Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF ZAMMIT AND VASSALLO v. MALTA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: 01,P1-1

NUMERO: 43675/16/2019
STATO: Malta
DATA: 28/05/2019
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

THIRD SECTION











CASE OF ZAMMIT AND VASSALLO v. MALTA



(Application no. 43675/16)























JUDGMENT







STRASBOURG



28 May 2019





FINAL



28/08/2019



This judgment has become final under Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.


In the case of Zammit and Vassallo v. Malta,

The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:

Helen Keller, President,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Dmitry Dedov,
Branko Lubarda,
Alena Polá?ková,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerström, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Section Registrar,

Having deliberated in private on 7 May 2019,

Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

PROCEDURE

1. The case originated in an application (no. 43675/16) against the Republic of Malta lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by seven Maltese nationals (see Annex), (“the applicants”), on 20 July 2016.

2. The applicants were represented by Dr A. Sciberras, a lawyer practising in Valletta. The Maltese Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Dr P. Grech, Attorney General.

3. The applicants alleged that they had suffered a de facto expropriation, in that their property had been demolished abusively, and that a yearly recognition rent of 158.40 euros (EUR) and an award of non?pecuniary damage of EUR 1,500 had not redressed the breach they suffered. Moreover, they had been deprived of their property and in thirty years had not yet received any compensation while they had to disburse costs in litigation.

4. On 21 March 2018 notice of the application was given to the Government.

THE FACTS

THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
5. The details of the applicants are available in the Annex.

Background to the case
6. The applicants are owners of a property situated at 8, Flat 1, Old Prison Street, Senglea, (hereinafter “the property”) which they inherited from their ancestors. The property had been conceded to third parties by a title of temporary emphyteusis for a period of seventeen years, at an established ground rent of 40 Maltese liras (MTL - approximately EUR 98) per year, which was to expire in 1990.

7. On 1 September 1986 the Government issued a requisition order on the property. In October 1988 the Government derequisitioned the property and returned the keys to the applicants.

8. On 15 April 1989 the Commissioner of Land took over (occupied) the property.

9. In spring-summer 1989 the applicants became aware that the property had been demolished at some point between March and September 1989 in connection with a slum clearance project, in order to make way for the development of social housing.

10. By means of a President’s declaration of 27 October 1989, that is after the property was demolished, the Commissioner of Land formally took over the property under title of possession and use (see relevant domestic law).

11. By means of a President’s declaration of 4 October 1991 the Commissioner of Land issued an order to convert the title from one of possession and use into one of public tenure (see relevant domestic law).

12. On 22 March 1999, the Commissioner of Land submitted a notice to treat to the Land Arbitration Board (LAB), by means of which the sum of MTL 15.62 (approximately EUR 36.39) per year was offered to the owners (the Zammit family) as a yearly recognition rent. The sum was based on an estimate of the Land Valuation Office in line with their policies, but did not take account other factors, and was significantly lower than the rent at which the property had been leased prior to its demolition.

13. By means of a judicial letter of 12 April 1999 the owners refused the offer.

14. On 22 May 2000 the Commissioner of Land instituted proceedings before the LAB requesting them to order the transfer of the property and set the relevant compensation.

15. On 29 November 2006, the second and seventh applicants intervened in the proceedings as heirs of their deceased parent.

16. During these proceedings, the technical experts, appointed before the LAB, considered that in 1986 the property had been valued at MTL 1,000 (approximately EUR 2,320). On 10 August 2005 the applicants’ ex?parte architect estimated the fair rent of the property in 2005 at the equivalent of EUR 229.64 per year, and its sale value at MTL 7,500 (approximately EUR 17,470.30) – the property having been demolished, his estimate was based on the plans of the building from which it transpired that it had a depth of 14.5 metres and a width of 5.5 metres. In 2011 the technical experts of the LAB considered that the rental value for the property was EUR 158.40 per year, and its sale value (according to the terms of possession and use) was EUR 10,575.36.

17. By a decision of 7 March 2012, acknowledging that the property had been demolished prior to the formal taking by the Government, the LAB considered that it was inconceivable that rent be paid for a property which had been demolished in order to be built anew, and that the right course of action would have been to acquire the property by outright purchase. Nevertheless, given that Article 19 of Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta concerning expropriation by public tenure did not preclude such an action, the LAB fixed the recognition rent at EUR 158.40 per year.

18. On 27 March 2012 the Commissioner of Land appealed against the amount of rent established. On 16 April 2012 the applicants filed a reply asking the court to declare the appeal null and void as appeals could only be lodged on points of law. It was also noted that constitutional redress proceedings were being lodged by the applicants concerning the illegalities in the procedure and the alleged unconstitutionality of the law. Following the constitutional redress proceedings (described below) the Commissioner of Land’s appeal was withdrawn.

Constitutional redress proceedings
19. On 16 April 2012 the applicants filed constitutional redress proceedings. They claimed that the demolition of the property was illegal and amounted to a de facto expropriation contrary to the Constitution and the Convention and its Protocols; that Article 19 of Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta and related articles were in breach of the Constitution and the Convention and its Protocols; they requested the court to annul the LAB’s decision and to award them damages as well as any other relevant remedy.

20. The defendants filed their reply and produced a valuation by an architect appointed by the Commissioner of Land who estimated the sale value of the property at EUR 45,000. The report noted that the property had been demolished and was replaced by new residential apartments.

First-instance
21. By a judgment of 12 February 2014 the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional competence delivered a partial judgment where it rejected the defendants’ plea that the applicants had not exhausted ordinary remedies, and found a violation of the applicants’ rights in so far as the recognition rent established for the taking under public tenure, which was not subject to any future increases, was too low and thus disproportionate. It rejected the remainder of the claims, and left the liquidation of damage to be established in the final judgment.

22. In particular the court was of the view that ? despite the applicants’ claim that the property had been demolished prior to it having been taken under possession and use ? the period in which the property had allegedly been taken and demolished must have been the same as that when it had been taken under title of possession and use, and thus the latter taking could not be considered illegal. According to domestic law the State could also have taken the property under title of public tenure in exchange for a recognition rent, to eventually demolish it. The demolition was thus lawful pursuant to Article 19 of Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta. As to the impugned law, this could not be found to be incompatible with the Constitution since it had been in force before 1962. As to its compatibility with the Convention, the court found that the taking had pursued a public interest namely a slum clearance project. However, the recognition rent established in line with LAB policies, which was not subject to any future increases, was too low and thus disproportionate. There had therefore been a breach of the applicants’ right of property.

23. During the continuation of the proceedings the applicants submitted an ex?parte architect valuation dated 2014 which established the sale value of the property at EUR 50,000 and its rental value at EUR 250 per year. The report noted that the property had been demolished, and that it had had the measurements identified above, which resulted in an area of 80 square metres for the apartment which was located in a block of two apartments. The defendants declared that they did not object to this valuation.

24. By a judgment of 27 May 2015 the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional competence awarded EUR 15,000 in non?pecuniary damage, bearing in mind the value of the property, that no compensation had been paid since its demolition, that the applicants would never get their property back and the recognition rent would never increase. The court further held that pecuniary compensation would be decided by the LAB, when deciding on the Commissioner of Land’s appeal. Costs were to be shared equally between the parties.

Appeal
25. The defendants appealed and the applicants cross?appealed. By a judgment of 18 February 2016 the Constitutional Court varied the first?instance judgment by limiting the basis of the violation, and reducing the compensation to EUR 1,500.

26. The Constitutional Court held that in view of the evidence, it could not agree with the first?instance court that the demolition had taken place after a legitimate taking. Indeed there had been relevant witness testimony to the effect that the property had been demolished around three months prior to the first taking, the LAB had accepted that it was so, and the Government had not objected to such fact, nor had they shown when the demolition took place. It followed that the demolition had taken place prior to the taking under possession and use and at a time when the Government had no title over the property. However, even if this were not so, and that it had been demolished when it was under title of possession and use, the demolition would still have been unlawful, since according to law it was not possible to demolish a property under a title of possession and use the rights attached to which were limited. That illegality persisted until the Commissioner of Land acquired the property under title of public tenure; however, despite the passage of three years since the demolition the applicants did not challenge that measure. In any event that was no longer an issue, as the situation was sanctioned when the State took the property under title of public tenure (as provided for in Article 19 of Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta). The measure thus became lawful, and pursued the general interest of slum clearance.

27. Moreover, the applicants were entitled to recognition rent for the property and, more importantly, for the land at issue. Indeed the fact that the taking consisted of land (as the property above it had been demolished) made it feasible to apply the taking under public tenure procedure. The Constitutional Court further rejected the applicants’ claim that it would have been more appropriate to take the property by means of outright purchase, as they had not requested the LAB to order the Commissioner of Land to take such a course of action under the mentioned Article 19. The law granted the Commissioner of Land discretion as to which form of taking it would undertake and the Constitutional Court’s role was limited to verifying whether the form of taking which was actually used breached the rights of an individual.

28. As to the proportionality of the measure, the Constitutional Court noted that the applicants had claimed recognition rent of EUR 229.64 yearly and were awarded by the LAB a rent of EUR 158.40 yearly which the applicants had not appealed. Thus, given the award, in the light of their claim, it could not be considered that there arose such a disproportionality leading to a violation of the applicants’ property rights. Nevertheless, a breach did arise as a result of a failure to pay compensation since 1989, given that the applicants’ refusal to accept the offer of MTL 15.62 (approximately EUR 36.39) had been entirely justified. The Constitutional Court noted that as the breach had occurred and continued to persist, there was no reason to await the outcome of the LAB proceedings.

