Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF MARSHALL AND OTHERS v. MALTA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 2 (media)
ARTICOLI: 01,41,13,06,P1-1

NUMERO: 79177/16/2020
STATO: Malta
DATA: 11/02/2020
ORGANO: Sezione Terza


TESTO ORIGINALE

THIRD SECTION

CASE OF MARSHALL AND OTHERS v. MALTA

(Application no. 79177/16)


JUDGMENT


Art 1 P1 • Control of the use of property • Capping of rent levels on commercial properties • Disproportionate individual burden

Art 13 (+ Art 1 P1) • Effective remedy • Constitutional redress proceedings ineffective in present case • Failure to order eviction of tenants or award higher future rents • Insufficient domestic compensation

Art 6 § 1 (civil) • Excessive length of proceedings

Art 13 (+ Art 6 § 1) • Effective remedy • Systemic flaws rendering constitutional redress proceedings ineffective in respect of length-of-proceedings complaints • Lack of speediness • Regular practice of unreasonably low compensation awards


STRASBOURG

11 February 2020

This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.

In the case of Marshall and Others v. Malta,

The European Court of Human Rights (Third Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:

Paul Lemmens, President,
Georgios A. Serghides,
Alena Polá?ková,
María Elósegui,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerström,
Lorraine Schembri Orland, judges,
and Stephen Phillips, Section Registrar,

Having deliberated in private on 21 January 2020,

Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:

PROCEDURE

1. The case originated in an application (no. 79177/16) against the Republic of Malta lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by Ms Mary Marshall a Maltese national, Ms Marie Christiane Ramsay Pergola, a British national and the estate of the late Marquis John Scicluna (represented by its administrator Marcus John Scicluna Marshall as duly authorised by the Civil Court (First Hall) (Voluntary Jurisdiction) on 5 May 2016) (“the applicants”), lodged on 16 December 2016.
2. The applicants were represented by Dr I. Refalo, Dr M. Refalo and Dr S. Grech, lawyers practising in Valletta. The Maltese Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Dr P. Grech, Attorney General.
3. The applicants complained, in particular, that the Constitutional Court judgment in their favour failed to give them appropriate redress for the violations suffered, they therefore remained victims of a violation of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 6 September 2018 notice of the complaints concerning Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 6 § 1 (length of proceedings), as well as Article 13 in connection with both just-mentioned articles was given to the Government and the remainder of the application was declared inadmissible pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
5. The British Government did not make use of their right to intervene in the proceedings (Article 36 § 1 of the Convention).

THE FACTS

THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. Details of the applicants are set out in the Annex.

Background to the case
7. The applicants are owners of commercial properties nos. 1 to 5 in St George’s Square, Valletta and nos. 132 to 135 Strait Street, Valletta (hereinafter jointly referred to as “the property”).
8. On 30 July 1958 the applicants’ ancestor (the late Marquis John Scicluna) leased the premises no. 1 to 5 in St George’s Square, Valletta, to Scicluna’s Bank for ten years starting on 1 January 1959 for the annual rent of 800 pounds sterling (GBP).
9. In March 1968, the premises no. 132 to 135 Strait Street, Valletta, adjacent to the other premises, were incorporated into the lease contract for use by Scicluna’s Bank. Thereinafter the lease was renewed every year.
10. On an unspecified date, Scicluna’s Bank was merged with the National Bank of Malta Ltd, and the contract of lease was renewed. The conditions imposed in the lease contracts of 1958 and 1968 et sequi stipulated that the property would be used as the seat of Scicluna’s Bank and that it could not be sublet or used for other purposes.
11. By means of Act XLV of 1973 as amended by Act IX of 1974 the Bank of Valletta (hereinafter “the Bank”) was established and the lease of the property was transferred in the name of the Bank by operation of law. The Bank was wholly owned by the Government.
12. The applicants objected to the transfer, considering it a breach of contract. Following numerous requests for the return of the property and futile attempts to agree over a new lease contract with appropriate conditions, in 1989 the applicants instituted ordinary proceedings (no. 926/1989) before the civil courts, in their ordinary jurisdiction, to regain possession of the property. In the applicants’ view, since it was a business lease and therefore a going concern which could be terminated at any time, the special rent laws under Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta did not apply to it.
13. Twenty?one years later, the case was determined by a final judgment of the Court of Appeal of 25 June 2010, whereby the court found that the lease in favour of the Bank was protected under Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta (until 2028) and therefore that the ordinary courts were not the competent forum to address the applicants’ complaints.
14. Over time the Government reduced its stake in the Bank by selling shares to private third parties.

Constitutional redress proceedings
15. On 11 November 2010 the applicants instituted constitutional redress proceedings relying on, inter alia, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and Article 6 § 1 of the Convention (fair trial within a reasonable time).
16. By a judgment of 9 February 2016 the Civil Court (First Hall) in its constitutional competence upheld the applicants’ claims in part. It found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention and a breach of the reasonable time requirement under Article 6 of the Convention in relation to proceedings no. 926/1989, and awarded the applicants 1,000,000 euros (EUR) in compensation. Costs were to be paid by the defendants.
17. In so far as relevant, the court rejected i) the defendant’s plea that the applicants had not presented proof of their title to the property ii) the defendant’s objection ratione temporis and iii) the defendant’s objection of non-exhaustion of ordinary remedies. The court noted that previous judicial action had recognised the applicants’ interest; that the situation complained of was a continuous one; and that the applicants had no ordinary remedies available to them given that the Rent Regulation Board (RRB) was not an effective remedy.
18. On the merits, the court found that the applicants had been deprived of their possessions, but the legislative intervention had been lawful (the lease at issue was valid at law and the Bank remained protected) and pursued the public interest in view of the economic climate at the time. Nevertheless, in the absence of adequate compensation there had been a breach of the applicants’ property rights. The court noted that, according to the court?appointed expert, the estimated rental value of the property in 2014 was EUR 159,350 [annually]. The rent received by the applicants was thus derisory and as a result they were suffering an excessive burden.
19. The court found a violation of the reasonable time requirement under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention in the light of the twenty?one year duration of the civil proceedings instituted by the applicants.
20. The Government and the applicants appealed.
21. By a judgment of 24 June 2016, the Constitutional Court upheld only in a limited part both appeals and confirmed the first?instance judgment, with a varied reasoning in part, but reduced the compensation to EUR 25,000.
22. In particular, the Constitutional Court confirmed the first?instance court’s rejection of the claim of non?exhaustion of ordinary remedies, noting that it had not been clear whether the competent forum to determine the matter was the civil courts or the RRB. The applicants pursued the remedy before the civil courts and it took the latter twenty?one years to come to the conclusion that they were not the competent forum. The first?instance court had thus been correct in looking into the merits of the case.
23. As to the merits, the Constitutional Court confirmed that the measure was disproportionate given the striking difference between the rent the applicants received, EUR 4,277.80 annually, and its rental value on the market, EUR 159,350 annually. The amendments as a result of Act X of 2009 [which amended the Civil Code and was aimed at ameliorating the position of land owners who were subject to controlled rents] were of little comfort given that the applicants had been suffering a breach for a long time and would continue to do so for another twelve years given that Article 1531I of the Civil Code resulting from the 2009 amendments ? which provided for a possibility of owners regaining their property ? could only come to play after twenty years from 2008. Furthermore, the fact that the applicants had not lodged proceedings before the RRB could not play in their disfavour given that the RRB was bound by law and therefore it could not award an amount of rent which would have fulfilled the proportionality requirement.
24. As to the violation of Article 6, the Constitutional Court noted, in brief, that the case had started in 1989 and the submission of evidence came to an end in 1994. It then took four years for the applicants to file their submissions. At that stage the court accepted the applicants’ request to nominate a court-appointed expert, but it then took six years, until 2006, for a court?appointed expert to submit a technical report, which was confirmed on oath in January 2007, and a first?instance judgment was delivered on 28 March 2008. During that time, in 2003 the court had asked the parties for submissions and the applicants had presented their submissions only a year later in 2004. The proceedings before the appeal court had not been excessively long, while it was true that the appeal was lodged on 16 April 2008 and was appointed for hearing on 12 April 2010, the final judgment had been issued just two months later. It was thus clear that most of the delay was due to the applicants, namely, four years for their submissions, and then six years for the additional technical experts’ report ? although the latter’s delay was justified given that two of the experts had to be replaced. However, given that the case was of average complexity the State could not be exonerated from its responsibility of an overall twenty?one?year delay. Nevertheless, given the responsibility of the applicants for part of the delay, in the Constitutional Court’s view a finding of a violation was sufficient just satisfaction in the present case.
25. As to redress, the Constitutional Court considered that it was not the adequate forum to decide on the eviction of a tenant, which was the competence of the ordinary courts or the RRB. However, given that the application of Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta, in combination with Act XLV of 1973 as amended by Act IX of 1974 had breached the applicants’ human rights, the Constitutional Court ordered that such laws could no longer be relied on as a basis for the occupation of the premises in the present case. As to compensation, having considered that the applicants had waited twenty?three years to lodge constitutional redress proceedings and the disproportion of the rent received by the applicants in the light of the market value, as well as the order invalidating the effects of the impugned laws between the parties at issue, the Constitutional Court awarded EUR 25,000. Costs were to be paid in the ratio of 3/5 by the applicants (amounting to EUR 4,620.43) and 2/5 by the Government.

RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
26. The relevant provision of the Reletting of Urban Property (Regulation) Ordinance, Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta, enacted in June 1931 and subsequently amended, and those of the Civil Code, Chapter 16 of the Laws of Malta, as amended in 2009, are set out in Zammit and Attard Cassar v. Malta (no. 1046/12, §§ 26-27, 30 July 2015).

27. Act XLV of 1973 and Act IX of 1974 vested the administration and full control of The National Bank of Malta and Tagliaferro Bank in the Council of Administration, which in turn passed the assets of The National Bank of Malta to the Bank of Valletta.

THE LAW

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
28. The applicants complained that the Constitutional Court judgment in their favour failed to give them appropriate redress for the violation suffered, they therefore remained victims of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:

“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.

The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
29. The Government contested that argument.

Admissibility
The Government’s objection of lack of victim status
30. The Government submitted that the applicants had lost their victim status following the Constitutional Court’s finding which acknowledged the violation and awarded EUR 25,000 in compensation. Moreover, the Constitutional Court had also made an order to the effect that the bank could no longer rely on the relevant law to retain title to the property, thus in theory it had evicted the Bank.
31. Relying on the Court’s case?law the applicants maintained that they remained victims of the violation upheld by the Constitutional Court. They noted that the rental value of the property according to the court?appointed expert was EUR 159,300 annually, thus the domestic court’s award of EUR 25,000 had only covered two months’ of rent, not forty years. Moreover, the applicants were made to pay part costs on appeal. The final award was also in stark contrast with the EUR 1,000,000 awarded by the first?instance court. Further, the applicants considered that the declaration facilitating eviction did not make up for the losses incurred since 1974.
32. The Court refers to its general principles about the matter as set out in Apap Bologna v. Malta (no. 46931/12, §§ 41 and 43, 30 August 2016).
33. In the present case the Court notes that there has been an acknowledgment of the violation by the domestic courts. As to whether appropriate and sufficient redress was granted, the Court considers that even assuming that the market value is not applicable and the rent valuations may be decreased due to the legitimate aim at issue, an award of EUR 25,000 – from which part costs amounting to EUR 4,620.43 had to be paid – for a property whose rental value on the market was EUR 159,350 annually (at least in 2014) as accepted by the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 23 above) cannot be considered sufficient for a violation which persisted for decades during which the applicants were being paid a disproportionate amount of rent.

34. That finding alone suffices to find that the redress provided by the Constitutional Court did not offer sufficient relief to the applicants, who thus retain victim status for the purposes of this complaint.35. The Government’s objection is therefore dismissed.

Conclusion
36. The Court notes that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
37. The applicants submitted that there had been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as upheld by the domestic courts.
38. The Government submitted that the applicants had not suffered any interference since they had voluntarily entered in to the contract and in any event a fair balance had been struck by the authorities.
39. Having regard to the findings of the domestic courts relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (see paragraph 23 above), the Court considers that it is not necessary to re?examine in detail the merits of the complaint. It finds that, as established by the domestic courts, the applicants were made to bear a disproportionate burden. In addition, the Court observes that while the overall measure may be in the general interest, the fact that there also exists an underlying private interest of a commercial nature cannot be disregarded (see, mutatis mutandis, Zammit and Attard Cassar v. Malta, no. 1046/12, § 63, 30 July 2015, and Bradshaw and Others v. Malta, no. 37121/15, § 64, 23 October 2018).
40. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention.

