richiedente
4. La ricorrente, SC Continental Hotels SA, è una società costituita nel 1990 ai sensi della legge n. 15/1990 come società statale. La proprietà della società richiedente comprendeva un albergo e il terreno su cui era situato l'albergo. Il Ministero del Turismo ha rilasciato un titolo di proprietà a tale riguardo.
5. Nel 1995 il Fondo per il patrimonio dello Stato (il "FPS") ha venduto le azioni della società. La società è stata trasformata da società statale in società privata.
6. Il 16 maggio 1996 l'Ispettorato di Stato per l'edilizia ha rilevato che l'albergo era in avanzato stato di degrado perché i lavori necessari per renderlo sicuro per l'uso come albergo non erano stati eseguiti da tempo. La relazione redatta in quell'occasione affermava che "l'edificio non soddisfaceva gli standard di sicurezza per quanto riguardava lo sfruttamento commerciale e la stabilità strutturale" e quindi "il suo proprietario doveva immediatamente smettere di utilizzarlo".
7. Il 17 settembre 1996 le autorità hanno concesso alla società richiedente un permesso per la demolizione dell'edificio. In una data non specificata dello stesso anno l'edificio è stato demolito.
8. Secondo il governo il permesso di demolizione è stato revocato dopo la demolizione a causa del procedimento di restituzione pendente tra la società richiedente e i successori dell'ex proprietario. Tuttavia, nessuna delle parti ha presentato una copia dell'ordine di cancellazione o di altri documenti ad esso relativi.
B. Procedimento civile contro la società richiedente per la restituzione dei beni
9. Nel 1994 i successori legali dell'ex proprietario del terreno e dell'albergo, che era stato privato dallo Stato dei suoi beni durante il regime comunista, hanno intentato un'azione contro la società richiedente per la restituzione del terreno e dell'albergo.
10. Con sentenza del 16 novembre 1995, il tribunale distrettuale di Bucarest ha accolto la loro azione civile e ha ordinato la restituzione dell'albergo e del terreno appannaggio ai ricorrenti.
11. La società ricorrente ha presentato ricorso per motivi di diritto. Il 18 dicembre 1996 la Corte d'Appello di Bucarest ha accolto il ricorso della società ricorrente. Il caso è stato rinviato al tribunale della contea di Buz?u.
12. La società richiedente ha chiesto al tribunale di presentare come parte in causa il FPS che aveva venduto le azioni della società nel processo di privatizzazione e che, a suo parere, avrebbe dovuto garantire il pagamento di un indennizzo per l'albergo e il terreno appannaggio nel caso in cui le richieste dei ricorrenti fossero state accolte. La società ricorrente ha basato la sua richiesta su (i) le pertinenti disposizioni del codice civile relative alla responsabilità del venditore per il quieto possesso dei beni venduti e all'obbligo del venditore di risarcire l'acquirente in caso di sfratto dell'acquirente e (ii) le clausole di responsabilità nel contratto di privatizzazione.
13. Il 15 giugno 1998 il tribunale della contea di Buz?u ha respinto il ricorso dei ricorrenti in quanto l'albergo e il terreno erano stati legalmente inclusi nel patrimonio della società richiedente.
14. I ricorrenti hanno presentato ricorso alla Corte d'appello di Ploie?ti.
15. La corte d'appello ha sospeso il processo tra il 10 maggio 1999 e il 22 dicembre 2006 in quanto erano in corso procedimenti civili tra i successori legali dell'ex proprietario.
16. Il 20 marzo 2009 la Corte d'appello di Ploie?ti ha accolto l'azione dei ricorrenti. Con la stessa decisione, l'Autorità per il recupero dei beni dello Stato (Autoritatea pentru Valorificarea Activelor Statului - AVAS), successore del FPS, è stata identificata come l'autorità statale responsabile del risarcimento dei danni causati alla società richiedente.
17. La società ricorrente ha presentato ricorso per motivi di diritto, sostenendo di non aver ricevuto alcun risarcimento per il terreno perduto. Anche l'AVAS e le ricorrenti hanno presentato ricorso per motivi di diritto.
18. Con decisione del 2 dicembre 2009 l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia ha accolto tutti i ricorsi per motivi di diritto, ha annullato la decisione e ha rinviato il caso alla Corte d'Appello di Ploie?ti.
19. Durante il nuovo procedimento d'appello, la società richiedente ha presentato una domanda per l'introduzione del Ministero delle Finanze come parte in causa.
