CASO: CASE OF ORLOVI? AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ORLOVI? AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 41,46,P1-1

NUMERO: 16332/18
STATO: Bosnia Herzegovina
DATA: 01/10/2019
ORGANO: Sezione Quarta


TESTO ORIGINALE

FOURTH SECTION






CASE OF ORLOVI? AND OTHERS v. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

(Application no. 16332/18)













JUDGMENT




STRASBOURG

1 October 2019



This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Orlovi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fourth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, President,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Paul Lemmens,
Iulia Antoanella Motoc,
Carlo Ranzoni,
Jolien Schukking,
Péter Paczolay, judges,
and Andrea Tamietti, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 2 July and 9 July 2019,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the latter date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 16332/18) against Bosnia and Herzegovina lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by fourteen citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the applicants”), Ms Fata Orlovi?, Mr Šaban Orlovi?, Ms Fatima Ahmetovi?, Mr Hasan Orlovi?, Ms Zlatka Baši?, Ms Senija Orlovi?, Mr Ejub Orlovi?, Mr Abdurahman Orlovi?, Ms Muška Mehmedovi?, Ms Mirsada Ehli?, Ms Melka Mehmedovi?, Ms Rahima Dahali?, Ms Fatima Orlovi? and Ms Murtija Hodži?, on 30 March 2018.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr F. Karkin, a lawyer practising in Sarajevo. The Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Ms B. Skalonji?.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that they were prevented from effectively enjoying their possession because an unlawfully built church has not been removed from their land. The applicants also alleged that the domestic courts’ decisions concerning their civil claim had been contrary to Article 6 of the Convention.
4. On 24 May 2018 notice of the application was given to the Government.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants were born in 1942, 1966, 1969, 1972, 1976, 1974, 1980, 1968, 1970, 1973, 1975, 1978, 1980 and 1982, respectively. The first applicant lives in Konjevi? Polje, Bosnia and Herzegovina. According to the information provided by the remaining applicants, they live in Srebrenik, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
A. Relevant background
6. The applicants are heirs to the first applicant’s husband, Š.O., and his brother M.O. The first applicant’s husband and more than twenty other relatives were killed in the Srebrenica genocide in 1995.
7. The applicants Mr Šaban Orlovi?, Ms Fatima Ahmetovi?, Mr Hasan Orlovi?, Ms Zlatka Baši?, Ms Senija Orlovi? and Mr Ejub Orlovi? are the first applicant’s and her late husband’s children. Mr Abdurahman Orlovi?, Ms Muška Mehmedovi?, Ms Mirsada Ehli?, Ms Melka Mehmedovi?, Ms Rahima Dahali?, Ms Fatima Orlovi? and Ms Murtija Hodži? are M.O.’s children.
8. The applicants lived in Konjevi? Polje, Bratunac Municipality in what is now the Republika Srpska (one of the two constituent entities of Bosnia and Herzegovina), on a property belonging to Š.O. and M.O. The property consisted of several individual and agricultural buildings, fields and meadows.
9. During the 1992-95 war the applicants were forced to flee their home and became internally displaced persons.
B. Building of a church on the applicants’ land
10. On 11 September 1997, following a request submitted by the Drinja?a Serbian Orthodox Parish (“the Parish”), Bratunac Municipality expropriated a part of the applicants’ land – a field with a total area of 11,765 sq. m, designated as cadastral parcel no. 996/1 – and allocated it to the Parish for the purpose of building a church. The decision referred to the land in question as undeveloped construction land and stipulated that compensation to the previous owners would be determined in separate proceedings. The applicants were never informed of the expropriation proceedings.
11. In 1998 a church was built on plot no. 996/1, 20.5 m away from the existing house in which the first applicant had lived with her family before the war. The church was built without any relevant technical documentation.
12. On 21 October 2003 the Parish submitted a request to the Spatial Planning and Housing Unit of Bratunac Municipality (“the SPHU”), asking for planning permission for the church.
13. On 14 April 2004, in the supervision proceedings of the work of the SPHU, the Construction Inspectorate of the Ministry of Spatial Planning, Construction and Ecology of the Republika Srpska (“the Inspectorate”) issued a decision by which it ordered the Construction Inspectorate of Bratunac Municipality (“the Municipal Inspectorate”) to ban the use of the church in Konjevi? Polje within three days of the delivery of that decision, in accordance with section 138 of the Spatial Development Act 2002 (see paragraph 43 below). The Inspectorate considered that the Municipal Inspectorate had not acted in accordance with the relevant law because it had failed to stop the construction work and later prevent the use of the church, although it had been built without planning permission and other technical documentation. Moreover, the Parish had never obtained a use permit.
14. On 27 August 2004 the Municipal Inspectorate informed the Ministry of Spatial Planning, Construction and Ecology that the deputy mayor of Bratunac had “expressly demanded” that the use of the church for that function not be stopped. It was further stated that in the deputy mayor’s opinion the issue should be resolved at a higher political level, for which purpose a meeting had been organised between the municipal representatives, the Ministry of Spatial Planning, Construction and Ecology and the bishop of the Zvornik-Tuzla Eparchy. After the meeting, the Serbian Orthodox Church had initiated the proceedings for the legalisation of the church. The Municipal Inspectorate concluded by stating that in view of those developments it had desisted from acting in accordance with section 138 of the Spatial Development Act 2002.
15. In December 2004 the Parish obtained planning permission for the church (see paragraph 12 above).
C. Restitution proceedings
16. On 28 October 1999, following a request submitted by the second applicant, Mr Šaban Orlovi?, the Commission for Real Property Claims of Displaced Persons and Refugees (“the CRPC”), set up by Annex 7 to the Dayton Peace Agreement (see paragraph 44 below), established that the first applicant’s late husband, Š.O., had been the owner of the land in Konjevi? Polje and annulled any involuntary transfer or restriction of ownership after 1 April 1992. The decision further established that Š.O.’s heirs were entitled to repossess the land in question sixty days after submitting a request for the enforcement of that decision.
17. On 14 November 2001, following a request submitted by the first applicant, Ms Fata Orlovi?, the Ministry for Refugees and Displaced Persons of the Republika Srpska, Bratunac Unit (“the Ministry for Refugees”), also established that Š.O. was the owner of the land in question, and in particular, the co-owner of plot no. 996/1 together with his brother M.O. Immediate repossession of the land was ordered.
18. On 17 April 2002 the first applicant submitted a request for the enforcement of the CRPC decision of 28 October 1999 to the Ministry for Refugees (see paragraph 16 above).
19. On an unspecified date after that the applicants regained possession of their land, except for plot no. 996/1, on which the church remained (see paragraph 11 above). The first applicant returned to the house in which she had lived with her family before the war.
20. On 3 April 2003 the first applicant submitted a request to the Ministry for Refugees asking for the full enforcement of its decision of 14 November 2001 (see paragraph 17 above). She also asked it to order the Parish to remove the church from her property in order to enable full repossession and to return the land in its original condition.
21. On 20 April 2004 the applicants wrote to the Parish asking for an amicable solution of the dispute. The applicants proposed relocation of the church as the best solution, as they argued that it had been illegally built on their land. In that regard they referred to the Inspectorate’s decision of 14 April 2004 (see paragraph 13 above).
22. On 20 January 2005 the mayor of Bratunac offered the applicants compensation, in an unspecified amount, or allocation of another property in lieu of the restitution of plot no. 966/1. The applicants refused and maintained their request for the full restitution of their property.
23. On 19 September 2005 the applicants wrote to the Ministry for Refugees, the Parish, the Ministry of Spatial Planning, Construction and Ecology and the mayor of Bratunac urging them to enable the full enforcement of the CRPC decision.
D. Civil proceedings
24. On 29 October 2002 the first applicant brought a civil action in the Srebrenica Court of First Instance (“the Court of First Instance”) against the Serbian Orthodox Church in Bosnia and Herzegovina seeking to recover possession of plot no. 996/1. She asked for the church to be removed from her land and for restitution of the land in its original condition.
25. On 4 March 2003 the Court of First Instance decided that it lacked subject-matter jurisdiction to decide the case and rejected the first applicant’s civil action.
26. On 25 August 2006, following an appeal by the first applicant, the Bijeljina District Court (“the District Court”) quashed the judgment of 4 March 2002 and remitted the case for re-examination.
27. In the course of the re-examination proceedings before the Court of First Instance, the other thirteen applicants joined the first applicant’s civil action. At the court’s request the applicants specified the respondents as follows: the Zvornik-Tuzla Eparchy of the Serbian Orthodox Church, the Bratunac Parish and the Konjevi? Polje Parish. The applicants specified that they sought a court order to remove the church built on the land in question and to cede possession of the land to the applicants within thirty days of the date of the judgment, in default of which the applicants would be authorised to remove the church themselves at the respondents’ expense.
28. The preparatory hearings before the Court of First Instance were adjourned several times at the request of the parties. In particular, a hearing scheduled for 27 December 2007 was adjourned at the request of the applicants’ representative who informed the court that he had talked to the Prime Minister of the Republika Srpska and that there was a possibility that the case could be settled in the course of 2008.
29. At a hearing of 20 April 2010 the applicants changed their claim in that they asked the court to recognise the validity of an out-of-court settlement concluded on 11 January 2008 between their representative and the respondents, who were represented by the Prime Minister of the Republika Srpska, his adviser, M.D., and the bishop of the Zvornik-Tuzla Eparchy, which was worded as follows:
“The respondents must remove the church built on plot no. 996 ... within fifteen days of the date on which they will have provided other land for the purpose of building a church in Konjevi? Polje, in default of which [the settlement will be] compulsorily enforced.”
30. On 21 May 2010 the Court of First Instance dismissed the applicants’ claim. That judgment was upheld by the District Court on 17 September 2010 (copies of those decisions are not in the case file).
31. On 1 February 2012, following an appeal on points of law lodged by the applicants, the Supreme Court of the Republika Srpska (“the Supreme Court”) quashed the District Court’s judgment of 17 September 2010 and remitted the case for re-examination (a copy of the Supreme Court’s decision is not in the case file).
32. Following remittal, on 24 September 2012 the District Court quashed the Court of First Instance’s judgment of 21 May 2010 and remitted the case to that court for re-examination (a copy of that decision is not in the case file). The District Court instructed the Court of First Instance to examine the facts concerning the existence of the out-of-court settlement, its content and the existence of the proper authorisation to conclude the settlement.
33. On 3 June 2013 the Court of First Instance rejected the applicants’ claim. On the one hand, the court held that the applicants had failed to demonstrate that the Prime Minister and his adviser had been authorised to conclude the settlement on behalf of the respondents. They had not been authorised to do so by the law either because of the principle of the separation of church and state. On the other hand, while the bishop of the Zvornik-Tuzla Eparchy could be considered as the respondents’ legal representative, it had not been proved that the settlement had indeed been concluded with him. In his witness statement M.D. had confirmed that he had contacted the bishop by phone to discuss the possibility of an amicable solution, but that no agreement had been reached. The applicants were ordered to pay 11,243.70 convertible marks (BAM – approximately 5,760 euros) in legal costs.
34. On 23 October 2013, following an appeal by the applicants, the District Court overturned the Court of First Instance’s judgment in the part concerning legal costs, decreasing the award to BAM 1,029.60, and upheld the remainder of the judgment.
35. On 6 August 2014 the Supreme Court rejected the applicants’ appeal on points of law. The court noted in particular that negotiations which had taken place in 2008 between the applicants’ representative and the Republika Srpska’s Prime Minister and his adviser had concerned the government’s financial aid to the Zvornik-Tuzla Eparchy with the purpose of relocation of the church from the applicants’ land. The lower courts had correctly concluded from the facts that no agreement had been concluded between the parties to the proceedings, namely the applicants and the Serbian Orthodox Church.
36. On 17 October 2014 the applicants lodged a constitutional appeal, relying on Article 6 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. They reiterated, in particular, that their right to the peaceful enjoyment of possessions had been violated because the church had been illegally built on their land. They also argued that the bishop during the telephone conversation with M.D. had given his consent to the out-of-court agreement.
37. On 28 September 2017 the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Constitutional Court”) dismissed the appeal as ill-founded, by five votes to four. Under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention, it held that the lower courts had given clear and convincing reasons for their rulings, and that these reasons were not arbitrary. In examining the applicants’ complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the court essentially referred to its conclusion under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. That decision was delivered to the applicants on 2 November 2017.
E. Other relevant information
38. On 10 September 2008 the first applicant was physically attacked by one of the police officers who were supervising the cleaning up of the area around the church in preparation for a service which was to be held the following day.
39. On the same day the Office of the High Representative issued the following statement:
“Agreement On Konjevi? Polje Church Must Be Implemented
The OHR condemns the incident that took place on Fata Orlovi?’s property in Konjevi? Polje this morning.
Last year the Government of Republika Srpska decided to provide funding for the relocation of the illegally constructed church from the private property of Fata Orlovi? in Konjevi?-Polje.
OHR welcomed the agreement as a sign that Fata Orlovi?’s right to private property would be respected.
On 30 August of last year, the Bratunac Security Forum, chaired by Bratunac Mayor Nedeljko Mla?enovi?, and attended by all the relevant actors, announced that the annual church feast of 11 September would be held for the last time in the existing church in Konjevi? Polje on 11 September 2007.
OHR maintains that last year’s agreement must be respected.
The Office of the High Representative calls for all those involved to stick to previously agreed positions, to show restraint and to refrain from any action that might enflame the situation.”
40. On 12 September 2010 the first applicant was again attacked on her property by a police officer.
II. RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
A. Restitution of Property Act 1998
41. The Restitution of Property Act 1998 (Zakon o prestanku primjene Zakona o korištenju napuštene imovine, Official Gazette of the Republika Srpska “OG RS”, no. 16/10), which regulates the restitution of privately-owned real property abandoned after 30 April 1991, replaced the Abandoned Property Act 1996 (Zakon o korištenju napuštene imovine, OG RS, nos. 3/96 and 21/96) and annulled all the acts regulating the status of abandoned property issued in the period between 30 April 1991 and 19 December 1998.
42. In accordance with section 5 of this Act, an owner has the right to repossession of property and to recognition of all the rights he or she had over that property until 30 April 1991 or until the date of the loss of possession. The right to claim repossession is not subject to the statute of limitations (section 9). A request can be submitted at any time to the competent unit of the Ministry for Refugees in the municipality in which the property in question is located and/or to the CRPC (sections 10(1) and 16(1)). The decisions of the CRPC are final and immediately enforceable by the relevant authorities of the Republika Srpska (section 16(3) and (5)). Property which has been vacated (by a temporary occupant) can be repossessed immediately (section 14(5)).
B. Spatial Development Act 2002
43. Under section 138 of the Spatial Development Act 2002 (Zakon o ure?enju prostora, OG RS, no. 84/02), which was in force at the material time, a building inspector was authorised, inter alia, to ban the use of an object or a part thereof, in the absence of a valid authorisation to use it.
III. RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL MATERIALS