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 6 § 1 OF THE CONVENTION
41. The applicants complained of a violation of the reasonable time requirement under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention which read as follows:
“In the determination of his civil rights and obligations ..., everyone is entitled to a ... hearing within a reasonable time by [a] ... tribunal...”

Scope of the complaint
42. The Court notes that in their application the applicants did not explicitly complain about the duration of the constitutional redress proceedings under Article 6 § 1 of the Convention. In consequence, despite any reference to this matter in their observations, the Court considers that the scope of the present complaint, as communicated to the respondent Government, solely refers to the duration of the civil proceedings no. 926/1989, which lasted twenty-one years over two jurisdictions.

Admissibility
The Government’s objection of lack of victim status
43. The Government submitted that the applicants had lost their victim status following the Constitutional Court’s finding which acknowledged the violation and awarded compensation.
44. The applicants submitted that they were still victims as no compensation had been awarded to them in respect of this violation.
45. The Court refers to its general principles about the matter in relation to complaints of length of proceedings as set out in Central Mediterranean Development Corporation Limited v. Malta (no. 35829/03, §§ 24-26 and 28, 24 October 2006).
46. The Court notes that no compensation whatsoever has been awarded to the applicants for the acknowledged breach of Article 6 § 1 concerning proceedings which lasted more than twenty years over two jurisdictions, as the Constitutional Court considered that a finding of a violation amounted to sufficient compensation, given that most of the delay was due to the applicants (see paragraph 24). The Court observes that what the Constitutional Court considered as “most of the delay” amounted on its own account to about ten years (four for submissions and six years for the court?appointed expert reports) out of twenty?one, and the Constitutional Court considered that the six years’ delay awaiting the experts who had to be replaced following their promotion was also partly justified. In this connection, the Court would reiterate that experts work in the context of judicial proceedings under the supervision of a judge, who remains responsible for the preparation and speedy conduct of proceedings (see, for instance, Proszak v. Poland, 16 December 1997, § 44, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1997?VIII, and ?ukjaniuk v. Poland, no. 15072/02, § 28, 7 November 2006). It follows that the applicants conduct cannot be said to have contributed to “most of the delay”. Moreover, the Constitutional Court explicitly remarked that, given that the case was of average complexity the State could not be exonerated from its responsibility of an overall twenty?one year delay.
47. It has not been shown in the present case that the applicants were largely responsible for the delay of the proceedings, nor that only a small part of the extraordinarily lengthy proceedings was attributable to the State (see, a contrario, Piper v. the United Kingdom, no. 44547/10, §§ 73?74, 21 April 2015, and McNamara v. the United Kingdom, Committee judgment no. 22510/13, §§ 67?68, 12 January 2017). In that light, the Court cannot consider that the Constitutional Court gave sufficient reasons for denying the applicants any compensation whatsoever.
48. It follows that the applicants retain victim status for the purposes of this complaint and the Government’s objection is therefore dismissed.

Conclusion
49. The Court considers that the complaint is not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that it is not inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
50. The applicants complained that their case had lasted unreasonably long. They considered that irrespective of any delaying factors it was not justifiable to take twenty years to decide a case, and that the responsibility lay with the courts.
51. The Government submitted that while the case had not been complex, the applicants’ behaviour had contributed to the delay. It followed that there had been no violation of Article 6.
52. Having regard to the findings of the domestic courts relating to the length of proceedings (see paragraph 24 above), and the Court’s considerations set out above (see paragraphs 46?47) the Court considers that it is not necessary to re?examine in detail the merits of the complaint. It finds that, as established by the domestic courts, the reasonable time requirement has been breached.
53. There has accordingly been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 13 OF THE CONVENTION
54. The applicants further complained that the Constitutional Court judgment in their favour failed to give them appropriate redress for the violations suffered. Thus, in their view, given the domestic case?law, constitutional redress proceedings could not be considered as an effective remedy. Article 13 reads as follows:

“Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in [the] Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity.”

Admissibility
55. The Government submitted that the applicants could have instituted a fresh set of constitutional redress proceedings to complain under Article 13 about the Constitutional Court judgment.
56. The applicants submitted that such an action would not have been appropriate and that the ordinary action at such stage was to bring the complaint before the Court.
57. The Government’s objection to this effect has been repeatedly rejected by this Court (see, amongst multiple authorities, Apap Bologna, cited above, § 63 and more recently Grech and Others v. Malta, no. 69287/14, § 50, 15 January 2019). The Court sees no reason to reach a different conclusion in the present case.
58. The Government’s objection is therefore dismissed.
59. Further, the Court notes that it has already found a violation of Article 6 and Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, it follows that the applicants’ claims are arguable for the purposes of Article 13.
60. The Court considers that the complaints under Article 13 in conjunction with both provisions are not manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention. It further notes that they are not inadmissible on any other grounds. They must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
61. The applicants submitted that, in connection with the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, as per its usual practice, the Constitutional Court, had i) failed to evict the tenants, ii) awarded a meagre amount of compensation ii) imposed costs of the proceedings on the successful applicants. In connection with Article 6 it had failed to award any compensation whatsoever.
62. In connection with the remedy in relation to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, while it was true that the courts of constitutional jurisdiction had “unlimited powers”, in this case those courts had failed to use their wide?ranging powers to rectify the breach. Indeed, domestic case?law showed that the Constitutional Court systematically reduced compensation awards made by the first?instance constitutional jurisdiction without giving any weighty reasons, and sometimes also without any adequate reasoning. Moreover, generally the Constitutional Court also ordered applicants who had been successful in their claims to pay part of the costs of the proceedings. They made reference to a number of domestic cases (see the list set out in Grech and Others, cited above, § 53).

63. As to eviction orders the applicants noted that the Constitutional Court had persistently struck down first-instance decisions by the constitutional jurisdictions which had ordered such evictions, as shown by the list submitted by the Government (see paragraph 67 below). It was only in some of those cases that the Constitutional Court ordered, instead, that the tenants could no longer rely on the relevant law to maintain title to the property. The applicants considered that the latter order was not tantamount to an eviction order. It was true that, like in the present case, once the Constitutional Court had ordered that the tenants could no longer rely on the relevant provisions of law to retain title to the property, an owner is sometimes successful in evicting the tenant. However, in the applicants’ view, such a process was burdensome and entailed another set of proceedings.
64. In connection with the remedy in relation to Article 6, the applicants relied on the list submitted by the Government which showed an inconsistency in the amounts awarded when compared to the relevant delay. They also noted that the Constitutional Court often considered a breach of Article 6 incidental to the main breach and compensation for the latter was absorbed by the main breach - they relied on Vica Limited vs the Commissioner of Land, Constitutional Court judgment of 3 February 2012. In other cases the Constitutional Court simply opted to find that a finding of a violation is sufficient just satisfaction, without providing any monetary compensation - they relied on Pawlu Cachia vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 28 December 2001.
(b) The Government
65. The Government submitted that constitutional proceedings were capable of providing adequate redress for the violation found by the domestic courts. In fact and in practice, the courts of constitutional jurisdiction could award any type of redress, ranging from an award of compensation, which was the usual type of redress granted in cases of a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 (they relied, for example, on AIC Joseph Barbara vs the Prime Minister, Constitutional Court judgment of 31 January 2014, and Angela sive Gina Balzan vs the Prime Minister, Constitutional Court judgment of 7 December 2012), to various other types of orders. The Government submitted, as examples from actual judgments, the reintegration of an employee into the public service, as well as an order made to the courts of criminal jurisdiction to discard a statement made by the accused when it had been taken by the police without legal assistance. They reiterated that there were no limits to the powers of the courts of constitutional jurisdiction to grant redress for Convention violations.
66. In reply to the Court’s specific request in relation to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to submit relevant examples, the Government submitted the following cases where the domestic courts of constitutional jurisdiction upheld the violation of the claimants’ property rights (in circumstances similar to the present case), awarded compensation and ordered that the tenants could no longer rely on the protection afforded by Chapter 158 of the Laws of Malta to retain title to the property, and thus facilitated eviction:
- Maria Pia sive Marian vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 31 January 2014,
- Vincent Curmi vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 24 June 2016,
- Rose Borg vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 11 July 2016,
- Maria Stella sive Estelle Azzopardi Vella et vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 30 September 2016.
67. A further four examples of the like dated 2018 were also included:
- Thomas Cauchi et vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 2 March 2018,
- Evelyn Montebello et vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 13 July 2018,
- John Mattei et vs the Housing Authority Constitutional Court judgment of 5 October 2018,
- Maria Pia sive Marian Galea vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 14 December 2018.
In the last?mentioned three cases the Constitutional Court revoked the eviction order which had been ordered by the first?instance court. In the other case the claimants had not been successful at first?instance.
68. The Government also submitted four examples dated 2016 where no eviction was ordered by the courts:
- Carmelo Grech vs the Housing Authority, Constitutional Court judgment of 10 February 2016;
- Maria Ludgarda sive Mary Borg et vs Rosario Mifsud et, Raymond Constitutional Court judgment of 29 April 2016;
- Cassar Torreggiani et vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 29 April 2016;
- Ian Peter Ellis et vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 24 June 2016.
69. In reply to the Court’s specific question in relation to Article 6, the Government relied on the Court’s findings in Central Mediterranean Development Corporation Limited (cited above). They also submitted a list of examples showing the compensation awarded by the Constitutional Court when upholding violations of the reasonable time requirement, the most recent of which are listed hereunder:
- John A. Said Pro et Noe vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 11 December 2011 – EUR 1,000 for 12 years [one instance];
- Joseph Camilleri vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 28 September 2012 – EUR 7,000 plus interest to date of payment, for 15 years [two instances];
- Joseph Lebrun vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 26 May 2014 – EUR 6,000 for 6 years plus EUR 10 per day until the bill of indictment is issued;
- Omar Asman Omar vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 6 February 2015 – EUR 4,000 and EUR 2,000 respectively to the victims for 5 years 8 months [one instance];
- Raymond Bonnici vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 2 March 2015 – EUR 700 for 23 years [one instance];
- Daniel Alexander Holmes vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 16 March 2015 – no compensation for 7 years [two instances];
- Iris Cassar vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 27 March 2015 – EUR 8,000 for 20 years [two instances];
- Samuel Onyeabor vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 14 December 2015 – EUR 5,000 for 7 years [one instance];
- Zakkarija Calleja vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 15 December 2015 – EUR 2,000 for 43 years [one instance];
- Anton Camilleri vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 1 February 2016 – EUR 3,000 for 6 years [one instance];
- Joseph Camilleri vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 27 May 2016 – EUR 4,000 for 11 years [one instance];
- Joseph Gauci vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 24 June 2016 – EUR 5,000 for 16 years [two instances];
- Malcolm Said vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 24 June 2016 – EUR 800 for five years [one instance];
- Filippa Seguna vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 30 September 2016 – EUR 3,000 for 23 years [one instance];
- Mario Schembri vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 24 November 2017 – EUR 3,000 for 7 years [one instance];
- Gordi Felice vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 27 November 2017 – EUR 6,000 for 13 years [two instances];
- Emmanuel Borg vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 13 July 2018 – EUR 3,000 for 33 years [two instances];
- Roberta Grech vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 5 October 2018 – EUR 8,000 for 8 years [one instance];
- Liliana Farrugia vs the Attorney General, Constitutional Court judgment of 5 October 2018 – EUR 8,000 for 20 years [two instances].

The Court’s assessment
(a) Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1
70. The Court reiterates its general principles under Article 13 as set out in Apap Bologna (cited above, §§ 76-79). In particular it reiterates that, for the purposes of Article 13, it is for the Court to determine whether the means available to an applicant for raising a complaint are “effective” in the sense either of preventing the alleged violation or its continuation or of providing adequate redress for any violation that had already occurred. In certain cases a violation cannot be made good through the mere payment of compensation and the inability to render a binding decision granting redress may also raise issues (ibid., § 77).