20. Con decisione del 16 dicembre 2010 la Corte d'Appello di Ploie?ti ha accolto l'azione civile presentata dai ricorrenti e ha respinto la richiesta presentata dalla società richiedente di nominare il Ministero delle Finanze quale garante. La società richiedente è stata obbligata a restituire il titolo di proprietà del terreno e a pagare ai ricorrenti un risarcimento di 11.138.275 lei rumeni (RON - circa 2.600.000 euro (EUR)) per l'hotel demolito. La Corte d'Appello ha inoltre condannato AVAS a pagare alla società ricorrente l'importo dovuto per l'albergo demolito e 2.209.200 RON (circa 515.000 euro) per il terreno che aveva perso, nonché tutte le spese processuali da essa sostenute.
21. Tutte le parti hanno presentato ricorso per motivi di diritto.
22. Con sentenza del 6 dicembre 2011 l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia ha respinto il ricorso della società ricorrente. Essa ha accolto il ricorso presentato da AVAS e ha respinto la richiesta della società richiedente di essere risarcita da AVAS come se fosse stata presentata da una persona non avente un locus standi. A questo proposito, il tribunale ha ritenuto che la società richiedente non fosse stata parte della transazione relativa alla vendita delle sue azioni.
C. Procedimento civile per il risarcimento del danno
23. Dopo aver presentato la sua domanda alla Corte, la società richiedente ha intentato un nuovo procedimento civile per ottenere un risarcimento contro (i) l'Autorità per l'amministrazione dei beni dello Stato (Autoritatea pentru Administrarea Activelor Statului - AAAS) (successore di AVAS) e (ii) lo Stato rumeno (attraverso il Ministero delle Finanze Pubbliche). In base all'articolo 324 dell'ordinanza governativa d'emergenza n. 88/1997 (si veda il successivo paragrafo 34) la società richiedente ha chiesto un risarcimento di 16.141.398 RON (circa 3.766.000 EUR) a titolo di risarcimento dei danni causati (i) dalla restituzione del terreno, il cui valore contabile ammontava a 5.003.123 RON (circa 1.166.000 EUR), e (ii) dal pagamento ai precedenti proprietari della somma di 11.138.275 RON (circa 2.600.000 EUR), che rappresenta l'equivalente monetario dell'edificio alberghiero demolito.
24. Con sentenza del 7 giugno 2013 il tribunale distrettuale di Bucarest ha parzialmente accolto la richiesta della società richiedente. Ha condannato AAAS a pagare alla società richiedente 5.003.123 RON come risarcimento per la restituzione del terreno, ma ha rifiutato di condannare AAAS a risarcirla per il pagamento dell'equivalente monetario dell'hotel demolito ai precedenti proprietari.
25. La società ricorrente ha presentato ricorso contro tale sentenza. Il 16 aprile 2014 la Corte d'Appello di Bucarest ha accolto il ricorso. Essa ha annullato la sentenza del tribunale di primo grado e ha accolto le richieste della società richiedente.
26.Il 27 gennaio 2015 l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia ha accolto il ricorso per motivi di diritto presentato da AAAS. Ha annullato la decisione emessa in appello e ha confermato la sentenza del tribunale di primo grado.
27. L'Alta Corte di Cassazione ha stabilito che, ai sensi dell'articolo 324 §§ 1 e 2 dell'ordinanza governativa d'urgenza n. 1. 88/1997 (si veda il successivo paragrafo 34), su cui il ricorrente si è basato per motivi legali, una società privatizzata aveva diritto al risarcimento solo nel caso in cui il danno subito fosse il risultato della restituzione dei suoi beni immobili agli ex proprietari. A questo proposito, il tribunale ha ritenuto che costringere la società richiedente a pagare l'equivalente monetario dell'edificio (invece di restituire la proprietà dell'edificio stesso) era il risultato del fatto che l'edificio era stato demolito, il che aveva posto la società richiedente "per propria colpa, al di fuori del quadro giuridico previsto dall'articolo 324 §§ 1 e 2 dell'Ordinanza governativa d'urgenza n. 1". 88/1997”.
28. In secondo luogo, l'Alta Corte ha ritenuto che l'articolo 324 § 5 dell'ordinanza governativa d'emergenza n. 88/1997. 88/1997, su cui il ricorrente si è basato per motivi giuridici sussidiari, non era applicabile anche perché "non prevedeva l'obbligo per l'istituzione pubblica interessata di pagare un risarcimento per l'edificio demolito".
29. In terzo luogo, la High Court ha ritenuto che la società ricorrente non fosse legittimata a presentare una domanda di risarcimento per l'ingiusto arricchimento da parte dello Stato (actio de in rem verso), in quanto con la demolizione dell'edificio "si era allontanata dal beneficio delle disposizioni di legge".
30. Infine, la High Court ha respinto la richiesta della società ricorrente di obbligare lo Stato rumeno, attraverso il Ministero delle Finanze, a pagare il risarcimento. Essa ha ritenuto che l'obbligo di risarcire le società privatizzate per le perdite causate dalla restituzione ai loro ex proprietari dei beni acquisiti dallo Stato si applicava solo alle istituzioni pubbliche coinvolte nel processo di privatizzazione e non allo Stato.