General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina (“the Dayton Peace Agreement”)
44. The Dayton Peace Agreement was initialled at a military base near Dayton, the United States, on 21 November 1995. It entered into force on 14 December 1995 when it was signed in Paris, France. It put an end to the 1992-95 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The relevant part of Annex 4 (the Constitution of Bosnia and Herzegovina) reads as follows:
Article II § 5
“All refugees and displaced persons have the right freely to return to their homes of origin. They have the right, in accordance with Annex 7 to the General Framework Agreement, to have restored to them property of which they were deprived in the course of hostilities since 1991 and to be compensated for any such property that cannot be restored to them. Any commitments or statements relating to such property made under duress are null and void.”
The relevant part of Annex 7 (the Agreement on Refugees and Displaced Persons) provides:
Article I: Rights of Refugees and Displaced Persons
“All refugees and displaced persons have the right freely to return to their homes of origin. They shall have the right to have restored to them property of which they were deprived in the course of hostilities since 1991 and to be compensated for any property that cannot be restored to them. The early return of refugees and displaced persons is an important objective of the settlement of the conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Parties confirm that they will accept the return of such persons who have left their territory, including those who have been accorded temporary protection by third countries.
The Parties shall ensure that refugees and displaced persons are permitted to return in safety, without risk of harassment, intimidation, persecution, or discrimination, particularly on account of their ethnic origin, religious belief, or political opinion.
The Parties shall take all necessary steps to prevent activities within their territories which would hinder or impede the safe and voluntary return of refugees and displaced persons. To demonstrate their commitment to securing full respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all persons within their jurisdiction and creating without delay conditions suitable for return of refugees and displaced persons, the Parties shall take immediately the following confidence building measures:
a. the repeal of domestic legislation and administrative practices with discriminatory intent or effect;
b. the prevention and prompt suppression of any written or verbal incitement, through media or otherwise, of ethnic or religious hostility or hatred; ...”
Article VII: Establishment of the Commission
“The Parties hereby establish an independent Commission for Displaced Persons and Refugees (‘the Commission’) ...”
Article VIII: Cooperation
“The Parties shall cooperate with the work of the Commission, and shall respect and implement its decisions expeditiously and in good faith, in cooperation with relevant international and nongovernmental organizations having responsibility for the return and reintegration of refugees and displaced persons.”
THE LAW
I. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
45. The applicants complained that they had been prevented from effectively enjoying their possession because the unlawfully built church had not yet been removed from their land. They relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
46. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
1. The parties’ submissions
47. The applicants maintained their request for the full restitution of their property and removal of the church. They also submitted that in the decision of 11 September 1997 Bratunac Municipality (see paragraph 10 above) had wrongly categorised the land in question as undeveloped construction land fit for expropriation. In reality it was a field, as described in the land register. The applicants furthermore submitted that the expropriation decision of 11 September 1997 had never been served on them. Moreover, the church in question had been used only once per year, on the day of its patron saint, because there was no Serb population in Konjevi? Polje.
48. The Government conceded that the decision of 11 September 1997 to expropriate the applicants’ land and allocate it to the Parish for the construction of a church had constituted interference with the applicants’ property rights. They further submitted that the interference in the present case had amounted to deprivation of possession, unless the Court found that the complexity of the legal and factual situation prevented its being classified in a precise category. As regards the lawfulness, the Government argued that the decision of 11 September 1997 had been given in accordance with the Development Land Act 1986. As to the proportionality of the interference the Government submitted that the Court had held before that the compulsory transfer of property from one individual to another, may, depending upon circumstances, constitute a legitimate means for promoting public interest. In the present case the applicants’ property was expropriated at the request of the Parish for the purpose of building a church in which Serbs from the surrounding villages could practise their religion.
49. The Government furthermore submitted that the Republika Srpska had been aware of the obligations it undertook under Annex 7 to the Dayton Peace Agreement concerning free return of refugees to their homes of origins and restitution of their property (see paragraph 44 above). In order to implement Annex 7, the Republika Srpska had enacted the Restitution of Property Act 1998 (see paragraph 41 above). The return of displaced persons and refugees was an important objective for all the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the authorities had not intended for this case to be a generator of further division and conflicts.
2. The Court’s assessment
50. The Court notes firstly that it is not disputed in the present case that the applicants are the owners of the property in question and that they were entitled to have the land restored to them.
51. As the Court has stated on a number of occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, amongst other things, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest and to secure the payment of penalties. The three rules are not, however, “distinct” in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98, and Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999-II).
52. The essential object of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is to protect a person against unjustified interference by the State with the peaceful enjoyment of his or her possessions. However, by virtue of Article 1 of the Convention, each Contracting Party “shall secure to everyone within [its] jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in [the] Convention”. The discharge of this general duty may entail positive obligations inherent in ensuring the effective exercise of the rights guaranteed by the Convention. In the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, those positive obligations may require the State to take the measures necessary to protect the right of property (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 143, ECHR 2004 V; Ališi? and Others v. Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia [GC], no. 60642/08, § 100, ECHR 2014; and Sargsyan v. Azerbaijan [GC], no. 40167/06, § 219, ECHR 2015), particularly where there is a direct link between the measures an applicant may legitimately expect from the authorities and his effective enjoyment of his possessions (see Önery?ld?z v. Turkey [GC], no. 48939/99, § 134, ECHR 2004 XII). Even in relations between private individuals or entities there may be positive obligation for the State (see Kotov v. Russia [GC], no. 54522/00, § 109, 3 April 2012).
53. With a view to establishing whether the respondent State has complied with its positive obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must examine whether a fair balance has been struck between the demands of the public interest involved and the applicant’s fundamental right of property (see Broniowski, cited above, § 144; Kotov, cited above, § 110; Ališi? and Others, cited above, § 101; and Sargsyan, cited above, § 220).
54. Turning to the present case the Court notes that under Annex 7 to the Dayton Peace Agreement the applicants, internally displaced persons, had the right to return to their homes of origin (see paragraph 44 above). As submitted by the Government, the return of displaced persons and refugees was an important objective for all the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina (see paragraph 49 above).
55. The Court further notes that the applicants’ right to full restitution had been established by the decisions of the CRPC and the Ministry for Refugees, of 28 October 1999 and 14 November 2001, respectively (see paragraphs 16 and 17 above). Both decision conferred the right to immediate repossession (see also section 14(5) of the 1998 Act in paragraph 42 above) and both were final and enforceable. The Court notes in particular that under the Restitution of Property Act 1998 and Article VIII of Annex 7 to the Dayton Peace Agreement, the relevant authorities of the Republika Srpska had to implement the CRPC’s decisions (see paragraphs 42 and 44 above). The Court considers that the applicants’ complaint is essentially one about inaction of the public authorities, contrary to the latter’s positive obligation to fully restore their property rights.
56. The Court notes furthermore that land was subsequently returned to the applicants, except for plot no. 996/1, on which the church remained. The applicants had repeatedly sought full repossession to no avail (see paragraphs 18, 20 and 23 above).
57. The Court will, therefore, determine if the prejudice sustained as a result of the authorities’ inaction by the applicants was justifiable in the light of the relevant principles. The assessment of proportionality requires an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. Furthermore, in each case involving an alleged violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must ascertain whether by reason of the State’s action or inaction the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate burden (see Szkórits v. Hungary, no. 58171/09, §§ 39 and 40, 16 September 2014).
58. The Court considers that the State’s obligation to secure to the applicants the effective enjoyment of their right of property, as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, required the national authorities to take practical steps to ensure that the decisions of 28 October 1999 and 14 November 2001 were enforced. Instead, the authorities initially even did the opposite by effectively authorising the church to remain on the applicants’ land (see paragraphs 14 and 15 above).
59. The Court also observes that the applicants had initiated civil proceedings seeking to recover possession of their land in the course of which they allegedly concluded an out-of-court settlement and subsequently changed their claim (see paragraph 29 above). The applicants’ claim was ultimately dismissed, which was confirmed by the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court, respectively (see paragraphs 35 and 37 above).
60. Despite having two final decisions ordering full repossession of their land, the applicants are still prevented, seventeen years after the ratification of the Convention and its protocols by the respondent State, from the peaceful enjoyment thereof.
61. Although a delay in the execution of a judgment may be justified in particular circumstances (see Burdov v. Russia, no. 59498/00, § 35, ECHR 2002 III), the Court notes that the Government did not offer any justification for the authorities’ inaction in the present case. The Court considers that the very long delay in the present case amounts to a clear refusal of the authorities to enforce the decisions of 28 October 1999 and 14 November 2001, leaving the applicants in a state of uncertainty with regard to the realisation of their property rights. Thus, as a result of the authorities’ failure to comply with the final and binding decisions, the applicants suffered serious frustration of their property rights (see, mutatis mutandis, Szkórits, cited above, § 45).
62. Having regard to all the above, the Court concludes that the applicants had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
II. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
63. The applicants complained that the domestic courts’ decisions concerning their civil claim had been contrary to Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.
64. The Government contested that argument.
65. The Court notes that this complaint is linked to the one examined above and must therefore likewise be declared admissible.
66. Having regard to the finding relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see paragraph 62 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to examine whether, in this case, there has also been a violation of Article 6 § 1.
III. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 46 OF THE CONVENTION
67. Article 46 of the Convention, in so far as relevant, provides:
“1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to abide by the final judgment of the Court in any case to which they are parties.
2. The final judgment of the Court shall be transmitted to the Committee of Ministers, which shall supervise its execution.”
68. The Court reiterates that by Article 46 of the Convention the Contracting Parties have undertaken to abide by the final judgments of the Court in any case to which they are parties, execution being supervised by the Committee of Ministers. It follows, inter alia, that a judgment in which the Court finds a breach of the Convention or the Protocols thereto imposes on the respondent State a legal obligation not just to pay those concerned the sums awarded by way of just satisfaction, but also to choose, subject to supervision by the Committee of Ministers, the general and/or, if appropriate, individual measures to be adopted in their domestic legal order to put an end to the violation found by the Court and to redress as far as possible the effects (see Scozzari and Giunta v. Italy [GC], nos. 39221/98 and 41963/98, § 249, ECHR 2000 VIII). The Court further notes that it is primarily for the State concerned to choose, subject to supervision by the Committee of Ministers, the means to be used in its domestic legal order to discharge its obligation under Article 46 of the Convention (see Öcalan v. Turkey [GC], no. 46221/99, § 210, ECHR 2005-IV).
69. However, exceptionally, with a view to helping the respondent State to fulfil its obligations under Article 46, the Court may seek to indicate the type of individual and/or general measures that might be taken in order to put an end to the Convention shortcoming it has found to exist (see Broniowski, cited above, § 194, and Scoppola v. Italy (no. 2) [GC], no. 10249/03, § 148, 17 September 2009).
70. The Court considers that the violation found in the instant case does not leave any real choice as to the measures required to remedy it.
71. In these conditions, having regard to the particular circumstances of the case, the Court considers that the respondent State must take all necessary measures in order to secure full enforcement of the CRPC’s decision of 28 October 1999 (see paragraph 16 above) and the decision of the Ministry for Refugees of 14 November 2001 (see paragraph 17 above), including in particular the removal of the church from the applicants’ land, without further delay and at the latest within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention.
IV. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
72. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Damage
73. In respect of pecuniary damage the applicants claimed 10,000 euros (EUR) each in respect of the loss sustained because they had been prevented from using the land, on which the church had been built, for agricultural purposes. They made no claim in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
74. The Government submitted that the applicants might have suffered some pecuniary damage and invited the Court to make its award on equitable basis and in accordance with its established case-law.
75. The Court has been unable to make a precise calculation regarding the loss sustained owing to the inability to use the land for agricultural purpose in view of the lack of evidence of the profit the applicants could have actually made had they been able to use that land. However, it considers that the applicants must necessarily have sustained pecuniary loss as they have been prevented from using a part of their land, although its immediate restitution had been ordered already in 1999 and 2001 (see paragraphs 16 and 17 above; see also, mutatis mutandis, Assanidze v. Georgia [GC], no. 71503/01, § 200, ECHR 2004 II). The Court further considers that the pecuniary loss was most significant for the first applicant because she is the one who had returned to the property in Konjevi? Polje (see paragraph 19 above). Consequently, ruling on an equitable basis and in accordance with the criteria set out in its case-law, the Court awards EUR 5,000 to the first applicant and EUR 2,000 to each of the remaining applicants under this head.
B. Costs and expenses
76. The applicants also claimed EUR 13,000 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts and before the Court.
77. The Government submitted that the domestic cost and expenses should be assessed in accordance with the applicable lawyers’ tariffs. As regards the costs and expenses before the Court, the Government argued that the applicants were entitled to reimbursement of necessary and actual costs.
78. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum (see, for example, Iatridis v. Greece (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000 XI). In the present case, the Court notes that the applicants have not submitted any evidence (bills or invoices) about the costs and expenses incurred. Therefore, their claim is rejected for lack of substantiation.
C. Default interest
79. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Declares, unanimously, the application admissible;

