CASO: CASE OF GRAMA AND DÎRUL v. THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA AND RUSSIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF GRAMA AND DÎRUL v. THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA AND RUSSIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: 13,P1-1

NUMERO: 28432/06 and 5665/07
STATO: Moldova
DATA: 15/10/2019
ORGANO: Sezione Seconda


TESTO ORIGINALE

SECOND SECTION
CASE OF GRAMA AND DÎRUL v. THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA AND RUSSIA
(Applications nos. 28432/06 and 5665/07)






JUDGMENT

STRASBOURG
15 October 2019

This judgment is final but it may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Grama and Dîrul v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Second Section), sitting as a Committee composed of:
Julia Laffranque, President,
Ivana Jeli?,
Arnfinn Bårdsen, judges,
and Hasan Bak?rc?, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 24 September 2019,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in two applications (nos. 28432/06 and 5665/07) against the Republic of Moldova and Russia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by two Moldovan nationals, Mr Ion Grama and Mr Mihai Dîrul (“the applicants”), on 28 June 2006 and 16 January 2007 respectively.
2. The applicants were represented by Mr A. Postic? and I. Manole lawyers practising in Chi?in?u. The Moldovan Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr O. Rotari, and the Russian Government were represented by their Agent, Mr G. Matyushkin.
3. On 02 July 2018 the complaints under Article 13 and under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention were communicated to the respondent Governments and the remainder of the applications was declared inadmissible.
4. The Russian Government objected to the examination of the application by a Committee. After having considered the objection, the Court rejects it.
THE FACTS
I. THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The applicants were born in 1955 and 1944, respectively, and live in Corjova and Lunga, the Transdniestrian region of Moldova.
6. They had their cars registered with the authorities of the Republic of Moldova and had Moldovan registration plates on them.
7. On 17 November 2005 and 21 December 2006 the customs office of the self-proclaimed “Moldovan Republic of Transdniestria” (“MRT”) stopped the applicants and seized their cars on the grounds that they had Moldovan plates and had not been registered with the “MRT” customs authorities and no customs duties had been paid for their temporary use on the territory of the “MRT”. The applicants were obliged to pay fines of some 18 United States dollars (“USD”) and some 9 euros (“EUR”) respectively in order to recover their cars.
8. The applicants recovered their cars on 16 December 2005 and 27 December 2006, respectively, after having paid the fines.
9. According to the applicants, they complained to the authorities of Moldova, who did not undertake any action.
10. The Moldovan Government submitted that only the second applicant informed the Moldovan authorities about the seizure of his car. As a result, the Government informed the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe and a criminal investigation was initiated by the Dub?sari District Prosecutor’s Office into that applicant’s complaints.
II. RELEVANT NON-CONVENTION MATERIAL
11. Reports by inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations, the relevant domestic law and practice of the Republic of Moldova, and other pertinent documents were summarised in Mozer v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia ([GC], no. 11138/10, §§ 61-77, 23 February 2016).
THE LAW
I. JOINDER OF APPLICATIONS
12. The Court notes that the subject matter of the applications (nos. 28432/06 and 5665/07) is similar. It is therefore appropriate to join the cases, in application of Rule 42 of the Rules of Court.
II. JURISDICTION
13. The Court must first determine whether the applicants fell within the jurisdiction of the respondent States for the purposes of the matters complained of, within the meaning of Article 1 of the Convention.
A. The parties’ submissions
14. The applicants and the Moldovan Government submitted that both respondent Governments had jurisdiction.
15. For their part, the Russian Government argued that the applicants did not come within their jurisdiction and that, consequently, the applications should be declared inadmissible ratione personae and ratione loci in respect of the Russian Federation. As they did in Mozer (cited above, §§ 92-94), the Russian Government expressed the view that the approach to the issue of jurisdiction taken by the Court in Ila?cu and Others v. Moldova and Russia ([GC], no. 48787/99, ECHR 2004 VII); Catan and Others v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia ([GC], nos. 43370/04, 8252/05 and 18454/06, ECHR 2012; and Ivan?oc and Others v. Moldova and Russia (no. 23687/05, 15 November 2011) was wrong and at variance with public international law.
B. The Court’s assessment
16. The Court recalls that the general principles concerning the issue of jurisdiction under Article 1 of the Convention in respect of acts and facts occurring in the Transdniestrian region of Moldova were set out in Ila?cu and Others (cited above, §§ 311-19); Catan and Others (cited above, §§ 103-07) and, more recently, Mozer (cited above, §§ 97-98).
17. In so far as the Republic of Moldova is concerned, the Court notes that in Ila?cu and Others, Catan and Others and Mozer it found that although Moldova had no effective control over the Transdniestrian region, it followed from the fact that Moldova was the territorial State that persons within that territory fell within its jurisdiction. However, its obligation, under Article 1 of the Convention, to secure to everyone within its jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in the Convention, was limited to that of taking the diplomatic, economic, judicial and other measures that were both in its power and in accordance with international law (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, § 333; Catan and Others, cited above, § 109; and Mozer, cited above, § 100). Moldova’s obligations under Article 1 of the Convention were found to be positive obligations (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, §§ 322 and 330-31; Catan and Others, cited above, §§ 109-10; and Mozer, cited above, § 99).
18. The Court sees no reason to distinguish the present cases from the above-mentioned cases. Besides, it notes that the Moldovan Government do not object to applying a similar approach in the present case. Therefore, it finds that Moldova has jurisdiction for the purposes of Article 1 of the Convention, but that its responsibility for the acts complained of is to be assessed in the light of the above-mentioned positive obligations (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, § 335).
