CASO: CASE OF KHIZANISHVILI AND KANDELAKI v. GEORGIA

Testo originale e tradotto della sentenza selezionata

Per effettuare una ricerca personalizzata clicca qui. Per conoscere il significato del livello d'importanza clicca qui.

CASO: CASE OF KHIZANISHVILI AND KANDELAKI v. GEORGIA

TIPOLOGIA: Sentenza
LIVELLO DI IMPORTANZA: 3 (limitata)
ARTICOLI: 01,P1-1

NUMERO: 25601/12/2019
STATO: Georgia
DATA: 17/12/2019
ORGANO: Sezione Quinta


TESTO ORIGINALE

CASE OF KHIZANISHVILI AND KANDELAKI v. GEORGIA
(Application no. 25601/12)
JUDGMENT
Art 1 P1 • Peaceful enjoyment of possessions • Domestic courts’ failure to explain satisfactorily their approach in establishing value of unlawfully demolished property and amount of compensation due
STRASBOURG
17 December 2019
This judgment will become final in the circumstances set out in Article 44 § 2 of the Convention. It may be subject to editorial revision.
In the case of Khizanishvili and Kandelaki v. Georgia,
The European Court of Human Rights (Fifth Section), sitting as a Chamber composed of:
Angelika Nußberger, President,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer,
Ganna Yudkivska,
Yonko Grozev,
Síofra O’Leary,
M?rti?š Mits,
Lado Chanturia, judges,
and Milan Blaško, Deputy Section Registrar,
Having deliberated in private on 22 October and 19 November 2019,
Delivers the following judgment, which was adopted on the latter date:

PROCEDURE
1. The case originated in an application (no. 25601/12) against Georgia lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by Georgian nationals, Ms Lali Khizanishvili (“the first applicant”) and Mr Giorgi Kandelaki (“the second applicant”), on 20 April 2012.

2. The applicants were represented by Ms L. Mukhashavria, a lawyer practising in the village of Kvemo Shukhuti. The Georgian Government (“the Government”) were represented by their Agent, Mr B. Dzamashvili, of the Ministry of Justice.
3. The applicants alleged, in particular, that the domestic courts had failed to afford them adequate redress for the unlawful demolition of their property, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.
4. On 20 September 2017 notice of the complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 was given to the Government and the remainder of the application was declared inadmissible pursuant to Rule 54 § 3 of the Rules of Court.
5. The first applicant died on 15 December 2017. Her mother, Ms Luba Khizanishvili, expressed her wish to continue the proceedings before the Court in her daughter’s stead.
THE FACTS
THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE CASE
6. The first applicant was born in 1963. The second applicant was born in 1955 and lives in Tbilisi.
7. On 31 October 2003, together with four other individuals and a company, the applicants acquired ownership of commercial premises situated in Tbilisi near the entrance to Gotsiridze metro station (“the building”) on a plot of land measuring 154 sq. m. The plot of land was registered in the Public Registry as being jointly owned by the above?mentioned individuals and the company. The building on the land, which was also registered as being jointly owned by those persons, had a total area of 494 sq. m: the first applicant’s property measured 76.82 sq. m (45.8 sq. m on the basement level and 31.02 sq. m on the ground floor), and the second applicant’s property measured 40.74 sq. m (25.67 sq. m on the basement level and 15.07 sq. m on the ground floor).
8. The case-file material indicates that the first applicant paid 12,500 Georgian laris (GEL – approximately 5,500 Euros (EUR)) and the second applicant paid GEL 12,000 (approximately EUR 5,300) for their respective shares in the building and their rights to the plot of land on which it was located. Various sources, including the financial stability reports issued by the National Bank of Georgia, indicate a significant increase in the value of real estate in Tbilisi between 2003 and 2007.
9. The building had been built on the basis of a permit obtained on 11 July 2002, and use of the building was approved by the relevant municipal authority on 28 May 2003.
10. On 29 January 2007 the applicants applied to the Tbilisi City Hall (“the City Hall”) with a request for information about rumoured demolition plans relating to the building and any legal grounds for such demolition. On the same date the Public Defender applied to the mayor, noting that any demolition of the building, which constituted property duly owned by the applicants and other private parties, should be carried out in accordance with the law and be based on a written order. It does not appear that either the applicants or the Public Defender received a response.
11. On 30 January 2007 the Supervision Service of the City Hall (“the Supervision Service”) demolished the building with a bulldozer. Media coverage of the events suggested that the demolition of the building formed part of a campaign initiated by the City Hall to demolish buildings which had been either unlawfully constructed or unsightly.
12. On 27 February 2007 the applicants instituted judicial proceedings, stating that the Supervision Service had demolished their property without any legal grounds, and claiming damages. They presented the findings of a private assessor in respect of the value of the property. According to that assessor’s report, the overall market value of the basement floor and the ground floor of the commercial premises, measuring 229.73 sq. m, had been 760,000 United States dollars (USD – approximately EUR 585,300). Given that the building concerned no longer existed, the expert gave a tentative price based on the value of an “analogous hypothetical building”.