29. As to redress the Constitutional Court considered that the applicants were to be awarded non?pecuniary damage for the violation suffered. It furthered considered that the taking had pursued two legitimate aims, firstly social housing, and secondly slum clearance. While the applicants claimed compensation of around EUR 50,000 the Constitutional Court noted that the sale value according to the applicant’s ex-parte architect in 2005 was EUR 17,470.30 and that in 2011, according to the technical experts of the board, it was EUR 10,575.36. Thus, given the small size of the property, the area in which it was in, the fact that it had been demolished at the expense of the Government and the fact that the recognition rent was adequate, the Constitutional Court considered that EUR 1,500 was an adequate amount of compensation to be shared by the applicants jointly. It further considered that it needed not examine the Convention compatibility of the relevant law in abstracto, it having already determined that its application in the present case constituted a breach. Costs of the first?instance proceedings were to remain shared by the parties, as were those of the main appeal; and costs of the cross appeal were to be paid by the applicants.

Other developments
30. At the date of lodging the application with the Court, the applicants had not received any compensation, nor had they received any recognition rent since the date of the demolition of the property. The property has been rebuilt as apartments for social housing.

RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
31. Section 5 of the Land Acquisition (Public Purposes) Ordinance (“the Ordinance”), Chapter 88 of the Laws of Malta (now repealed), provided for three methods of acquisition by the Government of private property. It reads as follows:

“The competent authority may acquire any land required for any public purpose, either -

(a) by the absolute purchase thereof; or

(b) for the possession and use thereof for a stated time, or during such time as the exigencies of the public purpose shall require; or

(c) on public tenure:

Provided that after a competent authority has acquired any land for possession and use or on public tenure the conversion into public tenure or into absolute ownership of the terms upon which such land is held shall always be deemed to be an acquisition of land required for a public purpose and to be in the public interest:

Provided also that, subject to the provisions of articles 14, 15 and 16, a competent authority may acquire land partly by one and partly by another or others of the methods in paragraphs (a), (b) and (c):

Provided further that where the land is to be acquired on behalf and for the use of a third party for a purpose connected with or ancillary to the public interest or utility, the acquisition shall, in every case, be by the absolute purchase of the land.”

32. Section 13 regarding compensation read, in so far as relevant, as follows:

“(1) The amount of compensation to be paid for any land required by a competent authority may be determined at any time by agreement between the competent authority and the owner, saving the provisions contained in subarticle (2).

(2) The compensation shall in the case of acquisition of land for temporary possession and use be an acquisition rent and in the case of acquisition of land on public tenure be a recognition rent determined in either case in accordance with the relevant provisions contained in article 27.”

33. The Ordinance provided that compensation in respect of absolute purchase was to be calculated in accordance with the applicable “fair rent”, as agreed by the parties following the Government’s offer or as established by the LAB. In respect of public tenure, Section 27(13) of the Ordinance provided as follows:

“The compensation in respect of the acquisition of any land on public tenure shall be equal to the acquisition rent assessable in respect thereof in accordance with the provisions contained in subarticles (2) to (12), inclusive, of this article, increased (a) by forty per centum (40%) in the case of an old urban tenement and (b) by twenty per centum (20%) in the case of agricultural land.”

34. In so far as relevant, Section 19(1) and (5) read as follows:

“(1) When land has been acquired by a competent authority for use and possession during such time as the exigencies of the public purpose shall require, the owner may, after the lapse of ten years from the date when possession was taken by the competent authority, apply to the Board for an order that the land be purchased or acquired on public tenure or vacated within a period of one year from the date of the order, and the land shall either be vacated or acquired on public tenure or purchased upon compensation to be determined in accordance with the provisions of this Ordinance or of any Ordinance amending or substituted for this Ordinance.

(5) Public tenure shall of its nature endure in perpetuity, without prejudice to any consolidation by mutual consent or otherwise according to law of that tenure with the residual ownership of the land; and the recognition rent payable in respect thereof shall in every case be unalterable, without prejudice to the effects of any consolidation, total or partial. The residual ownership of land held on public tenure with the inherent right to receive recognition rent, shall, for all purposes of law, be deemed to be an immovable right by reason of the object to which it refers and shall be transferable according to law at the option of the owner, from time to time, of that right.”

35. Thus, while a taking under title of “possession and use” was intended for a determinate period of time, a taking under title of “public tenure” was for an indeterminate period of time, possibly forever, and the relevant recognition rent was to remain unaltered for its duration.

THE LAW

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1
36. The applicants complained that that they had suffered a de facto expropriation, in that their property had been demolished abusively, and that a yearly recognition rent of EUR 158.40 and an award of non?pecuniary damage of EUR 1,500 had not redressed the breach they suffered. Moreover, they had been deprived of their property and in thirty years had not yet received any compensation while they had to disburse costs in litigation. The relied on Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which reads as follows:

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.

The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”

37. The Government contested that argument.

Admissibility
38. The Government submitted that the applicants were no longer victims of the violation complained of given that the Constitutional Court upheld a violation of their property rights and awarded compensation. In the Government’s view given that the acquisition pursued a legitimate aim, namely, a slum clearance project, compensation needed not reflect market values thus the EUR 1,500 awarded by the Constitutional Court was sufficient redress.

39. The applicants submitted that an award consisting of solely EUR 1,500, jointly, in non-pecuniary damage could not constitute effective redress for the violations suffered, the more so given that they had not been paid any compensation since 1989.

40. The Court reiterates that an applicant is deprived of his or her status as a victim if the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded appropriate and sufficient redress for a breach of the Convention (see, for example, Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, §§ 178-193, ECHR 2006-V; Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq v. Malta, no. 26771/07, § 50, 5 April 2011; and Frendo Randon and Others v. Malta, no. 2226/10, § 34, 22 November 2011).

41. As regards the first criterion, namely the acknowledgment of a violation of the Convention, the Court considers that the Constitutional Court’s findings have only upheld in part the applicants’ complaints and therefore their acknowledgment of the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is only partial.

42. As to the second criterion appropriate redress in Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 cases requires an award in respect of both pecuniary damage (see Frendo Randon and Others, cited above, § 37, and Azzopardi v. Malta, no. 28177/12, § 33, 6 November 2014) as well as non?pecuniary damage, which would generally be required when an individual was deprived of, or suffered an interference with, his or her possessions contrary to the Convention (see Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, cited above, § 53). The Court notes that, in the present case, the Constitutional Court awarded compensation of EUR 1,500. Even assuming that the award covered both heads of damage, that award was absorbed by the order for the applicants to pay costs, which according to the documents submitted, amounted to around EUR 5,000.

43. It follows that the redress provided by the Constitutional Court did not offer any relief to the applicants, who, thus, retain victim status.

44. The Government’s objection is therefore dismissed.

Merits
The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants

45. The applicants submitted that their property, which had been demolished prior to the taking over by the State ? as acknowledged by the Constitutional Court ? constituted an unlawful deprivation of possessions. Indeed, as in the domestic proceedings, the Government on whose orders the property had been demolished had again failed to mention, even less substantiate, when the property had been demolished. In the applicant’s view such an unlawful action (which amounted to a de facto expropriation) at a time when the Government had no authority to take such a decision, could not be sanctioned by means of the subsequent taking under title of public tenure despite its permanent nature. This was even more so given the conditions for the permanent taking, namely a paltry recognition rent paid annually.

46. Indeed, without prejudice to the above, even assuming that the demolition had been lawful, the applicants had suffered an excessive burden given that an annual recognition rent of EUR 158.40 was disproportionate to the real sale value of the property, which was calculated as being EUR 50,000 by the applicants’ ex parte architect and EUR 45,000 by the Government’s architect. Indeed the recognition rent, had it been paid retrospectively since 1991, would only have amounted to EUR 4,276 in twenty?seven years, which did not even cover the expenses incurred by the applicants in judicial fees to pursue the relevant proceedings. Nevertheless, that recognition rent was to remain unchanged without any consideration of the increase of rental prices on the market, especially in recent years. Moreover, in the initial years, the applicants could not have instituted proceeding before the LAB to establish compensation. These factors meant that there were no procedural safeguards in place.

47. Lastly, the applicants pointed out that while the taking had been for social housing, in Malta social housing was not for free. It was generally the case that social housing would be rented out for a subsidised rate or sold at a reduced rate. Thus, it could well have been the case that the Government had made a profit from the public interest they invoked.

(b) The Government

48. Despite a question to that effect the Government made no observations concerning the demolition, save that there was no concrete evidence as to when the property was demolished, and therefore that it had been demolished prior to the taking over by the Government on 15 April 1989.

49. As to the taking under title of possession and use (1989?1991) then by public tenure (1991 to date), the Government considered that the takings were lawful in accordance with Article 5 of the Ordinance and they pursued a public interest namely the construction of social accommodation following a slum clearance project. The Government submitted that when the property was held under title of possession and use the applicants had not requested its conversion to another title in terms of law. Thus, relying on Saliba and Others v. Malta (no. 20287/10, § 52, 22 November 2011) they considered that this was merely a control of use of property. They accepted however, that in Saliba and Others (§ 53), the Court had found that the taking under public tenure “verg[ed] on what could be equated to a de facto expropriation”. In any event, according to the Government what was important was the reaching of a fair balance.