19. In so far as the Russian Federation is concerned, the Court notes that in Ila?cu and Others it found that the Russian Federation contributed both militarily and politically to the creation of a separatist regime in the region of Transdniestria in 1991-1992 (see Ila?cu and Others, cited above, § 382). The Court also found in subsequent cases concerning the Transdniestrian region that up until July 2010, the “MRT” was only able to continue to exist, and to resist Moldovan and international efforts to resolve the conflict and bring democracy and the rule of law to the region, because of Russian military, economic and political support (see Ivan?oc and Others, cited above, §§ 116-20; Catan and Others, cited above, §§ 121 22; and Mozer, cited above, §§ 108 and 110). The Court concluded in Mozer that the “MRT”‘s high level of dependency on Russian support provided a strong indication that the Russian Federation continued to exercise effective control and a decisive influence over the Transdniestrian authorities and that, therefore, the applicants fell within that State’s jurisdiction under Article 1 of the Convention (see Mozer, cited above, §§ 110-11).
20. The Court sees no grounds on which to distinguish the present case from Ila?cu and Others, Ivan?oc and Others, Catan and Others and Mozer (all cited above).
21. It follows that the applicants in the present cases fell within the jurisdiction of the Russian Federation under Article 1 of the Convention. Consequently, the Court dismisses the Russian Government’s objections ratione personae and ratione loci.
22. The Court will hereafter determine whether there has been any violation of the applicants’ rights under the Convention such as to engage the responsibility of either respondent State (see Mozer, cited above, § 112).
III. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
23. The applicants complained that the seizure of their cars and the imposition of fines on them had constituted an unlawful interference with their right to property, which is guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 reads as follows:
Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
A. Admissibility
24. The Moldovan Government submitted that the applicants had not exhausted the remedies available to them in Moldova. They argued therefore that the parts of the applications concerning Moldova should be declared inadmissible for failure to exhaust domestic remedies in Moldova.
25. The Court notes that the same objection was raised by the Moldovan Government and dismissed by the Court in Mozer (cited above, §§ 115 121). It sees no grounds on which to distinguish the present case from Mozer (cited above) and rejects the Moldovan Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies on the same grounds as in that case.
26. The Russian Government submitted that the applications should be rejected for failure to exhaust domestic remedies before either the “MRT” courts, Moldovan courts or Russian courts. The Court recalls that it has already examined and dismissed a similar objection in the cases of Vardanean v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia (no. 22200/10, §§ 27 and 31, 30 May 2017) and Bobeico and Others v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia (no. 30003/04, § 39, 23 October 2018). Since no new arguments have been adduced by the Russian Government, the Court sees no reason to reach a different conclusion in this case. It follows that the Russian Government’s objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies must also be dismissed.
27. The Court notes that this complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention, and that it is not inadmissible on any other ground. The Court therefore declares it admissible.
B. Merits
28. The applicants complained that the seizure of their cars and the imposition of fines on them had violated their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
29. The Moldovan Government submitted that the interference with the applicants’ rights had not been lawful because it had not been provided for by the domestic laws of the Republic of Moldova.
30. The Russian Government did not submit any specific observations in this regard. Their position was that they did not have “jurisdiction” in the territory of the “MRT” and that they were therefore not in a position to make any observations on the merits of the case.
31. The Court notes that the parties did not dispute the fact that the applicants’ cars constituted possessions for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. It further notes that it is similarly undisputed that the cars were seized by the “MRT” authorities and that the applicants were forced to pay fines in order to recover them. In these circumstances, the Court finds that there was a clear interference with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions for the purposes of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. According to the Court’s case-law (see among other authorities, Bosphorus Hava Yollar? Turizm ve Ticaret Anonim ?irketi v. Ireland [GC], no. 45036/98, § 142, ECHR 2005 VI), such interference constitutes a measure of control of the use of property which falls to be examined under the second paragraph of that Article. For a measure constituting control of use to be justified, it must be lawful (see Katsaros v. Greece, no. 51473/99, § 43, 6 June 2002; Herrmann v. Germany [GC], no. 9300/07, § 74, 26 June 2012; Centro Europa 7 S.R.L. and Di Stefano v. Italy [GC], no. 38433/09, § 187, ECHR 2012) and “in accordance with the general interest”. The measure must also be proportionate to the aim pursued; however, it is only necessary to examine the proportionality of an interference once its lawfulness has been established (see Katsaros, cited above, § 43).
32. In so far as the lawfulness of the interference is concerned, no elements in the present case allow the Court to consider that there was a legal basis for interfering with the rights of the applicants guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Turturica and Casian v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia, nos. 28648/06 and 18832/07, § 49, 30 August 2016; and P?dure? v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia, no. 26626/11, § 29, 9 May 2017).
33. In those circumstances, the Court concludes that the interference was not lawful under domestic law. Accordingly, there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
34. The Court must next determine whether the Republic of Moldova fulfilled its positive obligation to take appropriate and sufficient measures to secure the applicants’ rights (see paragraph 17 above). In Mozer, the Court held that Moldova’s positive obligations related both to measures needed to re-establish its control over the Transdniestrian territory, as an expression of its jurisdiction, and to measures to ensure respect for individual applicants’ rights (see Mozer, cited above, § 151).