D. Procedimento di esecuzione
31. La società ricorrente ha avviato nei confronti di AAAS un procedimento esecutivo per il recupero dell'importo ad essa riconosciuto con sentenza del 7 giugno 2013 (si veda il successivo paragrafo 24), accolta in appello dall'Alta Corte di Cassazione.
32. Il 27 maggio 2014 il Tribunale distrettuale di Bucarest ha deciso di avviare un procedimento esecutivo. La società richiedente ha informato la Corte che l'agente esecutivo era riuscito a recuperare solo 69.747 RON (circa EUR 15.661), pari a solo l'1,39% di 5.003.123 RON, l'importo concesso dalla sentenza definitiva della High Court.
33. Con lettera del 19 agosto 2014 la Tesoreria del Comune di Bucarest ha informato la società richiedente che l'AAAS era insolvente. Ha inoltre informato la società richiedente di essere stata registrata come occupante 3.462 nella lista dei creditori di AAAS.
II. DIRITTO E PRASSI NAZIONALE PERTINENTE
A. Ordinanza governativa d'emergenza n. 88/1997 relativa alla privatizzazione delle società commerciali, approvata dalla legge n. 44/1998 e modificata dalla legge n. 99/1999
34. L'articolo 324 dell'ordinanza recita, per quanto pertinente, come segue:
"(1) Le istituzioni pubbliche designate assicurano il risarcimento dei danni causati alle società privatizzate o in via di privatizzazione mediante la restituzione agli ex proprietari dei beni presi in consegna dallo Stato;
(2) Le istituzioni pubbliche designate versano alle società di cui al paragrafo 1 un indennizzo che rappresenta l'equivalente monetario dei danni causati dalla restituzione agli ex proprietari, con sentenza definitiva e irrevocabile, dei beni immobili di proprietà della società.
3. Il risarcimento di cui al paragrafo 2 è concordato con le società e, in caso di disaccordo, è deciso dai tribunali.
...
(5) Nel caso in cui le società siano condannate, con sentenza definitiva e irrevocabile del tribunale a pagare l'equivalente monetario del bene, le istituzioni pubbliche designate pagano direttamente al precedente proprietario l'importo stabilito dalla sentenza.
(6) Lo Stato garantisce l'adempimento da parte delle istituzioni pubbliche degli obblighi previsti dalla presente legge".
35. L'articolo 324 dell'ordinanza è stato abrogato dall'articolo 56 della legge n. 137/2002 sulle misure per l'accelerazione del processo di privatizzazione. L'articolo 30 § 3 della legge prevedeva espressamente che l'articolo 324 dell'ordinanza restasse applicabile a tutti i contratti di compravendita di azioni già conclusi al momento dell'entrata in vigore della legge nel 2002.
B. Il Codice Civile
36. Le disposizioni del Codice Civile in materia sono le seguenti:
Articolo 1345
"Chiunque, senza colpa propria, si sia ingiustamente arricchito a danno di un terzo, è tenuto a restituire il patrimonio perduto da quel terzo, ma senza essere ritenuto responsabile oltre i limiti del proprio arricchimento".
Articolo 1346
"L'arricchimento è giustificato quando deriva da:
a) l'adempimento di un obbligo valido;
b) dal mancato esercizio, da parte della parte lesa, di un diritto nei confronti della parte arricchita;
c) da un atto compiuto dal danneggiato nel proprio interesse personale e a proprio esclusivo rischio o, se del caso, con l'intento di gratificare".
C. Decisione n. 18/2011 dell'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia
37. Con sentenza del 17 ottobre 2011, pubblicata nella Gazzetta Ufficiale del 16 dicembre 2011, l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia ha confermato che l'articolo 324 dell'Ordinanza governativa d'urgenza ha continuato ad applicarsi (anche dopo l'abrogazione dell'Ordinanza governativa d'urgenza) ai contratti di compravendita conclusi prima dell'entrata in vigore della Legge n. 137/2002 (cfr. paragrafo 35).
LA LEGGE
I. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
38. La società ricorrente ha lamentato che la decisione emessa dall'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia il 6 dicembre 2011 che respingeva la sua richiesta di essere risarita dall'autorità statale competente per mancanza di locus standi (si veda il precedente paragrafo 22) ha violato l'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:
"Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti e dei suoi obblighi civili ..., ognuno ha diritto ad un'equa ... udienza ... da [a] ... tribunale ...".
A. Osservazioni delle parti
39. Il Governo ha sollevato due obiezioni preliminari: una riguardava il presunto carattere abusivo della denuncia, l'altra riguardava la perdita da parte della società richiedente del suo "status di vittima".