50. In the Government’s view the measures were proportionate to the aims pursued. They explained that the acquisition rent paid while property was held under title of possession and use was equivalent to the controlled rent payable in respect of such premises. That rent also depended on the rental value declared by the owners to the Land Valuation Office. Under title of public tenure that acquisition rent was increased by 40%. They noted that the applicants received a recognition rent (established by the LAB) of EUR 158.40 annually for a property valued by the applicant’s architect at around EUR 17,475 with an annual rental value of EUR 611. In the Government’s view given the public interest at issue, the size and state of the property at the time of the acquisition and the average income at the time, that sum was adequate in 1989. While it was true that the sum could not be revised despite the taking being permanent, the Government considered that the legitimate objectives of public interest justified such conditions and thus the applicants had not suffered an excessive burden, the more so given that they used to make no use of the property.

The Court’s assessment
(a) General principles

51. As the Court has stated on a number of occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98; and Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 98, ECHR 2000-I).

52. In order to determine whether there has been a deprivation of possessions within the meaning of the second rule, the Court must not confine itself to examining whether there has been dispossession or formal expropriation, it must look behind the appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. Since the Convention is intended to guarantee rights that are “practical and effective”, it has to be ascertained whether that situation amounted to a de facto expropriation (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, judgment of 23 September 1982, Series A no. 52, pp. 24-25, § 63, and Vasilescu v. Romania, judgment of 22 May 1998, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998-III, p. 1078, § 51).

53. Nevertheless, the applicable principles are similar, namely that, in addition to being lawful, a deprivation of possessions or an interference such as the control of use of property must also satisfy the requirement of proportionality (see Saliba and Others, cited above, § 54). As the Court has repeatedly stated, a fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, the search for such a fair balance being inherent in the whole of the Convention. The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, §§ 69-74, and Brum?rescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999-VII).

(b) Application to the present case

(i) The demolition of the property

54. In the present case it is not disputed that the property was indeed demolished. The Court considers that such demolition amounted to a de facto expropriation of, at least, the building erected on the relevant land, no matter its state or condition (see, a contrario, Saliba v. Malta, no. 4251/02, § 33, 8 November 2005). The Court further notes that as held by the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 26 above) and as transpires from the evidence and submissions before this Court, the demolition took place before the taking under title of possession and use which was ordered by means of a President’s declaration of 27 October 1989, thus, at a time when the Government had simply occupied the property but had no title to it. It follows that, as held by the Constitutional Court, the demolition was unlawful (see paragraph 26 above, in primis). Moreover, as also held by that same court, even had it been demolished when it was under title of possession and use, the demolition would still have been unlawful, since according to law it was not possible to demolish a property under a title of possession and use, the rights attached to which were limited (see paragraph 26 above). That having been established it is unnecessary for this Court to consider whether the demolition pursued a legitimate aim, or whether the measure was proportionate. The Court notes that the applicants have not been compensated in any way for the unlawful demolition of their property.

(ii) The subsequent takings under various titles

55. From October 1989 to October 1991 the property was taken under title of possession and use. Under this title, the taking was meant to be temporary and in fact lasted for only two years during which time the applicants never lost their right to sell the property and the ownership title was never transferred to third parties. Although in the then obtaining circumstances a sale was improbable, the Court cannot accept that the measure complained of amounted to a de facto expropriation. However, the applicants’ right of property was severely restricted: they could not exercise the right of use in terms of physical possession. Thus, this constituted a means of State control of the use of property, which should be examined under the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see, mutatis mutandis, Saliba and Others, cited above, § 52).

56. In October 1991 the property was taken under title of public tenure and the restrictions remained the same as above described. However, the Court observes that public tenure implies that the property is taken permanently. Consequently, the applicants were not simply restricted in, or temporarily deprived of, their use and enjoyment of the property. The Court has already held that in such circumstances it is possible that such interference could be equated to a de facto expropriation (see Saliba and Others, cited above, § 53).

57. Given that the applicable principles are similar the Court will, in so far as possible, assess both regimes simultaneously. It has not been disputed by the parties that these measures were carried out in accordance with the provisions of the Ordinance. The successive takings were, therefore, “lawful” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. In the present case, the Court can also accept the Government’s argument that the measures were aimed at creating social housing, after a slum clearance. Thus, the measures had a legitimate aim in the general interest, as required by the second paragraph of Article 1.

58. As to the taking under possession and use, the Court notes that it is not disputed that the law provided for a 40% increase for recognition rent (applicable for the purposes of public tenure) vis-á-vis what had been the acquisition rent (applicable for the purposes of possession and use) (see paragraph 33 above). It follows that the applicants should have been paid approximately EUR 113 annually for the two years during which their property was taken under this title. In respect to this amount, the fact that, as argued by the Government, the rent received was in line with the rent laws applicable on the island, does not favour the Government’s case. Indeed, the Court has on various occasions held that legislation regarding controlled rents in Malta was in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see Ghigo v. Malta, no. 31122/05, §§ 69-70, 26 September 2006; Edwards v. Malta, no. 17647/04, §§ 78-79, 24 October 2006; Fleri Soler and Camilleri v. Malta, no. 35349/05, §§ 79-80, ECHR 2006?X; and Amato Gauci v. Malta, no. 47045/06, § 62, 15 September 2009). However, in the present case, it is not necessary for the Court to decide whether, given the legitimate aim and the value of the property (the remaining land, see paragraph 27 above) at the time when it was held under title of possession and use (see paragraph 16 above), such compensation was sufficient, as the applicable acquisition rent was never determined by the LAB nor paid to the applicants.

59. As to the time during which the property was held under public tenure, against an annual recognition rent of EUR 158.40, the Court considers that having regard to the legitimate aim and the value of the property (the remaining land) in the light of the applicant’s own valuations, it can accept that such a rent was reasonable in 1991 and subsequent years, but it is unlikely to be so today, three decades later. The Court reiterates that what might have been justified years ago, will not necessarily be justified today (see Amato Gauci, cited above, § 60, and Saliba and Others, cited above, § 63). It suffices for the purposes of the present case for the Court to find that since the recognition rent established for the taking under public tenure was not subject to any future increases despite developments in the property market, such compensation decades after the initial taking is disproportionate. More importantly, that recognition rent had not been paid until the Constitutional Court judgment and seems to have remained unpaid at least until the time of the introduction of the application, that is, nearly thirty years after the taking.

60. In the present case, having regard to the impossibility of the applicants ever recovering their property, which has been subject to successive regimes (possession and use and subsequently public tenure) and the amount of rent (at least over the most recent years since 2015) which was, moreover, for decades, not paid to the applicants, the Court finds that a disproportionate and excessive burden was imposed on the applicants. The latter were required to bear most of the social and financial costs of supplying housing accommodation to third parties (see, mutatis mutandis, Saliba and Others, cited above, § 67, see also Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, cited above, § 59). It follows that the Maltese State has failed to strike the requisite fair balance between the general interests of the community and the protection of the applicants’ right of property.

(iii) Conclusion

61. In view of all the elements above the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
62. Article 41 of the Convention provides:

“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”

Damage
63. The applicants claimed 47,500 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage representing the average between the two valuations submitted by the experts for the unlawful deprivation of property and, in the alternative, had the Court to consider the measure lawful, they claimed EUR 33,250 in the light of the public purpose behind the deprivation. They further claimed EUR 15,000 in non-pecuniary damage.

64. The Government submitted that if the Court were to consider the taking as unlawful, the award for pecuniary damage should not exceed EUR 17,500 and that if it were to find that it was lawful, the award should not exceed EUR 8,000. However, they considered that in both cases, the Court would have to order the applicants’ appearance on a deed of transfer. The Government considered that given the award made by the Constitutional Court no non?pecuniary damage was due, and without prejudice to that, any award should not exceed EUR 2,000.

65. The Court notes that the circumstances of the present case are very particular and do not fit squarely within the Court’s standard practices in respect of just satisfaction under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, which use different parameters according to specific situations (see, amongst many other authorities and situations, for example, Guiso-Gallisay v. Italy (just satisfaction) [GC], no. 58858/00, 22 December 2009, for unlawful expropriations; Schembri and Others v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 42583/06, 28 September 2010, for lawful de facto takings without payment of any adequate compensation; B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited and Coleiro Brothers Limited v. Malta, nos. 75225/13 and 77311/13, 11 September 2018, concerning lawful takings which overtime failed the public interest requirement; and Saliba and Others, cited above, concerning appropriate rent which should have been received prior to an outright purchase).

66. Indeed in the present case the Court has found that the demolition of the applicants’ property had been unlawful, while the subsequent takings had been lawful and pursued a public interest, however no fair balance had been achieved in the application of those measures. The Court further observes that at the time when it was demolished (1989) the value of the property was estimated by the LAB as being EUR 2,320 and in 2011 as being EUR 10,575.36; while the applicants’ architect estimated its value in 2005 as being EUR 17,500. Further, according to the valuations of the applicants, the property’s annual rental value was approximately EUR 230 in 2005 and EUR 250 in 2014.

67. In the specific circumstances of the case, and bearing in mind that applicants might have by now been paid, or in any event that they are still to be paid – sum which remains payable after this judgment – approximately EUR 4,435 in rent to date, and that they will remain being paid a recognition rent of EUR 158.40 until the Government decides to take the property under title of outright purchase (i.e. transfer of full ownership), the Court considers it reasonable to award the applicants, jointly, EUR 18,000 in respect of pecuniary damage, for the violations suffered.