35. As regards the first aspect of Moldova’s obligations, to re-establish control, the Court found in Mozer that, from the onset of the hostilities in 1991-1992 until July 2010 Moldova had taken all the measures in its power (see Mozer, cited above, § 152). Since the events complained of in the present case took place before the latter date, the Court sees no reason to reach a different conclusion (ibidem).
36. Turning to the second part of the positive obligations, namely to ensure respect for the applicants’ rights, the Court notes that the first applicant adduced no evidence to the effect that he had informed the Moldovan authorities of his problem. In such circumstances, the non-involvement of the Moldovan authorities in the case of the applicant cannot be held against them. In so far as the second applicant is concerned, the Court notes that the Moldovan authorities made efforts to secure his rights, namely a criminal investigation was initiated in respect of the seizure of his car and the OSCE was informed about the matter.
37. In the light of the foregoing, the Court concludes that the Republic of Moldova did not fail to fulfil its positive obligations in respect of the applicants. There has therefore been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Republic of Moldova.
38. In so far as the responsibility of the Russian Federation is concerned, the Court has established that Russia exercised effective control over the “MRT” during the period in question (see paragraphs 19-20 above). In the light of this conclusion, and in accordance with its case-law, it is not necessary to determine whether or not Russia exercised detailed control over the policies and actions of the subordinate local administration (see Mozer, cited above, § 157). By virtue of its continued military, economic and political support for the “MRT”, which could not otherwise survive, Russia’s responsibility under the Convention is engaged as regards the violation of the applicants’ rights.
39. In conclusion, and after having found that the applicants’ rights guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention have been breached (see paragraph 33 above), the Court holds that there has been a violation of that provision by the Russian Federation.
IV. ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION TAKEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
40. The applicants further complained that they had no effective remedy in respect of their complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. They relied on Article 13 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”
A. Admissibility
41. The Court notes that the complaint under Article 13 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that, in the light of its findings above (see paragraphs 24-26) it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.
B. Merits
42. The applicants submitted that they had had no means of asserting their rights in the face of the actions of the “MRT” authorities.
43. The respondent Governments did not make any submissions on the merits of this complaint.
44. The Court reiterates that Article 13 of the Convention guarantees the availability at national level of a remedy by which to complain of a breach of the Convention rights and freedoms. Therefore, although Contracting States are afforded some discretion as to the manner in which they conform to their obligations under this provision, there must be a domestic remedy allowing the competent national authority both to deal with the substance of the relevant Convention complaint and to grant appropriate relief. The scope of the obligation under Article 13 of the Convention varies depending on the nature of the applicant’s complaint under the Convention, but the remedy must in any event be “effective” in practice as well as in law, in particular in the sense that its exercise must not be unjustifiably hindered by the acts or omissions of the authorities of the State (Mozer, cited above, § 207; and Khlaifia and Others v. Italy [GC], no. 16483/12, § 268, 15 December 2016; and De Tommaso v. Italy [GC], no. 43395/09, § 179, 23 February 2017). However, Article 13 of the Convention requires that a remedy be available in domestic law only in respect of grievances which can be regarded as “arguable” in terms of the Convention (Mozer, cited above, § 207; and De Tommaso, cited above, § 180).
45. The Court observes that the applicants’ complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention was arguable.
46. In so far as the applicants complained against Moldova, the Court notes that the Moldovan Government did not point to the existence of any effective remedy under Moldovan domestic law.
47. In so far as the applicants complained against Russia, the Court also notes that there is no indication in the file, and the Russian Government have not claimed, that any effective remedies were available to the applicants in the “MRT” in respect of the above-mentioned complaints.
48. The Court therefore concludes that the applicants did not have an effective remedy in respect of their complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention. Consequently, the Court must decide whether any violation of Article 13 of the Convention can be attributed to either of the respondent States.
49. In so far as the responsibility of Moldova is concerned, the Court recalls that it found that the “remedies” which this State must offer to applicants consisted of enabling them to inform the Moldovan authorities of the details of their situation and to be kept informed of the various legal and diplomatic actions taken by these authorities (Mozer, cited above, § 214). In Mozer, it concluded among other things that Moldova had made procedures available to the applicant commensurate with its limited ability to protect the applicant’s rights and that it had thus fulfilled its positive obligations (ibid., § 216). In the present case, the Court sees no reason to reach a different conclusion (see Mangîr and Others v. the Republic of Moldova and Russia, no. 50157/06, § 71, 17 July 2018). Accordingly, it finds that there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention by Moldova.
50. In so far as the responsibility of the Russian Federation is concerned, for the same reasons as those given in respect of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and in the absence of any submission by the Russian Government as to any remedies available to the applicants, the Court concludes that there has been a violation by the Russian Federation of Article 13 of the Convention, taken in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention (see Mozer, cited above, § 218; and Mangîr and Others, cited above, § 72).
V. APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
51. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
A. Pecuniary damage
52. The applicants claimed 5 and 8 euros (EUR), respectively, in respect of pecuniary damage, representing the fine paid to the “MRT” authorities as calculated at the conversion rate on the date of the claim.
53. The Governments asked the Court to dismiss the applicants’ claims.
54. The Court has not found any violation of the Convention by Moldova in the present case. Accordingly, no award of compensation is to be made with regard to this respondent State.
55. The Court further notes that the Russian Government did not challenge the value of the fines paid by the applicants. The Court therefore considers it reasonable to award the applicants’ claim in full.
