Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF STREZOVSKI AND OTHERS v. NORTH MACEDONIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: 01,P1-1

NUMERO: 14460/16/2020 +7
STATO: Macedonia
DATA: 27/02/2020
ORGANO: Sezione Prima


TESTO ORIGINALE

FIRST SECTION

CASE OF STREZOVSKI AND OTHERS v. NORTH MACEDONIA

(Applications nos. 14460/16 and 7 others - see appended list)




JUDGMENT

Art 1 P1 • Control of the use of property • State-imposed standing charge payable to private heat suppliers by owners of flats disconnected from district heating system which supplies their residential buildings • State required to ensure that the impugned measure does not impose excessive burden on applicants, while allowing private heat suppliers to make potentially unjustified profits • Lack of objective assessment of indirect use of heating in each individual case • Domestic courts’ failure to strike the requisite fair balance between the interests involved by applying sufficient procedural safeguards
STRASBOURG
27 February 2020
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of Strezovski and Others v. North Macedonia,
The European Court of Human Rights (First Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Ksenija Turkovi?, President,
Aleš Pejchal,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pere Pastor Vilanova,
Tim Eicke,
Jovan Ilievski,
Raffaele Sabato, judges,
and Abel Campos, Section Registrar,
Having regard to:
the above applications (nos. 14460/16, 14958/16, 14962/16, 14966/16, 27884/16, 16064/17, 20229/17 and 30206/17) against the Republic of North Macedonia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by eight Macedonians/citizens of the Republic of North Macedonia, Mr Strezo Strezovski (“the first applicant”), Mr Cane Nikoloski (“the second applicant”), Mr Aco Spasovski (“the third applicant”), Mr Josip Juvan (“the fourth applicant”), Mr Zoran Kostovski (“the fifth applicant”), Ms Trajanka Nakevska (“the sixth applicant”), Mr Enver Iseni (“the seventh applicant”) and Ms Sonja Nalbanti-Dimoska (“the eighth applicant”), on the various dates indicated in the appended table;

the letter of 2 May 2018 by the first applicant’s wife, Ms V. Strezovska, informing the Court that the first applicant had died on 4 April 2017 and indicating her interest in continuing the application in his name;
the decision to give notice to the Government of North Macedonia (“the Government”) of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 and to declare inadmissible the remainder of the applications pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 of the Rules of Court
the parties’ observations;
Having deliberated in private on 4 February 2020,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on that date:
INTRODUCTION
1. The applicants, who are all owners of flats disconnected from the district heating network supplying their respective residential buildings, complained that the obligation to pay private heat suppliers a standing charge introduced by the State had violated their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions (flats) under Article 1 of Protocol No.1.

THE FACTS
2. The applicants live in Skopje. Ms Strezovska and the seventh applicant were represented by Mr A. Varela, the second and fifth applicants were represented by Ms D. Chakarovska-Grozdanovska, and the eighth applicant was represented by Mr I. Spirovski, all lawyers practising in Skopje. The remaining applicants were granted leave to represent themselves.
3. The Government were represented by their Agent, Ms D. Djonova.
4. All the applicants are owners of (and live in) flats in residential buildings (?????????? ??????? ?? ????????) in Skopje connected to a district heating network operated by private heat suppliers. Their units have either never been connected to the district heating network in the building (in application no. 20229/17, the seventh applicant installed his own heating system in his flat before the district heating network in his building became operable for other apartments) or were disconnected from it before 30 July 2012 (see paragraphs 5 and 13 below), either at the request of the former owner of the flat (application no. 30206/17, the eighth applicant) or by the applicants (the remaining applications, between 2002 and 2011).
5. On 30 July 2012 the Heat Energy Supply Regulations (“the 2012 Regulations”) were adopted by the Energy Regulatory Commission, a State body whose members are appointed by Parliament. Under those regulations, disconnected users were required to pay to private heat suppliers an annual standing charge (?????????? ?? ?????????? ???????), payable in monthly instalments (section 53(2) of the 2012 Regulations, see paragraph 12 below).
6. On 22 May 2013 the Constitutional Court declared that provision compatible with the Constitution. It held that disconnected units in buildings were indirect (???????) consumers of heat from pipes passing through them or from neighbouring and other units in the building connected to the district heating network (see paragraph 16 below).
7. Private heat suppliers issued invoices requiring the applicants to pay the standing charge subsequent to its introduction on 1 October 2012 (see section 66 of the 2012 Regulations, paragraph 13 below). After the applicants had failed to pay, a notary public granted the suppliers’ requests for enforcement of the unpaid invoices and issued payment orders regarding several unpaid monthly instalments of the standing charge (??????? ?? ??????? ?? ??????????). The monthly instalments payable by the applicants were in the range of between 5 and 29 euros (EUR).
8. The applicants opposed the payment orders (????????) before the Skopje Court of First Instance arguing (i) that they had not entered into an agreement with the supplier; (ii) that the charge had been introduced with the 2012 Regulations, notwithstanding that such an obligation could only be introduced by primary legislation (?????); (iii) that the Energy Act did not include the terms “disconnected users” and “indirect consumers” introduced by the 2012 Regulations; (iv) that their units had either never been connected or had been disconnected from the district heating system before the 2012 Regulations entered into force; and (v) that they received either little (in the case of the eighth applicant) or no heat whatsoever (in the case of the remaining applicants) since no pipes passed through the flats in question and/or all the neighbouring flats were also disconnected. In this connection, the fifth, sixth and seventh applicants (applications nos. 16064/16, 27884/16 and 20229/17) argued that their units were on the ground or uppermost floor of their buildings and were surrounded by flats disconnected from the district system. Some applicants claimed that their units were heated better than those heated through the district system, as a result of which they lost heat, instead of receiving any. The amounts claimed had not been based on an objective assessment of any heat received from other flats. In that connection, they requested that the courts carried out an on-site inspection. The fifth applicant submitted as evidence an expert report which stated that his flat received no heat whatsoever from the district heating system in the building either through the pipes or by conduction.
9. Following the applicants’ objections, all the cases were decided by the Skopje Court of First Instance and Court of Appeal. By separate decisions (Pl.P. 1486/13; 1487/14; 1794/14; 1824/14; 1907/14; 2133/14; 2837/14 and 977/15) given between December 2014 and February 2017 (final judgments rendered between September 2015 and February 2017) both courts dismissed the applicants’ objections and confirmed the orders. Referring to the findings of the Constitutional Court (see paragraphs 6 and 17) and without carrying out on-site visits (except in the case of the sixth applicant) or ordering an expert assessment, the courts held that the applicants were “indirect consumers” of heat distributed in the building through the district heating network. Since there were other units in the buildings heated through that network (“direct consumers”), the applicants were to be considered “indirect consumers” and were accordingly obliged to pay the standing charge as specified in section 53(2) (and section 66) of the 2012 Regulations. The courts further held (in the case of the first, fourth, fifth and seventh applicants) that “all (disconnected) units in a building connected to a district heating network [were] obliged to pay the standing charge irrespective of their position or the composition or construction of the internal installation”.
10. According to the Government, 12,000 of 60,000 flats in residential buildings were affected, having been disconnected from the district heating network.
RELEVANT LEGAL FRAMEWORK AND PRACTICE
DOMESTIC LAW AND PRACTICE
Civil Proceedings Act 2005
11. Section 400 of the Civil Proceedings Act 2005 provides that proceedings may be reopened if the Court has found a violation of the Convention. In such proceedings, the domestic courts are required to comply with the provisions of the final judgment of the Court.
Heat Energy Supply Regulations 2012, adopted by the Energy Regulatory Commission and published in Official Gazette no. 97/12 (“the 2012 Regulations”)
12. Under section 53(2) of the 2012 Regulations, disconnected users in residential buildings equipped with a single joint meter (???? ????????????? ?? ???????????? ?? ???? ????? ???? ?????????? ????? ????) were required to pay a fixed heating standing charge, the amount of which was to be determined in accordance with the heat tariff system (see paragraph 14 below). Under section 53(3), the charge was not payable if all the units linked to a single meter had been disconnected for one or more heating seasons or if the heat allocator had registered no heat consumption.
13. Under the transitional and final provisions of the 2012 Regulations (section 66), all previously disconnected users in residential buildings were required to enter into an agreement with the supplier and connect to the district network by 1 October 2012 at the latest. Failure to do so would result in having to pay the standing charge.
Tariff system for the sale of heat energy of 12 July 2013, adopted by the Energy Regulatory Commission and published in Official Gazette no. 99/2013 (“the heat tariff system”)
14. Under the heat tariff system, the standing charge was a fee related to the available heat capacity at meter level point (section 2). The standing charge for households at meter level point was calculated on the basis of the surface area of the unit (section 37).
Heat Energy Supply Regulations 2019, adopted on 23 March 2019 (effective as of 1 April 2019) and further amended on 1 August 2019 by the Energy Regulatory Commission (Official Gazette nos. 65/2019 and 162/2019, “the 2019 Regulations”)
15. Following the entry into force of the new Energy Act in May 2018, the Energy Regulatory Commission adopted new regulations to replace the 2012 Regulations (section 65). Under the 2019 Regulations, consumers are entitled to disconnect their flats in residential buildings from the district heating network if the owner of the unit demonstrates that the planned heating system would be more efficient and environmentally friendly than the heating provided by the district system. In the event of a dispute with the heat supplier, the owner can refer the matter to the Energy Regulatory Commission for a decision. Owners not living in such units are required to pay the standing charge. Owners of flats, which are disconnected from the district heating system, are not required to pay the standing charge if they provide valid proof (such as an identification card and the title deeds or lease) that they, inter alia, live in or use (rent) the unit. The latter category of owners can challenge before the Energy Regulatory Commission a decision of the heat supplier rejecting their request for exemption from paying the standing charge (section 54).
16. According to the Energy Regulatory Commission, disconnected users eligible under the above provision have not been required to pay the standing charge since April 2019.
Practice of the Constitutional Court
17. By a decision (U.br.125/2012) of 22 May 2013 (given following an application by three people, including the first applicant) the Constitutional Court declared section 53(2) of the 2012 Regulations compatible with the Constitution. Referring to the “specific nature of collective housing (?????????? ??????? ?? ????????)”, the court held that “owing to the transmission of heat through the substance from a warmer to a cooler place (heat conduction)” and pipes passing through the flats, disconnected units “indirectly” obtained heat from units in the building connected to the district heating network. Accordingly, disconnected units obtained heat at the expense of units using the service provided through the district system installed in the building and were to be considered “indirect consumers of heat obtained from neighbouring and other flats in the building” connected to that system. According to the court, it was “clear” that in collective residential buildings “consumers disconnected from the district heating system objectively use certain heat ... which justifies that they pay for it ... Disconnected users are required under section 53(2) of the [2012 Regulations] to pay for a service which ... regardless of the fact that they are disconnected from the system, they receive. It is accordingly justified that they pay for it.”