It further considered that the applicants should be awarded EUR 8,500, jointly, in non?pecuniary damage.

Costs and expenses
68. The applicants also claimed EUR 7,575.35 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts (LAB and constitutional redress proceedings) including EUR 1,600 for those incurred before the Court, according to the relevant receipts and invoices submitted to the Court.

69. The Government considered that the amount of EUR 766 claimed in respect of the LAB proceedings was not due these being extraneous to the redress proceedings. They did not contest the EUR 1,087 paid by the applicants by way of judicial expenses but contested the other amounts claimed for domestic proceedings. They further considered that EUR 1,500 was a sufficient award for costs incurred before this Court.

70. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, as well as the fact that LAB proceedings are a part of redress proceedings and the fact that the Government did not explain why they contest some of the applicants’ claims which have been substantiated, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 7,500 covering costs under all heads.

Default interest
71. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,

Declares the application admissible;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:

(i) EUR 18,000 (eighteen thousand euros), in respect of pecuniary damage;

(ii) EUR 8,500 (eight thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;

(iii) EUR 7,500 (seven thousand five hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;

(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 28 May 2019, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.

Stephen Phillips Helen Keller
RegistrarPresident

[...]

TESTO TRADOTTO

TERZA SEZIONE





CASE OF SAMMIT E VASSALLO v. MALTA

(Applicazione n. 43675/16)