B. Non-pecuniary damage
56. The applicants also claimed EUR 6,000 each in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
57. The Governments contended that the claims were excessive and asked the Court to dismiss them.
58. For the reasons given above (see paragraph 54), no award is to be made with regard to the Republic of Moldova.
59. Having regard to its finding of a violation of the applicants’ rights by the Russian Federation, the Court considers that an award in respect of non pecuniary damage is justified in this case. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards EUR 3,000 to each applicant.
C. Costs and expenses
60. The applicants also claimed EUR 1,800 each for costs and expenses.
61. The respondent Governments considered that the sums claimed were excessive and asked the Court to dismiss them.
62. For the reasons given above (see paragraph 54), no award is to be made with regard to the Republic of Moldova.
63. The Court reiterates that in order for costs and expenses to be included in an award under Article 41 of the Convention, it must be established that they were actually and necessarily incurred and were reasonable as to quantum (see, for example, Mozer, cited above, § 240). Having regard to all the relevant factors and to Rule 60 § 2 of the Rules of Court, the Court awards the amounts claimed in full.
D. Default interest
64. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT
1. Decides to join the applications;
2. Declares the applications admissible in respect of the Republic of Moldova;
3. Declares the applications admissible in respect of the Russian Federation;
4. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Republic of Moldova;
5. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention by the Russian Federation;
6. Holds that there has been no violation of Article 13 of the Convention by the Republic of Moldova;
7. Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention by the Russian Federation;
8. Holds
(a) that the Russian Federation is to pay the applicants, within three months, the following amounts:
(i) EUR 5 (five euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage, to the first applicant;
(ii) EUR 8 (eight euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of pecuniary damage, to the second applicant;
(iii) EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to the first applicant;
(iv) EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage, to the second applicant;
(v) EUR 1,800 (one thousand eight hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the first applicant, in respect of costs and expenses;
(vi) EUR 1,800 (one thousand eight hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the second applicant, in respect of costs and expenses.
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
9. Dismisses the remainder of the applicants claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 15 October 2019, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Hasan Bak?rc? Julia Laffranque
Deputy Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

CASE OF GRAMA AND DÎRUL v. THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA AND RUSSIA
(Applications nos. 28432/06 and 5665/07)
JUDGMENT
STRASBOURG
15 October 2019
Nel caso di Grama e Dîrul contro Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia,
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (seconda sezione), riunita in un comitato composto da:
Julia Laffranque, presidente,
Ivana Jeli?,
Arnfinn Bårdsen, giudici,
e Hasan Bak?rc?, cancelliere aggiunto presso la sezione,
Deliberata in privato il 24 settembre 2019,
Emette la seguente sentenza, adottata a tale data:
PROCEDURA
1. Il caso ha avuto origine in due ricorsi (nn. 28432/06 e 5665/07) contro la Repubblica di Moldavia e la Russia presentate alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la protezione dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione”) di due cittadini moldovi, Ion Grama e Mihai Dîrul ("i richiedenti"), rispettivamente il 28 giugno 2006 e il 16 gennaio 2007.
2. I ricorrenti erano rappresentati dai sigg. A. Postic? e I. Manole che esercitano a Chi?in?u. Il governo moldavo ("il governo") era rappresentato dal loro agente, il sig. O. Rotari, e il governo russo era rappresentato dal loro agente, il sig. G. Matyushkin.
3. Il 2 luglio 2018 le denunce ai sensi dell'articolo 13 e dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione sono state comunicate ai Governi convenuti e il resto delle domande è stato dichiarato irricevibile.
4. Il governo russo si è opposto all'esame della domanda da parte di un comitato. Dopo aver esaminato l'obiezione, la Corte la respinge
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
5. I richiedenti nacquero rispettivamente nel 1955 e nel 1944 e vivono a Corjova e Lunga, la regione transnistrale della Moldavia.
6. Avevano le loro auto immatricolate presso le autorità della Repubblica di Moldavia e avevano targhe moldave su di esse.
7. Il 17 novembre 2005 e il 21 dicembre 2006 l'ufficio doganale dell'autoproclamata "Repubblica moldova di Transdniestria" ("MRT") fermò i richiedenti e sequestrò le loro auto perché avevano targhe moldave e non erano state registrate con le autorità doganali "MRT" e nessun dazio doganale era stato pagato per il loro uso temporaneo sul territorio della "MRT". I richiedenti furono obbligati a pagare multe di circa 18 dollari statunitensi ("USD") e circa 9 euro ("EUR"), rispettivamente, al fine di recuperare le loro auto.
8. I richiedenti hanno recuperato le loro automobili rispettivamente il 16 dicembre 2005 e il 27 dicembre 2006, dopo aver pagato le ammende.
9. I ricorrenti si sono lamentati con le autorità della Moldavia, che non hanno intrapreso alcuna azione.
10. Il governo moldavo ha sostenuto che solo il secondo richiedente ha informato le autorità moldave del sequestro della sua auto. Di conseguenza, il governo ha informato l'Organizzazione per la sicurezza e la cooperazione in Europa e un'indagine penale è stata avviata dalla Procura del distretto di Dub?sari in merito alle denunce del richiedente.
II. MATERIALE RILEVANTE NON-CONVENZIONALE
11. Rapporti di organizzazioni intergovernative e non governative, le leggi e le prassi interne pertinenti della Repubblica di Moldavia e altri documenti pertinenti sono stati riassunti in Mozer c. Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia ([GC], n. 11138 / 10, §§ 61-77, 23 febbraio 2016).
LA LEGGE
I. RIUNIONE DELLE FATTISPECIE
12. La Corte nota che l'oggetto delle domande (nn. 28432/06 e 5665/07) è simile. È pertanto opportuno riunire le cause, in applicazione dell'articolo 42 del regolamento della Corte.