18. The court also held that section 66 of the 2012 Regulations had introduced a deadline for already disconnected users to connect to the district heating system (1 October 2012) or else risk paying the standing charge. Since that provision was of a provisional nature and had ceased to apply after that time-limit had expired, the court held that it was no longer valid and accordingly rejected that part of the application.
19. In a dissenting opinion, one judge stated that the Energy Act contained no provisions relating to the standing charge. Accordingly, its introduction by the 2012 Regulations had been contrary to the Constitution. In this connection, he referred to an earlier decision of the Constitutional Court (U.br.148/2008) declaring a piece of secondary legislation introducing a similar charge unconstitutional. He concluded that the payment of the charge was an issue of fact that had to be determined by the civil courts.
Legal opinion of the Supreme Court of 20 February 2018
20. Following an application alleging inconsistent domestic practice, the Civil Division of the Supreme Court adopted a legal opinion, holding as follows:
“... consumers who have never been connected to a district heating system, have never entered into an agreement with the supplier and [whose] unit has not been equipped with a heating installation by the latter cannot be regarded as disconnected indirect consumers and are not required to pay the standing charge.”
That approach concerned flats in residential buildings which were not pre-equipped with a heating installation, flats using an independent (individual) heating system before the supplier equipped some units in the building with a heating installation (which did not pass through the flats in question) and consumers who had never entered into an agreement with the heat supplier. The court stated that the above category of consumers had never used the service provided by the supplier and could not therefore seek its discontinuation. Accordingly, they were neither direct nor indirect consumers.
OTHER MATERIALS
21. The Government submitted a report drawn up in 2019 by the Academy of Sciences and Arts of North Macedonia before the 2019 Regulations (see paragraphs 15 and 16 above) entered into force. The report is a comprehensive study of the national legislation regarding the heating standing charge and contains several conclusions and recommendations. The report finds, inter alia, that the 2012 Regulations dealt with disconnected units collectively rather than individually, given that the standing charge applied to all such units irrespective of whether they were heated more efficiently than units connected to the district heating network. In that connection, the report suggests that the new regulations should allow units heated more efficiently ? an issue to be determined in appropriate proceedings before an independent commission ? to discontinue the service provided through the district heating system. It also points to the possibility of a full or partial exemption from the obligation to pay the standing charge in other situations, such as if an unit has more exterior walls, good quality insulation, and so forth.
THE LAW
JOINDER OF THE APPLICATIONS
22. Having regard to the similar subject matter of the applications, the Court finds it appropriate to examine them jointly in a single judgment.
ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL No. 1 OF THE CONVENTION
23. The applicants complained that the obligation to pay the standing charge had violated their property rights under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
Admissibility
1. The victim status of the applicants
(a) The parties’ submissions
(i) The Government
24. The Government contested the victim status of the applicants.
25. As regards Ms Strezovska, they submitted that her letter informing the Court of her husband’s (the first applicant) death had reached it over a year after he had died, and six months before notice of the case had been given. Furthermore, she had failed to demonstrate that she had any legitimate interest in pursuing the application.
26. The Government further argued that all the applicants had lost their victim status following the introduction of the 2019 Regulations (paragraphs 15 and 16 above). This was because they were all owners of the disconnected units in which they lived. Accordingly, they were eligible to be exempted from the obligation to pay the standing charge under the 2019 Regulations.
(ii) The applicants
27. The first, fourth and seventh applicants contested the Government’s objection, arguing that 2019 Regulations did not apply to the standing charge payable under the 2012 Regulations. In this connection, Ms Strezovska submitted a copy of a (non-final) judgment of the Skopje Court of First Instance dated 16 July 2019 stating that she was liable to pay the monthly instalments of the standing charge for the period January to July 2018 since she owned the flat and had lived there after the first applicant’s death. The fourth applicant confirmed, however, that the invoices he had received regarding the standing charge for the months subsequent to the entry into force of the 2019 Regulations had been cancelled.
(b) The Court’s assessment
(i) The standing of Ms Strezovska
28. Where an applicant has died after lodging an application, the Court has accepted that the next of kin or heir may in principle pursue the application, provided that he or she has sufficient interest in the case (see Centre for Legal Resources on behalf of Valentin Câmpeanu v. Romania [GC], no. 47848/08, § 97, ECHR 2014). This is particularly the case in applications which were introduced by the applicant him or herself and were only continued by his or her surviving spouse after his or her subsequent death (see Dalban v. Romania [GC], no. 28114/95, ECHR 1999?VI).
29. Having regard to the request by Ms Strezovska, as the first applicant’s widow, to pursue the proceedings (see above), and her material interest based on the direct effect on her pecuniary rights (see paragraph 27 above), which the Government did not contest, the Court considers that she has the requisite standing under Article 34 of the Convention to continue the application in his name (see Streltsov and other “Novocherkassk military pensioners” cases v. Russia, nos. 8549/06 and 86 others, § 39, 29 July 2010, and Stojkovic v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, no. 14818/02, § 25, 8 November 2007). That she did not promptly bring the first applicant’s death to the Court’s attention is of no relevance for her standing. Consequently, the Government’s objection under this head must be dismissed.
(ii) The victim status of all the applicants
30. As the Court has repeatedly held, a decision or measure favourable to an applicant is not, in principle, sufficient to deprive him or her of his or her status as a “victim” for the purposes of Article 34 of the Convention unless the national authorities have acknowledged, either expressly or in substance, and then afforded appropriate and sufficient redress for the breach of the Convention (see Moon v. France, no. 39973/03, § 29, 9 July 2009). Only when these conditions are satisfied does the subsidiary nature of the protective mechanism of the Convention preclude examination of an application (see Mili? and Nikezi? v. Montenegro, nos. 54999/10 and 10609/11, § 73, 28 April 2015).
31. The Court notes that the present case concerns the alleged violation of the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions owing to the requirement to pay the heating standing charge under the 2012 Regulations. These regulations were replaced by the 2019 Regulations. Section 54 of the 2019 Regulations provides that consumers that are already disconnected from the district heating system in residential buildings can be exempted from the obligation to pay the standing charge under certain conditions (see paragraph 15 above). These regulations entered into force on 1 April 2019, and since that date consumers eligible under this exemption clause have no longer been required to pay the standing charge (see paragraphs 16 and 27 above). However, there is nothing to suggest that this provision applies to the monthly instalments of the standing charge payable under the 2012 Regulations. Furthermore, the Government did not submit any example of domestic practice in which that provision had been interpreted so as to apply to the obligation for payment of the standing charge prior to the introduction of the exemption clause under the 2019 Regulations. In such circumstances, while it is likely that the 2019 Regulations lay a basis for the applicants’ exemption from the obligation to pay the standing charge as of 1 April 2019, they cannot be interpreted as an acknowledgment or redress for the alleged violation of the Convention.
32. In view of the foregoing, the Court concludes that the applicants can claim to be “victims” of a breach of their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions as regards the standing charge payable under the 2012 Regulations. Consequently, the Government’s objection must be dismissed.
Exhaustion of domestic remedies in respect of the seventh applicant
(a) The parties’ submissions
(i) The Government
33. In a document dated 9 May 2018 containing their additional observations and comments on the seventh applicant’s just satisfaction claims, the Government, for the first time, objected that he had failed to sue the private heat supplier for unjust enrichment (?????????? ??? ?????). In support of their objection, they relied on the Supreme Court’s legal opinion (paragraph 20 above) that had been adopted subsequent to their initial observations on the admissibility and merits of the case of 17 January 2018. They submitted that, in the alleged circumstances of his case (paragraph 4 above), the seventh applicant was entitled by law to bring such a claim against the supplier. To show the effectiveness of that remedy, they submitted copies of several final court judgments in cases where claimants had successfully sued a private electricity supplier for unjust enrichment regarding a standing charge, which the competent (administrative and judicial) authorities (in separate proceedings) had found to be in violation of competition law. To show that a claim for unjust enrichment would not lack any prospect of success, they submitted copies of judgments postdating the Supreme Court’s legal opinion in which the same courts (paragraph 9 above) had held that claimants in similar circumstances to the seventh applicant were not required to pay the standing charge to the heat supplier (for period covered by the 2012 Regulations).
(ii) The seventh applicant
34. The seventh applicant contested the Government’s objection, arguing that the remedy suggested (an unjust enrichment claim) could not compensate him for the payments ordered in the proceedings at issue. Furthermore, the judgments submitted concerning the private electricity supplier were irrelevant as they concerned different issues. The remaining judgments submitted by the Government made no mention of the Supreme Court’s legal opinion. In the latter connection, he submitted, inter alia, three final judgments of the Skopje Court of Appeal (Gz.3268/17; Gz.4066/17 and Gz.4945/17) dated between February and November 2018 dismissing appeals brought by him, notwithstanding the fact that he had submitted the Supreme Court’s legal opinion as evidence.
(b) The Court’s assessment
35. The Court would like to note at the outset that, having regard to the explanation provided by the Government as to why they had not promptly relied on the existence of the civil avenue of redress (see paragraph 33 above), they are not estopped from raising the objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies, in particular, based on the failure of the seventh applicant to sue the district heat supplier for unjust enrichment (see, conversely, Khlaifia and Others v. Italy [GC], no. 16483/12, § 52, 15 December 2016).
36. The general principles regarding the exhaustion rule under Article 35 § 1 of the Convention are set out in Vu?kovi? and Others v. Serbia ((preliminary objection) [GC], nos. 17153/11 and 29 others, §§ 70-77, 25 March 2014, with further references, in particular to Akdivar and Others v. Turkey, 16 September 1996, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1996?IV).
37. In that connection, the Court finds it appropriate to reiterate that in order to be effective, a remedy must be capable of remedying directly the state of affairs at issue and must offer reasonable prospects of success. There is no obligation to have recourse to remedies which are inadequate or ineffective. In addition, according to the “generally recognised rules of international law”, there may be special circumstances which absolve the applicant from the obligation to exhaust the domestic remedies at his or her disposal (see Vu?kovi? and Others, §§ 73-74, and Akdivar and Others, §§ 67 and 71, both cited above).
38. Furthermore, as regards the distribution of the burden of proof in the area of the exhaustion of domestic remedies, it is incumbent on the Government claiming non-exhaustion to satisfy the Court that the remedy was an effective one available in theory and in practice at the relevant time, that is to say, that it was accessible, was one which was capable of providing redress in respect of the applicant’s complaints, and offered reasonable prospects of success. However, once this burden of proof has been satisfied, it falls to the applicant to establish that the remedy advanced by the Government was in fact exhausted or was for some reason inadequate and ineffective in the particular circumstances of the case or that there existed special circumstances absolving him or her from the requirement (see Akdivar and Others, § 68, and Vu?kovi? and Others, § 77, both cited above).
39. Turning to the present case, the Court does not consider that a claim for unjust enrichment against the private heat supplier would be an effective remedy in the circumstances of the seventh applicant. In this connection, it notes that the Government have not provided any examples of domestic practice in which a legal opinion by the Supreme Court served as a legal basis for such a claim. The examples submitted by the Government do not allow the Court to hold otherwise for the following reasons.
40. The case-law concerning claims for unjust enrichment lodged against the electricity provider cannot be regarded as a valid reference for the present case because those claims were made on the basis of final court judgments, unlike in the present case, where such a claim would rely on the Supreme Court’s legal opinion. No argument or evidence was submitted as to the legal nature of such an opinion and whether it was binding. Furthermore, and on the basis of the material submitted by the parties, the Court notes that discordant decisions by the same courts postdating the Supreme Court’s opinion of 22 February 2018 existed simultaneously. Moreover, those courts dismissed the seventh applicant’s identical claims notwithstanding the fact that he had brought that opinion to their attention.
41. In view of the foregoing, the Court considers that the Government have not substantiated that a claim for unjust enrichment against the district heat supplier would have been an available, let alone effective, remedy in the present case. Consequently, their objection on the grounds of non?exhaustion of domestic remedies with respect to the seventh applicant has to be rejected.
Whether the applicants have suffered a significant disadvantage
(a) The parties’ submissions
42. The Government submitted that the Court’s assessment of the case should be limited to the standing charge, which the applicants had been required to pay on a monthly basis (free of the court costs related to the civil proceedings at issue). In that connection, they maintained that the highest monthly instalment payable by the applicants had been EUR 21, which had been insignificant given the standard of living in the respondent State. Furthermore, any damage that that requirement had entailed had been insignificant in view of the applicants’ “privilege” of being able to reconnect their units to the district heating system or to benefit indirectly from the heat, which that system produced in the building.
43. The seventh and eighth applicants contested the Government’s objection, arguing that the amount of the standing charge had not been negligible (and should take into account trial costs). In this connection, the eighth applicant maintained that she had been required to pay the standing charge indefinitely, to avoid enforcement action, which had been a significant financial burden for her. Furthermore, the issue at stake concerned a matter of principle of considerable importance. Lastly, the possibility to reconnect their dwellings to the district heating system could neither be regarded as a “privilege”, nor were both issues (payment of the standing charge and reconnection) comparable.
(b) The Court’s assessment
44. The relevant part of Article 35 § 3 of the Convention reads as follows:
“The Court shall declare inadmissible any individual application submitted under Article 34 if it considers that:
...
(b) the applicant has not suffered a significant disadvantage, unless respect for human rights as defined in the Convention and the Protocols thereto requires an examination of the application on the merits and provided that no case may be rejected on this ground which has not been duly considered by a domestic tribunal.”
45. The Court has considered the rule contained in Article 35 § 3 (b) of the Convention to consist of three criteria. Firstly, whether the applicant has suffered a “significant disadvantage”; secondly, whether respect for human rights compels the Court to examine the case; and thirdly, whether the case has been duly considered by a domestic tribunal (see Savelyev v. Russia (dec.), no. 42982/08, 21 May 2019, § 25).
46. The first question of whether the applicant has suffered any “significant disadvantage” represents the main element. It applies where, notwithstanding a potential violation of a right from a purely legal point of view, the level of severity attained does not warrant consideration by an international court (see Adrian Mihai Ionescu v. Romania (dec), no. 36659/04, 1 June 2010; Korolev v. Russia (dec.), no. 25551/05, 1 July 2010; and Gaftoniuc v. Romania (dec.), no. 30934/05, 22 February 2011). The assessment of this minimum level is, in the nature of things, relative, and depends on all the circumstances of the case. The level of severity must be assessed in the light of the financial impact of the matter in dispute and the importance of the case for the applicant (see Burov v. Moldova (dec.), no. 38875/03, 14 June 2011, § 25).
47. The present case concerns civil proceedings in which the applicants unsuccessfully challenged the payment of several monthly instalments of the standing charge. The highest single monthly instalment payable by the applicants did not exceed EUR 30 (see paragraphs 7 and 42 above). The Court notes that none of the parties submitted information concerning the financial situation of the applicants. Nevertheless, the Court does not consider that that sum, as such, would have had a significant effect on them (see Jovanovska and Others v. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (dec.), no. 14001/13 and 22883/14, 14 November 2017, § 29).
48. However, the Court considers that the applicants’ grievances in the present case should be seen in the overall context in which the payment requirement in question operated. In this connection, it is to be noted that the obligation to pay the standing charge was not a one-off requirement extinguished by the proceedings at issue, but rather one of a recurrent nature that operated within the framework of the 2012 Regulations. The applicants were required to pay the standing charge while those regulations were in force, that is, between 1 October 2012 and 1 April 2019. The overall amount cannot be said to have been insignificant in the light of the standard of living in the respondent State.
49. In addition, the Court also considers that the present case satisfies the safeguard clause contained in this admissibility criterion compelling the Court to continue the examination of the application, even in the absence of any significant disadvantage suffered by the applicant, if respect for human rights as defined in the Convention and the Protocols thereto so requires. This is because it raises questions of a general nature affecting other persons in the same position as the applicants. In this connection, it is noteworthy that, according to the Government, there are 12,000 units affected on the basis that they have discontinued district heating, whose owners are likely to have been required to pay the standing charge in question. Furthermore, there are over 120 similar cases pending before the Court. When giving notice of the applications to the Government, the Court indicated that they were potentially leading cases (see, mutatis mutandis, Finger v. Bulgaria, no. 37346/05, § 75, 10 May 2011).
50. In view of the foregoing, the Court does not consider it necessary to determine whether the case has been duly considered by a domestic tribunal.
51. It follows that the Government’s objection must be rejected.
The Court’s conclusion on admissibility
52. The Court notes that the case is neither manifestly ill-founded nor inadmissible on any other grounds listed in Article 35 of the Convention. It must therefore be declared admissible.
Merits
The parties’ submissions
(a) The applicants
53. The seventh and eighth applicants reiterated that the interference in question had not been in accordance with the law because the standing charge had been introduced by the 2012 Regulations, as secondary legislation. The Energy Act did not contain any provisions in that regard. The eighth applicant further criticised the Constitutional Court’s decision (see paragraphs 17-19 above) as being inconsistent with its earlier decision finding, in similar circumstances, that the heating standing charge could not be introduced by secondary legislation.
54. They also contested the general interest grounds which, in the Government’s view (see paragraph 58 below), the standing charge had pursued. All those grounds had aimed to protect the commercial interests of the private heat suppliers (at the expense of consumers) rather than any public interest. Flats had been disconnected from the district heating network out of the heating season, so the supplier had had timely information about the number of consumers and could have made the necessary adjustments to the heat supply. Furthermore, the standing charge had neither been a tax nor a penalty payable to the State. The Government’s argument that it had represented “payment for the privilege to be disconnected from the system” demonstrated that it had been regarded as a “tax” or “penalty” payable to a private company. Any argument that it had related to the indirect use of heat distributed through that system pertained to an issue of fact that the domestic courts had not undertaken to establish. In any event, the domestic courts in their decisions had not identified any public interest to justify the standing charge.
55. The eighth applicant further argued that in her case the 2012 Regulations had been applied retroactively given the fact that her flat had been already disconnected from the district heating system by the previous owner in 2011, before the regulations had entered into force. Furthermore, the domestic courts had applied the 2012 Regulations in such a manner that they had considered the standing charge a public fee payable to the supplier, which could not be contested. Accordingly, any prospect of success in the proceedings at issue had been merely theoretical and illusory. Lastly, she maintained that the State’s margin of appreciation in regulating commercial activities based on the rules of competition in a regulated market, as it was in the present case, was narrower than in an area of housing with sensitive aspects of social justice. The State should not impose on residents a particular source of heat, but rather should allow free choice based on reasonable factors.
56. The remaining applicants, who were at the time represented by a lawyer of their own choosing, did not submit timely observations in compliance with the Rules of Court.
(b) The Government
57. The Government acknowledged that the requirement to pay the standing charge had amounted to an interference with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. It had been introduced by the 2012 Regulations, adopted pursuant to the Energy Act, and had become payable after those regulations had entered into force. The Constitutional Court had confirmed that those regulations were compatible with the law and the Constitution (see paragraphs 17 and 18 above). Accordingly, the interference in question had been in accordance with the law.
58. The requirement to pay the standing charge had been justified not only because disconnected consumers used heat provided in the building from the district system (for the reasons advanced by the Constitutional Court, see paragraph 17 above), but it also aimed to ensure a safe, secure and efficient heat supply, a matter of public interest. Disconnection from the district heating system affected the energy balance in the building and reduced heating efficiency. The standing charge had aimed to offset the adverse effects of the use of heat by disconnected users, had represented a payment for their privilege to disconnect (and remain as such) from the district system, had been an attempt to prevent a disconnection spiral by other consumers in the building, and had ensured protection of the consumers that used heat distributed through the district system. The Government emphasised that the charge had neither been “a tax” nor “a penalty” within the meaning of the invoked provision of the Convention. Furthermore, a similar charge had existed in several States in the region, which reflected the trend at the time.
59. According to the Government, when moving into the buildings the applicants had been aware or ought to have been aware of the heating system in the building and what their obligations were as tenants. The standing charge also included a fee for the heating of the communal parts of the building (such as stairways and corridors) used by all residents irrespective of whether they themselves used heat provided by the district suppliers. Furthermore, the amount had been minor in relation to the possibility to reconnect to the system, which was offered to such consumers for free.
60. The Government concluded that the introduction of the standing charge by the 2012 Regulations and the manner in which that requirement had been interpreted and implemented in the applicants’ cases had not amounted to a violation of their property rights. Referring to the eighth applicant, they argued that the judicial procedures at issue, which had involved litigation between private parties, had contained the necessary procedural safeguards under Article 1 of Protocol No.1 to the Convention. Furthermore, the State had a wide margin of appreciation in this sphere and the standing charge had not disturbed the balance between the individual and general interest, namely the stability of the energy system and the safe and efficient supply of heat to consumers connected to that system.
The Court’s consideration
(a) General principles
61. The essential object of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is to protect a person against unjustified interference by the State with the peaceful enjoyment of his or her possessions. However, by virtue of Article 1 of the Convention, each Contracting Party “shall secure to everyone within [its] jurisdiction the rights and freedoms defined in [the] Convention”. The discharge of this general duty may entail positive obligations inherent in ensuring the effective exercise of the rights guaranteed by the Convention. In the context of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, even in cases involving litigation between individuals and companies, those positive obligations may require the State to take the measures necessary to protect the right of property. This means, in particular, that the States are under an obligation to provide judicial procedures that offer the necessary procedural guarantees and therefore enable the domestic courts and tribunals to adjudicate effectively and fairly any cases concerning property matters (see Anheuser ? Busch Inc. v. Portugal [GC], no. 73049/01, § 83, ECHR 2007?I, and Bistrovi? v. Croatia, no. 25774/05, § 33, 31 May 2007).
62. The boundaries between the State’s positive and negative obligations under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 do not lend themselves to precise definition. The applicable principles are nonetheless similar. Whether the case is analysed in terms of a positive duty of the State or in terms of interference by a public authority which needs to be justified, the criteria to be applied do not differ in substance. In both contexts, regard must be had to the fair balance to be struck between the competing interests of the individual and of the community as a whole. In both contexts the State enjoys a certain margin of appreciation in determining the steps to be taken to ensure compliance with the Convention (see Kotov v. Russia [GC], no. 54522/00, § 110, 3 April 2012 and Arzhiyeva and Tsadayev v. Russia, nos. 66590/10 and 3773/11, § 49, 13 November 2018).
(b) Application of these principles to the present case