Giudizio



Strasburgo

giovedì 28 maggio 2019


Finale

28/08/2019

Questa sentenza è diventata definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 : 2 della Convenzione. Può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nel caso di
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Terza sezione), seduta in una Camera composta da:
Helen Keller, Presidente,
Vincent A. De Gaetano,
Dmitry Dedov,
Branko Lubarda,
Alena Pol'kova,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerstrom, giudici,
e StephenPhillips, Sezione Registrar,
Dopo aver deliberato in privato il 7 maggio 2019,
Pronuncia la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in tale data:
PROCEDURA
1. Il caso è stato originato da una domanda (n. 43675/16) contro la Repubblica di Malta presentata alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la protezione dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("Convenzione") da parte di sette cittadini maltesi (cfr. allegato), ("i richiedenti"), il 20 luglio 2016.
2. I ricorrenti erano rappresentati dal dottor A. Sciberras, avvocato che esercitava a La Valletta. Il governo maltese ("il governo") era rappresentato dal loro agente, il dottor P. Grech, procuratore generale.
3. Le ricorrenti sostenevano di aver subito un'espropriazione de facto, in quanto la loro proprietà era stata demolita abusivamente e che un canone di locazione annuale di 158,40 euro (EUR) e un premio di danno nonpecuniario di 1.500 euro non avevano rimediato alla violazione subita. Inoltre, essi erano stati privati dei loro beni e in trent'anni non avevano ancora ricevuto alcun risarcimento mentre dovevano erogare i costi in caso di contenzioso.
4. Il 21 marzo 2018 l'avviso della domanda è stato dato al governo.
I FATTI
I. LE CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
5. I dettagli dei richiedenti sono disponibili nell'allegato.
A. Informazioni generali sul caso
6. I richiedenti sono proprietari di un immobile situato a 8, Flat 1, Old Prison Street, Senglea, (qui di seguito "la proprietà") che hanno ereditato dai loro antenati. La proprietà era stata concessa a terzi con un titolo di enfiteusi temporanea per un periodo di diciassette anni, con un appoggio di terreni finoa quando era stabilito di 40 liras maltesi (MTL - circa 98) all'anno, che doveva scadere nel 1990.
7. Il 10 settembre 1986 il governo ha emesso un ordine di richiesta sulla proprietà. Nell'ottobre 1988 il governo ha annullato la proprietà e ha restituito le chiavi ai ricorrenti.
8. Il 15 aprile 1989 il Commissario del Territorio ha rilevato (occupato) la proprietà.
9. Nella primavera-estate 1989 le ricorrenti si sono rese conto che la proprietà era stata demolita in un certo momento tra marzo e settembre 1989 in relazione a un progetto di sgombero delle baraccopoli, al fine di far posto allo sviluppo dell'edilizia sociale.
10. Con una dichiarazione del Presidente del 27 ottobre 1989, cioè dopo la demolizioni della proprietà, il Commissario del Land ha formalmente rilevato la proprietà sotto titolo di possesso e di utilizzo (cfr. diritto interno pertinente).
11. Con una dichiarazione del Presidente del 4 ottobre 1991 il Commissario per il Land ha emesso un ordine di convertire il titolo da possesso e uso in uno di incarico pubblico (cfr. diritto interno pertinente).
12. Il 22 marzo 1999, il Commissario del Land ha presentato un avviso di trattamento al Land Arbitration Board (LAB), mediante il quale la somma di MTL 15,62 (circa 36,39 EUR) all'anno è stata offerta ai proprietari (la famiglia zammit) come un affitto annuale. L'importo si basava su una stima dell'Ufficio di valutazione del territorio in linea con le loro politiche, ma non tiene conto di altri fattori ed era significativamente inferiore all'affitto al quale l'immobile era stato affittato prima della sua demolizione.
13. Con una lettera giudiziaria del 12 aprile 1999 i proprietari hanno rifiutato l'offerta.
14. Il 22 maggio 2000 il Commissario del Land ha avviato un procedimento dinanzi al LAB chiedendo loro di ordinare il trasferimento dell'immobile e di fissare il relativo risarcimento.
15. Il 29 novembre 2006, il secondo e il settimo richiedente sono intervenuti nel procedimento come eredi del genitore deceduto.
16. Nel corso del procedimento, gli esperti tecnici, nominati dinanzi al LAB, hanno ritenuto che nel 1986 l'immobile fosse stato valutato a MTL 1.000 (circa 2.320 euro). Il 10 agosto 2005 l'architetto exparte delle ricorrenti ha stimato l'affitto equo dell'immobile nel 2005 all'equivalente di 229,64 euro all'anno, e il suo valore di vendita a MTL 7.500 (circa 17.470,30 euro) – la proprietà è stata demolita, la sua stima si è basata su i piani dell'edificio da cui è emerso che aveva una profondità di 14,5 metri e una larghezza di 5,5 metri. Nel 2011 gli esperti tecnici del LAB hanno ritenuto che il valore locativo dell'immobile fosse di 158,40 euro all'anno e che il suo valore di vendita (secondo le condizioni di possesso e utilizzo) fosse di EUR 10.575,36.
17. Con una decisione del 7 marzo 2012, riconoscendo che l'immobile era stato demolito prima della presa formale da parte del governo, il LAB ha ritenuto inconcepibile il pagamento di un immobile che era stato demolito per essere costruito di nuovo , e che la giusta linea d'azione sarebbe stata quella di acquisire l'immobile con acquisto a titolo definitivo. Tuttavia, dato che l'articolo 19 del capitolo 88 del capitolo 88 delle leggi di Malta in materia di espropriazione pubblica da parte di un mandato pubblico non escludeva tale azione, il LAB ha fissato il canone di locazione di riconoscimento a 158,40 euro all'anno.
18. Il 27 marzo 2012 il Commissario del Land ha presentato ricorso contro l'importo dell'affitto stabilito. Il 16 aprile 2012 le ricorrenti hanno presentato una risposta in cui il giudice chiedeva di dichiarare nullo il ricorso in secondo quanto i ricorsi potevano essere presentati solo su punti di diritto. È stato inoltre osservato che i ricorrenti hanno presentato un procedimento di ricorso costituzionale in merito alle illegalità nella procedura e alla presunta incostituzionalità della legge. A seguito del procedimento di ricorso costituzionale (descritto di seguito) è stato ritirato il ricorso del Commissario del Land.
B. Procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale
19. Il 16 aprile 2012 i ricorrenti hanno presentato un procedimento costituzionale di ricorso. Essi hanno sostenuto che la demolizione del bene era illegale e equivaleva a un espropriazione di fatto contrario alla Costituzione e alla Convenzione e ai suoi Protocolli; che l'articolo 19 del capitolo 88 delle leggi di Malta e gli articoli correlati violavano la Costituzione e la Convenzione e i suoi protocolli; essi chiesero al giudice di annullare la decisione del LAB e di concedere loro danni nonché qualsiasi altro rimedio pertinente.
20. I convenuti hanno presentato la loro risposta e prodotto una valutazione da parte di un architetto nominato dal Commissario del Land che ha stimato il valore di vendita dell'immobile a 45.000 euro. Il rapporto ha osservato che la proprietà era stata demolita ed è stata sostituita da nuovi appartamenti residenziali.
1. Primo grado
21. Con sentenza del 12 febbraio 2014 il Tribunale civile (Prima Sala) nella sua competenza costituzionale ha emesso una sentenza parziale in cui ha respinto l'atto degli imputati che le ricorrenti non avevano esaurito i rimedi ordinari e ha riscontrato una violazione per quanto riguarda il canone di locazione di riconoscimento stabilito per l'assunzione di un mandato pubblico, che non è stato soggetto ad alcun aumento futuro, era troppo basso e quindi sproporzionato. Essa ha respinto il resto dei crediti e ha lasciato che la liquidazione del danno fosse stabilita nella sentenza definitiva.
22. In particolare, il giudice era del parere che, nonostante l'affermazione delle ricorrenti, che il bene fosse stato demolito prima di essere stato preso in possesso e utilizzare il periodo in cui l'immobile sarebbe stato preso e demolito doveva essere lo stesso che quando era stato preso sotto titolo di possesso e uso, e quindi quest'ultima presa non poteva essere considerata illegale. Secondo il diritto nazionale lo Stato avrebbe anche potuto prendere la proprietà sotto il titolo di mandato pubblico in cambio di un affitto di riconoscimento, per demolirlo alla fine. La demolizione era quindi lecita ai sensi dell'articolo 19 del capitolo 88 delle leggi di Malta. Per quanto riguarda la legge impugnata, ciò non poteva essere ritenuto incompatibile con la Costituzione poiché era in vigore prima del 1962. Per quanto riguarda la sua compatibilità con la Convenzione, il giudice ha constatato che l'informazione aveva perseguito un interesse pubblico, vale a dire un progetto di sdoganamento. Tuttavia, l'affitto di riconoscimento stabilito in linea con le politiche del LAB, che non era soggetto ad alcun aumento futuro, era troppo basso e quindi sproporzionato. Vi era stata pertanto una violazione del diritto di proprietà delle ricorrenti.
23. Nel corso della prosecuzione del procedimento, i ricorrenti hanno presentato una valutazione dell'architetto exparte datata 2014 che ha stabilito il valore di vendita dell'immobile a 50.000 euro e il suo valore locativo a 250 euro all'anno. La relazione ha osservato che la proprietà era stata demolita, e che aveva avuto le misure sopra identificate, che ha portato ad una superficie di 80 metri quadrati per l'appartamento che si trovava in un blocco di due appartamenti. Gli imputati hanno dichiarato di non opporsi a tale valutazione.
24. Con sentenza del 27 maggio 2015 il Tribunale Civile (Prima Sala) di sua competenza costituzionale ha conferito 15.000 euro di danni non pecuniari, tenendo conto del valore dell'immobile, secondo il fatto che non era stato versato alcun risarcimento dalla sua demolizione, che le ricorrenti non avrebbero mai ottenere la loro proprietà indietro e l'affitto riconoscimento non sarebbe mai aumentare. La Corte ha inoltre ritenuto che il LAB avrebbe deciso un indennizzo pecuniario, al momento di decidere il ricorso del Commissario per il Land. I costi dovevano essere ripartiti equamente tra le parti.
2. Appello
25. I convenuti hanno presentato ricorso e le ricorrenti hannopresentato ricorso. Con sentenza del 18 febbraio 2016 la Corte costituzionale ha variato la sentenza di prima istanza limitando la base della violazione e riducendo il risarcimento a 1.500 euro.
26. La Corte costituzionale ha ritenuto che, alla luce dei dati, non fosse d'accordo con la Corte di primo istanza che la demolizione era avvenuta dopo una presa legittima. Ineffetti, vi era stata una testimonianza rilevante dell'effetto che la proprietà era stata demolita circa tre mesi prima della prima assunzione, il LAB aveva accettato che fosse così, e il governo non aveva obiettato a tale fatto, né aveva mostrato quando il la demolizione ha avuto luogo. Ne consegue che la demolizione aveva avuto luogo prima dell'assunzione in possesso e l'uso e in un momento in cui il governo non aveva alcun titolo sulla proprietà. Tuttavia, anche se non fosse così, e che fosse stata demolita quando era sotto il titolo di possesso e utilizzo, la demolizione sarebbe stata ancora illegittima, poiché secondo la legge non era possibile demolire una proprietà sotto un titolo di possesso e utilizzare i diritti ttached a cui erano limitati. Tale illegalità persisteva fino a quando il Commissario del Land non avesse acquisito la proprietà in base al titolo di mandato pubblico; tuttavia, nonostante il passaggio di tre anni dalla demolizione, le ricorrenti non hanno contestato tale misura. In ogni caso questo non fosse più un problema, in quanto la situazione è stata sanzionata quando lo Stato ha assunto la proprietà sotto il titolo di mandato pubblico (come previsto dall'articolo 19 del capitolo 88 delle leggi di Malta). La misura divenne così legittima, e perseguì l'interesse generale dello sdoganamento.