13. On 1 May 2008 the first-instance court commissioned an expert examination with respect to the value of the demolished property. Among other things, the court asked the experts to determine the market value of the demolished property as of 30 January 2007. The resulting report – no. 1765/15/19, dated 30 October 2008 – was written by two experts from the National Forensic Bureau (“the first NFB report”). The report concluded that the total market price of the building at the time of its demolition would have been GEL 1,068,975 (approximately EUR 497,400). However, as the building had no longer existed at the time of the assessment, and certain documents concerning the materials used for its construction had not been available, it had been impossible to describe the real picture, and the experts had given guide prices (???????????? ????). The experts also noted that they had not had specific data (evidenced by documents) regarding information concerning the sale and purchase of similar buildings.
14. On 8 July 2009 the first-instance court ordered another expert examination in order to calculate the market price of the building excluding the value of the plot of land on which it had been located, as the applicants had retained ownership of the land. The resulting report – no. 1363/04/19 of 17 September 2009, issued by an expert from the National Forensic Bureau (“the second NFB report”) – concluded that the value of the plot of land in question was GEL 50,820 (approximately EUR 23,648), taking GEL 330 (approximately EUR 153) as the market price of each square metre. Therefore, the total market value of the building at the time of its demolition, without taking into account the value of the plot of land, would have been GEL 1,018,155 (approximately EUR 473,790): the first applicant’s share being GEL 187,501.74 (approximately EUR 87,252), and that of the second applicant being GEL 133,862.20 (approximately EUR 62,291).
15. On 9 November 2009 the City Court found that the demolition of the commercial premises had been unlawful. It noted the following:
“The court agrees with the claimants’ arguments and considers that the case material, as well as the video-recording [of the demolition], have incontrovertibly established the fact that the building owned by the claimants was illegally demolished by the ... Supervision Service of the Tbilisi City Hall ... especially considering that, despite the court’s instruction, the respondent failed to produce the material concerning the administrative proceedings relating to the demolition of the building, [and] the demolition of the building was carried out without any legal grounds. Accordingly, the Tbilisi City Hall is obliged to compensate [the claimants] for the damage inflicted upon [them].”
16. In making an award, the first-instance court noted that the applicants had not been deprived of the plot of land, therefore they should only be compensated for damage relating to the market price of the building. Relying on the findings of the second NFB report (see paragraph 14 above), the court allowed the applicants’ claims in part, and granted them damages as follows: the first applicant was granted GEL 187,501 (approximately EUR 87,252) and the second applicant was granted GEL 133,862 (approximately EUR 62,291). The second applicant was also granted the equivalent of USD 550 (approximately EUR 417) per month in the national currency in respect of the period from 1 February 2007 until the judgment was finally enforced, in relation to the rent he would have received under a rental agreement concluded on 1 August 2006 in respect of his part of the building. Similar requests by the first applicant and the second applicant in respect of a lease agreement concluded with another party were dismissed for lack of sufficient evidence.
17. On 1 February 2010 the applicants lodged an appeal with the appellate court. Among other things, they disagreed with the amount of the award made in respect of them, and with the lower court’s assessment of the evidence in that connection.
18. On 19 October 2010 the City Hall asked the appellate court to allow it to commission an expert examination by a panel of experts, owing to the fact that the State expert who had issued the second NFB report which the lower court had relied on to award damages had used a different method of calculating damage in other proceedings concerning similar facts, namely calculating the value of a property by means of material obtained as a result of its demolition. On the same date the appellate court adjourned the proceedings and instructed the City Hall to produce the results of the expert examination.
19. On 19 October 2010 the City Hall addressed the following request to the National Forensic Bureau:
“We request that you carry out a panel examination: (1) with a view to determining the value of the material [obtained] from the demolished commercial building at no. 2 Tsotne Dadiani Street in Tbilisi [a different location from where the applicants’ property had been situated], and (2) taking into account the letter from the Architecture Service of the City Hall ..., with a view to determining the value of the demolished commercial building in Tbilisi near ... the Viktor Gotsiridze metro station.”
20. The resulting report of the panel of three experts (including the author of the second NFB report) – no. 15737/10/1, produced between 20 October 2010 and 10 December 2010 (“the third NFB report”) – contained the following conclusions:
“The value of the material obtained as a result of the demolition of the commercial building located at no. 2 Tsotne Dadiani Street in Tbilisi is equivalent to USD 825 (approximately EUR 625) ...
The value of the material obtained as a result of the demolition of the commercial property near ... the Viktor Gotsiridze metro station in Tbilisi is equivalent to USD 9,880 (approximately EUR 7,490) ...”
21. The descriptive part of the third NFB report noted that, in a different expert examination, the value of the building at no. 2 Tsotne Dadiani Street had been calculated on the basis of adding the value of the plot of land to the value of the material obtained as a result of the demolition of that property.
22. As concerns the applicants’ property (the building near the Viktor Gotsiridze metro station in Tbilisi), the third NFB report noted the existence of the second NFB report, without elaborating on the latter’s findings regarding the value of the property in question. The authors of the third NFB report took note of letters from the Architecture Service of the City Hall, according to which only the underground side of the plot of land measuring 154 sq. m could technically have been used, without elaborating further. The experts then addressed the technical aspects of the building itself, as described in the second NFB report, and, on the basis of that information, concluded “the value of the [construction] material obtained as a result of the demolition ... is USD 20 [approximately EUR 15] per square metre, hence the value of 494 sq. m is equivalent to USD 9,880 [approximately EUR 7,490] ...” The third NFB report concluded by explaining the experts’ method for calculating “the market price of material obtained as a result of the demolition of immovable property.”
23. On 15 January 2011 the applicants obtained a linguistic report from a philology expert. The expert had been asked to assess whether the findings of the third NFB report (see paragraph 20 above) had been relevant to the questions which the experts had been asked. The philology expert noted that while the two questions put to the experts had concerned two issues: one related to “the value of material” and the other related to “the value of a commercial property”, essentially different things, “the answer in respect of both questions referred only to the value of the material obtained as a result of the demolition”. Therefore, the philology expert concluded that the second question, which had concerned the determination of the value of the building, had not been answered.
24. On 21 January 2011 the Tbilisi Court of Appeal agreed with the lower court’s finding that the demolition of the applicants’ property had lacked any legal basis (see paragraph 15 above), and upheld the first?instance court’s award in respect of the lost income (see paragraph 16, in fine), but overturned the lower court’s award in respect of pecuniary damage in so far as the value of the demolished building was concerned. The appellate court granted the applicants reduced damages: the equivalent of USD 1,536.40 for the first applicant (approximately EUR 1,164), and the equivalent of USD 814.80 (approximately EUR 617) in the national currency for the second applicant. The appellate court based its decision on the third NFB report produced by the panel of experts (see paragraph 20 above). In particular, it noted the following:
“... the appellate court shares the view of the City Hall that, in cases ... where the value of a plot of land was not being taken into account, the expert [who wrote the second NFB report, see paragraph 14 above] used a different method to calculate the value of demolished buildings ...
The appellate court considers that while assessing [the first NFB report], the first-instance court did not consider the experts’ comment that, in determining the value of the building, they had not had specific data (evidenced by documents) regarding information concerning the sale and purchase of similar buildings. In that same report, the experts explained that as the building had no longer existed at the time of the assessment, it had been impossible to describe the real picture, and they had given guide prices. The appellate court also cannot consider [the second NFB report] convincing, as the expert did not duly reason the research method [used].
Accordingly, in view of the above-mentioned considerations, the appellate court considers that the first-instance court violated Article 105 of the Civil Procedure Code when assessing the National Forensic Bureau reports of 30 October 2008 and 17 September 2009.
...
The appellate court explains that, in accordance with Article 173 of the Civil Procedure Code, if the opinions of several experts are in contradiction, a court may, of its own motion, commission another expert examination ... if the circumstances set out in Article 162 § 1 exist. Considering that, in the instant case, the expert examination report by a panel of experts was presented by a party (the Tbilisi City Hall), the court [does] not consider it appropriate to commission another examination of its own motion. The appellate court underlines the fact that [the following factors] were taken into account during the examination by the panel of experts: the type of building [in question], building material, and the prospects of developing the plot of land belonging to the appellants. The appellate court considers the report issued by the panel of experts to be credible, taking into account the fact that it integrates the results of the [earlier] expert examinations of 30 October 2008 and 17 September 2009, and [it] is consistent with [the approach taken in] expert examinations carried out in similar cases [reference was made to eleven pages in the case-file material].”
25. As concerns the linguistic report adduced by the applicants (see paragraph 23 above), the appellate court noted the following:
“In order to disprove the findings of the panel of experts, [the appellants] presented the conclusions of a linguistic expert examination which concerned the question of to what extent the answers of the panel of experts had been consistent with the questions put to them. According to the findings of the linguistic expert, the value of the commercial property had not been determined and the answer to the question provided by the experts was inadequate. The court cannot share the conclusions of the linguist, for the simple reason that several expert examinations were carried out in order to determine the value of the demolished building, and the panel of experts also assessed the findings of earlier expert examinations, consequently it is less likely that the experts moved away from the issue about which they were asked. As concerns the formulation of the answer, it may indeed not be straightforward from a literal perspective, but the assessment [of that answer] should be based on reasonable judgment.”
26. The court reached the following conclusion regarding the value of the demolished property:
“Assessing the totality of the evidence available in the case file, as well as that presented during the appellate proceedings, the appellate court considers it proven that the value of the demolished building ... should be determined as being USD 9880, with [the price of] 1 square metre [being] USD 20.”
27. On an unspecified date the applicants appealed against the Court of Appeal’s judgment. The case-file material does not contain a copy of their appeal on points of law.
28. On 12 September 2011 the Supreme Court of Georgia declared the appeals on points of law inadmissible. On 21 October 2011 the decision of the Supreme Court was served on the parties.