(i) “Preventing the alleged violation or its continuation”

71. The Court notes that as in Apap Bologna, cited above, and Portanier v. Malta (no. 55747/16, 27 August 2019), in the present case the constitutional jurisdictions and in particular the Constitutional Court did not order the eviction of the tenant. There is no doubt that, in law, the courts of constitutional jurisdiction could annul an order and evict a tenant (as sometimes ordered by the first-instance constitutional jurisdiction, see paragraph 67 in fine above), which measure would have prevented the continuation of the violation. However, it is clear, from the case?law relied on by the Government, that in situations such as those of the present case, namely where as a result of a protected rent regime (such as that arising from Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta at issue in the present case) the owners have suffered an excessive burden leading to a violation, the courts of constitutional jurisdiction, and in particular the Constitutional Court on appeal, do not take such action. More particularly, the Constitutional Court revokes such an action when it was ordered by the first?instance court. Indeed, the Government have not provided one example of a final finding ordering eviction, despite having been requested to do so, and despite the fact that numerous violations of the kind have been found at the domestic level. In similar circumstances, in Apap Bologna (concerning violations arising from requisition orders) the Court found that, despite having the power to do so, in practice, the Constitutional Court had repeatedly failed to take the required action which would bring the violation to an end (ibid., § 86).
72. In Apap Bologna, § 88, the Court, noting that it was not for it to interpret domestic law, also expressed regret at the interpretation given by the constitutional jurisdictions as to their impossibility of awarding a higher future rent. According to the Court, such an order would constitute a measure vis?à?vis an individual applicant, which would provide for an end to the violation without affecting the tenant. The same was reiterated in the more recent Portanier judgment, § 48, which noted that this course of action has not been popular with the constitutional jurisdictions, and where the Court reiterated that in the event that the constitutional jurisdictions award a higher future rent (to be paid by the Government, with the possibility of an arrangement with the tenants who would have for years benefitted from a generous regime), eviction would not always be necessary. Indeed, when the measure did pursue a legitimate aim (such as the social protection of needy tenants), the adaptation of the future rent to present circumstances might be sufficient to repair the existing disproportionality and thus bring the violation to an end. The Court notes that, in the present case, despite the less weighty legitimate aim, an adequate future rent in the light of that aim, could nonetheless bring the violation to an end. Moreover, the future rent would have had to be established only until 2028 date when the lease will no longer be protected under Chapter 69 of the Laws of Malta. Nevertheless, the Constitutional Court did not take that approach.
73. The Court notes that in the present case, while none of the above actions were taken, the Constitutional Court took an alternative action. It ordered that the tenants could no longer rely on the relevant law provisions to retain title to the property. From the domestic case?law brought to the Court’s attention by the Government, that same action appears to have become customary, at least since 2016. In Portanier the Court maintained that it still had doubts as to this approach, and reiterated its reservations about the fact that the Constitutional Court, whose role is to bring a violation to an end and to redress the upheld violation, abdicates the responsibility assigned to it by the Constitution of Malta and refers applicants to yet another remedy despite it having the power and authority to grant such redress (§ 51). In that case, while having set out a number of considerations, in view of the parties’ limited submissions and the fact that the applicant had been successful in evicting the tenants, the Court refrained from adjudicating on the effectiveness of that approach in general (§§ 52?54). Similar considerations apply in the present case in relation to the parties’ limited submissions, and for, inter alia, those same reasons the Court will refrain from adjudicating on the matter in general. The Court will however adjudicate on the effectiveness of such a measure in the present case.

74. Firstly, the Court notes that it has not been informed that eviction proceedings were undertaken and if so that they have been concluded. Nor has the Court been informed that the tenants have voluntarily vacated the property since they now (as a result of the Constitutional Court judgment) no longer have title to it (in the absence of the relevant protection of law). It follows that the inaction of both parties has led to the status quo remaining that which existed on the date of the Constitutional Court judgment, more than three years ago. In this connection the Court makes reference to its case?law to the effect that it is inappropriate to require an individual who has obtained judgment against the State at the end of legal proceedings to then bring enforcement proceedings to obtain satisfaction (Musci v. Italy [GC], no. 64699/01, § 90 ECHR 2006?V (extracts)). That reasoning appears to be relevant to the situation in the present case, and echoes the concerns expressed by the Court in Portanier concerning a further set of eviction proceedings.
75. However, leaving that matter open, the Court notes that, unlike the situation in other similar cases against Malta where the interferences had been justified by the legitimate aim of providing social housing, in the present case the interference applied in favour of a commercial entity, namely a bank. Moreover, as the law stood at the time of the Constitutional Court proceedings, the bank would in any event lose the protection of the law and therefore would have to vacate the property when the lease comes to an end in 2028. It follows that, in the circumstances of the present case, there seems to be no particular justification for delaying redress and continuing to perpetrate the violation established. Thus, in the absence of an award covering future rent until 2028, the Court considers that the only remedy capable of giving adequate and speedy redress to the applicants in the situation of the present case was for the Constitutional Court to order eviction – a course of action it failed to undertake, as is its normal practice (see paragraph 71 above).
76. It follows from the above that, in the present case, because of the deficiency in the redress given by the Constitutional Court the violation still persists and thus the remedy at issue did not prevent its continuation.

(ii) “Providing adequate redress for any violation that had already occurred”
77. The Court notes that it has repeatedly found that the sums awarded in compensation by the Constitutional Court do not constitute adequate redress. It also makes reference to its considerations in paragraphs 33 and 34 above where the Court found that the financial redress offered was also not adequate in the present case.
78. The Court reiterates that, just like an award for pecuniary damage under Article 41 of the Convention, an award for pecuniary damage made by a domestic court must be intended to put the applicant, as far as possible, in the position he would have enjoyed had the breach not occurred. It transpires from the information and cases brought before the Court that this is often not the case. Such pecuniary awards are also often not accompanied by an adequate award of non-pecuniary damage and/or an order for the payment of the relevant costs (ibid. § 90 and Grech and Others, cited above, § 62). No domestic case-law dispelling such conclusions has been brought to the Court’s attention in the present case.

(iii) Conclusion
79. In the light of the above considerations, the Court concludes that although constitutional redress proceedings are an effective remedy in theory, they are not so in practice, in cases such as the present one. In consequence, they cannot be considered an effective remedy for the purposes of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerning arguable complaints in respect of the rent laws in place, which though lawful and pursuing legitimate objectives, impose an excessive individual burden on applicants.
80. No other remedies have been referred to by the Government.
81. Accordingly, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 13, in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
(b) Article 13 in conjunction with Article 6 § 1 (length of proceedings)
82. As regards length-of-proceedings cases, the Court reiterates that a remedy designed to expedite the proceedings in order to prevent them from becoming excessively lengthy is the most effective solution (see Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 183, ECHR 2006?V). However, States can also choose to introduce only a compensatory remedy, without that remedy being regarded as ineffective. The Court has set key criteria for verification of the effectiveness of a compensatory remedy in respect of the excessive length of judicial proceedings. These criteria are as follows:
– an action for compensation must be heard within a reasonable time;
– the compensation must be paid promptly and generally no later than six months from the date on which the decision awarding compensation becomes enforceable;
– the procedural rules governing an action for compensation must conform to the principle of fairness guaranteed by Article 6 of the Convention;
– the rules regarding legal costs must not place an excessive burden on litigants where their action is justified;
– the level of compensation must not be unreasonable in comparison with the awards made by the Court in similar cases (see Valada Matos das Neves v. Portugal, no. 73798/13, § 73, 29 October 2015, and Brudan v. Romania, no. 75717/14, § 69, 10 April 2018).
83. On this last criterion, the Court indicated that, with regard to pecuniary damage, the domestic courts are clearly in a better position to determine the existence and quantum. The situation is, however, different with regard to non-pecuniary damage. There is a strong, although rebuttable, presumption in favour of non-pecuniary damage being occasioned by the excessive length of proceedings. However, there may also be situations where no such damage, or only minimal damage, has been ascertained – for instance where an applicant’s conduct has entirely or partly caused the procrastination or where the delay has been caused by circumstances independent of the authorities (see Rutkowski and Others v. Poland, nos. 72287/10 and 2 others, § 182, 7 July 2015, and the case?law cited therein).
84. In the present case the Court will evaluate the effectiveness of the remedy, namely constitutional redress proceedings, in the light of the criteria mentioned above (§ 82).
85. The Court notes that the parties have not argued, and therefore, for the purposes of the present case, the Court has no reason to doubt that constitutional redress proceedings are, in principle, governed by the procedural fairness guarantees provided by Article 6, and that the compensation awards made are, generally, paid promptly.
86. Neither have the parties accentuated or defended at length the issue of the costs of the proceedings. Nevertheless, the Court cannot ignore that it has repeatedly found (in the context of cases relating to Article 1 of Protocol No. 1) that compensation awards are reduced or even absorbed by an order for the payment of costs (see, as recent examples, Zammit and Vassallo v. Malta, no. 43675/16, § 42, 28 May 2019, and Portanier, cited above, § 55). The same occurred in the present case, where in proceedings where the applicants’ claims under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and Article 6 in connection with the length of proceedings were upheld, the Constitutional Court nevertheless ordered the applicants to pay 3/5 of the costs of the proceedings (see paragraph 25 above). Thus, while it has not been argued that such costs impede access to such a remedy, they, at the very least, often have an impact on the compensation awarded.
87. The Court observes that there existed no limit on the amount of compensation which could be granted to an applicant in such proceedings. The redress to be awarded is based solely on the exercise by the domestic court judges’ of their discretion as to what might constitute appropriate pecuniary redress in the circumstances of the particular case. The mere fact that an amount of compensation awarded is low, or that no amount is awarded at all, does not render the remedy in itself ineffective, although it does have an impact on the Court’s assessment of the applicant’s victim status concerning the length of proceedings complaint (see, mutatis mutandis, Zarb v. Malta, no. 16631/04, § 51, 4 July 2006, and ?liwi?ski v. Poland, no. 40063/06, § 36, 5 January 2010 respectively). In the present case the Constitutional Court denied the applicants any compensation whatsoever without giving sufficient reasons (see paragraph 47-48 above). Moreover, the two cases relied on by the applicants and one of the cases put forward by the Government, as well as the applicants’ own case, suggest that the Maltese Constitutional Court far too often fails to award any compensation at all for such breaches. Even when they do make an award, the cases brought forward by the Government indicate that the Constitutional Court generally awards sums which do not constitute adequate redress (compare, Apap Bologna, cited above, § 89, in relation to pecuniary awards in property cases). Indeed, the Court observes that in around two thirds of the cases relied on by the Government the Constitutional Court made awards which were significantly lower (between 20 and 40 % of the amount), or even manifestly unreasonably lower (as low as 2 and 5 % of the amount) than what the Court would have awarded in those circumstances. Thus, the material brought forward by the parties appears to be sufficient evidence to show that the remedy at issue does not fulfil this criterion due to a regular practice of significantly or unreasonably low compensation awards in such cases, or even no compensation at all, as happened in the present case.
88. Further, the Court recalls that a remedy which could last for several years through two jurisdictions would not be reconcilable with the requirement that the remedy for delay (even before a constitutional court) be sufficiently swift (see McFarlane v. Ireland [GC], no. 31333/06, § 123, 10 September 2010, and the case?law cited therein). In particular, the Court has held that to conform with the reasonable time principle, a remedy for length of proceedings should not in principle and in the absence of exceptional circumstances, last more than two and half years over two jurisdictions, including the execution phase (see Gagliano Giorgi v. Italy, no. 23563/07, § 73, ECHR 2012). The Court notes that the parties have not elaborated on this matter. However, the fact that the constitutional redress proceedings in the present case lasted nearly six years over two jurisdictions raises doubts about the speediness of the remedial action itself.
89. The Court concludes that, in the light of the above considerations and bearing in mind the systemic flaws identified above, the Government have not demonstrated that constitutional redress proceedings, which are an effective remedy in theory, constituted effective remedies in practice, for length of proceedings complaints at the relevant time, as demonstrated by the circumstances of the present case.
90. Accordingly, the Court finds that there has been a violation of Article 13, in conjunction with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention.

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
91. Article 41 of the Convention provides:

“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”

Damage
The parties’ submissions
92. The applicants claimed 14,291,500 euros (EUR) in respect of pecuniary damage and EUR 598,000 in non-pecuniary damage. The pecuniary damage represented the loss of rent calculated by the court?appointed expert as being EUR 159,350 annually multiplied by 45 years, from which had to be deducted the EUR 25,000 awarded by the domestic court, resulting in EUR 7,145,750 and the same sum in interest according to law. The non-pecuniary claim was calculated on the basis of EUR 10,000 per year for the violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, and EUR 3,000 per year for the twenty year delay in the proceedings plus the six year delay before the constitutional redress proceedings, as well as EUR 35,000 each for the two violations of Article 13. The legal representatives indicated their firm’s bank account to receive payment of all the sums awarded by the Court.
93. The Government submitted that the applicants’ claims were grossly exaggerated. They noted that according to the evaluation of their own ex parte architect the market rental price of the property in 2014 was EUR 93,500 annually. Moreover, at least until the year 2000, the rent received was commensurate to the market prices, thus sums in respect of those years were not due. They also noted that judicial interest was only payable from the date of judgment according to Maltese legislation. They also considered that the applicants had already obtained EUR 25,000 in non?pecuniary damage from the domestic court. In their view the award for pecuniary damage should not exceed EUR 75,000 jointly and that in non-pecuniary damage should not exceed EUR 2,000.