II. GIURISDIZIONE
13. La Corte deve in primo luogo determinare se i richiedenti rientrano nella giurisdizione degli Stati convenuti ai fini delle materie contestate, ai sensi dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione.
A. Argomenti delle parti
14. I richiedenti e il governo moldavo hanno sostenuto che entrambi i governi convenuti erano competenti.
15. Da parte loro, il governo russo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non rientravano nella loro giurisdizione e che, di conseguenza, le domande dovevano essere dichiarate inammissibili ratione personae e ratione loci nei confronti della Federazione russa. Come hanno fatto a Mozer (citata sopra, §§ 92-94), il governo russo ha espresso l'opinione che l'approccio alla questione della giurisdizione adottato dalla Corte in Ila?cu e a. Contro Moldavia e Russia ([GC], n. 48787/99, CEDU 2004 VII); Catan e a. Contro Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia ([GC], n. 43370/04, 8252/05 e 18454/06, CEDU 2012; e Ivan?oc e a. Contro Moldavia e Russia (n. 23687/05, 15 Novembre 2011) era sbagliato e in contrasto con il diritto internazionale pubblico.
B. La valutazione della Corte
16. La Corte ricorda che i principi generali riguardanti la questione della competenza giurisdizionale ai sensi dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione in relazione ad atti e fatti che si verificano nella regione transnistrale della Moldavia sono stati stabiliti in Ila?cu e a. (Citata sopra, §§ 311-19); Catan e altri (citata sopra, §§ 103-07) e, più recentemente, Mozer (citata sopra, §§ 97-98).
17. Per quanto riguarda la Repubblica della Moldavia, la Corte nota che a Ila?cu e a., Catan e a. E Mozer ha riscontrato che, sebbene la Moldavia non avesse un controllo effettivo sulla regione Transnistria, il fatto che la Moldavia era la Stato territoriale in base al quale le persone all'interno di quel territorio erano di sua competenza. Tuttavia, il suo obbligo, ai sensi dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione, di garantire a tutti i soggetti all'interno della propria giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definiti nella Convenzione, era limitato a quello di prendere le misure diplomatiche, economiche, giudiziarie e di altro tipo che erano al suo potere e in conformità con il diritto internazionale (vedere Ila?cu e a., cit. sopra, § 333; Catan e a., citata sopra, § 109; e Mozer, citata sopra, § 100). Gli obblighi della Moldavia ai sensi dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione sono risultati positivi (vedi Ila?cu e a., Citati sopra, §§ 322 e 330-31; Catan e a., Citata sopra, §§ 109-10; e Mozer, citata sopra, § 99).
18. La Corte non vede alcun motivo per distinguere le presenti cause da quelle sopra menzionate. Inoltre, osserva che il governo moldavo non si oppone all'applicazione di un approccio simile nel caso di specie. Pertanto, rileva che la Moldavia è competente ai fini dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione, ma che la sua responsabilità per gli atti denunciati deve essere valutata alla luce dei suddetti obblighi positivi (cfr. Ila?cu e a., Citati sopra, § 335).
19. Per quanto riguarda la Federazione Russa, la Corte nota che a Ila?cu e a. Ha riscontrato che la Federazione Russa ha contribuito sia militarmente che politicamente alla creazione di un regime separatista nella regione della Transnistria nel 1991-1992 (vedi Ila?cu e a., citata sopra, § 382). La Corte ha anche riscontrato in casi successivi riguardanti la regione della Transnistria che fino a luglio 2010, la "MRT" poteva solo continuare a esistere e resistere agli sforzi moldovi e internazionali per risolvere il conflitto e portare la democrazia e lo stato di diritto al regione, a causa del sostegno militare, economico e politico russo (vedi Ivan?oc e a., citata sopra, §§ 116-20; Catan e a., citata sopra, §§ 121 22; e Mozer, citata sopra, §§ 108 e 110). La Corte ha concluso a Mozer che l'alto livello di dipendenza della "MRT" dal sostegno russo ha fornito una forte indicazione del fatto che la Federazione russa ha continuato a esercitare un controllo efficace e un'influenza decisiva sulle autorità della Transnistria e che, pertanto, le ricorrenti rientravano in tale Competenza statale ai sensi dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione (vedi Mozer, citata sopra, §§ 110-11).
20. La Corte non vede alcun motivo per distinguere la presente causa da Ila?cu e a., Ivan?oc e a., Catan e a. E Mozer (tutti citati sopra).
21. Ne consegue che i ricorrenti nelle presenti cause rientrarono nella giurisdizione della Federazione Russa ai sensi dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge le obiezioni del governo russo ratione personae e ratione loci.
22. La Corte determinerà in seguito se vi sia stata alcuna violazione dei diritti dei richiedenti ai sensi della Convenzione tale da assumere la responsabilità di entrambi gli Stati convenuti (vedere Mozer, citata sopra, § 112).
III. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL 'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
23. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il sequestro delle loro automobili e l'imposizione di multe su di loro avevano costituito un'interferenza illegale con il loro diritto alla proprietà, che è garantito dall'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. L'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 recita come segue:
Articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni precedenti non devono tuttavia in alcun modo pregiudicare il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni. ”
A. Sulla ricevibilità
24. Il governo moldavo ha sostenuto che i richiedenti non avevano esaurito i rimedi a loro disposizione in Moldavia. Sostenevano pertanto che le parti delle domande relative alla Moldavia dovevano essere dichiarate irricevibili per mancato esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne in Moldavia.