RELEVANT DOMESTIC LAW
29. At the material time, Article 105 (evaluation of evidence) of the 1997 Civil Procedure Code (“the CPC”) provided that the judges of a court had to evaluate evidence in accordance with their inner conviction, on the basis of a “comprehensive, full and impartial examination of the evidence”. A judgment had to set out the considerations underpinning that inner conviction.
30. In accordance with Article 162 § 1 of the CPC,
“If a judge does not have specialist knowledge regarding a matter relating to the case under consideration, a court may, of its own motion, commission an expert examination at any stage of the proceedings, only in circumstances where clarification of the matter is essential for deciding the case and it is impossible to reach a decision without it. In such cases, a court shall deliver a reasoned decision.”
31. Article 172 of the CPC provided that an expert opinion was not binding upon a court, which made its assessment in accordance with Article 105 of the Code, but a refusal to admit an expert report had to be duly reasoned.
32. Article 173 of the CPC provided as follows:
“1. If an expert opinion is incomplete or unclear, a court may, of its own motion, commission an additional expert examination, if the conditions provided for in Article 162 § 1 exist.
2. If a court does not agree with an expert’s conclusion on the grounds that it is not reasoned, [or] if several expert opinions are in contradiction with each other, a court may, of its own motion, commission another expert examination and order another expert or other experts to carry out the examination, if the conditions provided for in Article 162 § 1 exist.”
33. Article 423 § 1 (g) of the CPC provides for a right to request the re?opening of civil proceedings based on newly discovered circumstances if “there exists a final judgment (decision) of the European Court of Human Rights finding a violation of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and/or its Protocols in relation to that case, and the violation found [by the European Court] originates from the judgment to be reviewed.”

THE LAW
PRELIMINARY ISSUE
34. The Court notes at the outset that the first applicant, Ms Lali Khizanishvili, died after lodging the application on 20 April 2012, and that her mother, Ms Luba Khizanishvili, expressed the wish to continue the proceedings before the Court (see paragraph 5 above). The Government did not dispute that Ms Luba Khizanishvili had standing to pursue the application in the first applicant’s stead.
35. The Court reiterates that in cases where an applicant has died in the course of the proceedings, it has previously taken into account the statements of the applicant’s heirs or close family members expressing the wish to pursue the proceedings before the Court (see Centre for Legal Resources on behalf of Valentin Câmpeanu v. Romania [GC], no. 47848/08, § 97, ECHR 2014; Fartushin v. Russia, no. 38887/09, §§ 31-34, 8 October 2015; and Paposhvili v. Belgium [GC], no. 41738/10, § 126, ECHR 2016). In view of the above, and having regard to the circumstances of the present case, the Court accepts that the first applicant’s mother has a legitimate interest in pursuing the application, in so far as it has been lodged by the first applicant. However, for reasons of convenience, the text of this judgment will continue to refer to Ms Lali Khizanishvili as “the first applicant”, although her mother is today to be regarded as having this status.

ALLEGED VIOLATION OF ARTICLE 1 OF PROTOCOL NO. 1 TO THE CONVENTION
36. The applicants complained that the domestic courts had failed to afford them adequate redress for the unlawful demolition of their property, in breach of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which reads as follows:
“Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law.
The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties.”
37. The Government contested that argument.
The parties’ submissions
The Government
38. The Government asked the Court to strike the application out of the list of cases, because the applicants had lost their victim status after the domestic courts had found that their right of property had been violated and granted them compensation in respect of pecuniary damage, thus providing adequate redress for the breach of the Convention. According to the Government, the redress granted to the applicants had been the result of the domestic courts considering in detail the various reports obtained in the proceedings, with a view to determining the extent of the losses suffered by the applicants. According to the Government, it was within the domestic courts’ discretion to evaluate the evidence before them. As regards the amount of compensation awarded, the Government submitted that the Court’s case-law did not provide for there being full compensation in all cases. However, the compensation awarded to the applicants had been adequate with regard to the damage sustained. The Government also submitted that the applicants’ failure to request compensation for pecuniary damage before the Court as regards the allegedly inadequate compensation awarded in respect of the demolition of the building further indicated that they had lost their victim status.
39. The Government also maintained that the applicants had not suffered a significant disadvantage, owing to the fact that they had retained ownership of the plot of land on which the demolished building had been located. Furthermore, the first applicant and the second applicant had paid GEL 12,500 (approximately EUR 5,500) and GEL 12,000 (approximately EUR 5,300) respectively for their shares in the commercial premises and the plot of land on which it had been located. Those sums were considerably smaller than the amounts which applicants had sought in damages before the domestic courts. Accordingly, the award made by the domestic courts (see paragraph 24 above) had been sufficient and had not caused the applicants a significant disadvantage.

The applicants
40. The applicants submitted that they had not been awarded adequate redress for the unlawful demolition of their property. In this connection, they argued that the domestic courts’ findings – especially those of the appellate court – had not been sufficiently reasoned. They submitted that the appellate court had failed, among other things, to take due account of the findings of the linguistic expert examination produced by the applicants according to which the third NFB report had merely established the value of the demolished construction materials rather than the value of the demolished building. Therefore, the award of compensation had not corresponded to the real losses which the applicants had suffered as a result of the illegal demolition of their property. In such circumstances, the compensation amount had been insufficient, and had not deprived them of their victim status, nor had the disadvantage which they had suffered been insignificant. The applicants also submitted that the award had not been enforced.
41. Furthermore, relying on the letter addressed to them by a prosecutor concerning the fact that a criminal investigation into the unlawful destruction of their property had still been ongoing in April 2015, the applicants additionally complained that that investigation had been ineffective.