2. Holds, unanimously, that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;

3. Holds, unanimously, that there is no need to examine the complaint under Article 6 of the Convention;

4. Holds,
(a) by six votes to one, that the respondent State must take all necessary measures in order to secure full enforcement of the CRPC’s decision of 28 October 1999 and the decision of the Ministry for Refugees of 14 November 2001, including in particular the removal of the church from the applicants’ land, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention;
(b) unanimously, that the respondent State is to pay, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final, in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 5,000 (five thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, to the first applicant and EUR 2,000 (two thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, to each of the remaining applicants, in respect of pecuniary damage, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;
(c) unanimously, that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

5. Dismisses, unanimously, the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 1 October 2019, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Andrea Tamietti Jon Fridrik Kjølbro
Deputy Registrar President
In accordance with Article 45 § 2 of the Convention and Rule 74 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the separate opinion of Judge Jon Fridrik Kjølbro is annexed to this judgment.
JFK
ANT

PARTLY DISSENTING OPINION OF JUDGE KJØLBRO
1. I am in agreement with the judgment with the exception of one point where my view differs from that of the majority. Consequently, I voted against point 4 (a) of the operative provisions that reflects the majority’s reasoning in paragraph 71 of the judgment, where the Court has indicated as an individual measure that the respondent State has to ensure “the removal of the church from the applicant’s land, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final”.
2. In my view, and for the reasons explained below, I find the individual measure indicated problematic as it does not take sufficient account of the fact that the present case concerns not only a dispute between the applicants and the respondent State, but also and in particular a dispute between the applicants and a private third party, the Drinja?a Serbian Orthodox Parish (“the Parish”), which is not a party to the proceedings before the Court.
3. As rightly pointed out by the majority (see paragraphs 68-69 of the judgment), it is only in exceptional situations that the Court under Article 46 will indicate individual measures to be adopted by a respondent State, and, in general, the Court will only do so when the finding of a violation “does not leave any real choice as to the measures required to remedy it” (see, for example, Öcalan v. Turkey [GC], no. 46221/99, § 210, ECHR 2005 IV).
4. In the present case, the Court has, in its reasoning as well as the operative provisions, indicated that the respondent State has to ensure ”the removal of the church from the applicants’ land, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final”. The present case, however, does not only concern a dispute between the applicants (seeking the return of the remaining part of the land and the removal of the church built on it) and the respondent State, but also a dispute between the applicants and the Parish (the owner of the church built on the disputed land).
5. By ordering the removal of the church, the Court is, de facto, ruling on and deciding a dispute between two private parties, to the detriment of one the parties, the Parish, which is not a party to the proceedings before the Court and has not had a chance to express its legal views and defend its interests, not even as an intervening third party to the proceedings before the Court.
6. By dissenting on this point, I am not expressing a view on how the dispute between the applicants and the Parish is to be decided. That is, in my view, an issue to be decided by domestic authorities in domestic proceedings, where the necessary procedural guarantees and the required balancing of interests can take place; it is not an issue to be decided by the Court.
7. In this context, I draw attention to the following facts: The land in question was expropriated in 1997 and allocated to the third party (see paragraph 10 of the judgment). In 1998, the Parish built the church in question (see paragraph 11 of the judgment). The church has been in place and has been used by the Parish for more than 21 years now. In addition, in 2004, a planning permit was issued (see paragraph 15 of the judgment). Without expressing any view on the measures adopted by the domestic authorities when allocating the land to the Parish and issuing the planning permit, I cannot but notice that the Parish may, as a private party, rely on and invoke the rights set out in the Convention, including the right to respect for property as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. How the dispute between the applicants and the Parish is to be decided is for the domestic courts to decide with the possibility of subsequently lodging an individual application with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention.
8. In the present case, the applicant had instituted civil proceedings against the Parish. Initially, the applicants had demanded the removal of the church and the restoration of the land in question (see paragraph 24 of the judgment). However, subsequently, and in the context of the civil proceedings, the applicants had amended their claim and asked the domestic courts to recognise the validity of an out-of-court settlement allegedly concluded between the parties (see paragraph 29 of the judgment), a claim that was ultimately dismissed since no agreement had been concluded as alleged by the applicants (see paragraph 35 of the judgment).
9. In other words, in the context of the civil proceedings the domestic courts did not have a chance to rule on the merits of the dispute between the parties, that is the question of the removal of the church and the return of the land in question, and this is a direct consequence of the applicants’ choice in the context of the domestic proceedings.
10. If the present case had not involved the interests of a private third party, the Parish, I would have had no problem with the Court ordering or indicating the return of the land, but in the present case there is an underlying dispute between private parties with conflicting claims and interests, and the Court is deciding the dispute to the detriment of one of the parties, which, as mentioned, is not represented before the Court. That I do find very problematic.
11. If the domestic courts had acted in a manner similar to the approach adopted by the majority in the present case, ordering the removal of a building and the return of land in proceedings to which the owner or a person with property rights was not a party and was unable to present its view and defend its interests, the Court would have found a clear violation of Article 6 of the Convention (see, for example, Gankin and Others v. Russia, nos. 2430/06 and 3 others, §§ 33-39, 31 May 2016, concerning the right to be informed of proceedings and be able to attend hearings and defend rights), as well as Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, for example, G.I.E.M. S.R.L. and Others v. Italy [GC], nos. 1828/06 and 2 others, § 303, 28 June 2018, concerning procedural rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1).
12. Although the Court has in many cases ordered or indicated the return of property to an applicant, it has nonetheless always borne in mind that there may be situations where the return of property is impossible de facto or de jure, inter alia on account of the rights and interests of third parties. That is why in such cases the Court has indicated the return of the property in question or, in the alternative, the payment of compensation equal to the actual value of the property in question (see, for example, Zwierzy?ski v. Poland (just satisfaction), no. 34049/96, §§ 13-16, 2 July 2002; Hodo? and Others v. Romania, no. 29968/96, §§ 72-73, 21 May 2002; Scordino v. Italy (no. 3) (just satisfaction), no. 43662/98, §§ 37-38, 6 March 2007; Budescu and Petrescu v. Romania, no. 33912/96, § 53-54, 2 July 2002; Cretu v. Romania, no. 32925/96, §§ 59-60, 9 July 2002; and B?l?nescu v. Romania, no. 35831/97, §§ 36-37, 9 July 2002).
13. In my view, that is what the Court could and should have done in the present case: indicate the removal of the church and return of the property in question or, in the alternative, the payment of compensation equal to the actual value of the land in question.
14. That would have enabled the respondent State, under the supervision of the Committee of Ministers, to have the dispute decided in proceedings in which both parties would have a chance to put forward their legal arguments, the procedural rights set out in Article 6 of the Convention could have been respected and the balancing of interests required by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention could have taken place. The majority has, however, decided to interfere with the rights of a private third party, the Parish, which is not a party to the proceedings before the Court and has not had a chance to put forward any arguments, not even as a intervening third party before the Court.
15. That having been said, I would like to add one final observation concerning the approach adopted by the Court in the present case: I wonder whether the measure complained of should be assessed under the State’s positive or negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention.
16. For the reasons stated in paragraphs 54 to 57 of the judgment, the Court proceeds on the basis that the case concerns the State’s positive obligations. However, the Court’s case-law is not always consistent on this point. In some cases concerning a State’s failure to comply with a final and binding domestic decision concerning property rights, the Court has assessed the State’s inaction as an interference with the applicant’s property under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see, for example, Iatridis v. Greece [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999 II; Antonetto v. Italy, no. 15918/89, § 34, 20 July 2000; Frascino v. Italy, no. 35227/97, § 32, 11 December 2003; and Paudicio v. Italy, no. 77606/01, § 42, 24 May 2007), P?duraru v. Romania, no. 63252/00, § 92, ECHR 2005 XII (extracts), Via?u v. Romania, no. 75951/01, § 59, 9 December 2008. However, as the Court has stated in many cases, the principles to be applied are the same (see, for example, Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 144, ECHR 2004 V) and, therefore, had the Court decided to assess the case as a question of interference or negative obligations, the reasoning might have been different but the outcome of the case would have been the same.