63. The Court will determine whether the conduct of the respondent State – regardless of whether that may be characterised as interference or failure to comply with its positive obligation, or a combination of both ? was justifiable in the light of the applicable principles.
(i) The applicable rule
64. The Court notes that the Government acknowledged that the imposition of the heating standing charge on the applicants, as owners of flats disconnected from the district heating system, had amounted to an interference with their right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. The Court notes that the standing charge was introduced by the Energy Regulatory Commission, a State body. Whereas the charge did not affect the applicants’ right to dispose of (to pledge, to lend or to sell) their flats, it imposed a financial burden on the applicants directly related to the heating of the flats and capable of affecting the exercise of their right to use and their possession of the flats. Accordingly, and to the extent that the charge was a result of State regulation, the Court considers that its continuing application (see paragraphs 31 and 48 above) constituted a means of State control of the use of the applicants’ property within the meaning of the second paragraph of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
65. In addition, the Court notes that the impugned proceedings concerned standing charge-related-disputes between the applicants and the private heat suppliers, the latter being the recipients of the charge. The Court’s duty under Article 19 of the Convention to ensure the observance of the engagements undertaken by the Contracting Parties to the Convention, requires it to examine whether the way in which the domestic courts applied the system of payment of the standing charge have infringed the applicants’ rights and freedoms protected by the Convention. As noted in paragraph 62 above, regardless of whether the situation falls to be analysed in terms of the respondent State’s negative or positive obligation, the applicable principles are similar.
66. The Court needs to examine whether the system in which the heating standing charge operated under the 2012 Regulations was compatible with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, that is to say whether it was lawful, in the general interest and proportionate, that is, whether it struck a “fair balance” between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights (see Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 107, ECHR 2000?I).
(ii) Whether the impugned measure was “provided for by law”
67. The first requirement of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 is that any interference by a public authority with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions be lawful. In particular, the second paragraph of Article 1, while recognising that States have the right to control the use of property, subjects their right to the condition that it be exercised by enforcing “laws”. Moreover, the principle of lawfulness presupposes that the applicable provisions of domestic law are sufficiently accessible, precise and foreseeable in their application (see Bradshaw and Others v. Malta, no. 37121/15, § 52, 23 October 2018). When speaking of “law”, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 alludes to a concept which comprises statutory law, as well as case-law (see Brezovec v. Croatia, no. 13488/07, § 60, 29 March 2011).
68. In the present case, the Court agrees with the Government (see paragraph 57 above) that the standing charge was introduced under section 53(2) of the 2012 Regulations. It was secondary legislation, which the Energy Regulatory Commission, a State body, adopted pursuant to the Energy Act, as confirmed by the Constitutional Court (see paragraph 17 above),. It applied to all units disconnected from the district heating system in residential buildings equipped with a single joint meter (see paragraph 12 above). Section 66 of those regulations extended that requirement to all previously disconnected users, including the applicants (see paragraph 13 above). The 2012 Regulations became binding after they had been published in the Official Gazette.

69. Accordingly, the Court is satisfied that the interference in question was “lawful” within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 of the Convention.
(iii) Whether the measure pursued a “legitimate aim in the general interest”
70. A measure aimed at controlling the use of property can only be justified if it is shown, inter alia, to be “in accordance with the general interest”. Because of their direct knowledge of their society and its needs, the national authorities are in principle better placed than the international judge to appreciate what is in the “general” or “public” interest (see Bradshaw and Others, cited above, § 54).
71. In the present case, the Government identified the safe, secure and efficient heat supply as the aim in the general interest pursued by the standing charge. In that connection, they referred to the effect that disconnected users had on the balance of the energy sector and the quality of heat supplied to users connected to the district heating system in residential buildings (see paragraph 58 above).
72. The Court observes that the public interest invoked by the Government was not referred to by any of the courts dealing with the issue. Indeed, in the decision finding section 53(2) of the 2012 Regulations compatible with the Constitution, the Constitutional Court did not go beyond noting that the requirement to pay the standing charge was related to the heat that the disconnected consumers used from units connected to the district heating system in the buildings. That court considered the standing charge as the price which disconnected users were required to pay for heat received indirectly from other units in the buildings heated by the district system (see paragraph 17 above). The courts of general jurisdiction that decided the applicants’ civil claims followed that approach and confirmed the findings of the standing charge as the price for the heat received by the applicants (see paragraph 9 above).
73. The Court does not consider that the rationale of the standing charge identified by the domestic courts is necessarily inconsistent with the public interest invoked by the Government. Both concepts are not mutually exclusive. This is because the indirect use of district heating by disconnected users, in particular if it concerns a considerable share of the affected market, as in the present case (see paragraph 10 above), can be regarded as a factor capable of affecting the stability of the energy sector as a whole. Furthermore, the standing charge applied to a specific category of disconnected users in residential buildings (see paragraph 12 above). In the Court’s opinion, it is not unreasonable that “the specific nature of collective housing” (see paragraph 17 above) has a bearing on the efficiency of the district heating system at building level.
74. That the respondent State amended its legislation in 2019 so that that category of disconnected users is no longer required, under certain conditions, to pay the standing charge (see paragraph 15 above), does not necessarily undermine the public interest invoked by the Government. It can be seen in the context of the State’s right to exercise its margin of appreciation in this sphere, where the operation of specific legislation has wide-reaching consequences for numerous individuals (see Fleri Soler and Camilleri v. Malta, no. 35349/05, § 76, ECHR 2006?X).
75. Given that the notion of “public interest” is necessarily extensive and that States enjoy certain margin of appreciation to define what is “in the public interest” (see Jahn and Others v. Germany [GC], nos. 46720/99 and 2 others, § 91, ECHR 2005?VI), the Court is ready to accept that the obligation to pay the heating standing charge imposed on the applicants whose flats were disconnected from the district heating system can be regarded as having pursued the legitimate aim of ensuring a safe, secure and efficient heat supply.
(iv) Principle of “fair balance”

76. Both an interference with the peaceful enjoyment of possessions and an abstention from action must strike a fair balance between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights. The concern to achieve this balance is reflected in the structure of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 as a whole. In each case involving the alleged violation of that Article the Court must, therefore, ascertain whether by reason of the State’s action or inaction the person concerned had to bear a disproportionate and excessive burden (see Broniowski v. Poland [GC], no. 31443/96, § 150, ECHR 2004?V; Zolotas v. Greece (no. 2), no. 66610/09, § 40, ECHR 2013 (extracts); and Dickmann and Gion v. Romania, nos. 10346/03 and 10893/04, § 90, 24 October 2017).
77. In assessing compliance with Article 1 of Protocol No. 1, the Court must make an overall examination of the various interests in issue, bearing in mind that the Convention is intended to safeguard rights that are “practical and effective”. It must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. That assessment may involve not only the conditions of the measure, but also the existence of procedural and other safeguards ensuring that the operation of the system and its impact on one’s property rights is neither arbitrary nor unforeseeable. Uncertainty ? be it legislative, administrative or arising from practices applied by the authorities – is a factor to be taken into account in assessing the State’s conduct (see Broniowski, § 151, and Bradshaw and Others, § 56, both cited above).
78. In the present case, all the applicants are owners of flats in residential buildings connected to a district heating network. Their units had been disconnected from that system before the 2012 Regulations entered into force, either at the request of the former owner or by the applicants (see paragraph 4 above). At that time, there were no regulations requiring the payment of a heating standing charge. As noted above, such a requirement was introduced, for the first time, with the 2012 Regulations. Accordingly, at the relevant time the applicants could not have anticipated with any reasonable certainty that there would be, or the extent of, a standing charge imposed in the future.
79. The applicants were required to pay the standing charge from 1 October 2012 onwards. There is nothing to indicate that that requirement applied retroactively. It remained payable for at least six and a half years, that is to say until 1 April 2019, the date of entry into force of the 2019 Regulations, which, as noted above, seems to provide a basis for the applicants’ exemption from the obligation to pay the standing charge after that date (see paragraphs 26, 27 and 31 above). As noted above (see paragraph 48 above), the overall financial burden on the applicants cannot be regarded as insignificant.
80. The Court notes that the monthly instalments of the standing charge differed for each applicant (see paragraph 7 above). In the absence of any explanation by the parties, it appears that that difference was related to the different surface area of each unit, as a determinative factor for the calculation of the standing charge specified in the heat tariff system (see paragraph 14 above).
81. On the other hand, it has not been argued that the regulatory framework that operated under the 2012 Regulations identified any other factor related to the disconnected units relevant for the calculation of the standing charge, unlike the current system under the 2019 Regulations (see paragraph 15 above). Similarly, there is nothing to suggest that that framework allowed and set any conditions under which such units could seek a full or partial exemption from paying the standing charge.
82. The above elements (paragraphs 78-81 above) must be weighed against the interests at play in the present case.
83. In that context, the Court notes that the judicial authorities that dealt with the issue justified the payment of the standing charge by disconnected users, such as the applicants, only by reference to them indirectly using the heat provided in the building through the district network. Firstly, the Constitutional Court established the principle that users disconnected from the district network were “indirect consumers” of heat provided through that network to other units in the building. According to that court, “[since they] objectively use certain heat ... [they] are required ... to pay for a service which ... they receive” (see paragraph 17 above). Subsequent to that decision, the courts of general jurisdiction applied the same approach and dismissed the applicants’ arguments against the private heat suppliers. In so doing, they referred to the fact that there were units in the applicants’ buildings that were connected to and used the heat provided by the district network (“direct consumers”). In such circumstances, the courts held the applicants liable to pay the standing charge as “indirect consumers” for having benefited from that heat. This approach was applied to all such disconnected units. It was only in February 2018, over five years after the standing charge had become payable, that the Supreme Court limited the scope of application of that approach by excluding a particular category of units if the conditions specified in its legal opinion were met. However, as noted above (see paragraph 40 above), that opinion was not consistently applied by the competent courts.
84. The above blanket approach developed by the domestic courts was based exclusively on the premise that the applicants, as indirect consumers within the meaning given by the Constitutional Court, used heat that was distributed in the building through the district network. There was nothing in their decisions to suggest that the standing charge which the applicants were ordered to pay also concerned, as argued by the Government (see paragraph 59 above), the heating of the communal parts of the building. Similarly, it has not been argued that the standing charge was to be regarded “contribution”, within the meaning of paragraph 2 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, levied to support a public service.
85. In the proceedings at issue, the applicants challenged that premise by making arguments regarding certain issues of fact specific to their units. They also sought measures and proposed evidence relevant for an objective assessment of that premise in view of the units’ individual characteristics (see paragraph 8 above). The courts disregarded those requests and took no account of the applicants’ arguments. They did not undertake an examination of the contested issues of fact, holding that “all (disconnected) units in a building connected to a district heating network [were] obliged to pay the standing charge irrespective of their position or the composition or construction of the internal installation” (see paragraph 9 above). Accordingly, the individual circumstances related to the applicants’ units played no role in the judicial adjudication of their claims.
86. While the Court has accepted above (se paragraph 75 above) that the overall measure was, in principle, capable of being regarded as being in the general interest, the fact that there also existed an underlying private interest of a commercial nature cannot be disregarded. In such circumstances, both States and the Court in its supervisory role must be vigilant to ensure that measures, such as the one at issue, do not give rise to an imbalance that imposes an excessive burden on the applicants (as owners of disconnected units) while allowing private heat suppliers to make potentially unjustified profits. It is also in such contexts that effective procedural safeguards become indispensable (see, mutatis mutandis, Bradshaw and Others, cited above, § 64).
87. Having regard to the considerations discussed above, the Court cannot accept the Government’s contention (see paragraph 60 above) that there existed sufficient procedural safeguards in the application by the domestic courts of the law regarding the payment of the heating standing charge. The Court considers that it was necessary in the proceedings at issue to have the facts contested by the applicants established in a precise manner by verifying their arguments regarding the level of district heating provided in the building that their units allegedly used. Only after a verification of all relevant factors would it have been possible for the domestic authorities to make an objective assessment of the “indirect” use of heating in each individual case.
88. Having assessed all the elements above, the Court finds that the respondent State, notwithstanding its margin of appreciation, has failed to strike the requisite fair balance between the interests involved and has failed to make efforts to ensure adequate protection of the applicants’ property rights in the context of the proceedings at issue, which involved the ultimate interference on the part of the State with these rights.
89. Having regard to the foregoing, the Court finds that there has been a violation of the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions, as guaranteed by Article 1 of Protocol No. 1.
APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
90. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”
Damage
91. In respect of pecuniary damage, the seventh and eighth applicants claimed reimbursement of the standing charge which they had paid, on the basis of the court orders in the domestic proceedings, to the heat supplier.
92. The eighth applicant further claimed 4,000 euros (EUR) in respect of non?pecuniary damage for the distress and anxiety suffered as a result of the alleged violation. The seventh applicant also made a claim under this head, but left it to the Court’s discretion to specify the amount.
93. The remaining applicants did not submit a claim for just satisfaction in compliance with Rule 60 of the Rules of Court.
94. The Government contested these claims as unsubstantiated and excessive, arguing that there was no causal link between the alleged violation and the damage claimed.
95. As to the pecuniary damage claimed, the Court considers that, having regard to the grounds on which it found a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, it is unable to assess the applicants’ claim under this head. In this connection, it refers to the possibility available to the applicants to request reopening of the proceedings in accordance with section 400 of the Civil Proceedings Act (see paragraph 11 above), which would allow for a fresh examination of their claims (see Bistrovi?, cited above, § 58).
96. On the other hand, the Court considers that the seventh and eighth applicants must have sustained non-pecuniary damage resulting from the lack of respect for their rights guaranteed under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. Having regard to the relative seriousness of the violation and the introduction of the 2019 Regulations under which the applicants can seek to be exempted from paying the standing charge, the Court awards these applicants EUR 1,000 each in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable.
Costs and expenses
97. The seventh applicant claimed EUR 355 and the eighth applicant EUR 115 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts. These figures included court and notary fees, as well as the costs which these applicants were ordered to pay in the domestic proceedings (some payment slips were submitted as evidence).
98. As regards the proceedings before the Court, the applicants made the following claims: for legal fees, the first applicant claimed EUR 320 for the preparation of one set of submissions; the seventh applicant claimed EUR 1,970 for the preparation of the application and three sets of submissions (these claims were calculated on the basis of the tariff list of the Bar of the respondent State); while the eighth applicant claimed EUR 1,770 for the preparation of one set of submissions. As regards postal expenses, the seventh applicant claimed EUR 15 and the eighth applicant EUR 70. A retainer agreement and payment slips were submitted in support.
99. The Government contested the above claims as unsubstantiated, excessive and not necessarily incurred.
100. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these were actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum (see Editions Plon v. France, no. 58148/00, § 64, ECHR 2004?IV). In the present case, regard being had to the documents in its possession and the above criteria, the Court considers it reasonable to award the first applicant the full sum of EUR 320 claimed by him; as regards the seventh applicant the sum of EUR 2,100; and as regards the eighth applicant the sum of EUR 360, covering costs under all heads, plus any tax that may be chargeable to them.
Default interest
101. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European District Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
Decides to join the applications;
Declares that the first applicant’s wife, namely Ms V. Strezovska, has standing to continue the present proceedings in her late husband’s stead;
Declares the applications admissible;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds,
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the following applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, the following amounts, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement:
(i) as regards the first applicant: EUR 320 (three hundred and twenty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to him, in respect of costs and expenses;
(ii) as regards the seventh applicant:
- EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
- EUR 2,100 (two thousand one hundred euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to him, in respect of costs and expenses;
(iii) as regards the eighth applicant:
- EUR 1,000 (one thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non-pecuniary damage;
- EUR 360 (three hundred and sixty euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to her, in respect of costs and expenses;
(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European District Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;
Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 27 February 2020, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.
Abel Campos Ksenija Turkovi?
Registrar President