40. Per quanto riguarda la prima obiezione, il Governo ha sottolineato che, dopo aver presentato la sua domanda a Strasburgo, la società richiedente aveva avviato un nuovo procedimento civile per chiedere il risarcimento del danno subito. La società richiedente non aveva informato la Corte che con sentenza del 7 giugno 2013 (cfr. paragrafo 24), confermata in appello con sentenza del 27 gennaio 2015 (cfr. paragrafo 26), i tribunali nazionali avevano parzialmente accolto le sue richieste di risarcimento. Di conseguenza, basandosi su una decisione resa dalla Corte nella causa Ibri? contro la Romania ((dec.), n. 15193/12, 21 giugno 2016), il governo ha chiesto alla Corte di dichiarare la denuncia abusiva in quanto la società richiedente non aveva fornito informazioni su aspetti del caso che, a suo parere, erano essenziali per la sua valutazione.
41. Inoltre, per le stesse ragioni - in particolare perché i tribunali nazionali avevano valutato e accolto in parte le richieste della società ricorrente - il Governo ha sostenuto che la società ricorrente non era più una "vittima" e ha chiesto alla Corte di dichiarare la denuncia inammissibile ratione personae.
42. La società ricorrente ha sostenuto che il procedimento civile avviato dopo il rigetto della sua prima domanda da parte dell'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia il 6 dicembre 2011 aveva riguardato due diverse domande: una relativa al danno causato dalla restituzione del terreno in questione e l'altra al pagamento dell'equivalente monetario dell'edificio demolito. Con la decisione del 27 gennaio 2015 l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia aveva accolto solo la domanda relativa al danno fondiario e aveva respinto l'altra.
43. Inoltre, le sue prospettive di recupero del risarcimento per il terreno erano piuttosto ridotte a causa delle difficoltà incontrate nell'esecuzione della sentenza del 7 giugno 2013. Ha quindi ritenuto di poter ancora rivendicare di essere una "vittima" ai sensi dell'articolo 6 della Convenzione, in quanto la sentenza nazionale definitiva aveva fornito solo un risarcimento parziale.
44. La società richiedente ha inoltre sostenuto che non vi era stato, da parte sua, alcun tentativo di fuorviare la Corte.
B. Valutazione della Corte
1. Se vi è stato un abuso del diritto di richiesta individuale
45. La Corte ribadisce che un'istanza può essere respinta come abuso del diritto di ricorso se è stata consapevolmente basata su fatti non veritieri con l'intento di indurre in errore la Corte (cfr. Centro Europa 7 S.r.l. e Di Stefano v. Italia [GC], no. 38433/09, § 97, ECHR 2012). La presentazione di informazioni incomplete (e quindi fuorvianti) può anche costituire un abuso del diritto di richiesta, soprattutto se le informazioni in questione riguardano il nucleo stesso del caso e non è stata fornita una spiegazione sufficiente per la mancata divulgazione di tali informazioni. Lo stesso vale nel caso in cui si verifichino nuovi e significativi sviluppi durante il procedimento dinanzi alla Corte e qualora - nonostante l'articolo 47 § 6 del Regolamento della Corte lo richieda espressamente - il richiedente non riveli tali informazioni alla Corte, impedendole così di pronunciarsi sul caso con piena cognizione di causa. Tuttavia, anche in tali casi, l'intenzione del richiedente di indurre in errore la Corte deve essere sempre accertata con sufficiente certezza (cfr. Gross v. Svizzera [GC], n. 67810/10, § 28, CEDU 2014).
46. La Corte rileva che la società richiedente ha riconosciuto di aver portato avanti la sua causa per il risarcimento dinanzi ai tribunali civili e non ne ha informato la Corte dopo aver presentato la sua istanza alla Corte di Strasburgo. Considerata la spiegazione fornita dalla ricorrente - ossia che solo una parte della sua domanda era stata accolta e che, per quanto riguarda la parte di domanda accolta, aveva avuto difficoltà ad ottenerne l'esecuzione (si vedano i precedenti paragrafi 42 e 43) - la Corte ritiene che l'omissione in questione non possa essere considerata come un tentativo di nascondere alla Corte informazioni essenziali.
47. Inoltre, nelle sue osservazioni scritte, il richiedente ha fornito tutte le informazioni e i documenti pertinenti relativi alla nuova serie di procedimenti che ha avviato dopo aver presentato la domanda alla Corte.
48. In conclusione, non avendo riscontrato alcun intento fraudolento da parte della società richiedente, la Corte respinge l'obiezione che vi sia stato un abuso del diritto di ricorso.
2. Se la società richiedente ha perso il suo status di vittima
49. La Corte ribadisce che una decisione o misura favorevole ad un richiedente non è in linea di principio sufficiente a privarlo della sua condizione di "vittima", a meno che le autorità nazionali non abbiano riconosciuto, espressamente o in sostanza, e quindi concesso un risarcimento per la violazione della Convenzione (cfr., tra le altre autorità, Dalban c. Romania [GC], n. 28114/95, § 44, CEDU 1999 VI).