TESTO TRADOTTO

CASO DI ORLOVI? E ALTRI v. BOSNIA E ERZEGOVINA
QUARTA SEZIONE
(Applicazione n. 16332/18)
GIUDICE
STRASBURGO
1 ottobre 2019
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Essa può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.
Nel caso di Orlovi? e altri contro la Bosnia-Erzegovina,
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Quarta Sezione), che si riunisce come Sezione composta da:
Jon Fridrik Kjølbro, Presidente,
Faris Vehabovi?,
Paul Lemmens,
Iulia Antoanella Motoc,
Carlo Ranzoni,
Jolien Schukking,
Péter Paczolay, giudici,
e Andrea Tamietti, vice cancelliere della sezione,
Avendo deliberato in privato il 2 luglio e il 9 luglio 2019,
Emette la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in quest'ultima data:
PROCEDURA
1. Il caso ha avuto origine in una domanda (n. 16332/18) contro la Bosnia-Erzegovina, presentata alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da quattordici cittadini della Bosnia-Erzegovina ("i richiedenti"), la sig.ra Fata Orlovi?, Šaban Orlovi?, Fatima Ahmetovi?, Hasan Orlovi?, Zlatka Baši?, Senija Orlovi?, Ejub Orlovi?, Abdurahman Orlovi?, Muška Mehmedovi?, Mirsada Ehli?, Melka Mehmedovi?, Rahima Dahali?, Fatima Orlovi? e Murtija Hodži?, il 30 marzo 2018.
2. I ricorrenti erano rappresentati dal sig. F. Karkin, avvocato che esercitava a Sarajevo. Il governo della Bosnia-Erzegovina (in prosieguo: il "governo") era rappresentato dal loro agente, sig.ra B. Skalonji?.
3. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto, in particolare, di non poter godere effettivamente del loro possesso perché una chiesa costruita illegalmente non è stata rimossa dal loro terreno. Le ricorrenti hanno anche sostenuto che le decisioni dei tribunali nazionali relative alla loro causa civile erano state contrarie all'articolo 6 della Convenzione.
4. Il 24 maggio 2018 è stata data comunicazione della richiesta al Governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
5. I ricorrenti sono nati rispettivamente nel 1942, 1966, 1969, 1969, 1972, 1976, 1976, 1974, 1980, 1980, 1968, 1970, 1973, 1973, 1975, 1978, 1980 e 1982. Il primo richiedente vive a Konjevi? Polje, Bosnia ed Erzegovina. Secondo le informazioni fornite dagli altri richiedenti, essi vivono a Srebrenik, Bosnia ed Erzegovina.
A. Contesto rilevante
6. I ricorrenti sono eredi del marito della prima ricorrente, Š.O., e di suo fratello M.O. Il marito della prima ricorrente e più di venti altri parenti sono stati uccisi nel genocidio di Srebrenica nel 1995.
7. I ricorrenti sig. Šaban Orlovi?, la sig.ra Fatima Ahmetovi?, il sig. Hasan Orlovi?, la sig.ra Zlatka Baši?, la sig.ra Senija Orlovi? e il sig. Ejub Orlovi? sono figli della prima ricorrente e del suo defunto marito. Abdurahman Orlovi?, Muška Mehmedovi?, Mirsada Ehli?, Melka Mehmedovi?, Rahima Dahali?, Fatima Orlovi? e Murtija Hodži? sono figli di M.O.
8. Le ricorrenti vivevano a Konjevi? Polje, Comune di Bratunac, nell'attuale Republika Srpska (una delle due entità costitutive della Bosnia ed Erzegovina), su una proprietà appartenente alla Š.O. e alla M.O. La proprietà consisteva in diversi edifici individuali e agricoli, campi e prati.
9. Durante la guerra del 1992-95 i richiedenti sono stati costretti a fuggire dalla loro casa e sono diventati sfollati interni.
B. Costruzione di una chiesa sul terreno dei richiedenti
10. L'11 settembre 1997, a seguito di una richiesta presentata dalla Parrocchia serbo-ortodossa di Drinja?a ("la Parrocchia"), il Comune di Bratunac ha espropriato una parte del terreno dei richiedenti - un campo con una superficie totale di 11.765 mq, designato come parcella catastale n. 996/1 - e lo ha assegnato alla Parrocchia per la costruzione di una chiesa. La decisione si riferiva al terreno in questione come terreno edificabile non edificato e stabiliva che il risarcimento ai precedenti proprietari sarebbe stato determinato in un procedimento separato. I ricorrenti non sono mai stati informati del procedimento di esproprio.
11. Nel 1998 è stata costruita una chiesa sul terreno n. 996/1, a 20,5 m di distanza dalla casa esistente in cui la prima ricorrente aveva vissuto con la sua famiglia prima della guerra. La chiesa è stata costruita senza alcuna documentazione tecnica rilevante.
12. Il 21 ottobre 2003 la parrocchia ha presentato una richiesta all'Unità di pianificazione territoriale e abitativa del Comune di Bratunac ("l'SPHU"), chiedendo il permesso di costruire la chiesa.
13. Il 14 aprile 2004, nell'ambito della procedura di supervisione dei lavori dell'USPHU, l'Ispettorato per l'edilizia del Ministero della pianificazione territoriale, dell'edilizia e dell'ecologia della Republika Srpska ("l'Ispettorato") ha emesso una decisione con la quale ha ordinato all'Ispettorato per l'edilizia del Comune di Bratunac ("l'Ispettorato comunale") di vietare l'uso della chiesa di Konjevi? Polje entro tre giorni dalla consegna di tale decisione, ai sensi dell'articolo 138 della legge sullo sviluppo territoriale del 2002 (cfr. paragrafo 43). L'Ispettorato ha ritenuto che l'Ispettorato comunale non avesse agito in conformità con la legge in materia perché non aveva fermato i lavori di costruzione e successivamente impedito l'uso della chiesa, sebbene fosse stata costruita senza permesso di costruzione e altra documentazione tecnica. Inoltre, la parrocchia non aveva mai ottenuto un permesso d'uso.
14. Il 27 agosto 2004 l'Ispettorato comunale ha informato il Ministero dell'assetto territoriale, dell'edilizia e dell'ecologia che il vicesindaco di Bratunac aveva "espressamente richiesto" che l'uso della chiesa per tale funzione non venisse interrotto. È stato inoltre affermato che, secondo il vicesindaco, la questione dovrebbe essere risolta a un livello politico superiore, per cui è stato organizzato un incontro tra i rappresentanti comunali, il Ministero dell'assetto territoriale, dell'edilizia e dell'ecologia e il vescovo dell'Eparchia di Zvornik-Tuzla. Dopo l'incontro, la Chiesa ortodossa serba aveva avviato il procedimento per la legalizzazione della chiesa. L'Ispettorato comunale ha concluso affermando che, in considerazione di tali sviluppi, ha rinunciato ad agire in conformità con l'articolo 138 della legge sullo sviluppo del territorio del 2002.
15. Nel dicembre 2004 la parrocchia ha ottenuto il permesso di costruire la chiesa (vedi paragrafo 12).
C. Procedimento di restituzione
16. Il 28 ottobre 1999, a seguito di una richiesta presentata dal secondo ricorrente, il sig. Šaban Orlovi?, la Commissione per le rivendicazioni immobiliari degli sfollati e dei rifugiati ("CRPC"), istituita dall'allegato 7 dell'accordo di pace di Dayton (cfr. punto 44), ha stabilito che il defunto marito del primo ricorrente, Š.O., era stato il proprietario del terreno di Konjevi? Polje e ha annullato qualsiasi trasferimento o restrizione involontaria della proprietà dopo il 1o aprile 1992. La decisione ha inoltre stabilito che gli eredi della Š.O. avevano il diritto di riprendersi il terreno in questione sessanta giorni dopo aver presentato una richiesta di esecuzione della decisione.
17. Il 14 novembre 2001, a seguito di una richiesta presentata dalla prima richiedente, la sig.ra Fata Orlovi?, il Ministero per i rifugiati e gli sfollati della Republika Srpska, Unità di Bratunac ("il Ministero per i rifugiati"), ha inoltre stabilito che la Š.O. era proprietaria del terreno in questione e, in particolare, il comproprietario dell'appezzamento n. 996/1 insieme a suo fratello M.O. è stato ordinato il riappropriazione immediata del terreno.
18. Il 17 aprile 2002 il primo richiedente ha presentato al Ministero per i Rifugiati la richiesta di esecuzione della decisione CRPC del 28 ottobre 1999 (cfr. paragrafo 16).
19. In una data non specificata, dopo di che i richiedenti hanno riacquistato il possesso del loro terreno, ad eccezione dell'appezzamento n. 996/1, sul quale è rimasta la chiesa (cfr. paragrafo 11). La prima richiedente ritornò nella casa in cui aveva vissuto con la sua famiglia prima della guerra.
20. Il 3 aprile 2003 la prima ricorrente ha presentato una domanda al Ministero per i Rifugiati chiedendo la piena esecuzione della sua decisione del 14 novembre 2001 (cfr. paragrafo 17). Ha anche chiesto di ordinare alla parrocchia di rimuovere la chiesa dalla sua proprietà per consentire il completo riappropriazione e di restituire il terreno nelle sue condizioni originali.
21. Il 20 aprile 2004 i ricorrenti hanno scritto alla parrocchia chiedendo una soluzione amichevole della controversia. I ricorrenti hanno proposto il trasferimento della chiesa come la soluzione migliore, sostenendo che era stata costruita illegalmente sul loro terreno. A questo proposito hanno fatto riferimento alla decisione dell'Ispettorato del 14 aprile 2004 (cfr. paragrafo 13).
22. Il 20 gennaio 2005 il sindaco di Bratunac ha offerto ai ricorrenti un risarcimento, di importo non specificato, o l'assegnazione di un'altra proprietà in luogo della restituzione dell'appezzamento n. 966/1. I richiedenti hanno rifiutato e hanno mantenuto la loro richiesta di restituzione integrale della loro proprietà.
23. Il 19 settembre 2005 i ricorrenti hanno scritto al Ministero per i Rifugiati, alla Parrocchia, al Ministero della Pianificazione Territoriale, dell'Edilizia e dell'Ecologia e al Sindaco di Bratunac chiedendo loro di consentire la piena applicazione della decisione CRPC.
D. Procedimento civile
24. Il 29 ottobre 2002 il primo ricorrente ha intentato un'azione civile presso il Tribunale di primo grado di Srebrenica ("il Tribunale di primo grado") contro la Chiesa serbo-ortodossa in Bosnia ed Erzegovina per recuperare il possesso del lotto n. 996/1. Ha chiesto che la chiesa fosse rimossa dalla sua terra e che le venisse restituito il terreno nelle sue condizioni originarie.
25. Il 4 marzo 2003 il Tribunale di primo grado ha deciso che non era competente a decidere sul caso e ha respinto l'azione civile della prima ricorrente.
26. Il 25 agosto 2006, a seguito di un ricorso del primo ricorrente, il Tribunale distrettuale di Bijeljina ("il Tribunale distrettuale") ha annullato la sentenza del 4 marzo 2002 e ha rinviato il caso per un riesame.
27. Nel corso del procedimento di riesame dinanzi al Tribunale di primo grado, gli altri tredici ricorrenti si sono uniti all'azione civile del primo ricorrente. Su richiesta del tribunale i ricorrenti hanno specificato i convenuti come segue: l'Eparchia Zvornik-Tuzla della Chiesa ortodossa serba, la Parrocchia di Bratunac e la Parrocchia Konjevi? Polje. I ricorrenti hanno specificato che hanno chiesto un'ordinanza del tribunale per rimuovere la chiesa costruita sul terreno in questione e per cedere il possesso del terreno ai ricorrenti entro trenta giorni dalla data della sentenza, in contumacia della quale i ricorrenti sarebbero stati autorizzati a rimuovere la chiesa a spese dei convenuti.