TESTO TRADOTTO

PRIMA SEZIONE

CASO DI STREZOVSKI E ALTRI contro NORD MACEDONIA

(Applicazioni n. 14460/16 e 7 altre - vedi elenco allegato)
GIUDICE
Art. 1 P1 - Controllo dell'uso della proprietà - Tassa permanente imposta dallo Stato ai fornitori privati di calore da parte dei proprietari di appartamenti scollegati dal sistema di teleriscaldamento che rifornisce i loro edifici residenziali - Lo Stato è tenuto a garantire che la misura contestata non imponga oneri eccessivi ai richiedenti, consentendo nel contempo ai fornitori privati di calore di realizzare profitti potenzialmente ingiustificati - Mancanza di una valutazione obiettiva dell'uso indiretto del riscaldamento in ogni singolo caso - Mancanza, da parte dei tribunali nazionali, del necessario giusto equilibrio tra gli interessi in gioco attraverso l'applicazione di sufficienti garanzie procedurali
STRASBURGO
27 febbraio 2020
Questa sentenza diverrà definitiva nelle circostanze previste dall'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Essa può essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.
Nel caso di Strezovski e altri contro la Macedonia del Nord,
La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (Prima Sezione), che si riunisce come Camera composta da:
Ksenija Turkovi?, Presidente,
Aleš Pejchal,
Armen Harutyunyan,
Pere Pastor Vilanova,
Tim Eicke,
Jovan Ilievski,
Raffaele Sabato, giudici,
e Abel Campos, Registrar di sezione,
Considerando:
le applicazioni di cui sopra (n. 14460/16, 14958/16, 14962/16, 14966/16, 27884/16, 16064/17, 20229/17 e 30206/17) contro la Repubblica della Macedonia settentrionale, presentata alla Corte, ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la salvaguardia dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") da otto macedoni/cittadini della Repubblica della Macedonia settentrionale, il sig. Strezo Strezovski ("il primo richiedente"), Cane Nikoloski ("il secondo richiedente"), Aco Spasovski ("il terzo richiedente"), Josip Juvan ("il quarto richiedente"), Zoran Kostovski ("il quinto richiedente"), Trajanka Nakevska ("il sesto richiedente"), Enver Iseni ("il settimo richiedente") e Sonja Nalbanti-Dimoska ("l'ottavo richiedente"), alle varie date indicate nella tabella allegata;
la lettera del 2 maggio 2018 della moglie del primo ricorrente, la sig.ra V. Strezovska, con la quale si informava il Tribunale che il primo ricorrente era deceduto il 4 aprile 2017 e si indicava il suo interesse a proseguire la domanda a suo nome;
la decisione di notificare al governo della Macedonia settentrionale ("il governo") la denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del protocollo n. 1 e di dichiarare irricevibile il resto dei ricorsi ai sensi dell'articolo 54, paragrafo 3, del regolamento del tribunale
le osservazioni delle parti;
dopo aver deliberato in privato il 4 febbraio 2020,
Emette la seguente sentenza, che è stata adottata in tale data:
INTRODUZIONE
1. I ricorrenti, che sono tutti proprietari di appartamenti scollegati dalla rete di teleriscaldamento che alimenta i loro rispettivi edifici residenziali, hanno lamentato che l'obbligo di pagare ai fornitori privati di calore una tassa permanente introdotto dallo Stato ha violato il loro diritto al pacifico godimento dei loro beni (appartamenti) ai sensi dell'art. 1 del Protocollo n. 1.
I FATTI
2. I candidati vivono a Skopje. La sig.ra Strezovska e il settimo ricorrente erano rappresentati dal sig. A. Varela, il secondo e il quinto ricorrente erano rappresentati dalla sig.ra D. Chakarovska-Grozdanovska, e l'ottavo ricorrente era rappresentato dal sig. I. Spirovski, tutti avvocati che esercitano a Skopje. I restanti ricorrenti sono stati autorizzati a rappresentarsi da soli.
3. Il governo era rappresentato dal loro agente, la sig.ra D. Djonova.
4. Tutti i ricorrenti sono proprietari di (e vivono in) appartamenti in edifici residenziali (?????????? ??????? ?? ????????) a Skopje collegati ad una rete di teleriscaldamento gestita da fornitori di calore privati. Le loro unità non sono mai state collegate alla rete di teleriscaldamento dell'edificio (nella domanda n. 20229/17, il settimo richiedente ha installato il proprio sistema di riscaldamento nel suo appartamento prima che la rete di teleriscaldamento del suo edificio diventasse operativa per altri appartamenti) o sono state scollegate da essa prima del 30 luglio 2012 (cfr. paragrafi 5 e 13), sia su richiesta dell'ex proprietario dell'appartamento (domanda n. 30206/17, l'ottavo richiedente), sia da parte dei richiedenti (le restanti domande, tra il 2002 e il 2011).

5. Il 30 luglio 2012 è stato adottato il Regolamento per la fornitura di energia termica ("Regolamento 2012") dalla Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia, un organismo statale i cui membri sono nominati dal Parlamento. In base a tali regolamenti, gli utenti disconnessi erano tenuti a pagare ai fornitori privati di energia termica una tassa annuale permanente (?????????? ?? ?????????? ???????), pagabile in rate mensili (sezione 53(2) dei regolamenti del 2012, si veda il successivo paragrafo 12).
6. Il 22 maggio 2013 la Corte costituzionale ha dichiarato tale disposizione compatibile con la Costituzione. Essa ha dichiarato che le unità scollegate negli edifici sono consumatori indiretti (???????) di calore proveniente da tubi che li attraversano o da unità vicine e altre unità dell'edificio collegate alla rete di teleriscaldamento (cfr. paragrafo 16).
7. I fornitori di calore privati hanno emesso fatture che richiedono ai richiedenti il pagamento della tassa permanente dopo la sua introduzione il 1° ottobre 2012 (cfr. sezione 66 del Regolamento 2012, paragrafo 13 di seguito). Dopo che i richiedenti hanno omesso di pagare, un notaio ha accolto le richieste dei fornitori per l'esecuzione delle fatture non pagate e ha emesso ordini di pagamento relativi a diverse rate mensili non pagate della tassa permanente (??????? ?? ??????? ?? ??????????). Le rate mensili pagabili dai richiedenti erano comprese tra 5 e 29 euro (EUR).
8. I ricorrenti si sono opposti agli ordini di pagamento (????????) dinanzi al Tribunale di primo grado di Skopje sostenendo (i) di non aver stipulato un accordo con il fornitore; (ii) che l'addebito era stato introdotto con i regolamenti del 2012, nonostante tale obbligo potesse essere introdotto solo dalla legislazione primaria (?????); (iii) che la legge sull'energia non includeva i termini "utenti disconnessi" e "consumatori indiretti" introdotti dai regolamenti del 2012; (iv) che le loro unità non erano mai state collegate o erano state scollegate dal sistema di teleriscaldamento prima dell'entrata in vigore del Regolamento del 2012; e (v) che hanno ricevuto poco (nel caso dell'ottavo richiedente) o nessun tipo di calore (nel caso dei rimanenti richiedenti) in quanto non sono state scollegate anche le tubazioni che attraversavano gli appartamenti in questione e/o tutti gli appartamenti vicini. A questo proposito, il quinto, sesto e settimo richiedente (domande n. 16064/16, 27884/16 e 20229/17) ha sostenuto che le loro unità si trovavano al piano terra o al piano superiore dei loro edifici ed erano circondate da appartamenti scollegati dal sistema distrettuale. Alcuni richiedenti hanno sostenuto che le loro unità erano riscaldate meglio di quelle riscaldate attraverso il sistema distrettuale, in conseguenza del quale hanno perso calore, invece di riceverne. Gli importi richiesti non si basavano su una valutazione obiettiva del calore ricevuto da altri appartamenti. A tale riguardo, essi hanno chiesto che i tribunali effettuassero un'ispezione in loco. Il quinto richiedente ha presentato come prova una perizia in cui si affermava che il suo appartamento non riceveva alcun tipo di calore dall'impianto di teleriscaldamento dell'edificio né attraverso le tubature né per conduzione.
9. In seguito alle obiezioni dei richiedenti, tutti i casi sono stati decisi dal Tribunale di primo grado di Skopje e dalla Corte d'appello. Con decisioni separate (Pl.P. 1486/13; 1487/14; 1794/14; 1824/14; 1907/14; 2133/14; 2837/14 e 977/15) emesse tra dicembre 2014 e febbraio 2017 (sentenze definitive pronunciate tra settembre 2015 e febbraio 2017) entrambi i tribunali hanno respinto le obiezioni dei ricorrenti e confermato le ordinanze. Facendo riferimento alle conclusioni della Corte Costituzionale (cfr. paragrafi 6 e 17) e senza effettuare visite in loco (tranne nel caso del sesto ricorrente) o ordinare una perizia, i tribunali hanno ritenuto che i ricorrenti fossero "consumatori indiretti" di calore distribuito nell'edificio attraverso la rete di teleriscaldamento. Poiché negli edifici riscaldati attraverso tale rete vi erano altre unità ("consumatori diretti"), i ricorrenti dovevano essere considerati "consumatori indiretti" e, di conseguenza, erano obbligati a pagare la tassa permanente come specificato nell'articolo 53(2) (e nell'articolo 66) del Regolamento 2012. I tribunali hanno inoltre stabilito (nel caso del primo, del quarto, del quinto e del settimo ricorrente) che "tutte le unità (scollegate) di un edificio collegato a una rete di teleriscaldamento [erano] obbligate a pagare il canone permanente indipendentemente dalla loro posizione o dalla composizione o costruzione dell'impianto interno".

10. Secondo il Governo, sono stati interessati 12.000 dei 60.000 appartamenti in edifici residenziali, essendo stati scollegati dalla rete di teleriscaldamento.

QUADRO GIURIDICO E PRASSI GIURIDICA PERTINENTE

DIRITTO E PRASSI NAZIONALI
Legge sui procedimenti civili 2005
11. La sezione 400 del Civil Proceedings Act 2005 prevede che il procedimento possa essere riaperto se il tribunale ha riscontrato una violazione della Convenzione. In tali procedimenti, i tribunali nazionali sono tenuti a conformarsi alle disposizioni della sentenza definitiva della Corte.