25. La Corte nota che la stessa obiezione è stata sollevata dal governo moldavo e respinta dalla Corte in Mozer (citata sopra, §§ 115 121). Non vede alcun motivo per distinguere la presente causa da Mozer (citata sopra) e respinge l'eccezione del governo moldavo di non esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali per gli stessi motivi di quel caso.
26. Il governo russo rappresentò che le domande dovevano essere respinte per mancato esaurimento delle vie di ricorso nazionali dinanzi ai tribunali "MRT", tribunali moldavi o tribunali russi. La Corte ricorda di aver già esaminato e respinto un'obiezione simile nei casi di Vardanean contro la Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia (n. 22200/10, §§ 27 e 31, 30 maggio 2017) e Bobeico e a. Contro il Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia (n. 30003/04, § 39, 23 ottobre 2018). Poiché il governo russo non ha avanzato nuovi argomenti, la Corte non vede alcun motivo per giungere a una conclusione diversa nel caso di specie. Ne consegue che anche l'eccezione del governo russo di non esaurimento delle vie di ricorso interne deve essere respinta.
27. La Corte nota che questa azione di reclamo non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell 'Articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione, e che non è inammissibile per nessun altro motivo. La Corte lo dichiara quindi ricevibile.
B. Nel merito
28. I richiedenti si lamentarono che il sequestro delle loro automobili e l'imposizione di multe su di loro avevano violato il loro diritto al godimento pacifico dei loro possedimenti sotto l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
29. Il governo moldavo ha sostenuto che l'interferenza con i diritti dei ricorrenti non era stata lecita perché non era stata prevista dalle leggi nazionali della Repubblica di Moldavia.
30. Il governo russo non ha presentato osservazioni specifiche al riguardo. La loro posizione era che non avevano "giurisdizione" nel territorio della "MRT" e che quindi non erano in grado di fare alcuna osservazione sul merito del caso.
31. La Corte nota che le parti non hanno contestato il fatto che le auto dei richiedenti costituivano proprietà ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Nota inoltre che è altrettanto indiscusso che le auto sono state sequestrate dalle autorità "MRT" e che i richiedenti sono stati costretti a pagare multe per recuperarle. In queste circostanze, la Corte constata che c'era una chiara interferenza con il diritto dei richiedenti al godimento pacifico dei loro possedimenti ai fini dell’ Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte (vedi tra le altre autorità, Bosphorus Hava Yollar? Turizm ve Ticaret Anonim ?irketi contro Ireland [GC], n. 45036/98, § 142, ECHR 2005 VI), tale interferenza costituisce una misura di controllo di l'uso della proprietà che deve essere esaminata ai sensi del secondo paragrafo di detto articolo. Perché una misura che costituisce controllo dell'uso sia giustificata, deve essere lecita (vedi Katsaros c. Grecia, n. 51473/99, § 43, 6 giugno 2002; Herrmann c. Germania [GC], n. 9300/07, § 74, 26 giugno 2012; Centro Europa 7 SRL e Di Stefano c. Italia [GC], n. 38433/09, § 187, CEDU 2012) e "in conformità con l'interesse generale". La misura deve inoltre essere proporzionata all'obiettivo perseguito; tuttavia, è necessario esaminare la proporzionalità di un'interferenza solo dopo averne accertato la liceità (si veda Katsaros, sopra citato, § 43).
32. Per quanto riguarda la liceità dell'interferenza, nessun elemento nella presente causa consente alla Corte di ritenere che esistesse una base giuridica per interferire con i diritti dei richiedenti garantiti dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 al Convenzione (vedi Turturica e Casian contro Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia, nn. 28648/06 e 18832/07, § 49, 30 agosto 2016; e P?dure? contro Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia, n. 26626/11, § 29, 9 maggio 2017).
33. In tali circostanze, la Corte conclude che l'interferenza non era lecita secondo il diritto interno. Di conseguenza, c'è stata una violazione dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione.
34. La Corte deve poi determinare se la Repubblica di Moldavia ha adempiuto al suo obbligo positivo di adottare misure adeguate e sufficienti per garantire i diritti dei richiedenti (vedere paragrafo 17 sopra). Nella sentenza Mozer, la Corte ha dichiarato che gli obblighi positivi della Moldavia riguardavano sia le misure necessarie per ristabilire il suo controllo sul territorio transnistrale, come espressione della sua giurisdizione, sia le misure per garantire il rispetto dei diritti dei singoli richiedenti (si veda Mozer, citata sopra, § 151).
35. Per quanto riguarda il primo aspetto degli obblighi della Moldavia, per ristabilire il controllo, la Corte ha constatato a Mozer che, dall'inizio delle ostilità nel 1991-1992 fino a luglio 2010, la Moldavia aveva adottato tutte le misure in suo potere (cfr. Mozer, sopra citato, § 152). Poiché gli eventi denunciati nella presente causa hanno avuto luogo prima di quest'ultima data, la Corte non vede alcun motivo per giungere a una conclusione diversa (ibidem).
36. Passando alla seconda parte degli obblighi positivi, vale a dire garantire il rispetto dei diritti dei ricorrenti, la Corte nota che il primo richiedente non ha fornito prove del fatto di aver informato le autorità moldave del suo problema. In tali circostanze, il mancato coinvolgimento delle autorità moldave nel caso del richiedente non può essere ritenuto contro di loro. Per quanto riguarda il secondo richiedente, la Corte nota che le autorità moldave hanno compiuto sforzi per garantire i suoi diritti, in particolare è stata avviata un'indagine penale in merito al sequestro della sua auto e l'OSCE è stata informata della questione.