27. Inoltre, i ricorrenti avevano diritto al riconoscimento dell'affitto dell'immobile e, cosa ancora più importante, del terreno in questione. Infatti, il fatto che la presa consistesse in terreni (come la proprietà sopra di essa era stata demolita) ha reso possibile applicare l'incarico nell'ambito della procedura di mandato pubblico. La Corte costituzionale ha inoltre respinto l'affermazione delle ricorrenti secondo cui sarebbe stato più opportuno assumere l'immobile mediante acquisto a titolo definitivo, in quanto non avevano chiesto al LAB di ordinare al Commissario di Land di intraprendere tale linea di condotta nell'ambito del citato l'articolo 19. La legge concedeva al Commissario del Land la discrezionalità su quale forma di assunzione sarebbe stata intrapresa e il ruolo della Corte costituzionale si limitava a verificare se la forma di assunzione effettivamente utilizzata violasse i diritti di un individuo.
28. Per quanto riguarda la proporzionalità della misura, la Corte costituzionale ha rilevato che le ricorrenti avevano rivendicato un canone di locazione di 229,64 euro all'anno e sono state assegnate dal LABORATORIo un canone di locazione di 158,40 euro all'anno che le ricorrenti non avevano presentato ricorso. Pertanto, alla luce del premio, alla luce della loro pretesa, non si può ritenere che tale sproporzione abbia comportato una violazione dei diritti di proprietà delle ricorrenti. Tuttavia, una violazione è estratta a causa di un mancato risarcimento dal 1989, dato che il rifiuto delle ricorrenti di accettare l'offerta di MTL 15,62 (circa 36,39 euro) era stato del tutto giustificato. La Corte costituzionale ha osservato che, poiché la violazione si era verificata e continuava a persistere, non c'era motivo di attendere l'esito del procedimento LAB.
29 Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento della Corte costituzionale, la Corte costituzionale ha ritenuto che le ricorrenti dovessero ricevere un danno nonpecuniario per la violazione subita. Essa ha inoltre ritenuto che l'assunzione avesse perseguito due obiettivi legittimi, in primo luogo l'edilizia sociale e, in secondo luogo, l'autorizzazione delle baraccopoli. Mentre le ricorrenti reclamavano un risarcimento di circa 50.000 euro, la Corte costituzionale ha rilevato che il valore di vendita secondo l'ex architetto della ricorrente nel 2005 era di 17.470,30 euro e che nel 2011, secondo gli esperti tecnici del consiglio, era di 10.575,36 euro. Così, date le piccole dimensioni dell'immobile, l'area in cui si trovava, il fatto che era stato demolito a spese del governo e il fatto che l'affitto del riconoscimento fosse adeguato, la Corte costituzionale ha ritenuto che 1.500 euro fosse un importo adeguato di compensazione da condividere congiuntamente dai ricorrenti. Essa ha inoltre ritenuto di non aver esame la compatibilità della Convenzione della legge pertinente nell'abstracto, avendo già determinato che la sua applicazione nel caso in esame costituiva una violazione. I costi del primo procedimento di primo grado dovevano rimanere condivisi dalle parti, così come quelli del ricorso principale; e le spese del ricorso incrociato dovevano essere pagate dai ricorrenti.
C. Altri sviluppi
30. Alla data di ritiro della domanda presso la Corte, le ricorrenti non avevano ricevuto alcun indennizzo, né avevano ricevuto alcun canone di riconoscimento dalla data della demolizione dell'immobile. La struttura è stata ricostruita come appartamenti per l'edilizia sociale.
II. DIRITTO INTERNO PERTINENTE
31. Sezione 5 dell'ordinanza sull'acquisizione del suolo (per motivi pubblici) ("l'ordinanza"), capitolo 88 delle leggi di Malta (ora abrogate), prevedeva tre metodi di acquisizione da parte del governo di proprietà privata. Si legge come segue:
"L'autorità competente può acquisire qualsiasi terreno richiesto per qualsiasi scopo pubblico,
(a) dall'acquisto assoluto di esso; o
(b) per il possesso e l'uso del loro per un tempo pregiato, o durante il tempo tale da richiedere le esigenze dello scopo pubblico;
(c) in servizio pubblico:
A condizione che, dopo che un'autorità competente ha acquisito qualsiasi terreno per il possesso e l'uso o in possesso pubblico, la conversione in possesso pubblica o in proprietà assoluta delle condizioni alle quali tale terreno è detenuto sia sempre considerata un'acquisizione di terreni richiesti per uno scopo pubblico e di essere nell'interesse pubblico:
A condizione inoltre che, fatte salve le disposizioni degli articoli 14, 15 e 16, un'autorità competente possa acquisire terreni in parte da uno e in parte da un altro o da altri metodi nei paragrafi (a), (b) e( c):
A condizione inoltre che, qualora il terreno debba essere acquisito per conto e per l'uso di un terzo per uno scopo collegato o ausiliario all'interesse pubblico o all'utilità, l'acquisizione deve, in ogni caso, essere dall'acquisto assoluto del terreno."
32. Sezione 13 relativa al risarcimento resivo, nella misura in cui è rilevante, come segue:
"(1) L'importo dell'indennizzo da versare per qualsiasi terreno richiesto da un'autorità competente può essere determinato in qualsiasi momento da un accordo tra l'autorità competente e il proprietario, salvando le disposizioni contenute nel sottoarticolo (2).
(2) L'indennizzo è per l'acquisizione di terreni per possesso e utilizzo temporaneo essere un canone di locazione di acquisizione e nel caso di acquisizione di terreni in possesso pubblica sia un canone di riconoscimento determinato in entrambi i casi in conformità con le pertinenti disposizioni pertinenti contenuto nell'articolo 27."
33. L'ordinanza prevedeva che la compensazione per l'acquisto assoluto doveva essere calcolata in base all'"affitto equo" applicabile, come concordato dalle parti in seguito all'offerta del governo o come stabilito dal LAB. Per quanto riguarda il mandato pubblico, la sezione 27(13) dell'ordinanza prevedeva quanto segue:
"L'indennizzo per l'acquisizione di qualsiasi terreno di proprietà pubblica è pari al canone d'affitto per acquisizione valutabile in relazione a tale progetto conformemente alle disposizioni contenute nei sottoelementi (2) a (12), compresi, di questo articolo, aumentati(a) diun quaranta per cento (40%) nel caso di un vecchio incarico urbano e (b) delventi per cento (20%) nel caso dei terreni agricoli.
34. Per quanto riguarda, le sezioni 19(1) e (5) leggono come segue:
"(1) Quando i terreni sono stati acquisiti da un'autorità competente per l'uso e il possesso durante il periodo in cui le esigenze dello scopo pubblico richiedono, il proprietario può, dopo la scadenza di dieci anni dalla data in cui il possesso è stato preso dall'autorità competente , chiedere al Consiglio di amministrazione l'ordine di ordinare che il terreno sia acquistato o acquistato in carico pubblico o sgomberato entro un periodo di un anno dalla data dell'ordine, e il terreno deve essere liberato o acquistato in carico pubblico o acquistato al momento del risarcimento da determinare in un rispetto alle disposizioni della presente ordinanza o di qualsiasi ordinanza che modifica o sostituisce questa ordinanza.
(5) Il mandato pubblico deve perseverare in perpetuo, senza pregiudizio di alcun consolidamento di mutuo o comunque secondo il diritto di tale mandato con la proprietà residua del terreno; e il riconoscimento dell'affitto da pagare per quanto lo stesso deve in ogni caso essere inalterabile, senza pregiudizio agli effetti di qualsiasi consolidamento, totale o parziale. La proprietà residua di terreni detenuti in servizio pubblico con il diritto intrinseco di ricevere l'affitto di riconoscimento, è considerata, a tutti gli scopi del diritto, considerata un diritto inamovibile a ragione dell'oggetto a cui si riferisce ed è trasferibile secondo la legge all'opzione o f il proprietario, di tanto in tanto, di quel diritto.
35. Così, mentre l'assunzione sotto il titolo di "possesso e utilizzo" era destinata a un determinato periodo di tempo, l'assunzione sotto il titolo di "possesso pubblico" era per un periodo di tempo indeterminato, possibilmente per sempre, e l'affitto relativo al riconoscimento doveva rimanere inalterato per la sua durata.
LA LEGGE
I. PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL’ARTICOLO 1 PROTOCOLLO N.1
36. Le ricorrenti hanno lamentato di aver subito un'espropriazione di fatto, in quanto la loro proprietà era stata demolita abusivamente e che un canone di locazione annuale di 158,40 euro e un'assegnazione di danni non pecuniari di 1.500 euro non avevano sanato la violazione subita. Inoltre, essi erano stati privati dei loro beni e in trent'anni non avevano ancora ricevuto alcun risarcimento mentre dovevano erogare i costi in caso di contenzioso. L'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 si basa sul seguente:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno deve essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e ai principi generali del diritto internazionale.
Le disposizioni precedenti non prevengono tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare tali leggi che ritiene necessario controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con gli interessi generali o di garantire il pagamento di imposte o altri contributi o sanzioni."
37. Il governo ha contestato tale argomentazione.
A. Ricevibilità
38. Il governo ha sostenuto che le ricorrenti non erano più vittime della violazione denunciata, dato che la Corte costituzionale ha confermato una violazione dei loro diritti di proprietà e ha riconosciuto un risarcimento. A parere del governo, dato che l'acquisizione perseguiva un obiettivo legittimo, vale a dire un progetto di sgombero delle baraccopoli, la compensazione necessaria non riflette valori di mercato, quindi i 1.500 euro concessi dalla Corte costituzionale erano un risarcimento sufficiente.
39. Le ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che un premio composto esclusivamente da 1.500 euro, congiuntamente, in danni non pecuniari non poteva costituire un risarcimento effettivo per le violazioni subite, tanto più che non erano state pagate alcuna compensazione dal 1989.
40. La Corte ribadisce che un richiedente è privato del suo status di vittima se le autorità nazionali hanno riconosciuto, espressamente o in sostanza, e quindi concesso un risarcimento adeguato e sufficiente per una violazione della Convenzione (si veda, ad esempio, Scordino v. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, n. 178-193, ECHR 2006-V; Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq v. Malta, n. 26771/07, 50, 5 aprile 2011; e Frendo Randon and Others v. Malta,n. 2226/10,n. 34, 22 novembre 2011).
41. Per quanto riguarda il primo criterio, vale a dire il riconoscimento di una violazione della Convenzione, la Corte ritiene che le conclusioni della Corte costituzionale abbiano confermato solo in parte le denunce dei ricorrenti e pertanto il loro riconoscimento della violazione L'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 è solo parziale.