Regolamento sull'approvvigionamento di energia termica 2012, adottato dalla Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia e pubblicato nella Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 97/12 ("il Regolamento 2012")
12. Ai sensi dell'articolo 53, paragrafo 2, del Regolamento 2012, gli utenti disconnessi in edifici residenziali dotati di un unico contatore comune (???? ????????????? ?? ?? ???????????? ?? ???? ????? ???? ?????????? ????? ????) erano tenuti a pagare una tassa fissa per il riscaldamento in piedi, il cui importo doveva essere determinato in base al sistema di tariffe di riscaldamento (cfr. paragrafo 14 di seguito). Secondo il paragrafo 53(3), la tassa non era pagabile se tutte le unità collegate ad un singolo contatore erano state scollegate per una o più stagioni di riscaldamento o se il ripartitore di calore non aveva registrato alcun consumo di calore.
13. In base alle disposizioni transitorie e finali del Regolamento 2012 (sezione 66), tutte le utenze precedentemente scollegate negli edifici residenziali erano tenute a stipulare un accordo con il fornitore e a connettersi alla rete distrettuale entro e non oltre il 1° ottobre 2012. In caso contrario, sarebbe stato necessario pagare il canone permanente.

Sistema tariffario per la vendita di energia termica del 12 luglio 2013, adottato dalla Commissione Regolatrice per l'Energia e pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale n. 99/2013 ("il sistema tariffario del calore")
14. Nell'ambito del sistema di tariffazione del calore, la tassa permanente era una tassa relativa alla capacità termica disponibile al punto di livello del contatore (sezione 2). La tariffa permanente per le utenze domestiche a livello di contatore è stata calcolata sulla base della superficie dell'unità (sezione 37).

Regolamento per l'approvvigionamento di energia termica 2019, adottato il 23 marzo 2019 (in vigore dal 1° aprile 2019) e ulteriormente modificato il 1° agosto 2019 dalla Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia (Gazzetta ufficiale n. 65/2019 e 162/2019, "il regolamento 2019").
15. A seguito dell'entrata in vigore della nuova legge sull'energia nel maggio 2018, la Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia ha adottato nuovi regolamenti in sostituzione dei regolamenti del 2012 (sezione 65). Secondo il Regolamento del 2019, i consumatori hanno il diritto di scollegare i loro appartamenti negli edifici residenziali dalla rete di teleriscaldamento se il proprietario dell'unità dimostra che il sistema di riscaldamento previsto sarebbe più efficiente ed ecologico rispetto al riscaldamento fornito dal sistema di teleriscaldamento. In caso di controversia con il fornitore di calore, il proprietario può rivolgersi alla Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia per una decisione. I proprietari che non vivono in tali unità sono tenuti a pagare la tassa permanente. I proprietari di appartamenti, che sono scollegati dal sistema di teleriscaldamento, non sono tenuti a pagare la tassa permanente se forniscono una prova valida (come una carta d'identità e gli atti di proprietà o di locazione) che, tra l'altro, vivono o utilizzano (affittare) l'unità. Quest'ultima categoria di proprietari può impugnare dinanzi alla Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia una decisione del fornitore di calore che respinge la richiesta di esenzione dal pagamento della tassa permanente (sezione 54).

16. Secondo la Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia, gli utenti disconnessi ammissibili ai sensi della disposizione di cui sopra non sono tenuti a pagare la tassa permanente dall'aprile 2019.

Prassi della Corte costituzionale
17. Con decisione (U.br.125/2012) del 22 maggio 2013 (emessa a seguito di un'istanza di tre persone, tra cui il primo richiedente) la Corte Costituzionale ha dichiarato l'articolo 53(2) del Regolamento 2012 compatibile con la Costituzione. Facendo riferimento alla "natura specifica delle abitazioni collettive (?????????? ??????? ?? ????????)", la corte ha dichiarato che "a causa della trasmissione di calore attraverso la sostanza da un luogo più caldo a un luogo più fresco (conduzione del calore)" e dei tubi che passano attraverso gli appartamenti, le unità scollegate hanno ottenuto "indirettamente" il calore dalle unità dell'edificio collegate alla rete di teleriscaldamento. Di conseguenza, le unità scollegate ottenevano il calore a spese delle unità che utilizzavano il servizio fornito attraverso il sistema di teleriscaldamento installato nell'edificio e dovevano essere considerate "utenze indirette di calore ottenute da appartamenti vicini e da altri appartamenti dell'edificio" collegati a tale sistema. Secondo il tribunale, era "chiaro" che negli edifici residenziali collettivi "le utenze scollegate dal sistema di teleriscaldamento utilizzano oggettivamente un certo calore ... che giustifica il pagamento di tale calore ... Gli utenti disconnessi sono tenuti, ai sensi dell'articolo 53, paragrafo 2, del [Regolamento 2012], a pagare per un servizio che ... a prescindere dal fatto che siano disconnessi dall'impianto, ricevono. È pertanto giustificato che paghino per questo servizio".
18. Il tribunale ha inoltre ritenuto che la sezione 66 del Regolamento 2012 ha introdotto un termine per gli utenti già scollegati per la connessione all'impianto di teleriscaldamento (1° ottobre 2012) o che rischiano di pagare la tassa permanente. Poiché tale disposizione era di natura provvisoria e aveva cessato di essere applicabile dopo la scadenza di tale termine, il tribunale ha ritenuto che non fosse più valida e di conseguenza ha respinto quella parte della domanda.
19. In un parere dissenziente, un giudice ha dichiarato che la legge sull'energia non contiene alcuna disposizione relativa all'onere permanente. Di conseguenza, la sua introduzione da parte del regolamento del 2012 era contraria alla Costituzione. A questo proposito, ha fatto riferimento a una precedente decisione della Corte costituzionale (U.br.148/2008) che dichiarava incostituzionale un atto di diritto derivato che introduceva un'accusa simile. Egli ha concluso che il pagamento dell'accusa era una questione di fatto che doveva essere determinata dai tribunali civili.

Parere giuridico della Corte Suprema del 20 febbraio 2018
20. 20. A seguito di un ricorso per incoerenza nella prassi nazionale, la Divisione Civile della Corte di Cassazione ha adottato un parere legale, così formulato:

"... i consumatori che non sono mai stati collegati ad un impianto di teleriscaldamento, non hanno mai stipulato un accordo con il fornitore e [la cui] unità non è stata dotata di un impianto di riscaldamento da parte di quest'ultimo non possono essere considerati come consumatori indiretti scollegati e non sono tenuti a pagare la tassa permanente".

Tale approccio riguardava gli appartamenti in edifici residenziali che non erano dotati di impianto di riscaldamento, gli appartamenti che utilizzavano un sistema di riscaldamento indipendente (individuale) prima che il fornitore attrezzasse alcune unità dell'edificio con un impianto di riscaldamento (che non passava attraverso gli appartamenti in questione) e i consumatori che non avevano mai stipulato un accordo con il fornitore di calore. Il tribunale ha dichiarato che la suddetta categoria di consumatori non aveva mai utilizzato il servizio fornito dal fornitore e non poteva quindi chiederne l'interruzione. Di conseguenza, essi non erano né consumatori diretti né indiretti.

ALTRI MATERIALI
21. Il Governo ha presentato un rapporto redatto nel 2019 dall'Accademia delle Scienze e delle Arti della Macedonia del Nord prima dell'entrata in vigore del Regolamento del 2019 (cfr. paragrafi 15 e 16). Il rapporto è uno studio completo della legislazione nazionale relativa alla carica permanente per il riscaldamento e contiene diverse conclusioni e raccomandazioni. Il rapporto rileva, tra l'altro, che i Regolamenti del 2012 trattano le unità scollegate collettivamente piuttosto che individualmente, dato che la tassa permanente si applica a tutte queste unità, indipendentemente dal fatto che siano state riscaldate in modo più efficiente rispetto alle unità collegate alla rete di teleriscaldamento. A tale proposito, la relazione suggerisce che il nuovo regolamento dovrebbe consentire alle unità riscaldate in modo più efficiente di determinare, nell'ambito di un'apposita procedura, una questione da sottoporre a una commissione indipendente per la cessazione del servizio fornito attraverso il sistema di teleriscaldamento. Essa indica inoltre la possibilità di un'esenzione totale o parziale dall'obbligo di pagare la tassa permanente in altre situazioni, come ad esempio se un'unità ha più pareti esterne, un isolamento di buona qualità e così via.

LA LEGGE
GIUNZIONE DELLE APPLICAZIONI
22. In considerazione dell'analogo oggetto delle domande, la Corte ritiene opportuno esaminarle congiuntamente in un'unica sentenza.

ALLEGATO VIOLAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 DELLA CONVENZIONE
23. I ricorrenti hanno lamentato che l'obbligo di pagare la tassa permanente aveva violato i loro diritti di proprietà ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, che recita come segue:

"Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Le disposizioni che precedono non pregiudicano tuttavia in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di tasse o altri contributi o sanzioni".

Ammissibilità
1. Lo stato di vittima dei richiedenti

a) Le osservazioni delle parti

i) Il governo

24. Il Governo ha contestato lo status di vittima dei ricorrenti.

25. Per quanto riguarda la sig.ra Strezovska, essi hanno sostenuto che la sua lettera che informava il Tribunale della morte del marito (il primo ricorrente) era giunta oltre un anno dopo la sua morte, e sei mesi prima della notifica del caso. Inoltre, la sig.ra Strezovska non aveva dimostrato di avere un interesse legittimo a presentare la domanda.
26. Il Governo ha inoltre sostenuto che tutti i richiedenti avevano perso il loro status di vittime a seguito dell'introduzione del regolamento del 2019 (paragrafi 15 e 16). Ciò è dovuto al fatto che erano tutti proprietari delle unità scollegate in cui vivevano. Di conseguenza, essi potevano essere esentati dall'obbligo di pagare la tassa permanente ai sensi dei regolamenti del 2019.

ii) I richiedenti

27. La prima, la quarta e la settima ricorrente hanno contestato l'obiezione del Governo, sostenendo che i regolamenti del 2019 non si applicavano alla tassa permanente dovuta ai sensi dei regolamenti del 2012. A tale riguardo, la sig.ra Strezovska ha presentato copia di una sentenza (non definitiva) del Tribunale di primo grado di Skopje del 16 luglio 2019, in cui si affermava che era tenuta a pagare le rate mensili della tassa permanente per il periodo gennaio-luglio 2018, poiché era proprietaria dell'appartamento e vi aveva abitato dopo la morte della prima ricorrente. La quarta ricorrente ha tuttavia confermato che le fatture che aveva ricevuto in relazione alla tassa permanente per i mesi successivi all'entrata in vigore del regolamento del 2019 erano state annullate.

b) La valutazione della Corte
i) La posizione della sig.ra Strezovska
28. Se un richiedente è deceduto dopo aver presentato una domanda, la Corte ha accettato che il parente o l'erede più prossimo possa, in linea di principio, dare seguito alla domanda, purché abbia un interesse sufficiente per il caso (cfr. Centro per le risorse legali per conto di Valentin Câmpeanu c. Romania [GC], n. 47848/08, § 97, ECHR 2014). Ciò vale in particolare per le domande presentate dal richiedente stesso e continuate dal coniuge superstite solo dopo il suo successivo decesso (cfr. Dalban c. Romania [GC], n. 28114/95, CEDU 1999-VI).
29. Tenuto conto della richiesta della sig.ra Strezovska, vedova della prima ricorrente, di proseguire il procedimento (v. sopra), e del suo interesse materiale basato sull'effetto diretto sui suoi diritti pecuniari (v. sopra, paragrafo 27), che il Governo non ha contestato, la Corte ritiene che la sig.ra Strezovska sia in possesso dei requisiti di cui all'articolo 34 della Convenzione per continuare la domanda a suo nome (v. Streltsov e altre cause "Novocherkassk military pensioners" v. Russia, nn. 8549/06 e altri 86, § 39, 29 luglio 2010, e Stojkovic c. l'ex Repubblica iugoslava di Macedonia, n. 14818/02, § 25, 8 novembre 2007). Il fatto che non abbia prontamente portato all'attenzione della Corte la morte della prima ricorrente non ha alcuna rilevanza per la sua posizione. Di conseguenza, l'obiezione del Governo sotto questo capo deve essere respinta.

(ii) Lo status di vittima di tutti i ricorrenti

30. Come la Corte ha ripetutamente affermato, una decisione o misura favorevole a un richiedente non è, in linea di principio, sufficiente a privarlo della sua condizione di "vittima" ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione, a meno che le autorità nazionali non abbiano riconosciuto, espressamente o sostanzialmente, e quindi concesso un adeguato e sufficiente risarcimento per la violazione della Convenzione (cfr. Moon c. Francia, n. 39973/03, § 29, 9 luglio 2009). Solo quando queste condizioni sono soddisfatte, il carattere sussidiario del meccanismo di protezione della Convenzione preclude l'esame di una domanda (cfr. Mili? e Nikezi? c. Montenegro, nn. 54999/10 e 10609/11, § 73, 28 aprile 2015).
31. La Corte rileva che la presente causa riguarda la presunta violazione del diritto dei ricorrenti al pacifico godimento dei loro beni a causa dell'obbligo di pagare la tassa per il riscaldamento in piedi ai sensi del Regolamento del 2012. Tale regolamento è stato sostituito dal Regolamento del 2019. L'articolo 54 del Regolamento del 2019 prevede che i consumatori già disconnessi dal sistema di teleriscaldamento negli edifici residenziali possono essere esentati dall'obbligo di pagare il canone di riscaldamento permanente a determinate condizioni (cfr. il precedente paragrafo 15). Tali regolamenti sono entrati in vigore il 1° aprile 2019 e da tale data i consumatori che possono beneficiare di questa clausola di esenzione non sono più tenuti a pagare il canone permanente (cfr. paragrafi 16 e 27 di cui sopra). Tuttavia, nulla fa pensare che questa disposizione si applichi alle rate mensili della tassa permanente pagabile ai sensi del Regolamento 2012. Inoltre, il governo non ha presentato alcun esempio di prassi nazionale in cui tale disposizione sia stata interpretata in modo da applicarsi all'obbligo di pagamento della tassa permanente prima dell'introduzione della clausola di esenzione ai sensi dei regolamenti del 2019. In tali circostanze, sebbene sia probabile che i Regolamenti del 2019 costituiscano la base per l'esenzione delle ricorrenti dall'obbligo di pagamento della tassa permanente a partire dal 1° aprile 2019, essi non possono essere interpretati come un riconoscimento o un rimedio per l'asserita violazione della Convenzione.
32. Alla luce di quanto precede, la Corte conclude che i ricorrenti possono sostenere di essere "vittime" di una violazione del loro diritto al pacifico godimento dei loro beni per quanto riguarda l'onere permanente dovuto ai sensi del Regolamento del 2012. Di conseguenza, l'obiezione del Governo deve essere respinta.