The Court’s assessment
Scope of the complaint
42. The Court observes that in their observations submitted to the Court after notice of the application had been given to the Government, the applicants stated that the award made by the domestic courts had not been enforced, without elaborating or providing any evidence or information as to the steps taken in that regard. Similarly, without providing a detailed explanation of their grievance, they also submitted that a criminal investigation into the unlawful demolition of their property had been ineffective. However, owing to the lack of information and the absence of evidence in that connection (see paragraph 40 above), and the fact that these issues were not part of the complaint of which the Government were given notice on 20 September 2017 (see paragraph 4 above), the Court will limit its consideration to the applicants’ initial complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, namely the alleged inadequacy of the compensation awarded for the unlawful demolition of their property.
Admissibility
43. The Court reiterates that, in accordance with its settled case-law, where the national authorities have found a violation and their decision constitutes appropriate and sufficient redress, the party concerned can no longer claim to be a victim within the meaning of Article 34 of the Convention (see, among other authorities, Scordino v. Italy (no. 1) [GC], no. 36813/97, § 181, ECHR 2006?V).
44. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court observes that the parties before it have not disputed the fact that the domestic courts expressly acknowledged a violation of the applicants’ right of property. However, the applicants and the Government disagree as to whether the applicants were afforded appropriate and sufficient redress in that regard. The Court considers that, in the particular circumstances of the case, the Government’s objection is so closely connected to the merits of the applicants’ complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention that it should be joined to the merits.
45. As regards the Government’s objection about the applicants not having suffered a significant disadvantage, it is likewise intrinsically linked to the merits of the applicants’ complaint. Accordingly, it must also be joined to the merits.
46. The Court further notes that the application is not manifestly ill?founded within the meaning of Article 35 § 3 (a) of the Convention or inadmissible on any other grounds. It must therefore be declared admissible.

Merits
(a) General principles
47. As the Court has stated on a number of occasions, Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 comprises three distinct rules: the first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of the peaceful enjoyment of property; the second rule, contained in the second sentence of the first paragraph, covers deprivation of possessions and subjects it to certain conditions; the third rule, stated in the second paragraph, recognises that the Contracting States are entitled, inter alia, to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest. The three rules are not, however, distinct in the sense of being unconnected. The second and third rules are concerned with particular instances of interference with the right to peaceful enjoyment of property and should therefore be construed in the light of the general principle enunciated in the first rule (see, among other authorities, James and Others v. the United Kingdom, 21 February 1986, § 37, Series A no. 98, and Beyeler v. Italy [GC], no. 33202/96, § 98, ECHR 2000-I).
48. In order to determine whether there has been a deprivation of possessions within the meaning of the second rule, the Court must not confine itself to examining whether there has been dispossession or formal expropriation, it must look behind appearances and investigate the realities of the situation complained of. Since the Convention is intended to guarantee rights that are “practical and effective”, it has to be ascertained whether that situation amounted to a de facto expropriation (see, among other authorities, Sporrong and Lönnroth v. Sweden, judgment of 23 September 1982, Series A no. 52, pp. 24-25, § 63, and Vasilescu v. Romania, judgment of 22 May 1998, Reports of Judgments and Decisions 1998?III, p. 1078, § 51).
49. Nevertheless, the applicable principles are similar, namely that, in addition to being lawful, a deprivation of possessions or an interference such as the control of use of property must also serve a legitimate public (or general) interest, and satisfy the requirement of proportionality (see, among other authorities, Béláné Nagy v. Hungary [GC], no. 53080/13, §§ 112-13, 13 December 2016). As the Court has repeatedly stated, a fair balance must be struck between the demands of the general interest of the community and the requirements of the protection of the individual’s fundamental rights, the search for such a fair balance being inherent in the whole of the Convention. The requisite balance will not be struck where the person concerned bears an individual and excessive burden (see Sporrong and Lönnroth, cited above, §§ 69-74, and Brum?rescu v. Romania [GC], no. 28342/95, § 78, ECHR 1999?VII).
50. The taking of property without payment of an amount reasonably related to its value will normally constitute a disproportionate interference that cannot be justified under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1. This provision does not, however, guarantee a right to full compensation in all circumstances, since legitimate objectives of “public interest” may call for less than reimbursement of the full market value (see, among other authorities, The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 December 1994, §§ 70?71, Series A no. 301?A; Papachelas v. Greece [GC], no. 31423/96, § 48, ECHR 1999?II; and Urbárska Obec Tren?ianske Biskupice v. Slovakia, no. 74258/01, § 115, ECHR 2007-XIII).

(b) Application of the above principles to the present case

51. Turning to the circumstances of the present case, the Court notes that the applicants were not deprived of their title to the plot of land on which the demolished building was located. However, it considers that by demolishing the building, which functioned as a commercial centre and parts of which were lawfully owned by the applicants (see paragraph 7 above), the administrative authorities interfered with the applicants’ right to the peaceful enjoyment of their possessions. The Court considers that such demolition amounted to a de facto expropriation of the building erected on the relevant plot of land (see Zammit and Vassallo v. Malta, no. 43675/16, § 54, 28 May 2019).

52. The Court notes that neither the applicants’ ownership of the property (see paragraph 7 above) nor the matter of whether the building had been constructed legally (see paragraph 9 above) was ever disputed at domestic level. Furthermore, the applicants were not officially notified of the demolition (see paragraphs 10-11 above). In this connection, the Court emphasises the domestic courts’ unequivocal finding that the demolition of the applicants’ property had lacked any legal grounds, and that no documents concerning the proceedings related to the demolition had been provided to the applicants or the domestic courts by the City Hall (see paragraphs 15 and 24 above). Having regard to those conclusions, which were not disputed by the parties in the proceedings before it, the Court considers that the interference with the applicants’ right of property was not lawful and did not pursue any public interest, no such interest having been argued either at domestic level or before the Court.

53. The Court will therefore consider the question at the core of the applicants’ complaint before it, namely whether the compensation afforded to them was adequate. While the domestic courts are normally in a better position to determine the existence and quantum of pecuniary damage (see Scordino, cited above, § 203), the Court has jurisdiction to assess whether the compensation was appropriate and sufficient within the meaning of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

54. In this context, considering what appears to have been a flagrant disregard of the applicants’ property rights (see paragraph 52 above), the Court reiterates that no considerations of “public interest” apply in the instant case. Therefore, it was not unreasonable for the applicants to have expected full compensation for the resulting damage. In this regard, the Court is confronted with a situation where the case-file material contains three different calculations made by State experts in respect of the value of the demolished property. However, it is not for the Court to identify which method of calculating pecuniary damage resulting from the demolition would have been more appropriate, or which expert report available in the case-file material was more convincing. Its role is limited to ascertaining two main issues: whether, in making the respective awards, the domestic courts satisfactorily explained their approach in establishing the value of the demolished property and hence the amount of compensation due in the face of the diverging factors and arguments; and whether they considered the resulting award fair and sufficient, considering the unlawfulness of the City Hall’s actions.