42. Per quanto riguarda il secondo criterio appropriato risarcimento di cui all'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 casi richiede un premio per entrambi i danni pecuniari (vedi Frendo Randon e altri,citati sopra,37 , e Azzopardi v. Malta, n. 28177/12,n. 33, 6 novembre 2014) così come i danni nonpecuniari, che sarebbero generalmente necessari quando un individuo è stato privato di, o ha subito un con, le sue interferenze o i suoi possedimenti contrariamente alla Convenzione (vedi Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, citata sopra, 53). La Corte rileva che, nella continsiva causa, la Corte costituzionale ha riconosciuto un risarcimento di 1.500 euro. Anche supponendo che l'aggiudicazione coprisse entrambi i capi del danno, tale premio è stato assorbito dall'ordinanza per le ricorrenti di pagare le spese, che secondo i documenti presentati ammontavano a circa 5.000 euro.
43. Ne consegue che il risarcimento previsto dalla Corte costituzionale non ha offerto alcun sollievo ai ricorrenti, che, pertanto, mantengono lo status di vittima.
44. L'obiezione del governo è pertanto respinta.
B. Meriti
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
(a) Le ricorrenti
45. Le ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che la loro proprietà, che era stata demolita prima della presa in mano da parte dello Stato, come riconosciuto dalla Corte costituzionale, costituiva una privazione illecita di beni. Infatti, come nel procedimento interno, il governo sui cui ordini la proprietà era stata demolita non aveva menzionato, ancor meno sostanziale, quando la proprietà era stata demolita. Secondo la ricorrente, un'azione illecita (che equivaleva a un espropriazione di fatto) in un momento in cui il governo non aveva l'autorità di prendere tale decisione, non poteva essere sanzionata mediante la successiva assunzione sotto il titolo di mandato pubblico, nonostante la sua natura permanente. Ciò è stato ancor più date le condizioni per l'assunzione permanente, vale a dire un misero canone di riconoscimento pagato annualmente.
46. Infatti, senza pregiudizio per quanto sopra, anche supponendo che la demolizione fosse stata lecita, le ricorrenti avevano subito un onere eccessivo, dato che un canone annuo di riconoscimento di 158,40 euro era sproporzionato rispetto al valore reale di vendita dell'immobile, che è stato calcolato come 50.000 euro dall'architetto ex-parte dei richiedenti e da 45.000 euro da parte del governo. Infatti, il canone di locazione riconosciuto, se fosse stato pagato retroattivamente dal 1991, sarebbe stato pari solo a 4.276 euro in ventisette anni, il che non copriva nemmeno le spese sostenute dalle ricorrenti in spese giudiziarie per perseguire il procedimento in questione. Tuttavia, tale canone di locazione di riconoscimento doveva rimanere invariato senza alcuna considerazione dell'aumento dei prezzi degli affitti sul mercato, soprattutto negli ultimi anni. Inoltre, nei primi anni, le ricorrenti non avrebbero potuto istituire un procedimento dinanzi al LAB per stabilire un indennizzo. Questi fattori hanno fatto sì che non vi fossero garanzie procedurali.
47. Infine, le ricorrenti hanno sottolineato che, mentre la presa era stata per l'edilizia sociale, a Malta l'edilizia sociale non era gratuita. In generale, l'edilizia sociale sarebbe stata affittata per un'aliquota sovvenzionata o venduta a un'aliquota ridotta. Pertanto, sarebbe stato il caso che il governo avesse tratto profitto dall'interesse pubblico che invocava.
(b) Il governo
48. Nonostante una domanda in tal senso, il governo non ha fatto osservazioni in merito alla demolizione, salvo che non vi erano prove concrete su quando la proprietà è stata demolita, e quindi che era stata demolita prima dell'acquisizione da parte del governo il del 15 aprile 1989.
49. Per quanto riguarda l'assunzione di un titolo di possesso e di utilizzo (1989-1991) e poi per mandato pubblico (1991 ad oggi), il governo ha ritenuto che le prese fossero legittime in conformità dell'articolo 5 dell'ordinanza e perseguiva un interesse pubblico vale la signora la costruzione di alloggi sociali a seguito di un progetto di sdoganamento. Il governo ha sostenuto che, quando la proprietà era detenuta sotto titolo di possesso e utilizza i ricorrenti, non avevano chiesto la sua conversione ad un altro titolo in termini di diritto. Così, basandosi su Saliba e altri v. Malta (n. 20287/10, - 52, 22 novembre 2011) hanno ritenuto che questo fosse solo un controllo dell'uso della proprietà. Essi accettarono tuttavia che a Saliba e in altri (n. 53), la Corte aveva constatato che la presa sotto il mandato pubblico "verg[ed] su ciò che poteva essere equiparato a un'espropriazione de facto". In ogni caso, secondo il governo, l'importante era il raggiungimento di un giusto equilibrio.
50. Secondo il governo, le misure erano proporzionate agli obiettivi perseguiti. Essi hanno spiegato che l'affitto di acquisizione pagato mentre la proprietà era detenuta sotto titolo di possesso e l'uso era equivalente all'affitto controllato da pagare per tali locali. Tale affitto dipendeva anche dal valore di affitto dichiarato dai proprietari al Land Valuation Office. Sotto il titolo di mandato pubblico, l'affitto dell'acquisizione è stato aumentato del 40%. Essi hanno osservato che i ricorrenti hanno ricevuto un canone di locazione di riconoscimento (stabilito dal LAB) di 158,40 euro all'anno per un immobile del valore dell'architetto del richiedente a circa 17.475 euro con un valore locativo annuo di 611 euro. A parere del governo, dato l'interesse pubblico in questione, le dimensioni e lo stato dell'immobile al momento dell'acquisizione e il reddito medio dell'epoca, tale somma era adeguata nel 1989. Se era vero che l'importo non poteva essere rivisto nonostante l'assunzione fosse permanente, il governo ha ritenuto che i legittimi obiettivi di interesse pubblico giustificassero tali condizioni e quindi le ricorrenti non avevano subito un onere eccessivo, tanto più che dato che non facevano uso della proprietà.
2. La valutazione della Corte
(a) Principi generali
51. Come la Corte ha affermato in diverse occasioni, l'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 comprende tre regole distinte: la prima norma, stabilita nella prima frase del primo comma, è di natura generale ed enuncia il principio del godimento pacifico della proprietà; la seconda regola, contenuta nella seconda frase del primo comma, riguarda la privazione dei beni e la sottopone a determinate condizioni; la terza norma, precisata nel secondo paragrafo, riconosce che gli Stati contraente hanno il diritto, tra l'altro,dicontrollare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale. Le tre regole, tuttavia, non sono distinte nel senso di essere scollegate. La seconda e la terza norma riguardano particolari casi di interferenza con il diritto al godimento pacifico della proprietà e dovrebbero pertanto essere interpretate alla luce del principio generale enunciato nella prima regola (cfr. tra le altre autorità, James e altri contro il Regno Unito,21 febbraio 1986, n. 37, Serie A 98; e Beyeler v. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, n. 98, ECHR 2000-I).
52. Al fine di determinare se vi sia stata una privazione di beni ai quali si tratta della seconda norma, la Corte non deve limitarsi ad esaminare se vi sia stata un'eliminazione o un'espropriazione formale, deve guardare dietro le apparenze e indagare sulla realtà della situazione di cui si è lamentato. Poiché la Convenzione ha lo scopo di garantire diritti "pratici ed efficaci", occorre accertare se tale situazione sia stata un'espropriazione de facto (cfr., tra le altre autorità, Sporrong e L'nnroth v. Svezia,sentenza del 23 settembre 1982, Serie A. 52, pp. 24-25, , 63, e Vasilescu v. Romania,sentenza del 22 maggio 1998, Relazioni di Giudizi e Decisioni 1998-III, p. 1078, 51).
53. Tuttavia, i principi applicabili sono simili, vale a dire che, oltre ad essere leciti, una privazione di beni o un'interferenza come il controllo dell'uso della proprietà deve anche soddisfare il requisito della proporzionalità (vedi Saliba e altri, citati sopra, 54). Come la Corte ha più volte affermato, occorre trovare un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della comunità e le esigenze di tutela dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo, in quanto la ricerca di un equilibrio equo insito nell'intera Convenzione. L'equilibrio richiesto non sarà raggiunto quando l'interessato sopporta un onere individuale ed eccessivo (cfr. Sporrong e Lunroth, citati sopra, 69-74, e Brum-rescu v. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, - 78, ECHR 1999-VII).
(b) Applicazione al caso in esame
(i) La demolizione dell'immobile
54. Nel caso di specie non è contestato che l'immobile sia stato effettivamente demolito. La Corte ritiene che tale demolizione sia stata pari ad un'espropriazione de facto dell'edificio eretto almeno sul terreno interessato, indipendentemente dal suo stato o dalle sue condizioni (cfr., un contrario, Saliba v. Malta, n. 4251/02, n. 33, 8 novembre 2005). La Corte rileva inoltre che, come tenuto dalla Corte costituzionale (cfr. paragrafo 26 sopra) e che traspare dagli elementi di prova e dalle osservazioni della Corte, la demolizione ha avuto luogo prima dell'assunzione sotto titolo di possesso e di uso che è stata ordinata mediante una dichiarazione del Presidente del 27 ottobre 1989, quindi, in un momento in cui il governo aveva semplicemente occupato la proprietà, ma non aveva alcun titolo. Ne consegue che, come tenuto dalla Corte costituzionale, la demolizione era illegittima (cfr. paragrafo 26 sopra, in primis). Inoltre, come anche tenuto da quello stesso tribunale, se fosse stato demolito quando era sotto il titolo di possesso e utilizzo, la demolizione sarebbe stata ancora illegittima, poiché secondo la legge non era possibile demolire una proprietà sotto un titolo di possesso e utilizzo, i diritti connessi erano limitati (vedi paragrafo 26 sopra). In questo caso, non è necessario che la Corte esamini se la demolizione abbia riconosciuto un obiettivo legittimo o se la misura sia stata proporzionata. La Corte rileva che le ricorrenti non sono state in alcun modo risarcite per la demolizione illecita dei loro beni.
(ii) Le successive assunzioni sotto vari titoli
55. Dall'ottobre 1989 all'ottobre 1991 la proprietà è stata presa sotto titolo di possesso e di utilizzo. In base a questo titolo, la presa doveva essere temporanea e infatti è durata solo due anni durante i quali le ricorrenti non hanno mai perso il diritto di vendere l'immobile e il titolo di proprietà non è mai stato trasferito a terzi. Anche se nelle circostanze allora ottenerle una vendita era improbabile, la Corte non può accettare che la misura si sia lamentata di un espropriazione de facto. Tuttavia, il diritto di proprietà delle ricorrenti era fortemente limitato: non potevano esercitare il diritto di utilizzo in termini di possesso fisico. Pertanto, ciò costituiva un mezzo di controllo statale dell'uso della proprietà, che dovrebbe essere esaminato ai sensi del secondo paragrafo dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 (vedi, mutatis mutandis, Saliba e altri,citati sopra, 52).
56. Nell'ottobre 1991 la proprietà è stata presa sotto il titolo di mandato pubblico e le restrizioni sono rimaste le stesse come sopra descritto. Tuttavia, la Corte osserva che il mandato pubblico implica che la proprietà è presa in modo permanente. Di conseguenza, le ricorrenti non erano semplicemente limitate nel loro uso e nel godimento dell'immobile, o temporaneamente prive del loro uso. La Corte ha già ritenuto che in tali circostanze sia possibile che tale interferenza possa essere equiparata a un'espropriazione di fatto (cfr. Saliba e altri,citati sopra, 53).