The Court’s assessment
94. The Court must proceed to determine the compensation the applicants are entitled to in respect of the loss of control, use and enjoyment of the property which they have suffered. However, the Court notes that the only valuation submitted by the court-appointed architect referred to 2014. The rental value of the premises was clearly not the same in the preceding decades. In consequence the Court is unable to identify in which year the disproportionality arose. For the same reasons the Court considers that it has no objective basis on which to determine the pecuniary damage for the years preceding 2014.
95. Thus, in assessing the pecuniary damage sustained by the applicants, the Court has, as far as appropriate, considered the estimates provided and had regard to the information available to it on rental values on the Maltese property market during the relevant period. It has also considered the legitimate purpose of the restriction suffered, bearing in mind that legitimate objectives in the “public interest”, such as those pursued in measures of economic reform or measures designed to achieve greater social justice, may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see, inter alia, Ghigo v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 31122/05, § 18 and 20, 17 July 2008). In the present case however, the Court keeps in mind that the property was not used for securing the social welfare of tenants or preventing homelessness (compare, Fleri Soler and Camilleri v. Malta (just satisfaction), no. 35349/05, § 18, 17 July 2008). Thus, the situation in the present case might be said to involve a degree of public interest which is significantly less marked than in other cases and which does not justify such a substantial reduction compared with the free market rental value (see, Zammit and Attard, cited above, § 75).
96. Furthermore, the sums already received by the applicants for the relevant period must be deducted.
97. The Court reiterates that an award for pecuniary damage under Article 41 of the Convention is intended to put the applicant, as far as possible, in the position he would have enjoyed had the breach not occurred. It therefore considers that interest should be added to the above award in order to compensate for loss of value of the award over time. As such, the interest rate should reflect national economic conditions, such as levels of inflation and rates of interest. The Court thus considers that a one?off payment of 5% interest should be added to the above amount.
98. The Court thus awards the applicants, jointly, EUR 500,000. As requested, the amount awarded is to be paid directly into the bank account designated by the applicants’ representatives.
99. Bearing in mind the Constitutional Court’s award of EUR 25,000, which remains payable to the applicants, the Court need not award a further sum in non-pecuniary damage, it therefore rejects such claim.

Costs and expenses
100. The applicants also claimed a total of EUR 26,041.62 in costs and expenses, including EUR 4,620.43 (as per taxed bill of costs) and EUR 19,817.20 (other legal costs incurred) in connection with the constitutional redress proceedings and EUR 6,224.42 for those incurred before the Court. The legal representatives indicated their firm’s bank account to receive payment of all the sums awarded by the Court.
101. The Government accepted the claim of EUR 4,620.43 (as per taxed bill of costs) but contested the remaining claims for expenses incurred domestically and considered that costs before this Court should not amount to more than EUR 2,000.
102. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the sum of EUR 16,000, jointly, covering costs under all heads. As requested, the amount awarded is to be paid directly into the bank account designated by the applicants’ representatives (see, for example, Denisov v. Ukraine [GC], no. 76639/11, § 148, 25 September 2018 and the Practice Directions to the Rules of Court concerning just satisfaction claims, under the heading payment information).

Default interest
103. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,

Declares the application admissible;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1;
Holds that that there has been a violation of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 6 § 1 of the Convention;
Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, into the bank account designated by the applicants’ representatives, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts:

(i) EUR 500,000 (five hundred thousand euros), jointly, in respect of pecuniary damage;

(ii) EUR 16,000 (sixteen thousand euros), jointly, plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicants, in respect of costs and expenses;

(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 11 February 2020, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.

Stephen Phillips Paul Lemmens
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO


TERZA SEZIONE

CASO DI MARSHALL E ALTRI v. MALTA

(Applicazione n. 79177/16)


GIUDICE

Art. 1 P1 - Controllo dell'utilizzo degli immobili - Riduzione dei canoni di locazione degli immobili commerciali - Onere individuale sproporzionato

Art. 13 (+ Art. 1 P1) - Ricorso effettivo - Procedimento di ricorso costituzionale inefficace nel caso di specie - Mancato ordine di sfratto degli inquilini o mancata concessione di canoni di locazione futuri più elevati - Insufficiente indennizzo interno

Art. 6 § 1 (civile) - Eccessiva durata del procedimento

Art. 13 (+ art. 6 cpv. 1) - Mezzi di ricorso efficaci - Vizi di sistema che rendono inefficaci i procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale in caso di reclami relativi alla durata del procedimento - Mancanza di rapidità - Pratica regolare di premi di indennizzo irragionevolmente bassi

STRASBURGO

11 febbraio 2020

Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Essa può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nel caso di Marshall e altri contro Malta,

La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Terza Sezione), che si riunisce come Sezione composta da:

Paul Lemmens, Presidente,
Georgios A. Serghides,
Alena Polá?ková,
María Elósegui,
Gilberto Felici,
Erik Wennerström,
Lorraine Schembri Orland, giudici,
e Stephen Phillips, cancelliere di sezione,

Avendo deliberato in privato il 21 gennaio 2020,

Emette la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in tale data:

PROCEDURA
1. La causa ha avuto origine da un ricorso (n. 79177/16) contro la Repubblica di Malta presentato alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") dalla sig.ra Mary Marshall, cittadina maltese, dalla sig.ra Marie Christiane Ramsay Pergola, cittadina britannica, e dal patrimonio del defunto Marchese John Scicluna (rappresentata dal suo amministratore Marcus John Scicluna Marshall, debitamente autorizzata dal Tribunale Civile (Prima Sala) (Giurisdizione volontaria) il 5 maggio 2016). ("i ricorrenti"), depositata il 16 dicembre 2016.
2. I ricorrenti erano rappresentati dal Dr. I. Refalo, dal Dr. M. Refalo e dal Dr. S. Grech, avvocati che esercitano a La Valletta. 3. Il Governo maltese ("il Governo") era rappresentato dal loro agente, il Dr. P. Grech, Procuratore Generale.
3. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato, in particolare, che la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale a loro favore non ha dato loro un adeguato risarcimento per le violazioni subite; essi sono quindi rimasti vittime di una violazione dell'articolo 6 e dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
4.Il 6 settembre 2018 è stata data comunicazione al Governo delle denunce relative all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione e all'articolo 6 § 1 (durata del procedimento), nonché all'articolo 13 in relazione ad entrambi gli articoli appena citati e il resto del ricorso è stato dichiarato irricevibile ai sensi dell'articolo 54 § 3 del Regolamento della Corte.
5. Il governo britannico non si è avvalso del suo diritto di intervenire nel procedimento (articolo 36 § 1 della Convenzione).

I FATTI
I. CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
6. I dettagli dei richiedenti sono riportati nell'allegato.

A. Contesto del caso
7. I richiedenti sono proprietari degli immobili commerciali dal n. 1 al n. 5 in Piazza San Giorgio, La Valletta e dal n. 132 al n. 135 di Strait Street, La Valletta (di seguito congiuntamente denominati "l'immobile").
8. Il 30 luglio 1958 l'antenato dei ricorrenti (il defunto Marchese Giovanni Scicluna) ha preso in locazione il locale n. da 1 a 5 in Piazza San Giorgio, La Valletta, alla Banca di Scicluna per dieci anni a partire dal 1° gennaio 1959 per l'affitto annuale di 800 sterline inglesi (GBP).
9.Nel marzo 1968, il locale n. 132-135 Strait Street, La Valletta, adiacente agli altri locali, sono stati incorporati nel contratto di locazione ad uso della Banca di Scicluna. Di seguito il contratto di locazione è stato rinnovato ogni anno.
10. In una data non specificata, la Banca di Scicluna è stata fusa con la National Bank of Malta Ltd e il contratto di locazione è stato rinnovato. Le condizioni imposte nei contratti di locazione del 1958 e del 1968 e seguenti stabilivano che l'immobile sarebbe stato utilizzato come sede della Banca di Scicluna e che non avrebbe potuto essere subaffittato o utilizzato per altri scopi.
11. Con la legge XLV del 1973, modificata dalla legge IX del 1974, è stata istituita la Banca di La Valletta (di seguito "la Banca") e la locazione dell'immobile è stata trasferita a nome della Banca per effetto di legge. La Banca era interamente di proprietà del Governo.
12.I ricorrenti si sono opposti al trasferimento, ritenendolo un inadempimento contrattuale. A seguito di numerose richieste di restituzione dell'immobile e di inutili tentativi di concordare un nuovo contratto di locazione con condizioni adeguate, nel 1989 le ricorrenti hanno avviato un procedimento ordinario (n. 926/1989) dinanzi ai tribunali civili, nella loro giurisdizione ordinaria, per il rientro in possesso dell'immobile. Secondo le ricorrenti, trattandosi di un contratto di locazione d'affari e quindi di un'impresa in attività che poteva essere risolto in qualsiasi momento, le leggi speciali sull'affitto previste dal capitolo 69 delle leggi di Malta non si applicavano ad esso.
13. Ventun anni dopo, il caso è stato determinato da una sentenza definitiva della Corte d'Appello del 25 giugno 2010, con la quale il tribunale ha stabilito che il contratto di locazione a favore della Banca era protetto ai sensi del Capitolo 69 delle Leggi di Malta (fino al 2028) e quindi che i tribunali ordinari non erano il foro competente a trattare i reclami dei ricorrenti.
14. Nel corso del tempo il Governo ha ridotto la sua partecipazione nella Banca vendendo azioni a terzi privati.

B. Procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale.
15. L'11 novembre 2010 i ricorrenti hanno avviato un procedimento di ricorso costituzionale basandosi, tra l'altro, sull'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione e sull'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione (processo equo entro un termine ragionevole).
16. Con sentenza del 9 febbraio 2016 il Tribunale Civile (Prima Sala) nella sua competenza costituzionale ha parzialmente accolto le richieste dei ricorrenti. Ha trovato una violazione dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione e una violazione del requisito del tempo ragionevole ai sensi dell'articolo 6 della Convenzione in relazione al procedimento n. 926/1989, e ha concesso ai ricorrenti 1.000.000 di euro (EUR) a titolo di risarcimento. Le spese erano a carico dei convenuti.
17. Per quanto pertinente, il tribunale ha respinto i) l'eccezione del convenuto secondo cui i ricorrenti non avevano presentato la prova della loro proprietà, ii) l'obiezione del convenuto ratione temporis e iii) l'obiezione del convenuto relativa alla non esaurimento dei mezzi di ricorso ordinari. Il tribunale ha osservato che l'azione giudiziaria precedente aveva riconosciuto l'interesse delle ricorrenti, che la situazione contestata era continua e che le ricorrenti non avevano a disposizione rimedi ordinari, dato che il Rent Regulation Board (RRB) non era un rimedio efficace.
18. Nel merito, il tribunale ha ritenuto che i ricorrenti erano stati privati dei loro beni, ma l'intervento legislativo era stato legittimo (il contratto di locazione in questione era valido per legge e la Banca è rimasta protetta) e ha perseguito l'interesse pubblico in considerazione del clima economico del momento. Tuttavia, in assenza di un adeguato risarcimento, si era verificata una violazione dei diritti di proprietà dei ricorrenti. Il tribunale ha rilevato che, secondo il perito nominato dal tribunale, il valore locativo stimato dell'immobile nel 2014 era pari a 159.350 euro [annualmente]. Il canone di locazione ricevuto dalle ricorrenti era quindi irrisorio e, di conseguenza, le stesse subivano un onere eccessivo.
19. Il tribunale ha rilevato una violazione del requisito del tempo ragionevole ai sensi dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione alla luce della durata di ventun anni del procedimento civile avviato dai ricorrenti.
20. Il Governo e i ricorrenti hanno presentato ricorso.
21. Con sentenza del 24 giugno 2016, la Corte Costituzionale ha accolto solo in parte i due ricorsi e confermato la sentenza di primo grado, con un ragionamento in parte variegato, ma ha ridotto l'indennizzo a 25.000 euro.
22. In particolare, la Corte Costituzionale ha confermato il rigetto da parte della prima istanza della richiesta di non esaurimento dei rimedi ordinari, rilevando che non era chiaro se il foro competente a determinare la questione fosse il tribunale civile o la RRB. I ricorrenti hanno presentato ricorso dinanzi ai tribunali civili e ci sono voluti ventuno anni per giungere alla conclusione che non erano il foro competente. Il tribunale di primo grado aveva quindi esaminato correttamente il merito del caso.
23. Quanto al merito, la Corte costituzionale ha confermato che il provvedimento era sproporzionato, data la notevole differenza tra il canone di locazione ricevuto dai ricorrenti, 4.277,80 euro all'anno, e il suo valore locativo sul mercato, 159.350 euro all'anno. Le modifiche derivanti dalla legge X del 2009 [che ha modificato il Codice Civile e mirava a migliorare la posizione dei proprietari di terreni soggetti ad affitti controllati] sono state di scarso conforto, dato che i ricorrenti avevano subito una violazione per lungo tempo e avrebbero continuato a farlo per altri dodici anni, dato che l'articolo 1531I del Codice Civile risultante dalle modifiche del 2009 - che prevedeva la possibilità per i proprietari di riacquistare la loro proprietà - poteva entrare in gioco solo dopo vent'anni dal 2008. Inoltre, il fatto che le ricorrenti non avessero presentato un ricorso dinanzi alla RRB non poteva giocare a loro sfavore, dato che la RRB era vincolata dalla legge e quindi non poteva concedere un importo di affitto che avrebbe soddisfatto il requisito della proporzionalità.
24. Per quanto riguarda la violazione dell'articolo 6, la Corte costituzionale ha osservato, in breve, che il caso era iniziato nel 1989 e la presentazione delle prove si è conclusa nel 1994. Ci sono voluti quindi quattro anni prima che i ricorrenti presentassero le loro osservazioni. In quella fase la corte ha accettato la richiesta dei ricorrenti di nominare un perito nominato dal tribunale, ma ci sono voluti sei anni, fino al 2006, perché un perito nominato dal tribunale presentasse una perizia tecnica, che è stata confermata sotto giuramento nel gennaio 2007, e una sentenza di primo grado è stata emessa il 28 marzo 2008. Durante questo periodo, nel 2003, il tribunale aveva chiesto alle parti di presentare le proprie conclusioni e i ricorrenti avevano presentato le loro conclusioni solo un anno dopo, nel 2004. Il procedimento dinanzi alla corte d'appello non era stato eccessivamente lungo, mentre è vero che il ricorso è stato presentato il 16 aprile 2008 ed è stato nominato per l'udienza del 12 aprile 2010, la sentenza definitiva era stata emessa solo due mesi dopo. Era quindi evidente che la maggior parte del ritardo era dovuta ai ricorrenti, ossia quattro anni per le loro memorie, e poi sei anni per la perizia tecnica supplementare - sebbene il ritardo di quest'ultima fosse giustificato dal fatto che due dei periti dovevano essere sostituiti. Tuttavia, dato che il caso era di media complessità, lo Stato non poteva essere esonerato dalla responsabilità di un ritardo complessivo di ventun anni. Tuttavia, data la responsabilità dei ricorrenti per una parte del ritardo, a parere della Corte Costituzionale la constatazione di una violazione è stata sufficiente, nel caso in questione, a soddisfare la giusta soddisfazione.
25. Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento, la Corte Costituzionale ha ritenuto che non era la sede adeguata per decidere sullo sfratto di un inquilino, che era di competenza dei tribunali ordinari o della RRB. Tuttavia, dato che l'applicazione del capitolo 69 delle leggi di Malta, in combinazione con la legge XLV del 1973, modificata dalla legge IX del 1974, aveva violato i diritti umani dei ricorrenti, la Corte costituzionale ha ordinato che tali leggi non potevano più essere invocate come base per l'occupazione dei locali nel presente caso. Per quanto riguarda il risarcimento, dopo aver considerato che i ricorrenti avevano aspettato ventitré anni per presentare un ricorso costituzionale e la sproporzione del canone di locazione ricevuto dai ricorrenti alla luce del valore di mercato, nonché l'ordinanza che invalidava gli effetti delle leggi contestate tra le parti in causa, la Corte Costituzionale ha concesso 25.000 euro. I costi dovevano essere pagati in ragione di 3/5 dalle ricorrenti (pari a EUR 4.620,43) e 2/5 dal Governo.

II. DIRITTO INTERNO PERTINENTE
26. Le disposizioni pertinenti dell'Ordinanza relativa alla proprietà urbana (regolamento), capitolo 69 delle leggi di Malta, emanata nel giugno 1931 e successivamente modificata, e quelle del Codice Civile, capitolo 16 delle leggi di Malta, come modificato nel 2009, sono contenute in Zammit e Attard Cassar c. Malta (n. 1046/12, §§ 26-27, 30 luglio 2015).
27. La legge XLV del 1973 e la legge IX del 1974 hanno conferito l'amministrazione e il pieno controllo dela National Bank of Malta e della Tagliaferro Bank al Consiglio di amministrazione, che a sua volta ha trasferito gli attivi della National Bank of Malta alla Bank of Valletta.

LA LEGGE
I. ALLEGATO VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
28. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato che la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale a loro favore non ha dato loro un adeguato risarcimento per la violazione subita, essi sono quindi rimasti vittime di una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:
"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Le disposizioni che precedono non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni".
29. Il governo ha contestato tale argomentazione.

A.Ammissibilità
1.L'obiezione del Governo sulla mancanza di status di vittima
30. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti avevano perso il loro status di vittime a seguito della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale che ha riconosciuto la violazione e ha concesso 25.000 euro di risarcimento. Inoltre, la Corte Costituzionale aveva anche ordinato che la banca non poteva più fare affidamento sulla legge in questione per mantenere la proprietà della proprietà, quindi in teoria aveva sfrattato la banca.
31.Basandosi sulla giurisprudenza della Corte, i ricorrenti hanno sostenuto di essere rimasti vittime della violazione confermata dalla Corte Costituzionale. Essi hanno osservato che il valore locativo della proprietà secondo il perito nominato dal tribunale era di EUR 159.300 all'anno, quindi la sentenza del tribunale nazionale di EUR 25.000 aveva coperto solo due mesi di affitto, non quaranta anni. Inoltre, le ricorrenti sono state condannate a pagare una parte delle spese in appello. Anche il premio finale era in netto contrasto con l'importo di 1.000.000 di euro assegnato dal tribunale di primo grado. Inoltre, le ricorrenti hanno ritenuto che la dichiarazione di facilitazione dello sfratto non compensasse le perdite subite dal 1974.
32. La Corte fa riferimento ai suoi principi generali in materia come esposti nell'Apap Bologna c. Malta (n. 46931/12, §§ 41 e 43, 30 agosto 2016).
33. Nella presente causa la Corte rileva che vi è stato un riconoscimento della violazione da parte dei tribunali nazionali. Per quanto riguarda la concessione di un risarcimento adeguato e sufficiente, la Corte ritiene che, anche supponendo che il valore di mercato non sia applicabile e che le valutazioni dei canoni di locazione possano essere diminuite a causa del legittimo obiettivo in questione, un risarcimento di 25.000 euro - di cui una parte di costi pari a 4.620 euro.43 doveva essere pagato - per un immobile il cui valore locativo sul mercato era pari a EUR 159.350 all'anno (almeno nel 2014) come accettato dalla Corte Costituzionale (si veda il precedente paragrafo 23) non può essere considerato sufficiente per una violazione che si è protratta per decenni durante la quale alle ricorrenti è stato pagato un importo sproporzionato di affitto.
34. Questa constatazione è sufficiente per constatare che il risarcimento fornito dalla Corte Costituzionale non ha offerto un sollievo sufficiente ai ricorrenti, che mantengono così lo status di vittima ai fini della presente denuncia.
35. L'obiezione del Governo è quindi respinta.

2.Conclusione
36. La Corte rileva che la denuncia non è manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, lettera a), della Convenzione. Rileva inoltre che non è inammissibile per altri motivi. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
B. MERITI
37. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, come confermato dai tribunali nazionali.
38. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti non hanno subito alcuna interferenza in quanto hanno volontariamente aderito al contratto e in ogni caso è stato raggiunto un giusto equilibrio da parte delle autorità.
39. Alla luce delle conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali relative all'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 (cfr. paragrafo 23), la Corte ritiene che non sia necessario riesaminare in dettaglio la fondatezza della denuncia. Essa ritiene che, come stabilito dai giudici nazionali, le ricorrenti sono state fatte carico di un onere sproporzionato. Inoltre, la Corte osserva che, mentre la misura complessiva può essere nell'interesse generale, non può essere trascurato il fatto che esiste anche un sottostante interesse privato di natura commerciale (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Zammit e Attard Cassar c. Malta, n. 1046/12, § 63, 30 luglio 2015, e Bradshaw e altri c. Malta, n. 37121/15, § 64, 23 ottobre 2018).
40. Vi è stata pertanto una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 6 § 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
41. I ricorrenti hanno denunciato una violazione del requisito del tempo ragionevole ai sensi dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione che recita come segue:

"Nella determinazione dei suoi diritti e dei suoi obblighi civili ..., ognuno ha diritto ad un'udienza ... entro un ragionevole lasso di tempo da [a] ... tribunale ...".

A. Portata del reclamo
42. La Corte osserva che nella loro domanda i ricorrenti non hanno esplicitamente lamentato la durata del procedimento di ricorso costituzionale ai sensi dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione. Di conseguenza, nonostante qualsiasi riferimento a questa materia nelle loro osservazioni, la Corte ritiene che la portata della presente denuncia, come comunicato al governo convenuto, si riferisce esclusivamente alla durata del procedimento civile n. 926/1989, che è durato ventuno anni su due giurisdizioni.

B. Ammissibilità
1.L'obiezione del Governo sulla mancanza di status di vittima
43. Il governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti avevano perso il loro status di vittime a seguito della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale che ha riconosciuto la violazione e ha concesso un risarcimento.
44. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che erano ancora vittime in quanto non era stato loro concesso alcun risarcimento per questa violazione.
45. La Corte fa riferimento ai suoi principi generali sulla questione in relazione alle denunce di durata del procedimento come stabilito nella Central Mediterranean Development Corporation Limited v. Malta (n. 35829/03, §§ 24-26 e 28, 24 ottobre 2006).
46. La Corte osserva che non è stato concesso alcun tipo di risarcimento ai ricorrenti per la violazione riconosciuta dell'articolo 6 § 1 relativo ai procedimenti che sono durati più di venti anni in due giurisdizioni, in quanto la Corte Costituzionale ha ritenuto che la constatazione di una violazione equivaleva ad un risarcimento sufficiente, dato che la maggior parte del ritardo era dovuto ai ricorrenti (cfr. paragrafo 24). La Corte osserva che quello che la Corte Costituzionale ha considerato come "la maggior parte del ritardo" ammontava per conto proprio a circa dieci anni (quattro per le perizie e sei anni per le relazioni dei periti nominati dal tribunale) su ventuno, e la Corte Costituzionale ha ritenuto che il ritardo di sei anni in attesa dei periti che dovevano essere sostituiti a seguito della loro promozione fosse anche in parte giustificato. A questo proposito, la Corte ribadisce che i periti lavorano nell'ambito di un procedimento giudiziario sotto la supervisione di un giudice, che rimane responsabile della preparazione e del rapido svolgimento del procedimento (cfr., ad esempio, Proszak c. Polonia, 16 dicembre 1997, § 44, Relazioni delle sentenze e decisioni 1997-VIII, e ?ukjaniuk c. Polonia, n. 15072/02, § 28, 7 novembre 2006). Ne consegue che non si può dire che la condotta dei ricorrenti abbia contribuito alla "maggior parte del ritardo". Inoltre, la Corte costituzionale ha osservato esplicitamente che, dato che il caso era di media complessità, lo Stato non poteva essere esonerato dalla sua responsabilità di un ritardo complessivo di ventun anni.
47. Nel caso di specie non è stato dimostrato che le ricorrenti fossero in gran parte responsabili del ritardo del procedimento, né che solo una piccola parte del procedimento straordinariamente lungo fosse attribuibile allo Stato (v., a contrario, Piper c. Regno Unito, n. 44547/10, §§ 73-74, 21 aprile 2015, e McNamara c. Regno Unito, sentenza del Comitato n. 22510/13, §§ 67-68, 12 gennaio 2017). Alla luce di ciò, la Corte non può ritenere che la Corte costituzionale abbia fornito motivi sufficienti per negare ai ricorrenti qualsiasi tipo di risarcimento.
48. Ne consegue che i ricorrenti mantengono lo status di vittima ai fini della presente denuncia e l'obiezione del Governo è quindi respinta.
2.Conclusione
49. La Corte ritiene che la denuncia non sia manifestamente infondata ai sensi dell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, lettera a), della Convenzione. Essa rileva inoltre che non è inammissibile per altri motivi. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
C. Meriti
50. I ricorrenti si sono lamentati del fatto che il loro caso è durato irragionevolmente a lungo. Ritennero che, a prescindere da eventuali fattori di ritardo, non era giustificabile prendere vent'anni per decidere un caso, e che la responsabilità spettava ai tribunali.
51. Il Governo ha sostenuto che, sebbene il caso non fosse stato complesso, il comportamento dei ricorrenti aveva contribuito al ritardo. Ne consegue che non vi è stata alcuna violazione dell'articolo 6.
52.Tenuto conto delle conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali relative alla durata del procedimento (cfr. paragrafo 24) e delle considerazioni della Corte sopra esposte (cfr. paragrafi 46-47), la Corte ritiene che non sia necessario riesaminare in dettaglio il merito della denuncia. Essa ritiene che, come stabilito dai giudici nazionali, sia stato violato il requisito del termine ragionevole.
53. Di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.