55. In this regard, the Court notes that when making the respective awards of approximately EUR 1,164 and EUR 617 (see paragraph 24 above) the Tbilisi Court of Appeal set aside the awards made by the first-instance court on the grounds that the expert examination on which the lower court had relied had not been sufficiently reasoned in respect of the method of calculating the damage. The appellate court relied instead on the third NFB report issued by a panel of experts and commissioned by the City Hall with its approval (see paragraphs 18-19 and 24 above), noting that the report in question had integrated the earlier expert examinations. However, in reality the third NFB report only referred to the second NFB report’s description of various technical aspects of the demolished building (see paragraph 22 above), rather than its substantive findings.
56. Furthermore, and more importantly, the Court notes that the City Hall had asked the panel of experts to determine the value of the demolished building (see paragraphs 18-19 above). By contrast, the resulting third NFB report referred only to the value of the construction material obtained as a result of the demolition (see paragraphs 20-22 above). In this connection, an opinion by a philology expert, obtained by the applicants, indicated that the third NFB report had essentially left the question about the value of the demolished building unanswered (see paragraph 23 above). Against this background, the appellate court’s position that it was obvious from the overall context of the matter that the report had determined the value of the building rather than the value of the construction material (see paragraph 25 above) is not convincing.
57. The Court does not lose sight of the fact that no explanation was provided in the third NFB report to justify or explain how the value of the material left after the demolition could be equated with the value of the building before its demolition. The appellate court’s explanation – that the calculation of the pecuniary damage was consistent with how the value of property was routinely calculated in similar cases (see paragraph 24 above, in fine), without explicit reference to such other cases or, more importantly, an explanation of how comparable those cases were – cannot be considered sufficient in the circumstances of the present case. In the face of these uncertainties, the Court particularly notes that the appellate court found no need to exercise its statutory right to commission another expert examination to clarify the matter (see paragraphs 24 and 32 above).
58. Moreover, the appellate court proceeded to make the respective awards (see paragraph 24 above) without giving any consideration as to whether such a method of calculation and, more importantly, the resulting awards were fair and sufficient in view of the obvious difference between the value of a functional building and the value of construction materials left after the demolition of such a building. As a result of such an approach, the applicants were not awarded full compensation for the unlawful demolition of their property. No satisfactory explanation was provided for the approach followed or for the level of compensation achieved. Contrary to the Government’s submissions, such a serious omission cannot be balanced out either by comparing the respective final awards and the initial price paid by applicants for their shares in the building and the plot of land on which the building was located (compare paragraphs 39, 8 and 24 above), or by considering that the applicants retained their title to the plot of land (measuring 154 sq. m.) on which the building had been located. The Court particularly notes that the possibility of the further use of that land appears to have been somewhat limited as per the explanation given by the Architecture Service of the City Hall that only the underground side could be used (see paragraph 22 above). Moreover, the importance, or even the meaning, of that fact does not appear to have been given any meaningful consideration save for merely noting it.
59. In the light of the foregoing considerations, the Court concludes that the applicants have not been awarded full compensation in respect of the unlawful demolition of their property. The Court therefore dismisses the Government’s objection concerning the victim status. Having regard to the Court’s findings and the reported significant increase in the value of real estate in Tbilisi between 2003 and 2007 (see paragraph 8 above), the Government’s objection that the applicants had not suffered a significant disadvantage must also be dismissed.

There has accordingly been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention.

APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 41 OF THE CONVENTION
60. Article 41 of the Convention provides:
“If the Court finds that there has been a violation of the Convention or the Protocols thereto, and if the internal law of the High Contracting Party concerned allows only partial reparation to be made, the Court shall, if necessary, afford just satisfaction to the injured party.”

Damage
61. In their submissions under Article 41 of the Convention, the first applicant and the second applicant claimed 136,800 euros (EUR) each in respect of the alleged loss of income, in relation to the rent which they would have received by renting out their property. They also claimed EUR 200,000 and EUR 143,000 respectively in respect of non-pecuniary damage.
62. The Government submitted that any award had to have a causal link with the violation established by the Court. Furthermore, the applicants’ submissions in respect of pecuniary damage were highly speculative and unsupported by evidence. Additionally, the domestic courts had assessed their claims concerning future income and, on the basis of the documents presented before them, had granted only the second applicant’s claim. As concerns the applicants’ claims in respect of non-pecuniary damage, the Government submitted that they were exaggerated.
63. The Court notes that the applicants’ initial complaint under Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 concerned only the compensation in respect of the value of the unlawfully demolished building, rather than the loss of income claimed under Article 41 of the Convention (compare paragraphs 40 and 61 above). Therefore, the Court does not discern a causal link between the violation found and the pecuniary damage claimed in respect of loss of income. By contrast, the Court notes that a finding of a violation of the Convention or its Protocols by the Court is a ground for re-opening of the civil proceedings and review of the domestic judgments in the light of the Convention principles established by the Court, as provided in the Georgian Civil Procedure Code (see paragraph 33 above). The Court considers that a re?opening of the civil proceedings and review of the matter in the light of the principles it has identified in this judgment would be the most appropriate means of affording reparation to the applicants (see Vulakh and Others v. Russia, no. 33468/03, § 54, 10 January 2012, and Gu?? Tudor Teodorescu v. Romania, no. 33751/05, § 57, 5 April 2016) in the particular circumstances of the case where there is a discrepancy between what the applicants have claimed before the domestic courts and before this Court and, additionally, given the insufficiency of the information available to the Court. Accordingly, the Court rejects the applicants’ claim in respect of pecuniary damage at this stage.
64. As concerns the applicants’ claims in relation to non-pecuniary damage, having regard to all the circumstances of the present case, the Court accepts that the applicants suffered non-pecuniary damage which cannot be compensated for solely by the finding of a violation. Making its assessment on an equitable basis, the Court awards the applicants EUR 3,000 each in respect of non-pecuniary damage, plus any tax that may be chargeable to them.

Costs and expenses
65. The applicants also claimed EUR 2,700 for the costs and expenses incurred before the domestic courts, and EUR 948 for those incurred before the Court.
66. The Government contested the claim as unsubstantiated.
67. According to the Court’s case-law, an applicant is entitled to the reimbursement of costs and expenses only in so far as it has been shown that these have been actually and necessarily incurred and are reasonable as to quantum. In the present case, regard being had to the absence of documents in support of the applicants’ claims and the above criteria, the Court rejects the claim for costs and expenses.
Default interest
68. The Court considers it appropriate that the default interest rate should be based on the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank, to which should be added three percentage points.
FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT, UNANIMOUSLY,
Holds that the first applicant’s mother, Ms Luba Khizanishvili, has standing to pursue the application in her daughter’s stead;
Joins to the merits the Government’s objections as to the loss of victim status and the alleged lack of a significant disadvantage, and dismisses them;
Declares the application admissible;
Holds that there has been a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No. 1 to the Convention;
Holds
(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicants, within three months from the date on which the judgment becomes final in accordance with Article 44 § 2 of the Convention, EUR 3,000 (three thousand euros) each, plus any tax that may be chargeable, in respect of non?pecuniary damage, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;

(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amounts at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

Dismisses the remainder of the applicants’ claim for just satisfaction.
Done in English, and notified in writing on 17 December 2019, pursuant to Rule 77 §§ 2 and 3 of the Rules of Court.