37. Alla luce di quanto precede, la Corte conclude che la Repubblica di Moldavia non è venuta meno ai suoi obblighi positivi nei confronti delle ricorrenti. Non vi è quindi stata violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione da parte della Repubblica di Moldavia.
38. Per quanto riguarda la responsabilità della Federazione Russa, la Corte ha stabilito che la Russia ha esercitato un controllo effettivo sull'MRT durante il periodo in questione (vedere paragrafi 19-20 sopra). Alla luce di questa conclusione, e in conformità con la sua giurisprudenza, non è necessario determinare se la Russia abbia o meno esercitato un controllo dettagliato sulle politiche e sulle azioni dell'amministrazione locale subordinata (vedere Mozer, citata sopra, § 157). In virtù del suo continuo sostegno militare, economico e politico alla "MRT", che altrimenti non potrebbe sopravvivere, la responsabilità della Russia ai sensi della Convenzione è impegnata per quanto riguarda la violazione dei diritti dei richiedenti.
39. In conclusione, e dopo aver constatato che i diritti dei richiedenti garantiti dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione sono stati violati (si veda il precedente paragrafo 33), la Corte afferma che c'è stata una violazione di tale disposizione da parte del Federazione Russa.
IV. VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL'ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE PRESO IN CONGIUNZIONE CON L'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
40. I richiedenti inoltre lamentarono che non avevano rimedio effettivo riguardo alla loro denuncia sotto l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Hanno invocato l'articolo 13 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:
"Chiunque abbia violato i diritti e le libertà enunciati nella [della] Convenzione deve disporre di un ricorso effettivo dinanzi a un'autorità nazionale, nonostante la violazione sia stata commessa da persone che agiscono a titolo ufficiale."
A. Sulla ricevibilità
41. La Corte nota che la denuncia sotto l'Articolo 13 della Convenzione, presa in congiunzione con l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione, non è manifestamente mal-fondata all'interno del significato dell 'Articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione. Nota inoltre che, alla luce delle conclusioni di cui sopra (cfr. Paragrafi 24-26), non è inammissibile per altri motivi. Deve quindi essere dichiarato ricevibile.
B. Nel merito
42. I richiedenti presentarono che non avevano avuto modo di far valere i loro diritti di fronte alle azioni delle autorità "MRT".
43. I Governi convenuti non hanno presentato osservazioni in merito alla presente denuncia.
44. La Corte ribadisce che l'articolo 13 della Convenzione garantisce la disponibilità a livello nazionale di un rimedio mediante il quale lamentarsi di una violazione dei diritti e delle libertà della Convenzione. Pertanto, sebbene gli Stati contraenti dispongano di un certo margine di discrezionalità per quanto riguarda il modo in cui si conformano ai loro obblighi ai sensi della presente disposizione, deve esistere un rimedio interno che consenta all'autorità nazionale competente sia di trattare la sostanza della denuncia della Convenzione pertinente sia di concedere sollievo. La portata dell'obbligo ai sensi dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione varia a seconda della natura della denuncia del richiedente ai sensi della Convenzione, ma il rimedio deve in ogni caso essere "efficace" sia nella pratica che nella legge, in particolare nel senso che l'esercizio non deve essere ostacolato ingiustificatamente dagli atti o dalle omissioni delle autorità dello Stato (Mozer, citata sopra, § 207; e Khlaifia e a. c. Italia [GC], n. 16483/12, § 268, 15 dicembre 2016; e De Tommaso c. Italia [GC], n. 43395/09, § 179, 23 febbraio 2017). Tuttavia, l'articolo 13 della Convenzione richiede che un rimedio sia disponibile nel diritto interno solo per i reclami che possono essere considerati "discutibili" in termini di Convenzione (Mozer, citata sopra, § 207; e De Tommaso, citata sopra, § 180).
45. La Corte osserva che il reclamo dei richiedenti sotto l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione era discutibile.
46. Nella parte in cui i ricorrenti si sono lamentati contro la Moldavia, la Corte nota che il governo moldavo non ha indicato l'esistenza di alcun rimedio efficace secondo il diritto nazionale moldavo.
47. Nella misura in cui i ricorrenti si sono lamentati contro la Russia, la Corte nota anche che non vi è alcuna indicazione nel fascicolo, e il governo russo non ha sostenuto, che erano disponibili rimedi efficaci per i richiedenti nella "MRT" in relazione a i suddetti reclami.
48. La Corte conclude pertanto che i richiedenti non avevano un rimedio efficace riguardo alla loro azione di reclamo sotto l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione. Di conseguenza, la Corte deve decidere se una violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione possa essere attribuita a uno degli Stati convenuti.
49. Per quanto riguarda la responsabilità della Moldavia, la Corte ricorda che ha constatato che i "rimedi" che questo Stato deve offrire ai richiedenti consistevano nel consentire loro di informare le autorità moldave dei dettagli della loro situazione e di essere tenuti informato delle varie azioni legali e diplomatiche intraprese da queste autorità (Mozer, citata sopra, § 214). In Mozer, ha concluso tra l'altro che la Moldavia aveva reso le procedure disponibili per il richiedente commisurate alla sua limitata capacità di proteggere i diritti del richiedente e che aveva quindi adempiuto ai suoi obblighi positivi (ibid., § 216). Nella fattispecie, la Corte non vede alcun motivo per giungere a una conclusione diversa (vedi Mangîr e a. Contro Repubblica di Moldavia e Russia, n. 50157/06, § 71, 17 luglio 2018). Di conseguenza, rileva che la Moldavia non ha violato l'articolo 13 della Convenzione.