PRESUNTA VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 13 DELLA CONVENZIONE
54. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre lamentato che la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale a loro favore non ha dato loro un adeguato risarcimento per le violazioni subite. Pertanto, a loro avviso, data la giurisprudenza nazionale, il procedimento di ricorso costituzionale non poteva essere considerato un rimedio efficace. L'articolo 13 recita come segue:

"Ogni persona i cui diritti e le cui libertà, come stabilito dalla Convenzione, siano stati violati ha un ricorso effettivo dinanzi a un'autorità nazionale, nonostante la violazione sia stata commessa da persone che agiscono in veste ufficiale".
Ammissibilità
55. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i ricorrenti avrebbero potuto avviare una nuova serie di procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale per denunciare, ai sensi dell'articolo 13, la sentenza della Corte costituzionale.
56. I ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che una tale azione non sarebbe stata appropriata e che l'azione ordinaria in tale fase era quella di presentare il reclamo alla Corte.
57. L'obiezione del Governo in tal senso è stata ripetutamente respinta da questa Corte (si veda, tra le molteplici autorità, Apap Bologna, citato sopra, § 63 e più recentemente Grech e altri c. Malta, n. 69287/14, § 50, 15 gennaio 2019). La Corte non vede alcuna ragione per giungere ad una conclusione diversa nella presente causa.
58. L'obiezione del Governo è pertanto respinta.
59.Inoltre, la Corte osserva che ha già riscontrato una violazione dell'articolo 6 e dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, ne consegue che le richieste dei ricorrenti sono discutibili ai fini dell'articolo 13.
60. La Corte ritiene che le denunce ai sensi dell'articolo 13 in combinato disposto con entrambe le disposizioni non sono manifestamente infondate ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 3 (a) della Convenzione. Essa osserva inoltre che non sono inammissibili per altri motivi. Esse devono pertanto essere dichiarate ammissibili.

B. Meriti
1.Le osservazioni delle parti
a) I richiedenti
61. Le ricorrenti hanno sostenuto che, in relazione alla violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, secondo la sua prassi abituale, la Corte Costituzionale, aveva i) omesso di sfrattare gli inquilini, ii) concesso un magro indennizzo ii) imposto le spese del procedimento alle ricorrenti vincitrici. In relazione all'art. 6, essa non ha concesso alcun tipo di risarcimento.
62. In relazione al rimedio in relazione all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, se è vero che i giudici della giurisdizione costituzionale avevano "poteri illimitati", in questo caso tali giudici non avevano utilizzato i loro ampi poteri per rettificare la violazione. In effetti, la giurisprudenza interna ha dimostrato che la Corte costituzionale ha sistematicamente ridotto i risarcimenti concessi dalla giurisdizione costituzionale di prima istanza senza fornire alcuna motivazione rilevante, e talvolta anche senza una motivazione adeguata. Inoltre, in generale la Corte costituzionale ha anche condannato i ricorrenti che avevano accolto le loro richieste a pagare una parte delle spese processuali. Esse hanno fatto riferimento ad una serie di cause nazionali (si veda l'elenco riportato in Grech e altri, citato sopra, § 53).
63. Per quanto riguarda gli ordini di sfratto, i ricorrenti hanno notato che la Corte Costituzionale ha continuato ad annullare le decisioni di primo grado delle giurisdizioni costituzionali che avevano ordinato tali sfratti, come dimostra l'elenco presentato dal governo (cfr. paragrafo 67). È stato solo in alcuni di questi casi che la Corte Costituzionale ha ordinato, invece, che gli inquilini non potessero più fare affidamento sulla legge in questione per mantenere la proprietà della proprietà. I ricorrenti hanno ritenuto che quest'ultima ordinanza non equivaleva ad un ordine di sfratto. È vero che, come nel caso in esame, una volta che la Corte Costituzionale ha ordinato che gli inquilini non potevano più fare affidamento sulle disposizioni di legge per mantenere la proprietà dell'immobile, il proprietario riesce talvolta a sfrattare l'inquilino. Tuttavia, secondo le ricorrenti, tale processo è stato oneroso e ha comportato un'altra serie di procedimenti.
64. Per quanto riguarda il rimedio relativo all'articolo 6, le ricorrenti si sono basate sull'elenco presentato dal Governo, che mostrava un'incoerenza degli importi concessi rispetto al relativo ritardo. Esse hanno altresì rilevato che la Corte Costituzionale ha spesso considerato una violazione dell'articolo 6 come accidentale alla violazione principale e che il risarcimento per quest'ultima è stato assorbito dalla violazione principale - si sono basate su Vica Limited contro il Commissario del Land, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 3 febbraio 2012. In altri casi la Corte Costituzionale ha semplicemente scelto di ritenere che la constatazione di una violazione sia sufficiente e giusta soddisfazione, senza fornire alcun risarcimento pecuniario - si sono affidati a Pawlu Cachia contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 28 dicembre 2001.
b) Il governo
65. Il Governo ha sostenuto che i procedimenti costituzionali sono in grado di fornire un adeguato risarcimento per la violazione riscontrata dai tribunali nazionali. Di fatto e in pratica, le corti di giurisdizione costituzionale potevano concedere qualsiasi tipo di risarcimento, che andava da un indennizzo, che era il tipo di risarcimento abituale concesso nei casi di violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 (si basavano, ad esempio, sull'AIC Joseph Barbara contro il Primo Ministro, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 31 gennaio 2014, e Angela sive Gina Balzan contro il Primo Ministro, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 7 dicembre 2012), a vari altri tipi di ordini. Il Governo ha presentato, come esempi di sentenze effettive, la reintegrazione di un dipendente nel servizio pubblico, così come un ordine fatto ai tribunali di giurisdizione penale di scartare una dichiarazione fatta dall'imputato quando era stata presa dalla polizia senza assistenza legale. Hanno ribadito che non vi erano limiti ai poteri dei tribunali di giurisdizione costituzionale di concedere un risarcimento per le violazioni della Convenzione.
66. In risposta alla specifica richiesta della Corte in relazione all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 di presentare esempi pertinenti, il Governo ha presentato i seguenti casi in cui i tribunali nazionali di giurisdizione costituzionale hanno confermato la violazione dei diritti di proprietà dei ricorrenti (in circostanze simili al presente caso), hanno concesso un risarcimento e hanno ordinato che gli inquilini non potessero più fare affidamento sulla protezione offerta dal Capitolo 158 delle Leggi di Malta per mantenere la proprietà, facilitando così lo sfratto:
- Maria Pia sive Marian contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 31 gennaio 2014,
- Vincent Curmi contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 24 giugno 2016,
- Rose Borg contro il procuratore generale, sentenza della Corte costituzionale dell'11 luglio 2016,
- Maria Stella sive Estelle Azzopardi Vella e il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 30 settembre 2016.
67. Sono stati inclusi anche altri quattro esempi di simili sentenze del 2018:
- Thomas Cauchi e il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 2 marzo 2018,
- Evelyn Montebello e il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 13 luglio 2018,
- John Mattei e la sentenza della Corte Costituzionale della Housing Authority del 5 ottobre 2018,
- Maria Pia sive Marian Galea contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 14 dicembre 2018.
In questi ultimi tre casi la Corte Costituzionale ha revocato l'ordine di sfratto ordinato dal tribunale di primo grado. Nell'altro caso i ricorrenti non hanno avuto successo in prima istanza.
68. Il Governo ha inoltre presentato quattro esempi del 2016 in cui non è stato ordinato alcuno sfratto da parte dei tribunali:
- Carmelo Grech contro l'Autorità per gli alloggi, sentenza della Corte costituzionale del 10 febbraio 2016;
- Maria Ludgarda sive Mary Borg et contro Rosario Mifsud et, sentenza della Corte costituzionale di Raymond del 29 aprile 2016;
- Cassar Torreggiani e il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 29 aprile 2016;
- Ian Peter Ellis e il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 24 giugno 2016.
69. In risposta alla specifica domanda della Corte in relazione all'articolo 6, il Governo si è basato sulle conclusioni della Corte nella Central Mediterranean Development Corporation Limited (citata in precedenza). Ha inoltre presentato un elenco di esempi che mostrano il risarcimento concesso dalla Corte Costituzionale quando sostiene le violazioni del requisito del tempo ragionevole, le più recenti delle quali sono elencate qui di seguito:
- John A. Said Pro et Noe contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale dell'11 dicembre 2011 - 1.000 euro per 12 anni [un'istanza];
- Joseph Camilleri contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 28 settembre 2012 - EUR 7.000 più gli interessi fino alla data del pagamento, per 15 anni [due casi];
- Joseph Lebrun contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 26 maggio 2014 - 6.000 euro per 6 anni più 10 euro al giorno fino all'emissione dell'atto di accusa;
- Omar Asman Omar contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 6 febbraio 2015 - EUR 4.000 e EUR 2.000 rispettivamente alle vittime per 5 anni e 8 mesi [un'istanza];
- Raymond Bonnici contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 2 marzo 2015 - 700 euro per 23 anni [un'istanza];
- Daniel Alexander Holmes contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 16 marzo 2015 - nessun risarcimento per 7 anni [due casi];
- Iris Cassar contro l'Attorney General, sentenza della Corte costituzionale del 27 marzo 2015 - 8.000 euro per 20 anni [due casi];
- Samuel Onyeabor contro l'Attorney General, sentenza della Corte costituzionale del 14 dicembre 2015 - EUR 5.000 per 7 anni [un caso];
- Zakkarija Calleja contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 15 dicembre 2015 - EUR 2.000 per 43 anni [un'istanza];
- Anton Camilleri contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 1° febbraio 2016 - 3.000 euro per 6 anni [un'istanza];
- Joseph Camilleri contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 27 maggio 2016 - EUR 4.000 per 11 anni [un'istanza];
- Joseph Gauci contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 24 giugno 2016 - 5.000 euro per 16 anni [due casi];
- Malcolm Said contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 24 giugno 2016 - 800 euro per cinque anni [un'istanza];
- Filippa Seguna contro l'Attorney General, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 30 settembre 2016 - EUR 3.000 per 23 anni [un'istanza];
- Mario Schembri contro l'Avvocato generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 24 novembre 2017 - EUR 3.000 per 7 anni [un'istanza];
- Gordi Felice contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 27 novembre 2017 - EUR 6.000 per 13 anni [due casi];
- Emmanuel Borg contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 13 luglio 2018 - EUR 3.000 per 33 anni [due casi];
- Roberta Grech contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 5 ottobre 2018 - EUR 8.000 per 8 anni [un'istanza];
- Liliana Farrugia contro il Procuratore Generale, sentenza della Corte Costituzionale del 5 ottobre 2018 - 8.000 euro per 20 anni [due casi].