Milan BlaškoAngelika Nußberger
Deputy RegistrarPresident

TESTO TRADOTTO

CASO DI KHIZANISHVILI E KANDELAKI contro GEORGIA

(Domanda n. 25601/12)

GIUDIZIO
Art 1 P1 • Godimento pacifico dei beni • Mancata spiegazione soddisfacente da parte dei tribunali domestici del loro approccio nello stabilire il valore della proprietà demolita illegalmente e l'importo del risarcimento dovuto
STRASBURGO

17 dicembre 2019

Questa sentenza diventerà definitiva nelle circostanze di cui all'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione. Potrebbe essere soggetta a revisione editoriale.

Nel caso di Khizanishvili e Kandelaki contro Georgia,

La Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo (quinta sezione), riunita in sezione composta da:
Angelika Nußberger, President,
Gabriele Kucsko-Stadlmayer,
Ganna Yudkivska,
Yonko Grozev,
Síofra O’Leary,
M?rti?š Mits,
Lado Chanturia, judges,
and Milan Blaško, Deputy Section Registrar,
Dopo aver deliberato in privato il 22 ottobre e il 19 novembre 2019,
Emette la seguente sentenza, adottata in quest'ultima data:
PROCEDURA
1. La causa ha avuto origine in una domanda (n. 25601/12) contro la Georgia presentata alla Corte ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione per la protezione dei diritti dell'uomo e delle libertà fondamentali ("la Convenzione") di cittadini georgiani, sig.ra Lali Khizanishvili ("Il primo richiedente") e Giorgi Kandelaki ("il secondo richiedente"), il 20 aprile 2012.
2. I ricorrenti erano rappresentati dalla sig.ra L. Mukhashavria, avvocato praticante nel villaggio di Kvemo Shukhuti. Il governo georgiano ("il governo") era rappresentato dal loro agente, sig. B. Dzamashvili, del ministero della Giustizia.
3. I richiedenti addussero, in particolare, che i tribunali nazionali non erano riusciti a offrire loro un risarcimento adeguato per la demolizione illegale della loro proprietà, in violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
4. Il 20 settembre 2017 la notifica della denuncia ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 è stata data al governo e il resto della domanda è stato dichiarato irricevibile ai sensi dell'articolo 54 § 3 dell'Ordinamento della Corte.
5. La prima ricorrente è deceduta il 15 dicembre 2017. Sua madre, la sig.ra Luba Khizanishvili, ha espresso il desiderio di proseguire il procedimento dinanzi alla Corte al posto di sua figlia.
I FATTI
I.LE CIRCOSTANZE DEL CASO
6. Il primo richiedente è nato nel 1963. Il secondo richiedente è nato nel 1955 e vive a Tbilisi.
7. Il 31 ottobre 2003, insieme ad altre quattro persone fisiche e ad una società, i richiedenti acquisirono la proprietà di locali commerciali situati a Tbilisi vicino all'ingresso della stazione della metropolitana Gotsiridze ("l'edificio") su un appezzamento di terreno di 154 mq. Il lotto di terra è stato registrato nel Registro pubblico come proprietà congiunta delle suddette persone e della società. L'edificio sul terreno, anch'esso registrato come proprietà congiunta di tali soggetti, aveva una superficie totale di 494 mq: la proprietà del primo richiedente misurava 76,82 mq (45,8 mq al piano seminterrato e 31,02 mq. m al piano terra) e la proprietà del secondo richiedente misurava 40,74 mq (25,67 mq al piano seminterrato e 15,07 mq al piano terra).
8. Il materiale del fascicolo indica che il primo richiedente ha pagato 12.500 laris georgiani (GEL - circa 5.500 euro (EUR)) e il secondo richiedente ha pagato 12.000 GEL (circa 5.300 euro) per le loro rispettive quote nell'edificio e i loro diritti appezzamento di terreno su cui era situato. Varie fonti, tra cui i rapporti sulla stabilità finanziaria pubblicati dalla National Bank of Georgia, indicano un aumento significativo del valore degli immobili a Tbilisi tra il 2003 e il 2007.
9. L'edificio era stato costruito sulla base di un'autorizzazione ottenuta l'11 luglio 2002 e l'uso dell'edificio era stato approvato dall'autorità municipale competente il 28 maggio 2003.
10. Il 29 gennaio 2007 i richiedenti presentarono domanda al municipio di Tbilisi ("il municipio") con una richiesta di informazioni sui piani di demolizione che si riferivano all'edificio e su qualsiasi motivo legale per tale demolizione. Nella stessa data il Difensore pubblico ha fatto domanda al sindaco, rilevando che qualsiasi demolizione dell'edificio, che costituiva proprietà debitamente di proprietà dei richiedenti e di altre parti private, doveva essere effettuata in conformità con la legge e basata su un ordine scritto. Non sembra che né i richiedenti né il difensore pubblico abbiano ricevuto una risposta.
11. Il 30 gennaio 2007 il servizio di supervisione del municipio ("il servizio di supervisione") ha demolito l'edificio con un bulldozer. La copertura mediatica degli eventi ha suggerito che la demolizione dell'edificio faceva parte di una campagna avviata dal Municipio per demolire edifici che erano stati costruiti illegalmente o antiestetici.
12. Il 27 febbraio 2007 i richiedenti iniziarono procedimenti giudiziari, affermando che il servizio di supervisione aveva demolito le loro proprietà senza alcun motivo legale e chiedendo il risarcimento dei danni. Hanno presentato i risultati di un perito privato per quanto riguarda il valore della proprietà. Secondo il rapporto di tale valutatore, il valore di mercato complessivo del piano seminterrato e del piano terra dei locali commerciali, che misurava 229,73 mq, era stato di 760.000 dollari statunitensi (USD - circa 585.300 EUR). Dato che l'edificio in questione non esisteva più, l'esperto ha dato un prezzo provvisorio basato sul valore di un "analogo edificio ipotetico".
13. Il 1 ° maggio 2008 il tribunale di primo grado ha commissionato un esame di esperti in merito al valore della proprietà demolita. Tra le altre cose, il tribunale ha chiesto agli esperti di determinare il valore di mercato della proprietà demolita al 30 gennaio 2007. Il rapporto risultante - n. 1765/15/19, datato 30 ottobre 2008 - è stato scritto da due esperti dell'Ufficio nazionale forense ("il primo rapporto NFB"). Il rapporto ha concluso che il prezzo totale di mercato dell'edificio al momento della sua demolizione sarebbe stato di 1.068.975 GEL (circa 497.400 EUR). Tuttavia, poiché l'edificio non era più esistito al momento della valutazione e non erano disponibili alcuni documenti relativi ai materiali utilizzati per la sua costruzione, era impossibile descrivere il quadro reale e gli esperti avevano indicato i prezzi guida (???????????? ????). Gli esperti hanno inoltre osservato di non avere dati specifici (evidenziati da documenti) riguardanti le informazioni relative alla vendita e all'acquisto di edifici simili.