50. Nel caso di specie, la società ricorrente ha lamentato che, nella sua decisione del 6 dicembre 2011, l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia non aveva esaminato le sue richieste di risarcimento dei danni subiti, ma le aveva semplicemente respinte in quanto la società ricorrente non disponeva di un locus standi (cfr. paragrafo 38).
51. La Corte osserva che in una nuova serie di procedimenti civili avviati dalla società richiedente, i tribunali nazionali hanno esaminato le sue richieste nel merito e le hanno parzialmente accolte (cfr. paragrafo 24).
52. Secondo la Corte, ciò ha privato la società richiedente dello status di vittima per quanto riguarda la sua denuncia di mancato accesso al tribunale. Il fatto che le sue richieste di rimborso siano state accolte solo in parte dai tribunali nazionali non può modificare questa conclusione.
53. Ne consegue che la società richiedente non può più sostenere di essere vittima di una violazione dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, la sua denuncia è incompatibile rationae personae incompatibile con le disposizioni della Convenzione ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 3 (a) e deve essere respinta ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 4.
II. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
54. La società ricorrente ha sostenuto che il fatto di essere stata privata dei suoi beni, seguito dal mancato risarcimento da parte dello Stato, ha violato il suo diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni ai sensi dell'art. 1 del Protocollo n. 1, che prevede:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni che precedono non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni".
A. Ammissibilità
55. La Corte rileva che tale denuncia non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, lettera a), della Convenzione. Essa rileva inoltre che non è inammissibile per altri motivi. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
a) La società richiedente
56. La società ricorrente ha sostenuto che la privazione dei suoi beni in assenza di azioni da parte dello Stato volte a concedere un giusto ed effettivo risarcimento equivaleva ad un esproprio.
57. Secondo la società richiedente, vi era stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. a causa del fatto che nella prima serie di procedimenti civili, l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia aveva respinto le sue richieste di risarcimento (cfr. paragrafo 22). La società ricorrente ha sottolineato che il ragionamento della decisione della Alta Corte di Cassazione era stato inappropriato ed era stato eccessivamente formalistico nella sua interpretazione della legge.
58. La società ricorrente ha inoltre sostenuto che la seconda serie di procedimenti civili di cui si era avvalsa per ottenere il risarcimento si è rivelata inefficace.
59. Per quanto riguarda il rigetto, da parte dei tribunali nazionali, della richiesta di risarcimento della società ricorrente relativa al pagamento da essa effettuato ai successori legali dell'ex proprietario dell'edificio alberghiero, la società ricorrente ha sostenuto di aver adottato la misura di demolizione a causa dell'avanzato stato di deterioramento dell'edificio, come riconosciuto dall'Ispettorato di Stato per l'edilizia (cfr. punti 6 e 7 sopra). Con la demolizione dell'edificio, essa aveva agito solo in conformità con i suoi diritti di proprietario.
60. Inoltre, la società richiedente ha sostenuto che la decisione che stabilisce l'importo del risarcimento per il terreno restituito è stata finora applicata solo parzialmente (cfr. paragrafi 32 e 33).
b) Il governo
61. Il governo ha sostenuto che i tribunali nazionali avevano accolto la richiesta di risarcimento della società richiedente in relazione al terreno che aveva restituito ai successori legali dell'ex proprietario, ma avevano giustamente respinto la sua richiesta di risarcimento per l'edificio alberghiero che aveva demolito nel 1996.
62. Il governo ha sostenuto che l'unica parte responsabile del rigetto di quest'ultima richiesta era la società richiedente, che aveva demolito l'edificio dell'albergo sulla base di un permesso che era stato successivamente annullato (cfr. paragrafo 8).
63. Inoltre, con la demolizione dell'edificio la società richiedente si era collocata al di fuori del quadro giuridico stabilito dall'articolo 324 dell'ordinanza governativa d'urgenza n. 88/1997, in base al quale aveva diritto ad essere risarcita solo per la restituzione dell'edificio (cfr. paragrafo 27).
64. Secondo il governo, l'articolo 324 del decreto governativo d'urgenza n. 88/1997, in base al quale il governo aveva diritto ad essere risarcito solo per la restituzione dell'edificio vero e proprio (cfr. paragrafo 27). 88/1997 (cfr. paragrafo 34) soddisfaceva i requisiti di accessibilità, precisione e prevedibilità previsti dalla Convenzione. Le decisioni emesse dai tribunali nazionali avevano quindi una base giuridica come richiesto dall'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
65. Per quanto riguarda la proporzionalità delle decisioni dei tribunali nazionali, il Governo ha osservato che lo Stato godeva di un ampio margine di discrezionalità nel disciplinare questioni quali il risarcimento per gli abusi commessi dalle autorità statali sotto il regime comunista.