50. Per quanto riguarda la responsabilità della Federazione Russa, per gli stessi motivi indicati in relazione alla denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione e in assenza di qualsiasi richiesta del governo russo come a qualsiasi rimedio a disposizione dei richiedenti, la Corte conclude che c'è stata una violazione da parte della Federazione Russa dell'Articolo 13 della Convenzione, presa in combinato disposto con l'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione (vedi Mozer, citata sopra, § 218; e Mangîr e a., Citata sopra, § 72).
V. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
51. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede quanto segue:
"Se la Corte constata che c'è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli e se la legge interna dell'Alta Parte Contraente in questione consente di effettuare solo una riparazione parziale, la Corte deve, se necessario, offrire la giusta soddisfazione al parte lesa."
A. Danno pecuniario
52. I ricorrenti hanno chiesto rispettivamente 5 e 8 euro (EUR) in relazione al danno patrimoniale, che rappresentano l'ammenda pagata alle autorità "MRT" come calcolato al tasso di conversione alla data del reclamo.
53. I governi hanno chiesto alla Corte di respingere le richieste dei ricorrenti.
54. La Corte non ha riscontrato alcuna violazione della Convenzione da parte della Moldavia nella presente causa. Di conseguenza, non deve essere concesso alcun indennizzo nei confronti di questo Stato convenuto.
55. La Corte nota inoltre che il governo russo non ha contestato il valore delle ammende pagate dai richiedenti. Pertanto, la Corte ritiene ragionevole assegnare integralmente la domanda dei ricorrenti.
B. Danni non patrimoniali
56. I ricorrenti hanno inoltre richiesto EUR 6.000 ciascuno per danni non patrimoniali.
57. I governi hanno sostenuto che le rivendicazioni erano eccessive e hanno chiesto alla Corte di respingerle.
58. Per i motivi sopra indicati (cfr. Paragrafo 54), non è necessario assegnare alcun premio nei confronti della Repubblica di Moldavia.
59. Tenuto conto della sua constatazione di una violazione dei diritti dei ricorrenti da parte della Federazione Russa, la Corte ritiene che in questo caso sia giustificato un riconoscimento a titolo di danno morale. Effettuando la propria valutazione su una base equa, la Corte assegna 3.000 EUR a ciascun richiedente.
C. Costi e spese
60. I ricorrenti hanno inoltre richiesto EUR 1.800 ciascuno per costi e spese.
61. I governi convenuti hanno ritenuto che le somme richieste fossero eccessive e hanno chiesto alla Corte di respingerle.
62. Per i motivi sopra indicati (cfr. Paragrafo 54), non è necessario assegnare alcun premio nei confronti della Repubblica di Moldavia.
63. La Corte ribadisce che, affinché i costi e le spese siano inclusi in un premio ai sensi dell'articolo 41 della Convenzione, si deve stabilire che sono stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e ragionevoli riguardo al quantum (si veda, ad esempio, Mozer, sopra citato, § 240). Tenuto conto di tutti i fattori rilevanti e dell'articolo 60 § 2 del Regolamento della Corte, la Corte assegna gli importi richiesti integralmente.
D. Interesse di mora
64. La Corte ritiene appropriato che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale dovrebbero essere aggiunti tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE
1. decide di aderire alle domande;
2. Dichiara le domande ammissibili nei confronti della Repubblica di Moldavia;
3. Dichiara le domande ammissibili nei confronti della Federazione Russa;
4. Sostiene che non vi è stata violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione da parte della Repubblica di Moldavia;
5. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell'Articolo 1 del Protocollo N.ro 1 alla Convenzione da parte della Federazione Russa;
6. Sostiene che la Repubblica di Moldavia non ha violato l'articolo 13 della Convenzione;
7. Sostiene che c'è stata una violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione da parte della Federazione Russa;
8. Dichiara
a) che la Federazione russa paghi ai richiedenti, entro tre mesi, i seguenti importi:
(i) EUR 5 (cinque euro), più eventuali tasse che possono essere addebitabili, in relazione al danno patrimoniale, al primo richiedente;
(ii) EUR 8 (otto euro), più eventuali tasse che possono essere addebitabili, in relazione al danno patrimoniale, al secondo richiedente;
(iii) 3.000 EUR (tremila euro), più eventuali tasse che possono essere addebitabili, in relazione al danno morale, al primo richiedente;
(iv) 3.000 EUR (tremila euro), più eventuali tasse che possono essere addebitabili, in relazione al danno morale, al secondo richiedente;
(v) 1.800 EUR (mille ottocento euro), più eventuali tasse che possono essere addebitate al primo richiedente, in relazione a costi
e spese;
(vi) 1.800 EUR (mille ottocento euro), più eventuali tasse che possono essere addebitabili al secondo richiedente, in relazione a costi e spese.
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi summenzionati fino al regolamento siano pagabili interessi semplici sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea durante il periodo di default più tre punti percentuali;
9. Respinge il resto delle richieste dei richiedenti per la soddisfazione equa.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 15 ottobre 2019, facendo seguito all'Articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 dell'Ordinamento di Corte.
Hasan Bak?rc? Julia Laffranque
Vice cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 23/05/2022.