Esaurimento dei rimedi interni nei confronti della settima ricorrente
a) Le osservazioni delle parti

i) Il governo
33. In un documento del 9 maggio 2018 contenente le loro ulteriori osservazioni e commenti sulle giuste richieste di soddisfazione del settimo richiedente, il Governo, per la prima volta, ha obiettato che egli non aveva fatto causa al fornitore privato di calore per arricchimento senza causa (?????????? ??? ?????). A sostegno della loro obiezione, essi si sono basati sul parere giuridico della Corte Suprema (paragrafo 20) che era stato adottato successivamente alle loro osservazioni iniziali sulla ricevibilità e sul merito della causa del 17 gennaio 2018. Essi hanno sostenuto che, nelle presunte circostanze del suo caso (paragrafo 4 di cui sopra), il settimo ricorrente era legittimato per legge ad avanzare tale richiesta nei confronti del fornitore. Per dimostrare l'efficacia di tale rimedio, essi hanno presentato copie di diverse sentenze giudiziarie definitive nei casi in cui i ricorrenti avevano citato con successo un fornitore privato di energia elettrica per arricchimento senza causa in relazione a un'accusa permanente, che le autorità competenti (amministrative e giudiziarie) (in procedimenti distinti) avevano giudicato in violazione del diritto della concorrenza. Per dimostrare che una richiesta di arricchimento senza causa non sarebbe stata priva di prospettive di successo, hanno presentato copie delle sentenze successive al parere giuridico della Corte Suprema in cui gli stessi tribunali (paragrafo 9 di cui sopra) avevano ritenuto che i ricorrenti in circostanze analoghe a quelle del settimo ricorrente non fossero tenuti a pagare la tassa permanente al fornitore di calore (per il periodo coperto dal Regolamento 2012).

ii) Il settimo ricorrente
34. Il settimo ricorrente ha contestato l'obiezione del Governo, sostenendo che il rimedio suggerito (una richiesta di arricchimento senza causa) non poteva compensarlo per i pagamenti ordinati nel procedimento in questione. Inoltre, le sentenze presentate riguardanti il fornitore privato di energia elettrica erano irrilevanti in quanto riguardavano questioni diverse. Le altre sentenze presentate dal governo non menzionano il parere giuridico della Corte suprema. In quest'ultimo caso, egli ha presentato, tra l'altro, tre sentenze definitive della Corte d'Appello di Skopje (Gz.3268/17; Gz.4066/17 e Gz.4945/17), datate tra febbraio e novembre 2018, che respingono i ricorsi da lui presentati, nonostante avesse presentato il parere legale della Corte Suprema come prova.

b) La valutazione della Corte
35. La Corte desidera innanzitutto rilevare che, alla luce della spiegazione fornita dal Governo sul motivo per cui non ha fatto prontamente affidamento sull'esistenza della via civile di ricorso (cfr. paragrafo 33), non si esime dal sollevare l'obiezione di non esaurimento dei rimedi interni, in particolare, sulla base del fatto che la settima ricorrente non ha citato in giudizio il fornitore di teleriscaldamento per arricchimento senza causa (cfr., al contrario, Khlaifia e a./Commissione). Italia [GC], n. 16483/12, § 52, 15 dicembre 2016).
36. I principi generali relativi alla regola dell'esaurimento ai sensi dell'articolo 35 § 1 della Convenzione sono esposti in Vu?kovi? e altri c. Serbia ((obiezione preliminare) [GC], nn. 17153/11 e 29 altri, §§ 70-77, 25 marzo 2014, con ulteriori riferimenti, in particolare ad Akdivar e altri c. Turchia, 16 settembre 1996, Relazioni delle sentenze e decisioni 1996-IV).

37. A tale riguardo, la Corte ritiene opportuno ribadire che, per essere efficace, un rimedio deve essere in grado di porre rimedio direttamente allo stato di fatto in questione e deve offrire ragionevoli prospettive di successo. Non vi è alcun obbligo di ricorrere a rimedi che siano inadeguati o inefficaci. Inoltre, secondo le "regole generalmente riconosciute del diritto internazionale", possono sussistere circostanze particolari che esonerano il richiedente dall'obbligo di esaurire i rimedi nazionali a sua disposizione (cfr. Vu?kovi? e altri, §§ 73-74, e Akdivar e altri, §§ 67 e 71, entrambi citati).
38. Inoltre, per quanto riguarda la ripartizione dell'onere della prova nell'ambito dell'esaurimento dei rimedi nazionali, spetta al Governo, che sostiene la non esaurimento, convincere il Tribunale che il rimedio era un rimedio efficace, disponibile in teoria e in pratica nel momento in questione, vale a dire che era accessibile, che era in grado di fornire un rimedio per i reclami del ricorrente e che offriva ragionevoli prospettive di successo. Tuttavia, una volta soddisfatto tale onere della prova, spetta al ricorrente stabilire che il rimedio proposto dal Governo era in realtà esaurito o era per qualche motivo inadeguato e inefficace nelle particolari circostanze del caso o che esistevano circostanze particolari che lo esoneravano da tale obbligo (cfr. Akdivar e altri, § 68, e Vu?kovi? e altri, § 77, entrambi citati sopra).
39. Per quanto riguarda il presente caso, la Corte non ritiene che una richiesta di arricchimento senza causa nei confronti del fornitore privato di calore costituisca un rimedio efficace nelle circostanze del settimo ricorrente. A tale riguardo, essa osserva che il governo non ha fornito alcun esempio di prassi interna in cui un parere legale della Corte Suprema sia servito come base giuridica per tale richiesta. Gli esempi presentati dal Governo non consentono alla Corte di sostenere il contrario per i seguenti motivi.
40. La giurisprudenza relativa alle richieste di arricchimento senza causa presentate contro il fornitore di energia elettrica non può essere considerata un riferimento valido per il presente caso perché tali richieste sono state presentate sulla base di sentenze definitive del tribunale, a differenza di quanto avviene nel presente caso, in cui una tale richiesta si baserebbe sul parere giuridico della Corte Suprema. Non è stata presentata alcuna argomentazione o prova in merito alla natura giuridica di tale parere e alla sua natura vincolante. Inoltre, e sulla base del materiale presentato dalle parti, la Corte rileva che le decisioni discordanti degli stessi tribunali dopo il parere della Corte di Cassazione del 22 febbraio 2018 esistevano contemporaneamente. Inoltre, tali giudici hanno respinto le identiche richieste del settimo ricorrente, nonostante il fatto che egli avesse portato alla loro attenzione tale parere.
41. Alla luce di quanto precede, la Corte ritiene che il Governo non abbia dimostrato che una richiesta di arricchimento senza causa nei confronti del fornitore del teleriscaldamento sarebbe stata un rimedio disponibile, e tanto meno efficace, nel caso di specie. Di conseguenza, la loro obiezione, fondata sulla non esaurimento dei rimedi nazionali nei confronti del settimo richiedente, deve essere respinta.

Se le ricorrenti abbiano subito uno svantaggio significativo
a) Le osservazioni delle parti
42. Il Governo ha sostenuto che la valutazione del caso da parte della Corte dovrebbe essere limitata alla tassa permanente, che i ricorrenti sono stati obbligati a pagare mensilmente (senza le spese processuali relative al procedimento civile in questione). A tale riguardo, essi hanno sostenuto che la rata mensile più alta pagabile dai ricorrenti era stata di 21 euro, che era stata insignificante dato il tenore di vita nello Stato convenuto. Inoltre, l'eventuale danno che tale requisito avrebbe comportato sarebbe stato insignificante in considerazione del "privilegio" delle ricorrenti di poter ricollegare le loro unità all'impianto di teleriscaldamento o di beneficiare indirettamente del calore che tale impianto produceva nell'edificio.
43. Il settimo e l'ottavo ricorrente hanno contestato l'obiezione del Governo, sostenendo che l'importo dell'onere permanente non era stato trascurabile (e avrebbe dovuto tenere conto dei costi del processo). A tale riguardo, l'ottava ricorrente ha sostenuto di essere stata obbligata a pagare l'imposta permanente a tempo indeterminato, per evitare un'azione esecutiva, che ha rappresentato un onere finanziario significativo per lei. Inoltre, la questione in questione riguardava una questione di principio di notevole importanza. Infine, la possibilità di ricollegare le loro abitazioni al sistema di teleriscaldamento non poteva essere considerata un "privilegio", né entrambe le questioni (pagamento della tassa permanente e ricollegamento) erano paragonabili.
b) La valutazione della Corte
44. La parte pertinente dell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, della Convenzione recita come segue:

"La Corte dichiara inammissibile qualsiasi domanda individuale presentata ai sensi dell'articolo 34 se ritiene che:

...

b) il richiedente non abbia subito uno svantaggio significativo, a meno che il rispetto dei diritti umani come definiti nella Convenzione e nei suoi protocolli non richieda un esame della domanda nel merito e a condizione che nessun caso possa essere respinto per questo motivo che non sia stato debitamente considerato da un tribunale nazionale".

45. La Corte ha ritenuto che la norma contenuta nell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, lettera b), della Convenzione sia costituita da tre criteri. In primo luogo, se il richiedente ha subito uno "svantaggio significativo"; in secondo luogo, se il rispetto dei diritti umani obbliga la Corte ad esaminare il caso; e in terzo luogo, se il caso è stato debitamente esaminato da un tribunale nazionale (cfr. Savelyev c. Russia (dicembre), no. 42982/08, 21 maggio 2019, § 25).
46. La prima questione, se il richiedente abbia subito "uno svantaggio significativo", rappresenta l'elemento principale. Essa si applica quando, nonostante una potenziale violazione di un diritto da un punto di vista puramente legale, il livello di severità raggiunto non merita di essere preso in considerazione da un tribunale internazionale (cfr. Adrian Mihai Ionescu c. Romania (dic.), no. 36659/04, 1° giugno 2010; Korolev c. Russia (dic.), n. 25551/05, 1° luglio 2010; e Gaftoniuc c. Romania (dic.), n. 30934/05 del 22 febbraio 2011). La valutazione di questo livello minimo è, nella natura delle cose, relativa e dipende da tutte le circostanze del caso. Il livello di gravità deve essere valutato alla luce dell'impatto finanziario della controversia e dell'importanza del caso per il richiedente (cfr. Burov c. Moldova (dic.), n. 38875/03, 14 giugno 2011, § 25).
47. La presente causa riguarda un procedimento civile in cui i ricorrenti hanno contestato senza successo il pagamento di diverse rate mensili della tassa permanente. L'unica rata mensile più elevata pagabile dai ricorrenti non superava i 30 euro (cfr. paragrafi 7 e 42). La Corte rileva che nessuna delle parti ha fornito informazioni sulla situazione finanziaria dei ricorrenti. Tuttavia, la Corte non ritiene che tale somma, in quanto tale, avrebbe avuto un effetto significativo su di loro (cfr. Jovanovska e altri contro l'ex Repubblica iugoslava di Macedonia (dicembre), n. 14001/13 e 22883/14, 14 novembre 2017, § 29).
48. Tuttavia, la Corte ritiene che le doglianze delle ricorrenti nel caso di specie debbano essere considerate nel contesto generale in cui è stato operato il requisito del pagamento in questione. A tale riguardo, va osservato che l'obbligo di pagare la tassa permanente non era un obbligo una tantum estinto dal procedimento in questione, ma piuttosto un obbligo di natura ricorrente che operava nell'ambito del Regolamento del 2012. I ricorrenti erano tenuti al pagamento della tassa permanente durante il periodo di vigenza di tale regolamento, ossia tra il 1° ottobre 2012 e il 1° aprile 2019. L'importo complessivo non può essere considerato insignificante alla luce del tenore di vita dello Stato convenuto.
49. Inoltre, la Corte ritiene che la presente causa soddisfi anche la clausola di salvaguardia contenuta in questo criterio di ammissibilità che obbliga la Corte a proseguire l'esame della domanda, anche in assenza di un significativo svantaggio subito dal richiedente, se il rispetto dei diritti umani come definiti nella Convenzione e nei suoi Protocolli lo richiede. Ciò è dovuto al fatto che solleva questioni di carattere generale che riguardano altre persone che si trovano nella stessa posizione dei richiedenti. A questo proposito, è degno di nota il fatto che, secondo il Governo, sono 12.000 le unità interessate in base al fatto che hanno interrotto il teleriscaldamento, i cui proprietari sono stati probabilmente obbligati a pagare la tassa permanente in questione. Inoltre, vi sono oltre 120 cause simili pendenti dinanzi alla Corte. Al momento della notifica delle richieste al Governo, la Corte ha indicato che si trattava di casi potenzialmente di punta (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Finger c. Bulgaria, n. 37346/05, § 75, 10 maggio 2011).
50. Alla luce di quanto sopra, la Corte non ritiene necessario determinare se il caso sia stato debitamente esaminato da un tribunale nazionale.
51. Ne consegue che l'obiezione del Governo deve essere respinta.

La conclusione della Corte sulla ricevibilità
52. La Corte rileva che la causa non è manifestamente infondata né irricevibile per altri motivi elencati nell'articolo 35 della Convenzione. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
Merits
Le osservazioni delle parti
a) I richiedenti
53. La settima e l'ottava ricorrente hanno ribadito che l'interferenza in questione non era stata conforme alla legge in quanto l'onere permanente era stato introdotto dal Regolamento del 2012, come diritto derivato. La legge sull'energia non conteneva alcuna disposizione al riguardo. L'ottava ricorrente ha inoltre criticato la decisione della Corte costituzionale (cfr. i precedenti punti 17-19) in quanto incompatibile con la sua precedente decisione, ritenendo, in circostanze analoghe, che la tassa permanente sul riscaldamento non potesse essere introdotta dal diritto derivato.
54. Essi hanno anche contestato i motivi di interesse generale che, secondo il Governo (cfr. punto 58), la tassa permanente aveva perseguito. Tutti questi motivi erano volti a tutelare gli interessi commerciali dei fornitori privati di calore (a spese dei consumatori) piuttosto che qualsiasi interesse pubblico. Gli appartamenti erano stati scollegati dalla rete di teleriscaldamento al di fuori della stagione di riscaldamento, per cui il fornitore aveva avuto informazioni tempestive sul numero di consumatori e avrebbe potuto effettuare i necessari adeguamenti della fornitura di calore. Inoltre, la tassa permanente non era né un'imposta né una sanzione da pagare allo Stato. L'argomentazione del governo secondo cui essa avrebbe rappresentato "un pagamento per il privilegio di essere disconnesso dal sistema" ha dimostrato che era stata considerata una "tassa" o una "sanzione" da pagare a una società privata. Qualsiasi argomentazione che avesse riguardato l'uso indiretto del calore distribuito attraverso tale sistema riguardava una questione di fatto che i tribunali nazionali non si erano impegnati a stabilire. In ogni caso, i tribunali nazionali nelle loro decisioni non avevano individuato alcun interesse pubblico che giustificasse l'onere permanente.
55. L'ottava ricorrente ha inoltre sostenuto che nel suo caso il Regolamento del 2012 era stato applicato retroattivamente in considerazione del fatto che il suo appartamento era già stato disconnesso dal sistema di teleriscaldamento dal precedente proprietario nel 2011, prima dell'entrata in vigore del regolamento. Inoltre, i tribunali nazionali avevano applicato il Regolamento del 2012 in modo tale che avevano considerato la tassa permanente come una tassa pubblica da pagare al fornitore, che non poteva essere contestata. Di conseguenza, ogni prospettiva di successo nel procedimento in questione era stata puramente teorica e illusoria. Infine, ha sostenuto che il margine di discrezionalità dello Stato nella regolamentazione delle attività commerciali basate sulle regole della concorrenza in un mercato regolamentato, come nel caso di specie, è più ristretto rispetto a quello di un'area residenziale con aspetti sensibili di giustizia sociale. Lo Stato non dovrebbe imporre ai residenti una particolare fonte di calore, ma dovrebbe piuttosto consentire la libera scelta sulla base di fattori ragionevoli.
56. I restanti ricorrenti, che all'epoca erano rappresentati da un avvocato di loro scelta, non hanno presentato osservazioni tempestive in conformità con il regolamento della Corte.