2. La valutazione della Corte
a) Principi generali
66. La Corte fa riferimento alla sua giurisprudenza consolidata sulla struttura dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 e sulle modalità di applicazione delle tre norme contenute in tale disposizione (v., tra molte altre autorità, J.A. Pye (Oxford) Ltd e J.A. Pye (Oxford) Land Ltd contro Regno Unito [GC], no. 44302/02, § 52, CEDU 2007-III, e Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 134, ECHR 2004-V).
67. La Corte ribadisce che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica nel godimento pacifico dei beni deve essere legittima, deve essere nell'interesse pubblico e deve perseguire uno scopo legittimo con mezzi ragionevolmente proporzionati allo scopo perseguito (cfr. Moskal c. Polonia, n. 10373/05, §§ 49-50, 15 settembre 2009).
b) Applicazione dei principi di cui sopra nel caso di specie
i. Se ci sia stata un'interferenza con i beni del richiedente
68. La Corte rileva che la società richiedente era il proprietario legale dell'albergo e dei terreni pertinenziali che sono stati trasferiti a proprietà privata durante il processo di privatizzazione che ha avuto luogo dopo la caduta del regime comunista (cfr. paragrafi 4 e 5). Il governo non ha contestato che l'obbligo di restituire la proprietà equivalga a un'interferenza con il diritto della società richiedente al pacifico godimento dei beni ai sensi dell'articolo 1, primo comma, seconda frase, del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione. I tribunali non vedono alcuna ragione per ritenere il contrario.
ii. Legittimità dell'ingerenza
69. La Corte ricorda che il primo e più importante requisito dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è che ogni ingerenza di un'autorità pubblica nel pacifico godimento dei beni sia lecita: la seconda frase del primo paragrafo autorizza una privazione dei beni solo "alle condizioni previste dalla legge". Il principio di legalità presuppone anche che le disposizioni applicabili del diritto interno siano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione (cfr. Broniowski, citato, § 147).
70. Passando al caso in esame, la Corte rileva che la Romania ha promulgato una legge sul restauro dei beni confiscati ai proprietari sotto il regime comunista (cfr. Maria Atanasiu e altri contro la Romania, nn. 30767/05 e 33800/06, § 44, 12 ottobre 2010). La Corte rileva che le parti non contestano che tale normativa abbia permesso ai successori legali dell'ex proprietario del terreno e dell'albergo di recuperare i loro diritti di proprietà. La privazione dei beni era quindi prevista dalla legge.
iii. Scopo legittimo
71. La Corte deve stabilire se questa privazione della proprietà persegue uno scopo legittimo, ossia se è "nell'interesse pubblico". A tal fine, essa rileva che i tribunali nazionali hanno invalidato il titolo di proprietà della società richiedente sui beni in questione al fine di soddisfare le richieste di restituzione delle persone alle quali tali beni erano stati espropriati dallo Stato sotto il regime comunista.
72. La Corte ammette che l'obiettivo generale delle leggi sulla restituzione - ossia attenuare le conseguenze di talune violazioni dei diritti di proprietà commesse dal regime comunista - è un obiettivo legittimo e un mezzo per garantire i diritti degli ex proprietari. In tali circostanze, la Corte ammette che la privazione della proprietà subita dal richiedente è stata utile non solo agli interessi dei proprietari originari del terreno in questione, ma anche agli interessi generali della società nel suo complesso (v., mutatis mutandis, sentenza Be?vá? e Be?vá?ová contro la Repubblica ceca, no. 58358/00, § 67, 14 dicembre 2004).
iv. Proporzionalità
73. La Corte ribadisce che qualsiasi ingerenza nella proprietà deve, oltre ad essere legittima e ad avere un fine legittimo, soddisfare anche il requisito della proporzionalità. Occorre trovare un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della collettività e quelle della tutela dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo; la ricerca di tale giusto equilibrio è insita in tutta la Convenzione. L'equilibrio richiesto non sarà raggiunto quando la persona interessata sopporta un onere individuale ed eccessivo (cfr. Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, 23 settembre 1982, §§ 69-74, Serie A n. 52; Brum?rescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 78, CEDU 1999 VII; e cfr. Do?rusöz e Aslan c. Turchia, n. 1262/02, § 27, 30 maggio 2006).
74. In diverse occasioni in casi simili - che, come nel caso in esame, riguardavano la correzione di errori commessi dalle autorità statali nel processo di restituzione - la Corte ha sottolineato la necessità di assicurare che la riparazione di vecchie lesioni non crei nuovi torti sproporzionati. A tal fine, la legislazione dovrebbe consentire di tener conto delle circostanze particolari di ciascun caso, in modo che le persone che hanno acquisito i loro beni in buona fede non si facciano carico dell'onere della responsabilità, che è giustamente quella dello Stato che ha confiscato tali beni (cfr. Velikovi e altri c. Bulgaria, nn. 43278/98 e 8 altri, § 178, 15 marzo 2007).