28. Le udienze preparatorie dinanzi al Tribunale di primo grado sono state rinviate più volte su richiesta delle parti. In particolare, un'udienza prevista per il 27 dicembre 2007 è stata rinviata su richiesta del rappresentante dei ricorrenti che ha informato il tribunale di aver parlato con il Primo Ministro della Republika Srpska e che c'era la possibilità che il caso potesse essere risolto nel corso del 2008.
29. All'udienza del 20 aprile 2010 i ricorrenti hanno modificato la loro domanda, chiedendo al tribunale di riconoscere la validità di una transazione extragiudiziale conclusa l'11 gennaio 2008 tra il loro rappresentante e i convenuti, che erano rappresentati dal Primo Ministro della Republika Srpska, dal suo consigliere, M.D., e dal vescovo dell'Eparchia Zvornik-Tuzla, formulata come segue:
"Gli intervistati devono rimuovere la chiesa costruita sull'appezzamento n. 996 ... entro quindici giorni dalla data in cui avranno messo a disposizione altri terreni per la costruzione di una chiesa a Konjevi? Polje, in difetto della quale [l'insediamento sarà] obbligatoriamente eseguito".
30. Il 21 maggio 2010 il Tribunale di primo grado ha respinto la domanda delle ricorrenti. Tale sentenza è stata confermata dal Tribunale distrettuale il 17 settembre 2010 (copie di tali decisioni non sono nel fascicolo di causa).
31. Il 1° febbraio 2012, a seguito di un ricorso per motivi di diritto presentato dai ricorrenti, la Corte Suprema della Republika Srpska ("la Corte Suprema") ha annullato la sentenza del Tribunale Distrettuale del 17 settembre 2010 e ha rinviato il caso per un riesame (una copia della decisione della Corte Suprema non è nel fascicolo della causa).
32. A seguito del rinvio, il 24 settembre 2012 la Corte distrettuale ha annullato la sentenza del Tribunale di primo grado del 21 maggio 2010 e ha rinviato la causa a tale tribunale per il riesame (una copia di tale decisione non è nel fascicolo di causa). Il Tribunale distrettuale ha incaricato il Tribunale di primo grado di esaminare i fatti relativi all'esistenza della transazione extragiudiziale, al suo contenuto e all'esistenza di un'adeguata autorizzazione a concludere la transazione.
33. Il 3 giugno 2013 il Tribunale di primo grado ha respinto la domanda dei ricorrenti. Da un lato, il tribunale ha ritenuto che le ricorrenti non avessero dimostrato che il Primo Ministro e il suo consulente fossero stati autorizzati a concludere la transazione per conto delle parti convenute. Essi non erano stati autorizzati a farlo neppure dalla legge a causa del principio della separazione tra Chiesa e Stato. D'altro canto, mentre il vescovo dell'Eparchia di Zvornik-Tuzla poteva essere considerato il rappresentante legale degli intervistati, non era stato dimostrato che l'accordo fosse stato effettivamente concluso con lui. Nella sua testimonianza M.D. aveva confermato di aver contattato telefonicamente il vescovo per discutere la possibilità di una soluzione amichevole, ma che non era stato raggiunto alcun accordo. I ricorrenti sono stati condannati a pagare 11.243,70 marchi convertibili (BAM - circa 5.760 euro) come spese legali.
34. Il 23 ottobre 2013, a seguito di un ricorso delle ricorrenti, la Corte distrettuale ha annullato la sentenza del Tribunale di primo grado nella parte relativa alle spese legali, diminuendo il premio a BAM 1.029,60, e ha confermato il resto della sentenza.
35. Il 6 agosto 2014 la Corte Suprema ha respinto il ricorso dei ricorrenti per motivi di diritto. Il tribunale ha rilevato in particolare che le trattative che avevano avuto luogo nel 2008 tra il rappresentante dei ricorrenti e il Primo Ministro della Republika Srpska e il suo consulente avevano riguardato l'aiuto finanziario del governo all'Eparchia Zvornik-Tuzla con lo scopo di trasferire la chiesa dal terreno dei ricorrenti. I tribunali di grado inferiore avevano correttamente concluso, sulla base dei fatti, che non era stato concluso alcun accordo tra le parti in causa, ovvero i ricorrenti e la Chiesa serbo-ortodossa.
36. Il 17 ottobre 2014 i ricorrenti hanno presentato un ricorso costituzionale, basandosi sull'articolo 6 della Convenzione e sull'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. Essi hanno ribadito, in particolare, che il loro diritto al pacifico godimento dei beni era stato violato perché la chiesa era stata costruita illegalmente sul loro terreno. Hanno anche sostenuto che il vescovo, durante la conversazione telefonica con il medico, aveva dato il suo consenso all'accordo extragiudiziale.
37. Il 28 settembre 2017 la Corte costituzionale della Bosnia ed Erzegovina ("la Corte costituzionale") ha respinto il ricorso come infondato, con cinque voti contro quattro. Ai sensi dell'articolo 6, paragrafo 1 della Convenzione, essa ha ritenuto che i tribunali di grado inferiore avessero fornito ragioni chiare e convincenti per le loro decisioni, e che tali ragioni non fossero arbitrarie. Nell'esaminare il reclamo dei ricorrenti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1, il tribunale ha fatto riferimento essenzialmente alla sua conclusione ai sensi dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Tale decisione è stata pronunciata ai ricorrenti il 2 novembre 2017.
E. Altre informazioni pertinenti
38. Il 10 settembre 2008 il primo richiedente è stato aggredito fisicamente da uno degli agenti di polizia che sorvegliavano la pulizia dell'area intorno alla chiesa in preparazione della funzione che si sarebbe tenuta il giorno successivo.
39. Lo stesso giorno l'Ufficio dell'Alto rappresentante ha rilasciato la seguente dichiarazione:
"L'accordo sulla Chiesa di Konjevi? Polje deve essere attuato
L'OHR condanna l'incidente avvenuto stamattina nella proprietà di Fata Orlovi? a Konjevi? Polje.
L'anno scorso il governo della Republika Srpska ha deciso di finanziare il trasferimento della chiesa costruita illegalmente dalla proprietà privata di Fata Orlovi? a Konjevi?-Polje.
L'OHR ha accolto l'accordo come un segno che il diritto di Fata Orlovi? alla proprietà privata sarebbe stato rispettato.
Il 30 agosto dello scorso anno, il Forum per la sicurezza di Bratunac, presieduto dal sindaco di Bratunac Nedeljko Mla?enovi?, al quale hanno partecipato tutti gli attori interessati, ha annunciato che la festa annuale della chiesa dell'11 settembre si terrà per l'ultima volta nella chiesa esistente a Konjevi? Polje l'11 settembre 2007.
L'OHR sostiene che l'accordo dell'anno scorso deve essere rispettato.
L'Ufficio dell'Alto rappresentante chiede a tutte le persone coinvolte di attenersi alle posizioni precedentemente concordate, di mostrare moderazione e di astenersi da qualsiasi azione che possa infiammare la situazione".
40. Il 12 settembre 2010 la prima ricorrente è stata nuovamente aggredita nella sua proprietà da un agente di polizia.
II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE PERTINENTE
A. Legge sulla restituzione della proprietà 1998
41. The Restitution of Property Act 1998 (Zakon o prestanku primjene Zakona o korištenju napuštene imovine, Gazzetta ufficiale della Republika Srpska "OG RS", n. 16/10), che disciplina la restituzione dei beni immobili di proprietà privata abbandonati dopo il 30 aprile 1991, ha sostituito la legge sulla proprietà abbandonata del 1996 (Zakon o korištenju napuštene imovine, OG RS, n. 3/96 e 21/96) e ha annullato tutti gli atti che regolano lo stato di proprietà abbandonata emanati nel periodo tra il 30 aprile 1991 e il 19 dicembre 1998.
42. Ai sensi dell'articolo 5 di questa legge, il proprietario ha il diritto di riappropriarsi dei beni e di riconoscere tutti i diritti che aveva su tali beni fino al 30 aprile 1991 o fino alla data della perdita del possesso. Il diritto di rivendicare il pignoramento non è soggetto a prescrizione (sezione 9). La richiesta può essere presentata in qualsiasi momento all'unità competente del Ministero per i Rifugiati del comune in cui si trova il bene in questione e/o alla CRPC (art. 10(1) e 16(1)). Le decisioni della CRPC sono definitive e immediatamente esecutive da parte delle autorità competenti della Republika Srpska (articolo 16, paragrafi 3 e 5). I beni che sono stati lasciati liberi (da un occupante temporaneo) possono essere ripresi immediatamente (articolo 14(5)).
B. Legge sullo sviluppo territoriale del 2002
43. Ai seni dell'articolo 138 della legge sullo sviluppo territoriale del 2002 (Zakon o ure?enju prostora, OG RS, n. 84/02), in vigore all'epoca dei fatti, un ispettore edilizio era autorizzato, tra l'altro, a vietare l'uso di un oggetto o di una parte di esso, in mancanza di un'autorizzazione valida per l'uso.
III. MATERIALI INTERNAZIONALI PERTINENTI
Accordo quadro generale per la pace in Bosnia-Erzegovina ("l'accordo di pace di Dayton")
44. L'accordo di pace di Dayton è stato siglato in una base militare vicino a Dayton, negli Stati Uniti, il 21 novembre 1995. È entrato in vigore il 14 dicembre 1995, quando è stato firmato a Parigi, in Francia. Ha posto fine alla guerra del 1992-95 in Bosnia ed Erzegovina.
La parte pertinente dell'allegato 4 (la Costituzione della Bosnia-Erzegovina) recita come segue:
Articolo II § 5
"Tutti i rifugiati e gli sfollati hanno il diritto di ritornare liberamente alle loro case d'origine. Essi hanno il diritto, in conformità con l'Allegato 7 dell'Accordo quadro generale, di aver restituito loro i beni di cui sono stati privati nel corso delle ostilità dal 1991 e di essere risarciti per i beni che non possono essere loro restituiti. Ogni impegno o dichiarazione relativa a tali beni fatta sotto costrizione è nulla e non avvenuta".
La parte pertinente dell'allegato 7 (l'accordo sui rifugiati e gli sfollati) prevede:
L'articolo I: Diritti dei rifugiati e degli sfollati
"Tutti i rifugiati e gli sfollati hanno il diritto di ritornare liberamente alle loro case d'origine. Essi hanno il diritto di avere restituito loro i beni di cui sono stati privati nel corso delle ostilità dal 1991 e di essere risarciti per i beni che non possono essere loro restituiti. Il rapido ritorno dei rifugiati e degli sfollati è un obiettivo importante per la soluzione del conflitto in Bosnia ed Erzegovina. Le parti confermano che accetteranno il ritorno di queste persone che hanno lasciato il loro territorio, comprese quelle che hanno ricevuto protezione temporanea da paesi terzi.