14. L'8 luglio 2009 il tribunale di primo grado ordinò un altro esame da parte di esperti per calcolare il prezzo di mercato dell'edificio, escluso il valore del lotto di terra su cui era situato, poiché i richiedenti avevano mantenuto la proprietà del terreno. Il rapporto risultante - no. 1363/04/19 del 17 settembre 2009, rilasciato da un esperto dell'Ufficio forense nazionale ("il secondo rapporto NFB") - ha concluso che il valore del lotto di terreno in questione era di 50.820 GEL (circa 23.648 EUR), prendendo GEL 330 (circa EUR 153) come prezzo di mercato di ogni metro quadrato. Pertanto, il valore di mercato totale dell'edificio al momento della sua demolizione, senza tener conto del valore del appezzamento di terreno, sarebbe stato di 1.018.155 GEL (circa 473.790 EUR): la prima quota del richiedente era di 187.501,74 GEL (circa 87.252 EUR) ) e quello del secondo richiedente pari a GEL 133.862,20 (circa EUR 62.291).
15. Il 9 novembre 2009 il tribunale comunale ha constatato che la demolizione dei locali commerciali era stata illegale. Ha notato quanto segue:
"Il tribunale concorda con le argomentazioni dei ricorrenti e ritiene che il materiale del caso, così come la videoregistrazione [della demolizione], abbiano definitivamente dimostrato il fatto che l'edificio di proprietà dei ricorrenti è stato demolito illegalmente dal ... Supervisione Servizio del municipio di Tbilisi ... soprattutto considerando che, nonostante le istruzioni della corte, il convenuto non è riuscito a produrre il materiale relativo ai procedimenti amministrativi relativi alla demolizione dell'edificio, [e] la demolizione dell'edificio è stata effettuata senza alcun motivi legali. Di conseguenza, il municipio di Tbilisi è tenuto a risarcire [i ricorrenti] per il danno inflitto su di loro ".
16. Nell'assegnare un premio, il tribunale di primo grado notò che i richiedenti non erano stati privati del terreno, quindi dovevano essere risarciti solo per i danni relativi al prezzo di mercato dell'edificio. Basandosi sui risultati del secondo rapporto NFB (vedere paragrafo 14 sopra), il tribunale ha accolto in parte le richieste dei richiedenti e ha concesso loro i danni come segue: al primo richiedente sono stati concessi 187.501 GEL (circa EUR 87.252) e il secondo richiedente era concesso GEL 133.862 (circa 62.291 EUR). Al secondo richiedente è stato inoltre concesso l'equivalente di 550 USD (circa 417 EUR) al mese in valuta nazionale per il periodo dal 1 ° febbraio 2007 fino a quando la sentenza è stata finalmente eseguita, in relazione al canone che avrebbe ricevuto in affitto accordo concluso il 1 ° agosto 2006 per quanto riguarda la sua parte dell'edificio. Richieste simili da parte del primo richiedente e del secondo richiedente in relazione a un contratto di locazione concluso con un'altra parte sono state respinte per mancanza di prove sufficienti.
17. Il 1 ° febbraio 2010 i ricorrenti hanno presentato ricorso dinanzi alla corte d'appello. Tra le altre cose, non erano d'accordo con l'ammontare del premio assegnato in relazione a loro, e con la valutazione del tribunale inferiore delle prove a tale proposito.
18. Il 19 ottobre 2010 il Municipio ha chiesto alla corte d'appello di consentirle di commissionare un esame di esperti da parte di un gruppo di esperti, a causa del fatto che l'esperto di Stato che aveva emesso il secondo rapporto NFB su cui la corte inferiore aveva fatto affidamento per risarcire i danni aveva utilizzato un metodo diverso per calcolare il danno in altri procedimenti riguardanti fatti simili, vale a dire il calcolo del valore di un immobile mediante materiale ottenuto a seguito della sua demolizione. Nella stessa data la corte d'appello ha rinviato il procedimento e ha incaricato il Municipio di produrre i risultati dell'esame degli esperti.
19. Il 19 ottobre 2010 il Municipio ha inviato la seguente richiesta al National Forensic Bureau:
“Vi chiediamo di effettuare un esame del pannello: (1) al fine di determinare il valore del materiale [ottenuto] dall'edificio commerciale demolito al n. 2 Tsotne Dadiani Street a Tbilisi [una posizione diversa da quella in cui era stata situata la proprietà dei richiedenti], e (2) tenendo conto della lettera del Servizio di Architettura del Municipio ..., al fine di determinare il valore di l'edificio commerciale demolito a Tbilisi vicino ... alla stazione della metropolitana Viktor Gotsiridze. "
20. La risultante relazione del gruppo di tre esperti (incluso l'autore della seconda relazione NFB) - n. 15737/10/1, prodotto tra il 20 ottobre 2010 e il 10 dicembre 2010 ("il terzo rapporto NFB") - conteneva le seguenti conclusioni:
“Il valore del materiale ottenuto a seguito della demolizione dell'edificio commerciale situato al n. 2 Tsotne Dadiani Street a Tbilisi equivale a 825 USD (circa 625 EUR) ...
Il valore del materiale ottenuto a seguito della demolizione della proprietà commerciale vicino ... la stazione della metropolitana Viktor Gotsiridze a Tbilisi è equivalente a 9.880 USD (circa 7.490 EUR) ... "
21. La parte descrittiva del terzo rapporto NFB ha osservato che, in un diverso esame di esperti, il valore dell'edificio al n. 2 Tsotne Dadiani Street era stata calcolata sulla base dell'aggiunta del valore della trama di terra al valore del materiale ottenuto a seguito della demolizione di quella proprietà.
22. Per quanto riguarda la proprietà dei richiedenti (l'edificio vicino alla stazione della metropolitana Viktor Gotsiridze a Tbilisi), il terzo rapporto NFB ha rilevato l'esistenza del secondo rapporto NFB, senza approfondire le conclusioni di quest'ultimo relative al valore della proprietà in questione. Gli autori del terzo rapporto NFB hanno preso atto delle lettere del servizio di architettura del municipio, secondo cui solo il lato sotterraneo del lotto di terra di 154 mq avrebbe potuto essere tecnicamente utilizzato, senza ulteriori elaborazioni. Gli esperti hanno quindi affrontato gli aspetti tecnici dell'edificio stesso, come descritto nel secondo rapporto NFB, e, sulla base di tali informazioni, hanno concluso che "il valore del materiale [di costruzione] ottenuto a seguito della demolizione ... è 20 USD [circa 15 EUR] per metro quadrato, quindi il valore di 494 mq equivale a 9.880 USD [circa 7.490 EUR] ... "Il terzo rapporto NFB si è concluso spiegando il metodo degli esperti per calcolare" il prezzo di mercato di materiale ottenuto a seguito della demolizione di beni immobili. "