75. Al fine di valutare l'onere sostenuto dal richiedente, il Tribunale deve valutare le circostanze particolari di ciascun caso - vale a dire le condizioni in cui il bene contestato è stato acquistato e il risarcimento che è stato ricevuto dal richiedente in cambio del bene (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Mohylová c. Repubblica Ceca (dic.), n. 75115/01, 6 settembre 2005).
76. A questo proposito, la Corte ribadisce che l'acquisizione di un bene senza il pagamento di un importo ragionevolmente correlato al suo valore costituirà di norma un'ingerenza sproporzionata e una totale mancanza di risarcimento può essere considerata giustificabile ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 solo in circostanze eccezionali. Questa disposizione, tuttavia, non garantisce il diritto ad un pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze, poiché obiettivi legittimi di "interesse pubblico" possono richiedere meno del rimborso dell'intero valore di mercato (cfr. The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 dicembre 1994, § 71, Serie A n. 301 A; Former King of Greece and Others v. Greece [GC], n. 25701/94, § 89, CEDU 2000 XII; e Zvolský e Zvolská v. the Czech Republic, no. 46129/99, § 70, ECHR 2002 IX).
77. Passando al caso in esame, la Corte rileva che al momento attuale, l'articolo 324 dell'ordinanza governativa di emergenza n. 88/1997 forniva il quadro giuridico per il risarcimento delle società privatizzate che avevano subito danni in seguito alla restituzione agli ex proprietari di beni immobili acquisiti dallo Stato sotto il regime comunista. Pertanto, l'articolo 324, paragrafi 1 e 2, stabiliva che le autorità pubbliche coinvolte nel processo di privatizzazione erano tenute a risarcire le perdite subite a seguito della restituzione dei beni immobili. Ai sensi dell'articolo 324, paragrafi 5 e 6, le stesse autorità pubbliche dovevano garantire il risarcimento di qualsiasi danno causato dal pagamento dell'equivalente monetario dei beni immobili in questione (cfr. il precedente paragrafo 34).
78. La Corte rileva che, nonostante tali disposizioni di legge, nel procedimento civile avviato dai successori legali dell'ex proprietario dell'immobile in questione, le richieste di risarcimento della società richiedente nei confronti dell'autorità statale (AVAS) sono state respinte (cfr. paragrafo 22) e la società richiedente è stata condannata dai tribunali nazionali a restituire il terreno e a pagare un risarcimento di 11.138.275 RON (circa 2.600.000 EUR) per l'edificio dell'albergo, che la società richiedente non ha potuto restituire perché lo aveva demolito (cfr. paragrafo 20).
79. Il fatto che la decisione emessa dall'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia in data 6 dicembre 2011 fosse in contraddizione sia con le disposizioni di legge applicabili, sia con la propria decisione del 17 ottobre 2011 sull'interpretazione della legge applicabile (si veda il precedente paragrafo 37) è stato confermato dal successivo esame nel merito delle medesime pretese in un nuovo procedimento civile avviato dalla società ricorrente. In tale procedimento, i giudici nazionali non solo hanno esaminato le pretese della società richiedente, ma hanno anche consentito che la sua pretesa venisse risarcita per i terreni che aveva restituito ai successori legali degli ex proprietari (si veda il precedente paragrafo 24).
80. La Corte rileva inoltre che la società richiedente si è conformata alla decisione del 16 dicembre 2010 (cfr. paragrafo 20 di cui sopra) e ha pagato il risarcimento ai successori legali dell'ex proprietario, anche se ai sensi dell'articolo 324 § 5 dell'ordinanza governativa d'emergenza n. 5 del decreto governativo d'urgenza. 88/1997 è stata l'autorità statale coinvolta nella privatizzazione delle società che ha dovuto pagare direttamente il risarcimento agli ex proprietari - non le società privatizzate.
81. Nel caso in esame, ciò che appare cruciale, secondo la Corte, è che, dopo l'invalidazione del titolo di proprietà della società richiedente sui beni immobili in questione, le autorità erano tenute a risarcirla per la perdita dei suoi diritti di proprietà in una delle forme previste dalla legge. Tuttavia, è stata accolta solo la richiesta di risarcimento del richiedente per la restituzione del terreno (cfr. paragrafo 24), mentre la richiesta di risarcimento per l'importo pagato per l'edificio alberghiero è stata infine respinta dall'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia (cfr. paragrafo 26).
82. Per quanto riguarda le motivazioni addotte nel respingere le richieste della società richiedente, la Corte rileva che l'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia ha ritenuto che, demolendo l'edificio, la società richiedente si è posta "per propria colpa, al di fuori del quadro giuridico previsto dall'articolo 324 §§ 1 e 2 dell'Ordinanza governativa d'urgenza n. 2". 88/1997" (si veda il precedente paragrafo 27).