Le parti garantiscono che ai rifugiati e agli sfollati sia consentito il ritorno in condizioni di sicurezza, senza rischi di molestie, intimidazioni, persecuzioni o discriminazioni, in particolare a causa della loro origine etnica, del loro credo religioso o delle loro opinioni politiche.
3. Le parti adottano tutte le misure necessarie per prevenire attività all'interno dei loro territori che ostacolino o impediscano il ritorno sicuro e volontario dei rifugiati e degli sfollati. 3. Per dimostrare il loro impegno a garantire il pieno rispetto dei diritti umani e delle libertà fondamentali di tutte le persone che rientrano nella loro giurisdizione e a creare senza indugio condizioni adatte al rientro dei rifugiati e degli sfollati, le parti adottano immediatamente le seguenti misure volte a rafforzare la fiducia:
a. l'abrogazione della legislazione nazionale e delle pratiche amministrative con intento o effetto discriminatorio;
b. la prevenzione e la rapida soppressione di qualsiasi incitamento scritto o verbale, attraverso i media o altro, di ostilità o di odio etnico o religioso; ...".
Articolo VII: Istituzione della Commissione
"Le parti istituiscono una Commissione indipendente per gli sfollati e i rifugiati ("la Commissione") ...".
Articolo VIII: Cooperazione
"Le Parti cooperano con il lavoro della Commissione e ne rispettano e attuano le decisioni in modo rapido e in buona fede, in cooperazione con le organizzazioni internazionali e non governative competenti che hanno la responsabilità del ritorno e della reintegrazione dei rifugiati e degli sfollati".
LA LEGGE
I. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
45. I ricorrenti si lamentavano del fatto che era stato loro impedito di godere effettivamente del loro possesso perché la chiesa costruita illegalmente non era ancora stata rimossa dal loro terreno. Essi si sono basati sull'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni che precedono non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni".
A. Ammissibilità
46. La Corte rileva che tale denuncia non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, lettera a), della Convenzione. Rileva inoltre che non è inammissibile per altri motivi. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
B. Meriti
1. 1. Le osservazioni delle parti
47. I ricorrenti hanno mantenuto la loro richiesta di restituzione completa delle loro proprietà e di rimozione della chiesa. Essi hanno inoltre sostenuto che nella decisione dell'11 settembre 1997 il Comune di Bratunac (cfr. paragrafo 10) aveva erroneamente classificato il terreno in questione come terreno edificabile non edificato idoneo all'esproprio. In realtà si trattava di un campo, come descritto nel catasto. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre fatto valere che la decisione di esproprio dell'11 settembre 1997 non era mai stata loro notificata. Inoltre, la chiesa in questione era stata utilizzata solo una volta all'anno, nel giorno del suo santo patrono, perché non c'era popolazione serba a Konjevi? Polje.
48. Il Governo ha ammesso che la decisione dell'11 settembre 1997 di espropriare i terreni dei ricorrenti e di destinarli alla parrocchia per la costruzione di una chiesa ha costituito un'interferenza con i diritti di proprietà dei ricorrenti. Essi hanno inoltre sostenuto che l'ingerenza nel caso in questione equivaleva ad una privazione del possesso, a meno che la Corte non ritenesse che la complessità della situazione giuridica e di fatto impedisse di classificarla in una precisa categoria. Per quanto riguarda la legittimità, il governo ha sostenuto che la decisione dell'11 settembre 1997 era stata emessa in conformità della legge del 1986 sui terreni edificabili. Per quanto riguarda la proporzionalità dell'ingerenza, il governo ha sostenuto che la Corte aveva ritenuto prima che il trasferimento obbligatorio di proprietà da un individuo ad un altro potesse, a seconda delle circostanze, costituire un mezzo legittimo per promuovere l'interesse pubblico. Nel caso in esame, la proprietà dei ricorrenti è stata espropriata su richiesta della parrocchia allo scopo di costruire una chiesa in cui i serbi dei villaggi circostanti potessero praticare la loro religione.
49. Il Governo ha inoltre affermato che la Republika Srpska era a conoscenza degli obblighi assunti ai sensi dell'allegato 7 dell'accordo di pace di Dayton relativo al libero ritorno dei rifugiati alle loro case d'origine e alla restituzione delle loro proprietà (cfr. paragrafo 44). Al fine di attuare l'allegato 7, la Republika Srpska aveva promulgato la legge sulla restituzione delle proprietà del 1998 (cfr. paragrafo 41). Il ritorno degli sfollati e dei rifugiati è stato un obiettivo importante per tutte le autorità della Bosnia-Erzegovina e le autorità non hanno voluto che questo caso fosse fonte di ulteriori divisioni e conflitti.
2. Valutazione della Corte
50. La Corte rileva, in primo luogo, che nella fattispecie non è contestato il fatto che i ricorrenti siano i proprietari dell'immobile in questione e che avessero il diritto di ottenere la restituzione del terreno.
51. Come la Corte ha affermato in diverse occasioni, l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. 1 comprende tre regole distinte: la prima regola, contenuta nel primo periodo del primo comma, ha carattere generale ed enuncia il principio del pacifico godimento dei beni; la seconda regola, contenuta nel secondo periodo del primo comma, riguarda la privazione del possesso e la sottopone a determinate condizioni; la terza regola, contenuta nel secondo comma, riconosce agli Stati contraenti il diritto, tra l'altro, di controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale e di garantire il pagamento delle sanzioni. Le tre regole non sono, tuttavia, "distinte" nel senso di non essere collegate tra loro. La seconda e la terza regola riguardano casi particolari di interferenza con il diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà e devono quindi essere interpretate alla luce del principio generale enunciato nella prima regola (cfr., tra le altre autorità, James e altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37, serie A n. 98, e Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], no. 31107/96, § 55, ECHR 1999-II).
52. L'oggetto essenziale dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è la protezione di una persona da interferenze ingiustificate da parte dello Stato nel pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Tuttavia, in virtù dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione, ciascuna parte contraente "garantisce a tutti coloro che si trovano nella [sua] giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definiti nella [Convenzione]". L'adempimento di questo dovere generale può comportare obblighi positivi inerenti all'effettivo esercizio dei diritti garantiti dalla Convenzione. Nel contesto dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, tali obblighi positivi possono richiedere allo Stato di adottare le misure necessarie per proteggere il diritto di proprietà (vedi Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], no. 31443/96, § 143, CEDU 2004 V; Ališi? e altri c. Bosnia-Erzegovina, Croazia, Serbia, Slovenia ed ex Repubblica iugoslava di Macedonia [GC], n. 60642/08, § 100, CEDU 2014; e Sargsyan c. Azerbaigian [GC], n. 40167/06, § 219, CEDU 2015), in particolare quando esiste un legame diretto tra le misure che un richiedente può legittimamente aspettarsi dalle autorità e il suo effettivo godimento dei suoi beni (cfr. Önery?ld?z c. Turchia [GC], n. 48939/99, § 134, CEDU 2004 XII). Anche nei rapporti tra privati o enti può sussistere un obbligo positivo per lo Stato (cfr. Kotov c. Russia [GC], n. 54522/00, § 109, 3 aprile 2012).
53. Al fine di stabilire se lo Stato convenuto ha rispettato i suoi obblighi positivi ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la Corte deve esaminare se è stato raggiunto un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse pubblico in questione e il diritto fondamentale di proprietà del richiedente (cfr. Broniowski, citato, § 144; Kotov, citato, § 110; Ališi? e altri, citato, § 101; e Sargsyan, citato, § 220).
54. Passando al caso in esame, la Corte rileva che, ai sensi dell'Allegato 7 dell'Accordo di pace di Dayton, i ricorrenti, sfollati interni, avevano il diritto di ritornare alle loro case d'origine (cfr. paragrafo 44). Come presentato dal governo, il ritorno degli sfollati e dei rifugiati era un obiettivo importante per tutte le autorità della Bosnia-Erzegovina (cfr. paragrafo 49).
55. La Corte rileva inoltre che il diritto dei richiedenti alla piena restituzione era stato stabilito dalle decisioni del CRPC e del ministero dei Rifugiati, rispettivamente del 28 ottobre 1999 e del 14 novembre 2001 (cfr. paragrafi 16 e 17). Entrambe le decisioni conferivano il diritto al recupero immediato (cfr. anche l'articolo 14, paragrafo 5, della legge del 1998 al paragrafo 42) ed entrambe erano definitive ed esecutive. La Corte rileva in particolare che, ai sensi della legge sulla restituzione della proprietà del 1998 e dell'articolo VIII dell'allegato 7 dell'accordo di pace di Dayton, le autorità competenti della Republika Srpska dovevano attuare le decisioni della CRPC (cfr. paragrafi 42 e 44). La Corte ritiene che la denuncia delle ricorrenti sia essenzialmente una denuncia relativa all'inazione delle autorità pubbliche, in contrasto con l'obbligo positivo di queste ultime di ripristinare pienamente i loro diritti di proprietà.
56. La Corte rileva inoltre che i terreni sono stati successivamente restituiti ai ricorrenti, ad eccezione dell'appezzamento n. 996/1, sul quale è rimasta la chiesa. I ricorrenti avevano ripetutamente chiesto il completo riappropriazione senza alcun risultato (cfr. paragrafi 18, 20 e 23).
57. La Corte stabilirà pertanto se il pregiudizio subito a causa dell'inazione delle autorità da parte dei ricorrenti fosse giustificabile alla luce dei principi pertinenti. La valutazione della proporzionalità richiede un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in questione, tenendo presente che la Convenzione è intesa a salvaguardare diritti "pratici ed effettivi". Inoltre, in ogni caso di presunta violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la Corte deve accertare se, a causa dell'azione o dell'inazione dello Stato, la persona interessata abbia dovuto sostenere un onere sproporzionato (cfr. Szkórits c. Ungheria, n. 58171/09, §§ 39 e 40, 16 settembre 2014).