57. Dato che i principi applicabili sono simili, la Corte valuterà, per quanto possibile, entrambi i regimi contemporaneamente. Le parti non contestano che tali misure siano state attuate conformemente alle disposizioni dell'ordinanza. Le esecuzioni successive sono state pertanto "lecite" ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1. Nel caso di specie, la Corte può anche accettare l'argomentazione del governo secondo cui le misure miravano a creare alloggi sociali, dopo lo sgombero delle baraccopoli. Pertanto, le misure avevano un obiettivo legittimo nell'interesse generale, come richiesto dal secondo paragrafo dell'articolo 1.
58. Per quanto riguarda l'imposizione in possesso e l'uso, la Corte rileva che non è contestato che la legge prevedesse un aumento del 40% per il canone di locazione (applicabile ai fini del possesso pubblico) nei confronti di quello che era stato il canone di locazione (applicabile ai fini del possesso e dell'uso) (cfr. paragrafo 33 sopra). Ne consegue che i ricorrenti avrebbero dovuto essere versati circa 113 euro all'anno per i due anni durante i quali la loro proprietà è stata presa sotto questo titolo. Per quanto riguarda tale importo, il fatto che, come sostenuto dal governo, l'affitto ricevuto fosse in linea con le leggi sugli affitti applicabili sull'isola, non favorisce il caso del governo. Infatti, la Corte ha ritenuto in varie occasioni che la legislazione in materia di affitti controllati a Malta violasse l'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 (si veda Ghigo v. Malta,n. 31122/05, n. 69-70, 26 settembre 2006; Edwards v. Malta, n. 17647/04, n. 78-79, 24 ottobre 2006; Fleri Soler e Camilleri v. Malta, n. 35349/05, 79-80, ECHR 2006X; e Amato Gauci contro Malta, n. 47045/06, 62, 15 settembre 2009). Tuttavia, nella causa, non è necessario che la Corte decida se, dato l'obiettivo legittimo e il valore dell'immobile (il terreno rimanente, vi è il paragrafo 27 sopra) nel momento in cui era tenuto sotto titolo di possesso e di utilizzo (cfr. paragrafo 16 sopra), tale indennizzo era sufficiente, in quanto l'affitto dell'acquisizione applicabile non è mai stato determinato dal LAB né pagato ai ricorrenti.
59. Per quanto riguarda il periodo in cui la proprietà era detenuta sotto il mandato pubblico, a fronte di un canone di locazione di riconoscimento annuo di 158,40 euro, la Corte ritiene che, tenuto conto dell'obiettivo legittimo e del valore dell'immobile (il terreno rimanente) alla luce delle valutazioni del richiedente, può accettare che tale canone fosse ragionevole nel 1991 e negli anni successivi, ma è improbabile che lo sia oggi, tre decenni dopo. La Corte ribadisce che ciò che sarebbe stato giustificato anni fa, non sarà necessariamente giustificato oggi (vedi Amato Gauci, citato sopra, 60, e Saliba e altri,citati sopra, 63). È sufficiente che la Causa europea scopra che, poiché l'affittuario di riconoscimento stabilito per l'assunzione di un mandato pubblico non era soggetto ad alcun aumento futuro nonostante l'evoluzione del mercato immobiliare, tale compensazione decenni dopo l'assunzione iniziale è sproporzionata. Ancora più importante, tale canone di locazione di riconoscimento non era stato pagato fino alla sentenza della Corte costituzionale e sembra essere rimasto non retribuito almeno fino al momento dell'introduzione della domanda, cioè quasi trent'anni dopo la presa.
60. Nella causa, data l'impossibilità che i ricorrenti abbiano mai recuperato i loro beni, che sono stati soggetti a regimi successivi (possesso e uso e successivamente incarico pubblico) e all'importo dell'affitto (almeno negli ultimi anni dal 2015) che per decenni non è stato pagato ai ricorrenti, la Corte ritiene che ai ricorrenti siano stati imposti oneri sproporzionati ed eccessivi. Questi ultimi sono stati tenuti a sostenere la maggior parte dei costi sociali e finanziari della fornitura di alloggi a terzi (vedi, mutatis mutandis, Saliba e altri, citati sopra, 67 , vedi anche Gera de Petri Testaferrata Bonici Ghaxaq, citato sopra,59). Ne consegue che lo Stato maltese non ha risondato il giusto equilibrio tra gli interessi generali della comunità e la tutela del diritto di proprietà dei ricorrenti.
(iii) Conclusione
61. Alla luce di tutti gli elementi di cui sopra la Corte rileva che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1.
II. APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
62. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se la Corte rileva che vi è stata una violazione della Convenzione o dei Protocolli in questione, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta parte contraente interessato consente di risarcire solo parzialmente, la Corte, se necessario, proibirà solo soddisfazione partito ferito.
A. Danni
63. Le ricorrenti hanno richiesto 47.500 euro (EUR) per quanto riguarda i danni pecunurari che rappresentano la media tra le due valutazioni presentate dagli esperti per la privazione illecita di beni e, in alternativa, hanno chiesto alla Corte di considerare legale la misura, hanno rivendicato 33.250 euro alla luce dello scopo pubblico dietro la privazione. Hanno inoltre chiesto 15.000 euro di danni non pecuniari.
64. Il governo ha sostenuto che, qualora la Corte considerasse illegittima l'iniezione, l'aggiudicazione del danno pecuniario non dovrebbe superare i 17.500 euro e che, qualora dovessero constatare il legittimo, il premio non dovrebbe superare gli 8.000 euro. Essi hanno tuttavia ritenuto che in entrambi i casi la Corte avrebbe dovuto ordinare l'apparizione delle ricorrenti su un atto di trasferimento. Il governo ha ritenuto che, dato il premio conferito dalla Corte costituzionale, non fosse dovuto alcun danno non pecuniario e, senza pregiudizio, qualsiasi premio non dovrebbe superare i 2.000 euro.
65. La Corte rileva che le circostanze della presente causa sono molto particolari e che non rientrano perfettamente nelle prassi standard della Corte in relazione alla giusta soddisfazione di cui all'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1, che utilizzano parametri diversi a seconda di situazioni specifiche (si veda, tra molte altre autorità e situazioni, ad esempio, Guiso-Gallisay v. Italia (solo soddisfazione) [gc], n. 58858/00,22 dicembre 2009; per eslegittima; Schembri and Others v. Malta (solo soddisfazione), n. 42583/06, 28 settembre 2010, per assunzioni legittime di fatto senza pagamento di un adeguato indennizzo; B. Tagliaferro & Sons Limited e Coleiro Brothers Limited v. Malta, nos. 75225/13 e 77311/13, 11 settembre 2018, riguardanti le assunzioni legali che straordinarinone non hanno inademportato l'obbligo di interesse pubblico; e Saliba e altri,citati sopra, in merito a un affitto appropriato che avrebbe dovuto essere ricevuto prima di un acquisto a titolo definitivo).
66. Infatti, nella causa di specie, la Corte ha constatato che la demolizione dei beni dei ricorrenti era illegittima, mentre le successive assunzioni erano state legittime e perseguite un interesse pubblico, tuttavia non era stato raggiunto un giusto equilibrio nell'applicazione di tali Misure. La Corte osserva inoltre che, al momento della demolizioni (1989), il valore dell'immobile era stimato dal LAB come pari a 2.320 euro e nel 2011 come EUR 10.575,36; mentre l'architetto dei richiedenti ha stimato il suo valore nel 2005 come 17.500 euro. Inoltre, secondo le valutazioni delle ricorrenti, il valore locativo annuo dell'immobile era di circa 230 euro nel 2005 e di 250 euro nel 2014.
67. Nelle circostanze specifiche del caso, e tenendo presente che i richiedenti potrebbero essere già stati pagati, o in ogni caso che devono ancora essere pagati – somma che rimane pagabile dopo questa sentenza – circa 4.435 euro in affitto fino ad oggi, e che essi n viene versato un canone di locazione di riconoscimento di 158,40 euro fino a quando il governo non decide di prendere la proprietà sotto titolo di acquisto a titolo definitivo (cioè il trasferimento della piena proprietà), la Corte ritiene ragionevole assegnare ai richiedenti, congiuntamente 18.000 euro per quanto riguarda il pecuniario danni, per le violazioni subite.
Essa ha inoltre ritenuto che alle ricorrenti dovrebbero essere concessi 8.500 euro, congiuntamente, in danno non pecuniario.
B. Costi e spese
68. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre chiesto 7.575,35 euro per le spese e le spese sostenute dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali (LAB e procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale) compresi 1.600 euro per quelli sostenuti dinanzi alla Corte, in base alle relative ricevute e fatture presentate alla Corte.
69. Il governo ha ritenuto che l'importo di 766 euro richiesto per quanto riguarda il procedimento LAB non fosse dovuto a un estraneo al procedimento di ricorso. Essi non contestavano i 1.087 euro pagati dai ricorrenti a titolo di spese giudiziarie, ma contestavano gli altri importi rivendicati per il procedimento nazionale. Essi hanno inoltre ritenuto che 1.500 euro fosse un premio sufficiente per i costi sostenuti dinanzi alla Corte.
70. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, il richiedente ha diritto al rimborso delle spese e delle spese solo nella misura in cui è stato dimostrato che questi sono stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e sono ragionevoli per quanto riguarda la quantistica. Nel caso di specie, si tratta dei documenti in suo possesso e dei suddetti criteri, nonché del fatto che il procedimento LAB fa parte del procedimento di ricorso e il fatto che il governo non abbia spiegato il motivo per cui contestano alcune delle rivendicazioni dei ricorrenti che sono stati motivati, la Corte ritiene ragionevole attribuire l'importo di 7.500 euro sotto tutte le spese di copertura.
C. Interessi di default
71. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di default si basi sul tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale si dovrebbero aggiungere tre punti percentuali.
PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
1. Dichiara ammissibile la domanda;
2. ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione;
3. Tiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare i richiedenti,entro tre mesi dalla data incui la sentenza diventa definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 , 2 della Convenzione, i seguenti importi:
(i) 18.000 euro (diciottomila euro), per quanto riguarda i danni pecuniari;
(ii) 8.500 euro (ottomilacinquecento euro), più eventuali imposte che possono essere addebitabili, per danni non pecuniari;
(iii) 7.500 euro (settemilacinquecento euro), più eventuali imposte che possono essere addebitabili ai richiedenti,in relazione a costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei suddetti tre mesi fino alla liquidazione degli interessi semplici siano pagabili sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso di prestito marginale della Banca centrale europea durante il periodo di insolvenza più tre punti percentuali;
4. Respinge il resto della domanda di candidati in consoddisfazione giusta.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 28 maggio 2019, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 n. 2 e 3 del Regolamento.
Stephen Phillips Helen Keller
Registrar President
[allegato]


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.