2.La valutazione della Corte
a) articolo 13 in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1
70. La Corte ribadisce i suoi principi generali ai sensi dell'articolo 13 come enunciati nell'Apap Bologna (citato sopra, §§ 76-79). In particolare ribadisce che, ai fini dell'articolo 13, spetta alla Corte determinare se i mezzi a disposizione di un richiedente per presentare una denuncia sono "efficaci" nel senso di prevenire la presunta violazione o la sua continuazione o di fornire un adeguato risarcimento per qualsiasi violazione già avvenuta. In alcuni casi una violazione non può essere sanata con il semplice pagamento di un risarcimento e l'impossibilità di rendere vincolante una decisione di concessione di un risarcimento può anche sollevare questioni (ibidem, § 77).
(i) "Prevenire la presunta violazione o la sua continuazione".
71.La Corte rileva che, come nel caso Apap Bologna, già citato, e Portanier c. Malta (n. 55747/16, 27 agosto 2019), nella fattispecie le giurisdizioni costituzionali e in particolare la Corte Costituzionale non hanno ordinato lo sfratto dell'inquilino. Non vi è dubbio che, in diritto, i tribunali di giurisdizione costituzionale potrebbero annullare un ordine e sfrattare un inquilino (come talvolta ordinato dalla giurisdizione costituzionale di prima istanza, si veda il paragrafo 67 della multa di cui sopra), misura che avrebbe impedito il proseguimento della violazione. Tuttavia, dalla giurisprudenza invocata dal Governo emerge chiaramente che, in situazioni come quelle del presente caso, ossia quando, a seguito di un regime di affitto protetto (come quello derivante dal Capitolo 69 delle Leggi di Malta in questione nel presente caso), i proprietari hanno subito un onere eccessivo che ha portato ad una violazione, i tribunali di giurisdizione costituzionale, e in particolare la Corte Costituzionale in appello, non intraprendono tale azione. Più in particolare, la Corte costituzionale revoca tale azione quando è stata ordinata dal tribunale di prima istanza. In effetti, il Governo non ha fornito un solo esempio di sentenza definitiva che ordini lo sfratto, nonostante sia stato richiesto, e nonostante il fatto che numerose violazioni del genere siano state riscontrate a livello nazionale. In circostanze analoghe, nella sentenza Apap Bologna (relativa alle violazioni derivanti da ordinanze di requisizione) la Corte ha rilevato che, pur avendone il potere, in pratica la Corte Costituzionale ha ripetutamente omesso di intraprendere le azioni necessarie per porre fine alla violazione (ibidem, § 86).
72. Nell'Apap Bologna, § 88, la Corte, rilevando che non spettava ad essa interpretare il diritto nazionale, ha anche espresso rammarico per l'interpretazione data dalle giurisdizioni costituzionali circa l'impossibilità di concedere un canone di locazione futuro più elevato. Secondo la Corte, una tale ordinanza costituirebbe un provvedimento nei confronti di un singolo richiedente, che prevede la cessazione della violazione senza conseguenze per l'inquilino. Lo stesso è stato ribadito nella più recente sentenza Portanier, § 48, che ha rilevato che questa linea di condotta non è stata popolare presso le giurisdizioni costituzionali, e dove la Corte ha ribadito che nel caso in cui le giurisdizioni costituzionali concedessero un affitto futuro più elevato (a carico del Governo, con la possibilità di un accordo con gli inquilini che per anni avrebbero beneficiato di un regime generoso), lo sfratto non sarebbe sempre necessario. Infatti, quando il provvedimento persegue un obiettivo legittimo (come la protezione sociale degli inquilini bisognosi), l'adeguamento del futuro affitto alle circostanze attuali potrebbe essere sufficiente a riparare la sproporzione esistente e quindi a porre fine alla violazione. La Corte rileva che, nella fattispecie, nonostante la finalità legittima meno pesante, un affitto futuro adeguato alla luce di tale finalità potrebbe comunque porre fine alla violazione. Inoltre, il futuro canone di locazione avrebbe dovuto essere stabilito solo fino al 2028, data in cui il contratto di locazione non sarà più protetto ai sensi del capitolo 69 delle leggi di Malta. Ciononostante, la Corte costituzionale non ha adottato questo approccio.
73. La Corte osserva che nel caso in esame, sebbene non sia stata intrapresa nessuna delle azioni sopra menzionate, la Corte Costituzionale ha intrapreso un'azione alternativa. Essa ha ordinato che gli inquilini non potessero più fare affidamento sulle disposizioni di legge pertinenti per conservare la proprietà della proprietà. Dalla giurisprudenza interna portata all'attenzione della Corte dal Governo, questa stessa azione sembra essere diventata una consuetudine, almeno dal 2016. Nel caso Portanier la Corte ha sostenuto di nutrire ancora dubbi su questo approccio, e ha ribadito le sue riserve sul fatto che la Corte Costituzionale, il cui ruolo è quello di porre fine ad una violazione e di rimediare alla violazione accertata, abdica alla responsabilità assegnatale dalla Costituzione di Malta e rinvia i ricorrenti all'ennesimo rimedio, nonostante abbia il potere e l'autorità di concedere tale rimedio (§ 51). In tal caso, pur avendo esposto una serie di considerazioni, in considerazione delle limitate argomentazioni delle parti e del fatto che il richiedente era riuscito a sfrattare gli inquilini, la Corte si è astenuta dal pronunciarsi sull'efficacia di tale approccio in generale (§§ 52-54). Considerazioni analoghe si applicano nel caso di specie in relazione alle osservazioni limitate delle parti e, tra l'altro, per le stesse ragioni, la Corte si asterrà dal pronunciarsi sulla questione in generale. La Corte si pronuncerà tuttavia sull'efficacia di tale provvedimento nella presente causa.
74. In primo luogo, la Corte rileva di non essere stata informata dell'avvio di un procedimento di sfratto e, in caso affermativo, della sua conclusione. Né la Corte è stata informata del fatto che gli inquilini hanno volontariamente lasciato l'immobile da quando (a seguito della sentenza della Corte costituzionale) non ne hanno più la proprietà (in assenza della relativa tutela giuridica). Ne consegue che l'inazione di entrambe le parti ha fatto sì che lo status quo sia rimasto quello esistente alla data della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale, più di tre anni fa. A questo proposito la Corte fa riferimento alla sua giurisprudenza secondo la quale è inopportuno chiedere ad un individuo che ha ottenuto la sentenza contro lo Stato al termine di un procedimento giudiziario di intentare un'azione esecutiva per ottenere soddisfazione (Musci c. Italia [GC], n. 64699/01, § 90 CEDU 2006-V (estratti)). Tale ragionamento appare pertinente alla situazione del caso di specie, e fa eco alle preoccupazioni espresse dal Tribunale di Portanier in merito ad un'ulteriore serie di procedimenti di sfratto.
75. Tuttavia, lasciando aperta la questione, la Corte rileva che, a differenza di quanto avvenuto in altre cause analoghe contro Malta, in cui le interferenze erano state giustificate dal legittimo scopo di fornire alloggi popolari, nella fattispecie l'interferenza si applicava a favore di un'entità commerciale, ossia una banca. Inoltre, allo stato attuale della legge all'epoca del procedimento della Corte Costituzionale, la banca perderebbe in ogni caso la tutela della legge e dovrebbe quindi liberare l'immobile al termine del contratto di locazione nel 2028. Ne consegue che, nelle circostanze del caso di specie, non sembra esserci alcuna giustificazione particolare per ritardare il risarcimento e continuare a perpetrare la violazione accertata. Pertanto, in assenza di una sentenza che copra i futuri canoni di locazione fino al 2028, la Corte ritiene che l'unico rimedio in grado di dare un adeguato e rapido risarcimento alle ricorrenti nella situazione del presente caso sia stato quello di ordinare lo sfratto da parte della Corte Costituzionale - una linea d'azione che non ha intrapreso, come è prassi normale (cfr. paragrafo 71).
76. Da quanto sopra consegue che, nel caso di specie, a causa della carenza del rimedio dato dalla Corte Costituzionale la violazione persiste ancora e quindi il rimedio in questione non ha impedito la sua continuazione.
(ii) "Fornire un adeguato risarcimento per ogni violazione già avvenuta".
77. La Corte rileva di aver ripetutamente constatato che le somme concesse a titolo di risarcimento dalla Corte costituzionale non costituiscono un risarcimento adeguato. Essa fa inoltre riferimento alle considerazioni di cui ai precedenti paragrafi 33 e 34, in cui la Corte ha ritenuto che il risarcimento finanziario offerto non fosse adeguato anche nel caso di specie.
78. La Corte ribadisce che, così come un risarcimento del danno pecuniario ai sensi dell'articolo 41 della Convenzione, un risarcimento del danno pecuniario effettuato da un giudice nazionale deve essere inteso a porre il ricorrente, per quanto possibile, nella posizione di cui avrebbe goduto se la violazione non si fosse verificata. Dalle informazioni e dalle cause presentate al tribunale emerge che spesso non è così. Tali risarcimenti pecuniari spesso non sono inoltre spesso accompagnati da un adeguato risarcimento dei danni non pecuniari e/o da un'ingiunzione di pagamento delle relative spese (ibidem § 90 e Grech e altri, sopra citati, § 62). Nel caso di specie non è stata portata all'attenzione della Corte alcuna giurisprudenza nazionale che confutasse tali conclusioni.
(iii) Conclusione
79. Alla luce delle considerazioni sopra esposte, la Corte conclude che, sebbene i procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale siano un rimedio efficace in teoria, non lo sono in pratica, in casi come quello attuale. Di conseguenza, essi non possono essere considerati un rimedio effettivo ai fini dell'articolo 13 in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 relativo a reclami discutibili in relazione alle leggi sull'affitto in vigore, che, pur essendo legittime e perseguendo obiettivi legittimi, impongono un onere individuale eccessivo ai richiedenti.
80. Il Governo non ha previsto altri rimedi.
81. Di conseguenza, la Corte ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 13, in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
b) articolo 13 in combinato disposto con l'articolo 6, paragrafo 1 (durata del procedimento)
82. Per quanto riguarda i casi di durata del procedimento, la Corte ribadisce che la soluzione più efficace è rappresentata da un rimedio volto ad accelerare il procedimento per evitare che diventi eccessivamente lungo (cfr. Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 183, ECHR 2006-V). Tuttavia, gli Stati possono anche scegliere di introdurre solo un rimedio compensativo, senza che tale rimedio sia considerato inefficace. La Corte ha stabilito criteri chiave per la verifica dell'efficacia di un rimedio compensativo in relazione all'eccessiva durata dei procedimenti giudiziari. Tali criteri sono i seguenti:
- un'azione risarcitoria deve essere esaminata entro un termine ragionevole;
- il risarcimento deve essere versato tempestivamente e generalmente non oltre sei mesi dalla data in cui la decisione di concessione del risarcimento diventa esecutiva;
- le norme procedurali che disciplinano un'azione di risarcimento devono essere conformi al principio di equità garantito dall'articolo 6 della Convenzione;
- le norme relative alle spese legali non devono comportare un onere eccessivo per le parti in causa, qualora la loro azione sia giustificata;
- il livello del risarcimento non deve essere irragionevole rispetto alle sentenze pronunciate dalla Corte in casi analoghi (cfr. Valada Matos das Neves c. Portogallo, n. 73798/13, § 73, 29 ottobre 2015, e Brudan c. Romania, n. 75717/14, § 69, 10 aprile 2018).
83. Su quest'ultimo criterio, la Corte ha indicato che, per quanto riguarda il danno pecuniario, i giudici nazionali sono chiaramente in una posizione migliore per determinare l'esistenza e il quantum. La situazione è invece diversa per quanto riguarda il danno non patrimoniale. Esiste una forte, anche se confutabile, presunzione a favore di un danno non pecuniario causato dall'eccessiva durata del procedimento. Tuttavia, vi possono essere anche situazioni in cui non è stato accertato alcun danno di questo tipo, o solo un danno minimo, ad esempio quando il comportamento del richiedente ha causato in tutto o in parte il procrastinare o quando il ritardo è stato causato da circostanze indipendenti dalle autorità (cfr. Rutkowski e altri c. Polonia, nn. 72287/10 e 2 altri, § 182, 7 luglio 2015, e la giurisprudenza ivi citata).
84. Nel presente caso la Corte valuterà l'efficacia del rimedio, ossia il procedimento di ricorso costituzionale, alla luce dei criteri sopra menzionati (§ 82).
85. La Corte rileva che le parti non hanno sostenuto, e pertanto, ai fini del presente caso, la Corte non ha motivo di dubitare che i procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale siano, in linea di principio, disciplinati dalle garanzie di equità procedurale previste dall'articolo 6, e che i risarcimenti concessi siano, in genere, corrisposti tempestivamente.
86. Le parti non hanno né accentuato né difeso a lungo la questione delle spese processuali. Tuttavia, la Corte non può ignorare di aver ripetutamente constatato (nell'ambito delle cause relative all'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1) che le compensazioni sono ridotte o addirittura assorbite da un'ingiunzione di pagamento delle spese (si veda, come esempi recenti, Zammit e Vassallo c. Malta, no. 43675/16, § 42, 28 maggio 2019, e Portanier, citato, § 55). Lo stesso si è verificato nel caso di specie, dove, in un procedimento in cui sono state accolte le richieste delle ricorrenti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 e dell'articolo 6 in relazione alla durata del procedimento, la Corte costituzionale ha tuttavia condannato le ricorrenti a pagare i 3/5 delle spese del procedimento (si veda il precedente paragrafo 25). Pertanto, sebbene non sia stato sostenuto che tali spese ostacolino l'accesso a tale rimedio, esse, come minimo, hanno spesso un impatto sul risarcimento concesso.
87. La Corte osserva che non esisteva alcun limite all'importo del risarcimento che poteva essere concesso ad un ricorrente in tale procedimento. Il risarcimento da concedere si basa esclusivamente sull'esercizio, da parte dei giudici del tribunale nazionale, della loro discrezionalità in merito a ciò che potrebbe costituire un adeguato risarcimento pecuniario nelle circostanze del caso specifico. Il semplice fatto che l'importo del risarcimento concesso sia basso, o che non venga concesso alcun importo, non rende il rimedio di per sé inefficace, anche se ha un impatto sulla valutazione della Corte della condizione di vittima del richiedente per quanto riguarda la durata del procedimento di reclamo (si veda, mutatis mutandis, Zarb c. Malta, n. 16631/04, § 51, 4 luglio 2006, e ?liwi?ski c. Polonia, no. 40063/06, § 36, 5 gennaio 2010). Nel caso di specie, la Corte Costituzionale ha negato ai ricorrenti qualsiasi risarcimento senza fornire una motivazione sufficiente (cfr. paragrafi 47-48). Inoltre, i due casi su cui si sono basati i ricorrenti e uno dei casi presentati dal governo, così come il caso dei ricorrenti stessi, suggeriscono che la Corte Costituzionale maltese troppo spesso non concede alcun risarcimento per tali violazioni. Anche quando fanno un premio, i casi presentati dal governo indicano che la Corte Costituzionale generalmente assegna somme che non costituiscono un adeguato risarcimento (confrontare, Apap Bologna, citato in precedenza, § 89, in relazione ai premi pecuniari nei casi di proprietà). La Corte osserva, infatti, che in circa due terzi delle cause invocate dal Governo la Corte Costituzionale ha pronunciato sentenze che erano significativamente inferiori (tra il 20 e il 40% dell'importo), o addirittura manifestamente inferiori (fino al 2% e al 5% dell'importo) a quanto la Corte avrebbe riconosciuto in tali circostanze. Pertanto, il materiale presentato dalle parti sembra essere una prova sufficiente a dimostrare che il rimedio in questione non soddisfa tale criterio a causa di una prassi regolare di risarcimenti significativamente o irragionevolmente bassi in tali casi, o addirittura nessun risarcimento, come è avvenuto nel caso di specie.
88. Inoltre, la Corte ricorda che un rimedio che potrebbe durare diversi anni attraverso due giurisdizioni non sarebbe conciliabile con il requisito che il rimedio per il ritardo (anche prima di una corte costituzionale) sia sufficientemente rapido (cfr. McFarlane c. Irlanda [GC], no. 31333/06, § 123, 10 settembre 2010, e la giurisprudenza ivi citata). In particolare, la Corte ha ritenuto che, per conformarsi al principio del termine ragionevole, un rimedio per la durata del procedimento non dovrebbe, in linea di principio e in assenza di circostanze eccezionali, durare più di due anni e mezzo su due giurisdizioni, compresa la fase esecutiva (cfr. Gagliano Giorgi c. Italia, n. 23563/07, § 73, CEDU 2012). La Corte rileva che le parti non si sono pronunciate in merito. Tuttavia, il fatto che il procedimento di ricorso costituzionale nella presente causa sia durato quasi sei anni su due giurisdizioni solleva dubbi sulla rapidità dell'azione correttiva stessa.
89. La Corte conclude che, alla luce delle considerazioni di cui sopra e tenendo conto dei vizi sistemici sopra identificati, il Governo non ha dimostrato che i procedimenti di ricorso costituzionale, che sono un rimedio efficace in teoria, costituiscano in pratica rimedi efficaci, per la durata dei ricorsi al momento rilevante, come dimostrato dalle circostanze del caso di specie.
90. Di conseguenza, la Corte ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione dell'articolo 13, in combinato disposto con l'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione.
APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
91. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se il Tribunale constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente un risarcimento solo parziale, il Tribunale, se necessario, dà giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".
A. Danni
1. Le osservazioni delle parti
92. I ricorrenti hanno chiesto 14.291.500 euro (EUR) per danni pecuniari e 598.000 euro per danni non pecuniari. Il danno pecuniario rappresentava la perdita del canone di locazione calcolato dal perito nominato dal tribunale, pari a EUR 159.350 all'anno moltiplicato per 45 anni, da cui si dovevano detrarre i EUR 25.000 concessi dal tribunale nazionale, con il risultato di EUR 7.145.750 e la stessa somma in interessi secondo la legge. Il credito non pecuniario è stato calcolato sulla base di EUR 10.000 all'anno per la violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, e di EUR 3.000 all'anno per il ritardo ventennale del procedimento più il ritardo di sei anni prima del procedimento di ricorso costituzionale, nonché di EUR 35.000 ciascuno per le due violazioni dell'articolo 13. I legali rappresentanti hanno indicato il conto corrente bancario del loro studio per ricevere il pagamento di tutte le somme concesse dal Tribunale.
93. Il Governo ha sostenuto che le richieste dei ricorrenti erano grossolanamente esagerate. Essi hanno osservato che, secondo la valutazione del loro architetto ex parte, il prezzo di mercato dell'immobile nel 2014 era di 93.500 euro all'anno. Inoltre, almeno fino al 2000, l'affitto ricevuto era commisurato ai prezzi di mercato, per cui le somme relative a quegli anni non erano dovute. Hanno anche rilevato che gli interessi giudiziari erano pagabili solo a partire dalla data della sentenza secondo la legislazione maltese. Hanno anche considerato che i ricorrenti avevano già ottenuto dal tribunale nazionale 25.000 euro di danni non pecuniari. A loro avviso, il risarcimento dei danni pecuniari non dovrebbe superare i 75.000 euro in solido e quello dei danni non pecuniari non dovrebbe superare i 2.000 euro.
2.La valutazione della Corte
94. Il Tribunale deve procedere a determinare il risarcimento cui i ricorrenti hanno diritto per la perdita del controllo, dell'uso e del godimento dei beni che hanno subito. Tuttavia, il Tribunale rileva che l'unica valutazione presentata dall'architetto nominato dal tribunale si riferisce al 2014. Il valore locativo dei locali non era chiaramente lo stesso nei decenni precedenti. Di conseguenza, la Corte non è in grado di individuare in quale anno è sorta la sproporzione. Per le stesse ragioni, il Tribunale ritiene di non avere una base oggettiva per determinare il danno patrimoniale per gli anni precedenti il 2014.
95.Pertanto, nel valutare il danno pecuniario subito dalle ricorrenti, la Corte ha, per quanto opportuno, considerato le stime fornite e ha tenuto conto delle informazioni di cui disponeva sui valori locativi sul mercato immobiliare maltese nel periodo di riferimento. Ha inoltre considerato la legittima finalità della restrizione subita, tenendo presente che obiettivi legittimi di "interesse pubblico", come quelli perseguiti con misure di riforma economica o misure volte ad ottenere una maggiore giustizia sociale, possono richiedere meno del rimborso dell'intero valore di mercato (si veda, tra l'altro, Ghigo v. Malta (giusta soddisfazione), n. 31122/05, § 18 e 20, 17 luglio 2008). Nel caso in esame, tuttavia, la Corte tiene presente che l'immobile non è stato utilizzato per garantire il benessere sociale degli inquilini o per prevenire il fenomeno dei senzatetto (cfr. Fleri Soler e Camilleri c. Malta (solo soddisfazione), no. 35349/05, § 18, 17 luglio 2008). Pertanto, si potrebbe dire che la situazione nel caso di specie comporta un grado di interesse pubblico significativamente meno marcato rispetto ad altri casi e che non giustifica una riduzione così sostanziale rispetto al valore locativo sul libero mercato (cfr., Zammit e Attard, cit., § 75).
96. Inoltre, devono essere detratte le somme già percepite dai ricorrenti per il periodo di riferimento.
97. La Corte ribadisce che un risarcimento del danno pecuniario ai sensi dell'articolo 41 della Convenzione ha lo scopo di mettere il ricorrente, per quanto possibile, nella posizione di cui avrebbe goduto se la violazione non si fosse verificata. Essa ritiene pertanto che al premio di cui sopra debbano essere aggiunti gli interessi per compensare la perdita di valore del premio nel tempo. In quanto tale, il tasso di interesse dovrebbe riflettere le condizioni economiche nazionali, quali i livelli di inflazione e i tassi di interesse. La Corte ritiene pertanto che all'importo di cui sopra debba essere aggiunto un pagamento una tantum del 5% di interessi.
98. La Corte concede quindi ai ricorrenti, congiuntamente, 500.000 euro. Come richiesto, l'importo concesso deve essere versato direttamente sul conto bancario designato dai rappresentanti dei ricorrenti.
99. Tenuto conto della sentenza della Corte Costituzionale di EUR 25.000, che rimane dovuta ai ricorrenti, la Corte non è tenuta a concedere un'ulteriore somma a titolo di danno morale, respinge pertanto tale richiesta.
Costi e spese
100. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre chiesto un totale di EUR 26.041,62 di costi e spese, di cui EUR 4.620,43 (come da fattura delle spese tassata) e EUR 19.817,20 (altre spese legali sostenute) in relazione al procedimento di ricorso costituzionale e EUR 6.224,42 per quelle sostenute dinanzi al Tribunale. I legali rappresentanti hanno indicato il conto corrente bancario del loro studio per ricevere il pagamento di tutte le somme concesse dal Tribunale.