58. La Corte ritiene che l'obbligo dello Stato di garantire ai ricorrenti il godimento effettivo del loro diritto di proprietà, come garantito dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, imponga alle autorità nazionali di adottare misure concrete per assicurare l'esecuzione delle decisioni del 28 ottobre 1999 e del 14 novembre 2001. All'inizio, invece, le autorità hanno fatto addirittura il contrario, autorizzando di fatto la Chiesa a rimanere sul terreno dei ricorrenti (cfr. i precedenti paragrafi 14 e 15).
59. La Corte osserva inoltre che i ricorrenti avevano avviato un procedimento civile volto a recuperare il possesso del loro terreno, nel corso del quale avrebbero concluso una transazione extragiudiziale e successivamente modificato il loro credito (cfr. paragrafo 29). Il credito dei ricorrenti è stato infine respinto, come confermato rispettivamente dalla Corte Suprema e dalla Corte Costituzionale (cfr. paragrafi 35 e 37).
60. Nonostante le due decisioni definitive che ordinano il completo riapproprio delle loro terre, ai ricorrenti è ancora impedito, diciassette anni dopo la ratifica della Convenzione e dei suoi protocolli da parte dello Stato convenuto, di goderne pacificamente.
61. Sebbene un ritardo nell'esecuzione di una sentenza possa essere giustificato in particolari circostanze (cfr. Burdov c. Russia, n. 59498/00, § 35, CEDU 2002 III), la Corte osserva che il Governo non ha offerto alcuna giustificazione per l'inerzia delle autorità nel presente caso. La Corte ritiene che il lunghissimo ritardo nel presente caso equivalga ad un chiaro rifiuto delle autorità di dare esecuzione alle decisioni del 28 ottobre 1999 e del 14 novembre 2001, lasciando i ricorrenti in uno stato di incertezza per quanto riguarda la realizzazione dei loro diritti di proprietà. Pertanto, a seguito del mancato rispetto delle decisioni definitive e vincolanti da parte delle autorità, i ricorrenti hanno subito una grave frustrazione dei loro diritti di proprietà (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Szkórits, citato sopra, § 45).
62. In considerazione di quanto sopra, la Corte conclude che i ricorrenti hanno dovuto sostenere un onere sproporzionato ed eccessivo. Di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
II. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
63. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato che le decisioni dei tribunali nazionali relative alla loro causa civile erano state contrarie all'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
64. Il Governo ha contestato tale argomentazione.
65. La Corte osserva che questa denuncia è legata a quella esaminata sopra e deve quindi essere dichiarata ammissibile.
66. Vista la constatazione relativa all'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione (cfr. paragrafo 62), la Corte ritiene che non sia necessario esaminare se, in questo caso, vi sia stata anche una violazione dell'articolo 6, paragrafo 1.
III. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 46 DELLA CONVENZIONE
67. L'articolo 46 della Convenzione prevede, per quanto pertinente, quanto segue:
"1. Le Alte Parti contraenti si impegnano a rispettare la sentenza definitiva della Corte in ogni caso in cui siano parti.
2. La sentenza definitiva della Corte è trasmessa al Comitato dei Ministri, che ne controlla l'esecuzione".
68. La Corte ribadisce che, ai sensi dell'articolo 46 della Convenzione, le Parti contraenti si sono impegnate a rispettare le sentenze definitive della Corte in ogni caso di cui sono parti, la cui esecuzione è controllata dal Comitato dei Ministri. Ne consegue, tra l'altro, che una sentenza in cui la Corte constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli impone allo Stato convenuto l'obbligo giuridico non solo di pagare agli interessati le somme concesse a titolo di giusta soddisfazione, ma anche di scegliere, sotto il controllo del Comitato dei Ministri, le misure generali e/o, se del caso, individuali da adottare nel loro ordinamento giuridico interno per porre fine alla violazione constatata dalla Corte e per sanarne, per quanto possibile, gli effetti (cfr. Scozzari e Giunta contro Giunta. Italia [GC], nn. 39221/98 e 41963/98, § 249, CEDU 2000 VIII). La Corte rileva inoltre che spetta in primo luogo allo Stato interessato scegliere, sotto la supervisione del Comitato dei Ministri, i mezzi da utilizzare nel proprio ordinamento giuridico interno per adempiere all'obbligo di cui all'articolo 46 della Convenzione (cfr. Öcalan c. Turchia [GC], n. 46221/99, § 210, CEDU 2005-IV).
69. Tuttavia, in via eccezionale, al fine di aiutare lo Stato convenuto ad adempiere agli obblighi di cui all'articolo 46, la Corte può cercare di indicare il tipo di misure individuali e/o generali che potrebbero essere adottate per porre fine alla carenza della Convenzione che ha riscontrato (cfr. Broniowski, citato, § 194, e Scoppola c. Italia (n. 2) [GC], n. 10249/03, § 148, 17 settembre 2009).
70. La Corte ritiene che la violazione riscontrata nel caso di specie non lascia alcuna reale scelta in merito alle misure necessarie per porvi rimedio.
71. In tali condizioni, tenuto conto delle particolari circostanze del caso, la Corte ritiene che lo Stato convenuto debba adottare tutte le misure necessarie per garantire la piena esecuzione della decisione del CRPC del 28 ottobre 1999 (cfr. paragrafo 16) e della decisione del Ministero per i rifugiati del 14 novembre 2001 (cfr. paragrafo 17), compresa in particolare la rimozione della chiesa dal terreno dei ricorrenti, senza ulteriore indugio e al più tardi entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva, ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione.
IV. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
72. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se il Tribunale constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente un risarcimento solo parziale, il Tribunale, se necessario, dà giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".
A. Danni
73. A titolo di risarcimento del danno pecuniario, i ricorrenti hanno chiesto 10.000 euro (EUR) ciascuno per il danno subito perché era stato loro impedito di utilizzare il terreno sul quale era stata costruita la chiesa per scopi agricoli. Non hanno presentato alcuna richiesta di risarcimento per danni non patrimoniali.
74. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti avrebbero potuto subire un danno pecuniario e ha invitato la Corte a pronunciarsi in via equitativa e in conformità con la sua giurisprudenza consolidata.
75. Il Tribunale non è stato in grado di effettuare un calcolo preciso del danno subito a causa dell'impossibilità di utilizzare il terreno a fini agricoli, in considerazione della mancanza di prove del profitto che i ricorrenti avrebbero potuto effettivamente realizzare se avessero potuto utilizzare quel terreno. Tuttavia, essa ritiene che i ricorrenti debbano necessariamente aver subito una perdita pecuniaria in quanto è stato loro impedito di utilizzare una parte della loro terra, sebbene la sua immediata restituzione fosse stata ordinata già nel 1999 e nel 2001 (cfr. paragrafi 16 e 17 di cui sopra; cfr. anche, mutatis mutandis, Assanidze c. Georgia [GC], n. 71503/01, § 200, CEDU 2004 II). La Corte ritiene inoltre che il danno pecuniario sia stato più significativo per la prima ricorrente perché è quella che è tornata nella proprietà di Konjevi? Polje (cfr. paragrafo 19). Di conseguenza, pronunciandosi su base equa e in conformità con i criteri stabiliti dalla sua giurisprudenza, la Corte assegna 5.000 euro al primo richiedente e 2.000 euro a ciascuno dei rimanenti richiedenti sotto questa testa.
B. Costi e spese
76. I ricorrenti hanno inoltre richiesto EUR 13.000 per i costi e le spese sostenute dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e alla Corte.
77. Il governo ha sostenuto che il costo e le spese interne dovrebbero essere valutati in base alle tariffe legali applicabili. Per quanto riguarda i costi e le spese sostenute dinanzi alla Corte, il governo ha sostenuto che i richiedenti avevano diritto al rimborso delle spese necessarie ed effettive.
78. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente ha diritto al rimborso dei costi e delle spese solo nella misura in cui è stato dimostrato che questi sono stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e che sono ragionevoli quanto al quantum (cfr., ad esempio, Iatridis c. Grecia (giusta soddisfazione) [GC], no. 31107/96, § 54, ECHR 2000 XI). Nel caso di specie, la Corte rileva che i ricorrenti non hanno presentato alcuna prova (bollette o fatture) dei costi e delle spese sostenute. Pertanto, la loro richiesta è respinta per mancanza di elementi di prova.
C. Interessi di mora
79. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale vanno aggiunti tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE
1. Dichiara, all'unanimità, la domanda ammissibile;
2. Dichiara, all'unanimità, che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
3. Dichiara, all'unanimità, che non è necessario esaminare la denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 6 della Convenzione;
4. Detenga,
a) con sei voti contro uno, che lo Stato convenuto deve adottare tutte le misure necessarie per garantire la piena esecuzione della decisione della CRPC del 28 ottobre 1999 e della decisione del Ministero per i rifugiati del 14 novembre 2001, compresa in particolare la rimozione della chiesa dal terreno dei richiedenti asilo, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva, ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione;
(b) all'unanimità, che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva, ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, 5.000 euro (cinquemila euro), più l'imposta eventualmente dovuta, al primo richiedente e 2.000 euro (duemila euro), più l'imposta eventualmente dovuta, a ciascuno dei restanti richiedenti, per i danni pecuniari, da convertire nella valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data del regolamento;
(c) all'unanimità, che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi sopraindicati fino al regolamento, sugli importi di cui sopra saranno dovuti interessi semplici ad un tasso pari al tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Centrale Europea durante il periodo di inadempienza, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;