83. La Corte non è convinta da tale argomentazione. Come sottolineato dalla società richiedente (si veda il precedente paragrafo 59), l'edificio dell'albergo ha dovuto essere demolito a causa del suo avanzato stato di deterioramento, che lo ha reso pericoloso. Il 16 maggio 1996 l'Ispettorato di Stato per l'edilizia aveva chiesto alla società richiedente di cessare l'uso dell'edificio, che "non soddisfaceva le norme di sicurezza per quanto riguarda lo sfruttamento commerciale e la stabilità strutturale" (cfr. paragrafo 6). Di conseguenza, la società richiedente aveva ottenuto un permesso di demolizione nel settembre 1996 e aveva demolito l'edificio nello stesso anno (cfr. paragrafo 7).
84. La Corte sottolinea che fino alla pronuncia della sentenza definitiva dell'Alta Corte di Cassazione e di Giustizia del 6 dicembre 2011, la società richiedente sarebbe stata proprietaria dell'edificio per più di quindici anni e quindi l'unica parte responsabile di eventuali danni causati dall'avanzato stato di degrado dell'edificio.
Pertanto, la Corte ritiene che nessuna colpa o negligenza possa essere imputata alla società richiedente per la demolizione dell'edificio. Tuttavia, la conseguenza dell'azione legittima della ricorrente è stata la perdita della somma di 11.138.275 RON (circa 2.600.000 euro), che essa ha dovuto pagare agli ex proprietari e che non ha potuto recuperare dallo Stato.
86. Inoltre, la Corte rileva che tutti i procedimenti esecutivi di cui la società richiedente si era avvalsa per compensare la perdita del terreno si sono rivelati inefficaci e la società richiedente ha recuperato solo una piccola parte di quanto le era stato riconosciuto dalla sentenza del 7 giugno 2013 (si veda il precedente paragrafo 32).
87. A questo proposito la Corte ribadisce di aver già riscontrato una violazione del diritto al pacifico godimento dei beni in considerazione dell'inefficacia del sistema di restituzione dello Stato e, in particolare, dei ritardi nella procedura di pagamento del risarcimento ai ricorrenti (cfr. Maria Atanasiu e altri c. Romania, nn. 30767/05 e 33800/06, § 183, 12 ottobre 2010).
88. Dopo aver esaminato tutte le prove in suo possesso alla luce dei principi articolati nella sua giurisprudenza, la Corte ritiene che il Governo non abbia avanzato alcun fatto o argomento in grado di giustificare la mancata garanzia del diritto della società richiedente al risarcimento dell'equivalente monetario dell'edificio alberghiero demolito che doveva pagare e le difficoltà di esecuzione della sentenza con cui la società richiedente aveva ottenuto il risarcimento per il terreno restituito.
89. In considerazione delle particolari circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte ritiene che lo Stato abbia imposto alla società richiedente un onere sproporzionato ed eccessivo, incompatibile con il diritto al pacifico godimento dei beni garantito dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
90. Di conseguenza, nella fattispecie si è verificata una violazione di tale disposizione.
III. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
91. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se il Tribunale constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente un risarcimento solo parziale, il Tribunale, se necessario, dà giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".
92. La società ricorrente ha chiesto la giusta soddisfazione per un danno patrimoniale pari a 3.776.514 euro (EUR). Essa ha chiesto un ulteriore risarcimento di 5.000 euro per il danno morale.
93. Il governo ha contestato le richieste.
94. Date le particolari circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte ritiene che la questione dell'applicazione dell'articolo 41 non sia pronta per una decisione. È pertanto necessario riservare tale questione, tenendo in debita considerazione la possibilità di un accordo tra lo Stato convenuto e l'attore (articolo 75 §§ 1 e 4 del regolamento della Corte).
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, IL TRIBUNALE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
2. Dichiara il reclamo ai sensi dell'art. 1 del Protocollo n. 1 ricevibile, e il resto del ricorso irricevibile;

2. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;

3. Dichiara che la questione della giusta soddisfazione ai sensi dell'articolo 41 della Convenzione non è pronta per la decisione, e di conseguenza:
a) si riserva la suddetta questione nella sua interezza;
b) invita il Governo e il richiedente a presentare, entro tre mesi, le loro osservazioni scritte sulla questione e, in particolare, a notificare alla Corte qualsiasi accordo che possano raggiungere;
c) si riserva l'ulteriore procedura e delega al Presidente del Comitato il potere di fissare la stessa, se necessario.
Fatto in inglese e notificato per iscritto l'8 ottobre 2019, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento del Tribunale.
Andrea Tamietti Faris Vehabovi?
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 23/05/2022.