101. Il Governo ha accettato la richiesta di EUR 4.620,43 (come da fattura delle spese tassata), ma ha contestato le rimanenti richieste per le spese sostenute in ambito nazionale e ha ritenuto che le spese sostenute dinanzi a questa Corte non dovessero superare i 2.000 EUR.
102. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente ha diritto al rimborso delle spese e dei costi solo nella misura in cui è stato dimostrato che questi sono stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e che sono ragionevoli in termini quantitativi. Nella fattispecie, tenuto conto dei documenti in suo possesso e dei criteri di cui sopra, la Corte ritiene ragionevole concedere la somma di 16.000 euro, in via solidale, a copertura di tutte le spese. Come richiesto, l'importo assegnato deve essere versato direttamente sul conto bancario designato dai rappresentanti dei ricorrenti (si veda, ad esempio, Denisov c. Ucraina [GC], n. 76639/11, § 148, 25 settembre 2018 e le Istruzioni pratiche al Regolamento della Corte relative alle giuste richieste di soddisfazione, alla voce informazioni sul pagamento).
B. Interessi di mora
103. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale vanno aggiunti tre punti percentuali.

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,

Dichiara il ricorso ammissibile;
Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1;
Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
2. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 13 della Convenzione in combinato disposto con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1;
3. Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 13 in combinato disposto con l'articolo 6 § 1 della Convenzione;
Contiene
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve versare ai ricorrenti, sul conto bancario designato dai rappresentanti dei ricorrenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, i seguenti importi:
(i) 500.000 euro (cinquecentomila euro), in solido, per i danni pecuniari;
(ii) 16.000 euro (sedicimila euro), in solido, più le imposte eventualmente dovute ai ricorrenti, a titolo di costi e spese;
(b) che dalla scadenza dei tre mesi sopra indicati fino al regolamento saranno dovuti interessi semplici sulle somme di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Centrale Europea durante il periodo di inadempienza, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;
3) Il resto della domanda delle ricorrenti è respinto per giusta soddisfazione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto l'11 febbraio 2020, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.

Stephen Phillips Paul Lemmens
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.