5) Il resto della domanda delle ricorrenti è respinto all'unanimità.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 1° ottobre 2019, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.
Andrea Tamietti Jon Fridrik Kjølbro
Cancelliere Presidente
In conformità all'articolo 45 § 2 della Convenzione e all'articolo 74 § 2 del regolamento della Corte, il parere separato del giudice Jon Fridrik Kjølbro è allegato alla presente sentenza.
JFK
ANT

PARERE PARZIALMENTE DISSENZIENTE DEL GIUDICE KJØLBRO
1. Sono d'accordo con la sentenza, ad eccezione di un punto in cui il mio punto di vista è diverso da quello della maggioranza. Di conseguenza, ho votato contro il punto 4, lettera a), delle disposizioni operative che riflettono il ragionamento della maggioranza al punto 71 della sentenza, in cui la Corte ha indicato come misura individuale che lo Stato convenuto deve garantire "l'allontanamento della chiesa dal terreno del richiedente, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva".
2. 2. A mio parere, e per le ragioni spiegate qui di seguito, trovo che il provvedimento individuale indicato sia problematico in quanto non tiene sufficientemente conto del fatto che il presente caso riguarda non solo una controversia tra i ricorrenti e lo Stato convenuto, ma anche e in particolare una controversia tra i ricorrenti e un terzo privato, la Parrocchia serbo-ortodossa di Drinja?a ("la Parrocchia"), che non è parte del procedimento dinanzi alla Corte.
3. Come giustamente sottolineato dalla maggioranza (si vedano i paragrafi 68-69 della sentenza), è solo in situazioni eccezionali che la Corte, ai sensi dell'articolo 46, indicherà misure individuali da adottare da parte di uno Stato convenuto e, in generale, la Corte lo farà solo quando la constatazione di una violazione "non lascia alcuna reale scelta sulle misure necessarie per porvi rimedio" (si veda, ad esempio, Öcalan c. Turchia [GC], n. 46221/99, § 210, CEDU 2005 IV).
4. Nel caso di specie, la Corte, nel suo ragionamento e nelle disposizioni operative, ha indicato che lo Stato convenuto deve garantire "la rimozione della chiesa dal terreno dei ricorrenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva". La presente causa, tuttavia, non riguarda solo una controversia tra i ricorrenti (che chiedono la restituzione della parte rimanente del terreno e la rimozione della chiesa costruita su di esso) e lo Stato convenuto, ma anche una controversia tra i ricorrenti e la parrocchia (il proprietario della chiesa costruita sul terreno contestato).
5. Con l'ordine di rimuovere la chiesa, il Tribunale, di fatto, si pronuncia e decide su una controversia tra due privati, a scapito di una delle parti, la Parrocchia, che non è parte nel procedimento dinanzi al Tribunale e non ha avuto la possibilità di esprimere le sue opinioni giuridiche e di difendere i suoi interessi, nemmeno come terzo interveniente nel procedimento dinanzi al Tribunale.
6. Con il mio dissenso su questo punto, non esprimo un'opinione su come debba essere decisa la controversia tra i ricorrenti e la Parrocchia. Si tratta, a mio avviso, di una questione che deve essere decisa dalle autorità nazionali nei procedimenti nazionali, dove possono avere luogo le necessarie garanzie procedurali e la necessaria ponderazione degli interessi; non è una questione che deve essere decisa dal Tribunale.
7. In tale contesto, richiamo l'attenzione sui seguenti fatti: Il terreno in questione è stato espropriato nel 1997 e assegnato al terzo (cfr. punto 10 della sentenza). Nel 1998 la parrocchia ha costruito la chiesa in questione (cfr. paragrafo 11 della sentenza). La chiesa è stata costruita ed è stata utilizzata dalla parrocchia per più di 21 anni. Inoltre, nel 2004 è stato rilasciato un permesso di costruzione (cfr. paragrafo 15 della sentenza). Senza pronunciarsi sulle misure adottate dalle autorità nazionali al momento dell'assegnazione del terreno alla parrocchia e del rilascio del permesso di costruire, non posso fare a meno di notare che la parrocchia può, in quanto parte privata, far valere e invocare i diritti previsti dalla Convenzione, compreso il diritto al rispetto della proprietà, come garantito dall'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione. Le modalità di decisione della controversia tra i ricorrenti e la Parrocchia sono di competenza dei tribunali nazionali, con la possibilità di presentare successivamente una domanda individuale al Tribunale ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione.
8.Nel caso di specie, l'istante aveva avviato un procedimento civile contro la Parrocchia. Inizialmente, i ricorrenti avevano chiesto la rimozione della chiesa e il restauro del terreno in questione (cfr. paragrafo 24 della sentenza). Tuttavia, successivamente, e nell'ambito del procedimento civile, i ricorrenti avevano modificato la loro pretesa e chiesto ai tribunali nazionali di riconoscere la validità di un accordo extragiudiziale presumibilmente concluso tra le parti (cfr. paragrafo 29 della sentenza), pretesa che è stata infine respinta in quanto non era stato concluso alcun accordo come sostenuto dai ricorrenti (cfr. paragrafo 35 della sentenza).
9. In altre parole, nell'ambito del procedimento civile i giudici nazionali non hanno avuto la possibilità di pronunciarsi sul merito della controversia tra le parti, ossia sulla questione della rimozione della chiesa e della restituzione del terreno in questione, e ciò è una diretta conseguenza della scelta delle ricorrenti nell'ambito del procedimento nazionale.
10. Se il presente caso non avesse coinvolto gli interessi di un terzo privato, la parrocchia, non avrei avuto alcun problema con la decisione del Tribunale di ordinare o indicare la restituzione del terreno, ma nel presente caso c'è una controversia di fondo tra privati con rivendicazioni e interessi contrastanti, e il Tribunale sta decidendo la controversia a scapito di una delle parti, che, come detto, non è rappresentata davanti al Tribunale. Questo lo trovo molto problematico.
11. Se i tribunali nazionali avessero agito in modo simile all'approccio adottato dalla maggioranza nella presente causa, ordinando la rimozione di un edificio e la restituzione di un terreno in un procedimento in cui il proprietario o una persona con diritti di proprietà non era parte in causa e non era in grado di presentare il proprio punto di vista e di difendere i propri interessi, la Corte avrebbe riscontrato una chiara violazione dell'articolo 6 della Convenzione (si veda, ad esempio, Gankin e altri c. Russia, nn. 2430/06 e altri 3, §§ 33-39, 31 maggio 2016, relativi al diritto di essere informato del procedimento e di poter partecipare alle udienze e di poter difendere i propri diritti), nonché l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione (si veda, ad esempio, G.I.E.M. S.R.L. e altri c. Italia [GC], nn. 1828/06 e altri 2, § 303, 28 giugno 2018, relativi ai diritti procedurali ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1).
12. ebbene il Tribunale abbia in molti casi ordinato o indicato la restituzione dei beni ad un richiedente, ha comunque sempre tenuto presente che possono esistere situazioni in cui la restituzione dei beni è impossibile de facto o de jure, tra l'altro a causa dei diritti e degli interessi di terzi. Per questo motivo, in tali casi, la Corte ha indicato la restituzione del bene in questione o, in alternativa, il pagamento di un risarcimento pari al valore effettivo del bene in questione (si veda, ad esempio, Zwierzy?ski c. Polonia (solo soddisfazione), no. 34049/96, §§ 13-16, 2 luglio 2002; Hodo? e altri c. Romania, n. 29968/96, §§ 72-73, 21 maggio 2002; Scordino c. Italia (n. 3) (solo soddisfazione), n. 43662/98, §§ 37-38, 6 marzo 2007; Budescu e Petrescu c. Romania, n. 33912/96, § 53-54, 2 luglio 2002; Cretu c. Romania, n. 32925/96, §§ 59-60, 9 luglio 2002; e B?l?nescu c. Romania, n. 35831/97, §§ 36-37, 9 luglio 2002).
13. A mio parere, questo è ciò che la Corte avrebbe potuto e dovuto fare nel caso di specie: indicare la rimozione della chiesa e la restituzione della proprietà in questione o, in alternativa, il pagamento di un indennizzo pari al valore effettivo del terreno in questione.
14. Ciò avrebbe consentito allo Stato convenuto, sotto la supervisione del Comitato dei Ministri, di far decidere la controversia in un procedimento in cui entrambe le parti avrebbero avuto la possibilità di presentare le loro argomentazioni giuridiche, i diritti procedurali di cui all'articolo 6 della Convenzione avrebbero potuto essere rispettati e si sarebbe potuto procedere al bilanciamento delle garanzie richiesto dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione. La maggioranza ha tuttavia deciso di interferire con i diritti di un terzo privato, la parrocchia, che non è parte del procedimento dinanzi alla Corte e non ha avuto la possibilità di presentare argomenti, nemmeno in qualità di terzo interveniente dinanzi alla Corte.
15. Detto questo, vorrei aggiungere un'ultima osservazione sull'approccio adottato dalla Corte nella presente causa: Mi chiedo se il provvedimento contestato debba essere valutato in base agli obblighi positivi o negativi dello Stato ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
16. Per le ragioni esposte nei paragrafi 54-57 della sentenza, la Corte procede sulla base del fatto che il caso riguarda gli obblighi positivi dello Stato. Tuttavia, la giurisprudenza della Corte non è sempre coerente su questo punto. In alcuni casi riguardanti il mancato rispetto da parte di uno Stato di una decisione nazionale definitiva e vincolante in materia di diritti di proprietà, la Corte ha valutato l'inazione dello Stato come un'interferenza con la proprietà del richiedente ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione (si veda, ad esempio, Iatridis c. Grecia [GC], n. 31107/96, § 55, CEDU 1999 II; Antonetto c. Italia, n. 15918/89, § 34, 20 luglio 2000; Frascino c. Italia, n. 35227/97, § 32, 11 dicembre 2003; e Paudicio c. Italia, n. 77606/01, § 42, 24 maggio 2007), P?duraru c. Romania, n. 63252/00, § 92, CEDU 2005 XII (estratti), Via?u c. Romania, n. 75951/01, § 59, 9 dicembre 2008. Tuttavia, come la Corte ha affermato in molti casi, i principi da applicare sono gli stessi (cfr., ad esempio, Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], n. 31443/96, § 144, CEDU 2004 V) e, pertanto, se la Corte avesse deciso di valutare il caso come una questione di interferenza o di obblighi negativi, il ragionamento avrebbe potuto essere diverso ma l'esito del caso sarebbe stato lo stesso.


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è venerdì 10/09/2021.