b) Il governo
57. Il governo ha riconosciuto che l'obbligo di pagare la tassa permanente equivaleva a un'interferenza con il diritto dei ricorrenti al pacifico godimento dei loro beni. Esso era stato introdotto dal Regolamento del 2012, adottato ai sensi della legge sull'energia, ed era divenuto esigibile dopo l'entrata in vigore di tale regolamento. La Corte costituzionale aveva confermato la compatibilità di tali regolamenti con la legge e la Costituzione (cfr. paragrafi 17 e 18). Di conseguenza, l'interferenza in questione era stata conforme alla legge.
58. L'obbligo di pagare la tassa permanente era stato giustificato non solo perché i consumatori disconnessi utilizzavano il calore fornito nell'edificio dal sistema distrettuale (per i motivi addotti dalla Corte costituzionale, cfr. il precedente paragrafo 17), ma anche per garantire una fornitura di calore sicura ed efficiente, una questione di interesse pubblico. La disconnessione dal sistema di teleriscaldamento ha influito sul bilancio energetico dell'edificio e ha ridotto l'efficienza del riscaldamento. La tassa permanente aveva lo scopo di compensare gli effetti negativi dell'uso del calore da parte degli utenti disconnessi, aveva rappresentato un pagamento per il loro privilegio di scollegarsi (e rimanere tali) dal sistema di teleriscaldamento, era stato un tentativo di prevenire una spirale di disconnessione da parte di altri consumatori nell'edificio, e aveva assicurato la protezione dei consumatori che utilizzavano il calore distribuito attraverso il sistema di teleriscaldamento. Il Governo ha sottolineato che l'addebito non era né "una tassa" né "una sanzione" ai sensi della invocata disposizione della Convenzione. Inoltre, un'imposta simile era esistita in diversi Stati della regione, il che rifletteva la tendenza dell'epoca.
59. Secondo il Governo, al momento di trasferirsi negli edifici i ricorrenti erano a conoscenza o avrebbero dovuto essere a conoscenza dell'impianto di riscaldamento dell'edificio e di quali fossero i loro obblighi in qualità di locatari. La tassa permanente comprendeva anche una tassa per il riscaldamento delle parti comuni dell'edificio (come scale e corridoi) utilizzate da tutti i residenti, indipendentemente dal fatto che essi stessi utilizzassero o meno il calore fornito dai fornitori del distretto. Inoltre, l'importo era stato modesto in relazione alla possibilità di ricollegarsi al sistema, che veniva offerto gratuitamente a tali consumatori.
60. Il Governo ha concluso che l'introduzione della tassa permanente da parte del Regolamento del 2012 e il modo in cui tale requisito è stato interpretato e attuato nei casi dei ricorrenti non ha costituito una violazione dei loro diritti di proprietà. Con riferimento all'ottavo ricorrente, essi hanno sostenuto che le procedure giudiziarie in questione, che avevano comportato un contenzioso tra privati, contenevano le necessarie garanzie procedurali ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione. Inoltre, lo Stato disponeva di un ampio margine di discrezionalità in questo ambito e l'onere permanente non aveva perturbato l'equilibrio tra l'interesse individuale e l'interesse generale, ossia la stabilità del sistema energetico e la fornitura sicura ed efficiente di calore ai consumatori collegati a tale sistema.

La considerazione della Corte
a) Principi generali

61. L'oggetto essenziale dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è la protezione di una persona da interferenze ingiustificate da parte dello Stato nel pacifico godimento dei suoi beni. Tuttavia, in virtù dell'articolo 1 della Convenzione, ciascuna parte contraente "garantisce a tutti coloro che si trovano nella [sua] giurisdizione i diritti e le libertà definiti nella [Convenzione]". L'adempimento di questo dovere generale può comportare obblighi positivi inerenti all'effettivo esercizio dei diritti garantiti dalla Convenzione. Nel contesto dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, anche nei casi di controversie tra persone fisiche e società, tali obblighi positivi possono richiedere allo Stato di adottare le misure necessarie per proteggere il diritto di proprietà. Ciò significa, in particolare, che gli Stati hanno l'obbligo di prevedere procedure giudiziarie che offrano le necessarie garanzie procedurali e che consentano quindi ai tribunali nazionali di giudicare in modo efficace ed equo qualsiasi caso in materia di proprietà (cfr. Anheuser - Busch Inc. c. Portogallo [GC], n. 73049/01, § 83, CEDU 2007-I, e Bistrovi? c. Croazia, n. 25774/05, § 33, 31 maggio 2007).
62. I confini tra gli obblighi positivi e negativi dello Stato ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 non si prestano a una definizione precisa. I principi applicabili sono comunque simili. Sia che il caso venga analizzato in termini di un obbligo positivo dello Stato, sia in termini di interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica che deve essere giustificata, i criteri da applicare non differiscono nella sostanza. In entrambi i contesti, si deve tener conto del giusto equilibrio da trovare tra gli interessi contrastanti del singolo e della comunità nel suo insieme. In entrambi i contesti lo Stato gode di un certo margine di discrezionalità nel determinare le misure da adottare per garantire il rispetto della Convenzione (cfr. Kotov c. Russia [GC], n. 54522/00, § 110, 3 aprile 2012 e Arzhiyeva e Tsadayev c. Russia, nn. 66590/10 e 3773/11, § 49, 13 novembre 2018).

b) Applicazione di questi principi al caso di specie
63. La Corte stabilirà se il comportamento dello Stato convenuto - indipendentemente dal fatto che possa essere qualificato come interferenza o mancato adempimento del suo obbligo positivo, o una combinazione di entrambi - fosse giustificabile alla luce dei principi applicabili.

i) La norma applicabile

64. La Corte osserva che il governo ha riconosciuto che l'imposizione della tassa per il riscaldamento ai ricorrenti, in quanto proprietari di appartamenti scollegati dal sistema di teleriscaldamento, ha rappresentato un'interferenza con il loro diritto al pacifico godimento dei loro beni. La Corte osserva che la tassa permanente è stata introdotta dalla Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia, un organismo statale. Mentre l'onere non incideva sul diritto dei ricorrenti di disporre (di dare in pegno, di prestare o di vendere) i loro appartamenti, esso imponeva un onere finanziario ai ricorrenti direttamente connesso al riscaldamento degli appartamenti e in grado di incidere sull'esercizio del loro diritto d'uso e sul loro possesso degli appartamenti. Di conseguenza, e nella misura in cui l'onere era il risultato di una regolamentazione statale, la Corte ritiene che la sua continua applicazione (cfr. i precedenti paragrafi 31 e 48) costituisse un mezzo di controllo statale sull'uso dei beni delle ricorrenti ai sensi dell'articolo 1, secondo comma, del protocollo n. 1.
65. Inoltre, la Corte rileva che il procedimento contestato riguardava le controversie permanenti in materia di oneri tra i ricorrenti e i fornitori privati di calore, questi ultimi i destinatari dell'onere. Il dovere della Corte, ai sensi dell'articolo 19 della Convenzione, di garantire il rispetto degli impegni assunti dalle parti contraenti della Convenzione, impone alla Corte di esaminare se il modo in cui i giudici nazionali hanno applicato il sistema di pagamento dell'imposta permanente abbia violato i diritti e le libertà dei ricorrenti tutelati dalla Convenzione. Come osservato nel precedente paragrafo 62, indipendentemente dal fatto che la situazione debba essere analizzata in termini di obbligo negativo o positivo dello Stato convenuto, i principi applicabili sono simili.
66. La Corte deve esaminare se il sistema in cui la tassa permanente per il riscaldamento funzionava ai sensi del Regolamento del 2012 era compatibile con l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, vale a dire se era legittimo, nell'interesse generale e proporzionato, vale a dire se ha trovato un "giusto equilibrio" tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della comunità e le esigenze della tutela dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo (cfr. Beyeler c. Italia [GC], n. 33202/96, § 107, CEDU 2000-I).

(ii) Se il provvedimento contestato fosse "previsto dalla legge".
67. Il primo requisito dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è che qualsiasi interferenza da parte di un'autorità pubblica nel pacifico godimento dei beni sia lecita. In particolare, il secondo comma dell'articolo 1, pur riconoscendo che gli Stati hanno il diritto di controllare l'uso dei beni, subordina il loro diritto alla condizione che esso sia esercitato mediante l'applicazione di "leggi". Inoltre, il principio di legalità presuppone che le disposizioni applicabili del diritto interno siano sufficientemente accessibili, precise e prevedibili nella loro applicazione (cfr. Bradshaw e altri c. Malta, n. 37121/15, § 52, 23 ottobre 2018). Quando si parla di "diritto", l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 allude a una nozione che comprende il diritto legale, nonché la giurisprudenza (cfr. Brezovec c. Croazia, n. 13488/07, § 60, 29 marzo 2011).
68. Nella fattispecie, la Corte concorda con il Governo (cfr. paragrafo 57) che l'onere permanente è stato introdotto ai sensi dell'articolo 53, paragrafo 2, del regolamento del 2012. Si trattava di diritto derivato, che la Commissione di regolamentazione dell'energia, un organismo statale, ha adottato ai sensi della legge sull'energia, come confermato dalla Corte costituzionale (cfr. paragrafo 17 di cui sopra). Si applicava a tutte le unità scollegate dal sistema di teleriscaldamento negli edifici residenziali dotati di un unico contatore comune (si veda il precedente paragrafo 12). L'articolo 66 di tali norme ha esteso tale requisito a tutte le utenze precedentemente scollegate, compresi i richiedenti (cfr. paragrafo 13 di cui sopra). Il Regolamento 2012 è diventato vincolante dopo la sua pubblicazione sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale.
69. Di conseguenza, la Corte è convinta che l'interferenza in questione fosse "legittima" ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.

iii) Se la misura persegue un "legittimo scopo di interesse generale".

70. Una misura volta a controllare l'uso dei beni può essere giustificata solo se si dimostra, tra l'altro, che essa è "conforme all'interesse generale". A causa della loro conoscenza diretta della loro società e delle sue esigenze, le autorità nazionali sono in linea di principio in una posizione migliore rispetto al giudice internazionale per apprezzare ciò che è nell'interesse "generale" o "pubblico" (cfr. Bradshaw e altri, citati sopra, § 54).
71. Nel caso in esame, il Governo ha identificato l'approvvigionamento di calore sicuro, protetto ed efficiente come l'obiettivo di interesse generale perseguito dall'accusa permanente. A tale riguardo, ha fatto riferimento all'effetto che gli utenti disconnessi hanno avuto sull'equilibrio del settore energetico e sulla qualità del calore fornito agli utenti collegati al sistema di teleriscaldamento negli edifici residenziali (cfr. paragrafo 58).
72. La Corte osserva che l'interesse pubblico invocato dal Governo non è stato invocato da nessuno dei giudici che si sono occupati della questione. Infatti, nella decisione che ha ritenuto compatibile con la Costituzione l'articolo 53, paragrafo 2, del Regolamento del 2012, la Corte Costituzionale non è andata oltre la constatazione che l'obbligo di pagare la tassa permanente era legato al calore che le utenze scollegate utilizzavano dalle unità collegate al sistema di teleriscaldamento degli edifici. Tale Corte ha considerato il canone permanente come il prezzo che le utenze disconnesse erano tenute a pagare per il calore ricevuto indirettamente da altre unità degli edifici riscaldati dal sistema di teleriscaldamento (si veda il precedente paragrafo 17). I tribunali di giurisdizione generale che hanno deciso le richieste civili dei ricorrenti hanno seguito questo approccio e hanno confermato le conclusioni della tassa permanente come prezzo per il calore ricevuto dai ricorrenti (cfr. paragrafo 9 sopra).
73. La Corte non ritiene che la logica dell'onere permanente individuata dai tribunali nazionali sia necessariamente incompatibile con l'interesse pubblico invocato dal Governo. Entrambi i concetti non si escludono a vicenda. Ciò è dovuto al fatto che l'uso indiretto del teleriscaldamento da parte di utenti disconnessi, in particolare se riguarda una quota considerevole del mercato interessato, come nel caso in esame (cfr. il precedente paragrafo 10), può essere considerato un fattore in grado di incidere sulla stabilità del settore energetico nel suo complesso. Inoltre, la tassa permanente applicata ad una specifica categoria di utenti disconnessi negli edifici residenziali (cfr. punto 12). Secondo la Corte, non è irragionevole che "la natura specifica delle abitazioni collettive" (cfr. paragrafo 17) abbia un'influenza sull'efficienza del sistema di teleriscaldamento a livello di edificio.
74. Il fatto che lo Stato convenuto abbia modificato la propria legislazione nel 2019 in modo che tale categoria di utenti disconnessi non sia più tenuta, a determinate condizioni, a pagare la tassa permanente (cfr. paragrafo 15 di cui sopra), non pregiudica necessariamente l'interesse pubblico invocato dal Governo. Essa può essere vista nel contesto del diritto dello Stato di esercitare il proprio margine di discrezionalità in questo ambito, in cui il funzionamento di una legislazione specifica ha conseguenze di ampia portata per numerosi individui (cfr. Fleri Soler e Camilleri c. Malta, n. 35349/05, § 76, CEDU 2006-X).
75. Dato che la nozione di "interesse pubblico" è necessariamente ampia e che gli Stati godono di un certo margine di discrezionalità per definire ciò che è "nell'interesse pubblico" (cfr. Jahn e altri c. Germania [GC], n. 46720/99 e altri 2, § 91, CEDU 2005-VI), la Corte è pronta ad accettare che l'obbligo di pagare la tassa di riscaldamento permanente imposta ai richiedenti i cui appartamenti sono stati scollegati dal sistema di teleriscaldamento può essere considerato come perseguito il legittimo obiettivo di garantire una fornitura di calore sicura ed efficiente.

iv) Principio del "giusto equilibrio
76. Sia l'interferenza con il pacifico godimento dei beni che l'astensione dall'azione devono trovare un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della comunità e le esigenze della tutela dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo. La preoccupazione di raggiungere tale equilibrio si riflette nella struttura dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 nel suo complesso. In ogni caso di presunta violazione di tale articolo la Corte deve pertanto accertare se, a causa dell'azione o dell'inazione dello Stato, la persona interessata abbia dovuto sostenere un onere sproporzionato ed eccessivo (cfr. Broniowski c. Polonia [GC], no. 31443/96, § 150, CEDU 2004-V; Zolotas c. Grecia (n. 2), n. 66610/09, § 40, CEDU 2013 (estratti); e Dickmann e Gion c. Romania, n. 10346/03 e 10893/04, § 90, 24 ottobre 2017).
77. Nel valutare il rispetto dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1, la Corte deve procedere a un esame complessivo dei vari interessi in questione, tenendo presente che la Convenzione mira a tutelare diritti "pratici ed effettivi". Essa deve guardare dietro le apparenze e indagare sulla realtà della situazione contestata. Tale valutazione può riguardare non solo le condizioni del provvedimento, ma anche l'esistenza di garanzie procedurali e di altro tipo che garantiscano che il funzionamento del sistema e il suo impatto sui propri diritti di proprietà non sia né arbitrario né imprevedibile. L'incertezza - sia essa legislativa, amministrativa o derivante da pratiche applicate dalle autorità - è un fattore da prendere in considerazione nella valutazione del comportamento dello Stato (cfr. Broniowski, § 151, e Bradshaw e altri, § 56, entrambi citati sopra).
78. Nel caso di specie, tutti i ricorrenti sono proprietari di appartamenti in edifici residenziali collegati ad una rete di teleriscaldamento. Le loro unità erano state scollegate da tale sistema prima dell'entrata in vigore del Regolamento 2012, su richiesta del precedente proprietario o dei richiedenti (cfr. paragrafo 4 sopra). All'epoca non esistevano regolamenti che imponessero il pagamento di una tassa di riscaldamento permanente. Come già detto, tale obbligo è stato introdotto, per la prima volta, con il Regolamento 2012. Di conseguenza, al momento in questione i richiedenti non potevano prevedere con ragionevole certezza che in futuro sarebbe stata imposta una tassa permanente o la portata di tale tassa.
79. I ricorrenti erano tenuti a pagare la tassa permanente a partire dal 1° ottobre 2012. Nulla indica che tale obbligo sia stato applicato retroattivamente. Esso è rimasto in vigore per almeno sei anni e mezzo, vale a dire fino al 1° aprile 2019, data di entrata in vigore del Regolamento 2019, che, come sopra rilevato, sembra fornire una base per l'esenzione delle ricorrenti dall'obbligo di pagare l'onere permanente dopo tale data (cfr. paragrafi 26, 27 e 31). Come già rilevato in precedenza (si veda il precedente paragrafo 48), l'onere finanziario complessivo a carico dei richiedenti non può essere considerato trascurabile.
80. La Corte osserva che le rate mensili della tassa permanente erano diverse per ciascun richiedente (cfr. paragrafo 7 sopra). In assenza di spiegazioni da parte delle parti, sembra che tale differenza sia stata correlata alla diversa superficie di ciascuna unità, come fattore determinante per il calcolo dell'onere permanente specificato nel sistema di tariffe per il riscaldamento (cfr. paragrafo 14 sopra).
81. D'altro canto, non è stato sostenuto che il quadro normativo che operava ai sensi dei Regolamenti del 2012 identificasse altri fattori relativi alle unità scollegate rilevanti per il calcolo dell'onere permanente, a differenza del sistema attuale ai sensi dei Regolamenti del 2019 (si veda il precedente paragrafo 15). Analogamente, non vi è nulla che suggerisca che tale quadro normativo consenta e stabilisca le condizioni alle quali tali unità possano chiedere un'esenzione totale o parziale dal pagamento del canone permanente.
82. Gli elementi di cui sopra (paragrafi 78-81) devono essere soppesati rispetto agli interessi in gioco nel presente caso.
83. In tale contesto, la Corte rileva che le autorità giudiziarie che si sono occupate della questione hanno giustificato il pagamento della tassa permanente da parte degli utenti disconnessi, come i ricorrenti, solo con riferimento ad essi, utilizzando indirettamente il calore fornito nell'edificio attraverso la rete distrettuale. In primo luogo, la Corte costituzionale ha stabilito il principio secondo cui gli utenti disconnessi dalla rete distrettuale erano "consumatori indiretti" del calore fornito attraverso tale rete ad altre unità dell'edificio. Secondo tale corte, "[dal momento che] utilizzano oggettivamente un certo calore ... [essi] sono tenuti ... a pagare per un servizio che ... ricevono" (cfr. paragrafo 17). In seguito a tale decisione, i giudici di giurisdizione generale hanno applicato lo stesso approccio e hanno respinto le argomentazioni delle ricorrenti contro i fornitori privati di calore. Così facendo, essi hanno fatto riferimento al fatto che negli edifici dei ricorrenti vi erano unità che erano collegate e utilizzavano il calore fornito dalla rete distrettuale ("consumatori diretti"). In tali circostanze, i tribunali hanno ritenuto le ricorrenti responsabili del pagamento della tassa permanente come "consumatori indiretti" per aver beneficiato di tale calore. Questo approccio è stato applicato a tutte queste unità scollegate. È stato solo nel febbraio 2018, oltre cinque anni dopo l'entrata in vigore della tassa permanente, che la Corte Suprema ha limitato l'ambito di applicazione di tale approccio escludendo una particolare categoria di unità se le condizioni specificate nel suo parere legale erano soddisfatte. Tuttavia, come osservato in precedenza (cfr. paragrafo 40), tale parere non è stato coerentemente applicato dai tribunali competenti.
84. Il suddetto approccio generale sviluppato dai tribunali nazionali si basava esclusivamente sulla premessa che i ricorrenti, in quanto consumatori indiretti ai sensi della Corte costituzionale, utilizzavano il calore distribuito nell'edificio attraverso la rete distrettuale. Nelle loro decisioni non vi era nulla che suggerisse che la tassa permanente che i ricorrenti erano stati condannati a pagare riguardasse anche, come sostenuto dal Governo (cfr. paragrafo 59), il riscaldamento delle parti comuni dell'edificio. Analogamente, non è stato sostenuto che la tassa permanente dovesse essere considerata un "contributo", ai sensi del paragrafo 2 del protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, riscosso per sostenere un servizio pubblico.
85. Nel procedimento in esame, i ricorrenti hanno contestato tale premessa adducendo argomenti relativi ad alcune questioni di fatto specifiche delle loro unità. Essi hanno inoltre chiesto misure e proposto prove pertinenti per una valutazione obiettiva di tale premessa in considerazione delle caratteristiche individuali delle unità (cfr. il precedente paragrafo 8). I tribunali hanno ignorato tali richieste e non hanno tenuto conto delle argomentazioni dei ricorrenti. Non hanno intrapreso un esame delle questioni di fatto contestate, ritenendo che "tutte le unità (scollegate) di un edificio collegato ad una rete di teleriscaldamento [erano] obbligate a pagare il canone permanente indipendentemente dalla loro posizione o dalla composizione o costruzione dell'impianto interno" (cfr. paragrafo 9 sopra). Di conseguenza, le singole circostanze relative alle unità dei ricorrenti non hanno avuto alcun ruolo nell'aggiudicazione giudiziaria delle loro pretese.
86. Mentre la Corte ha ammesso in precedenza (cfr. supra paragrafo 75) che il provvedimento complessivo poteva, in linea di principio, essere considerato di interesse generale, non può essere trascurato il fatto che esisteva anche un sottostante interesse privato di natura commerciale. In tali circostanze, sia gli Stati che la Corte, nel suo ruolo di controllo, devono vigilare affinché misure come quella in questione non diano luogo ad uno squilibrio che imponga un onere eccessivo ai ricorrenti (in quanto proprietari di unità scollegate), consentendo al contempo ai fornitori privati di calore di realizzare profitti potenzialmente ingiustificati. È anche in tali contesti che diventano indispensabili efficaci garanzie procedurali (cfr., mutatis mutandis, Bradshaw e altri, citato, § 64).
87. Alla luce delle considerazioni sopra esposte, la Corte non può accettare l'affermazione del governo (cfr. paragrafo 60) secondo cui esistono sufficienti garanzie procedurali nell'applicazione della legge da parte dei tribunali nazionali per quanto riguarda il pagamento della tassa per il riscaldamento in piedi. La Corte ritiene che nel procedimento in questione fosse necessario che i fatti contestati dai ricorrenti fossero accertati in modo preciso verificando le loro argomentazioni in merito al livello di teleriscaldamento fornito nell'edificio che le loro unità avrebbero utilizzato. Solo dopo la verifica di tutti i fattori pertinenti sarebbe stato possibile per le autorità domestiche effettuare una valutazione obiettiva dell'uso "indiretto" del riscaldamento in ogni singolo caso.
88. Dopo aver valutato tutti gli elementi di cui sopra, la Corte ritiene che lo Stato convenuto, nonostante il suo margine di discrezionalità, non abbia trovato il giusto equilibrio tra gli interessi in gioco e non si sia adoperato per garantire un'adeguata tutela dei diritti di proprietà dei ricorrenti nell'ambito del procedimento in questione, il che ha comportato l'interferenza finale dello Stato su tali diritti.
89. Alla luce di quanto precede, la Corte ritiene che vi sia stata una violazione del diritto dei ricorrenti al pacifico godimento dei loro beni, come garantito dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1.

APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
90. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:

"Se il Tribunale constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi Protocolli e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente un risarcimento solo parziale, il Tribunale, se necessario, dà giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".

Danni
91. Per quanto riguarda il danno pecuniario, il settimo e l'ottavo ricorrente hanno chiesto il rimborso della tassa permanente che avevano pagato, sulla base delle ordinanze del tribunale nel procedimento interno, al fornitore di calore.
92. L'ottava ricorrente ha chiesto inoltre 4.000 euro (EUR) a titolo di danno morale per il disagio e l'ansia subiti a causa della presunta violazione. Anche la settima ricorrente ha presentato un reclamo sotto questa voce, ma ha lasciato alla discrezione della Corte la facoltà di specificarne l'importo.
93. I restanti ricorrenti non hanno presentato una richiesta per la giusta soddisfazione in conformità con la regola 60 del Regolamento della Corte.
94. Il Governo ha contestato tali richieste in quanto infondate ed eccessive, sostenendo che non vi era alcun nesso causale tra la presunta violazione e il danno rivendicato.
95. Per quanto riguarda il danno pecuniario richiesto, la Corte ritiene che, in considerazione dei motivi in base ai quali ha riscontrato una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione, non è in grado di valutare la richiesta dei ricorrenti sotto questo profilo. A questo proposito, si riferisce alla possibilità a disposizione dei ricorrenti di chiedere la riapertura del procedimento ai sensi dell'articolo 400 della legge sulla procedura civile (cfr. paragrafo 11 di cui sopra), che consentirebbe un nuovo esame delle loro pretese (cfr. Bistrovi?, citato in precedenza, § 58).
96. D'altro canto, la Corte ritiene che il settimo e l'ottavo ricorrente debbano aver subito un danno non pecuniario derivante dal mancato rispetto dei diritti garantiti dall'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. In considerazione della relativa gravità della violazione e dell'introduzione del Regolamento del 2019, in base al quale i ricorrenti possono chiedere di essere esentati dal pagamento della tassa permanente, la Corte concede a questi ricorrenti 1.000 euro ciascuno per i danni non pecuniari, più l'imposta eventualmente esigibile.

Costi e spese
97. La settima ricorrente ha chiesto EUR 355 e l'ottava ricorrente EUR 115 per le spese e i costi sostenuti dinanzi ai giudici nazionali. Queste cifre comprendevano le spese processuali e notarili, nonché le spese che questi ricorrenti sono stati condannati a pagare nei procedimenti nazionali (alcuni bollettini di pagamento sono stati presentati come prova).
98. Per quanto riguarda il procedimento dinanzi al Tribunale, i ricorrenti hanno presentato le seguenti richieste: per le spese legali, il primo ricorrente ha chiesto EUR 320 per la preparazione di una serie di memorie; il settimo ricorrente ha chiesto EUR 1.970 per la preparazione della domanda e tre serie di memorie (queste richieste sono state calcolate sulla base dell'elenco tariffario dell'Ordine degli avvocati dello Stato convenuto); mentre l'ottavo ricorrente ha chiesto EUR 1.770 per la preparazione di una serie di memorie. Per quanto riguarda le spese postali, il settimo ricorrente ha chiesto 15 EUR e l'ottavo ricorrente 70 EUR. A sostegno sono stati presentati un contratto di acconto e dei bollettini di pagamento.
99. Il governo ha contestato le suddette richieste in quanto infondate, eccessive e non necessariamente sostenute.
100. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un ricorrente ha diritto al rimborso delle spese solo nella misura in cui è stato dimostrato che queste sono state effettivamente e necessariamente sostenute e che sono ragionevoli quanto al quantum (cfr. Edizioni Plon c. Francia, n. 58148/00, § 64, CEDU 2004-IV). Nel caso di specie, tenuto conto dei documenti in suo possesso e dei criteri di cui sopra, la Corte ritiene ragionevole concedere al primo ricorrente l'intera somma di EUR 320 da lui richiesta; per quanto riguarda il settimo ricorrente la somma di EUR 2.100; e per quanto riguarda l'ottavo ricorrente la somma di EUR 360, a copertura delle spese in tutti i capi, più l'imposta eventualmente dovuta.

Interessi di mora
101. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso di interesse di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Distrettuale Europea, al quale vanno aggiunti tre punti percentuali.

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,

Decide di aderire alle applicazioni;
Dichiara che la moglie della prima ricorrente, la sig.ra V. Strezovska, è legittimata a proseguire il presente procedimento al posto del suo defunto marito;
Dichiara le domande ammissibili;
Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'art. 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili; Dichiara che i ricorsi sono ricevibili,
a) che lo Stato convenuto paghi ai seguenti richiedenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la decisione diventa definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, i seguenti importi, da convertire nella valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data del regolamento:

i) per quanto riguarda il primo istante: 320 euro (trecentoventi euro), più le eventuali imposte a lui imputabili, per quanto riguarda le spese e i costi;

ii) per quanto riguarda il settimo ricorrente:

- Euro 1.000 (mille euro), più l'imposta eventualmente dovuta, a titolo di danno morale;
- Euro 2.100 (duemila cento euro), oltre all'imposta eventualmente dovuta, per costi e spese;
(iii) per quanto riguarda l'ottavo ricorrente:
- Euro 1.000 (mille euro), oltre all'imposta eventualmente dovuta, a titolo di danno morale;
- Euro 360 (trecentosessanta euro), più eventuali imposte a suo carico, a titolo di costi e spese;

(b) che a partire dalla scadenza dei tre mesi sopra indicati e fino al regolamento saranno dovuti interessi semplici sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Distrettuale Europea durante il periodo di inadempienza, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;

2) Il resto della domanda delle ricorrenti è respinto per giusta soddisfazione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 27 febbraio 2020, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte.

Abel Campos Ksenija Turkovi?
Cancelliere Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è lunedì 25/01/2021.