23. Il 15 gennaio 2011 i richiedenti ottennero un rapporto linguistico da un esperto di filologia. All'esperto era stato chiesto di valutare se i risultati del terzo rapporto NFB (cfr. Paragrafo 20 sopra) fossero stati pertinenti alle domande poste agli esperti. L'esperto di filologia ha osservato che mentre le due domande poste agli esperti riguardavano due questioni: una relativa al "valore del materiale" e l'altra relativa al "valore di una proprietà commerciale", essenzialmente cose diverse, "la risposta rispetto di entrambe le domande si riferiva solo al valore del materiale ottenuto a seguito della demolizione ”. Pertanto, l'esperto di filologia ha concluso che la seconda questione, che riguardava la determinazione del valore dell'edificio, non aveva ricevuto risposta.
24. Il 21 gennaio 2011 la Corte d'appello di Tbilisi ha concordato con la conclusione della corte inferiore che la demolizione della proprietà dei richiedenti era stata priva di qualsiasi base giuridica (vedere paragrafo 15 sopra) e ha confermato la sentenza del tribunale di primo grado in relazione alla perdita reddito (si veda il paragrafo 16, in fine), ma ha annullato la sentenza del tribunale inferiore per il danno patrimoniale in quanto riguardava il valore dell'edificio demolito. La corte d'appello ha concesso ai richiedenti una riduzione dei danni: l'equivalente di 1.536,40 USD per il primo richiedente (circa 1.164 EUR) e l'equivalente di 814,80 USD (circa 617 EUR) nella valuta nazionale per il secondo richiedente. La corte d'appello ha basato la sua decisione sul terzo rapporto NFB prodotto dal gruppo di esperti (vedere paragrafo 20 sopra). In particolare, ha osservato quanto segue:
"... la corte d'appello condivide l'opinione del Municipio secondo cui, nei casi ... in cui il valore di un appezzamento di terra non veniva preso in considerazione, l'esperto [che ha scritto il secondo rapporto della NFB, si veda il paragrafo 14 sopra ] ha utilizzato un metodo diverso per calcolare il valore degli edifici demoliti ...
La corte d'appello ritiene che durante la valutazione [del primo rapporto NFB], la corte di primo grado non abbia preso in considerazione il commento degli esperti secondo cui, nel determinare il valore dell'edificio, non avevano avuto dati specifici (evidenziati da documenti) riguardanti informazioni riguardanti la vendita e l'acquisto di edifici simili. In quello stesso rapporto, gli esperti hanno spiegato che poiché l'edificio non era più esistito al momento della valutazione, era stato impossibile descrivere il quadro reale e avevano indicato i prezzi guida. Inoltre, la corte d'appello non può considerare convincente [il secondo rapporto NFB], poiché l'esperto non ha debitamente motivato il metodo di ricerca [utilizzato].
Di conseguenza, alla luce delle considerazioni di cui sopra, la corte d'appello ritiene che il tribunale di primo grado abbia violato l'articolo 105 del codice di procedura civile nel valutare le relazioni dell'Ufficio forense nazionale del 30 ottobre 2008 e 17 settembre 2009.
...
La corte d'appello spiega che, ai sensi dell'articolo 173 del codice di procedura civile, se i pareri di più esperti sono in contraddizione, un tribunale può, d'altro canto, commissionare un altro esame di esperti ... se le circostanze di cui all'articolo 162 § 1 esiste. Considerando che, nella fattispecie, la relazione dell'esame di un gruppo di esperti è stata presentata da una parte (il Municipio di Tbilisi), il tribunale [non] ritiene opportuno commissionare un altro esame di propria iniziativa. La corte d'appello sottolinea il fatto che [i seguenti fattori] sono stati presi in considerazione durante l'esame da parte del gruppo di esperti: il tipo di edificio [in questione], il materiale da costruzione e le prospettive di sviluppo della trama di terra appartenente alle ricorrenti. La corte d'appello ritiene credibile la relazione emessa dal gruppo di esperti, tenendo conto del fatto che integra i risultati degli [precedenti] esami di esperti del 30 ottobre 2008 e 17 settembre 2009 e [è] coerente con [l'approccio adottato] esami di esperti condotti in casi simili [si è fatto riferimento a undici pagine nel materiale del fascicolo]. "
25. Per quanto riguarda la relazione linguistica presentata dai richiedenti (v. Supra, paragrafo 23), la corte d'appello ha osservato quanto segue:
“Al fine di confutare i risultati del gruppo di esperti, [i ricorrenti] hanno presentato le conclusioni di un esame di esperti linguistici che riguardava la questione di fino a che punto le risposte del gruppo di esperti fossero state coerenti con le domande poste loro. Secondo i risultati dell'esperto linguistico, il valore della proprietà commerciale non era stato determinato e la risposta alla domanda fornita dagli esperti era inadeguata. Il tribunale non può condividere le conclusioni del linguista, per la semplice ragione che sono stati effettuati numerosi esami di esperti per determinare il valore dell'edificio demolito, e il gruppo di esperti ha anche valutato i risultati di precedenti esami di esperti, di conseguenza è inferiore probabile che gli esperti si siano allontanati dal problema sul quale sono stati invitati. Per quanto riguarda la formulazione della risposta, potrebbe in effetti non essere semplice da una prospettiva letterale, ma la valutazione [di quella risposta] dovrebbe essere basata su un giudizio ragionevole. "
26. Il tribunale è giunto alla seguente conclusione per quanto riguarda il valore della proprietà demolita:"Valutando la totalità delle prove disponibili nel fascicolo del caso, così come quelle presentate durante i procedimenti di appello, la corte d'appello ritiene di aver dimostrato che il valore dell'edificio demolito ... dovrebbe essere determinato come 9880 USD, con [il prezzo di] 1 metro quadrato [essendo] USD 20. "
27. In una data non specificata i richiedenti fecero appello contro la sentenza della Corte d'appello. Il materiale del fascicolo non contiene una copia del loro ricorso in merito ai punti di legge.
28. Il 12 settembre 2011 la Corte suprema della Georgia ha dichiarato irricevibili i ricorsi per motivi di diritto. Il 21 ottobre 2011 è stata notificata alle parti la decisione della Corte suprema.

II. DIRITTO NAZIONALE APPLICABILE
29. All'epoca dei fatti, l'articolo 105 (valutazione delle prove) del codice di procedura civile del 1997 ("il CPC") prevedeva che i giudici di un tribunale dovevano valutare le prove conformemente alla loro convinzione interna, sulla base di un " esame completo, e imparziale delle prove”. Un giudizio doveva esporre le considerazioni alla base di quella convinzione interiore.
30. In conformità con l'articolo 162 § 1 del CPC,
"Se un giudice non dispone di conoscenze specialistiche in merito a una questione relativa al caso in esame, un tribunale può, d'ufficio, commissionare un esame di esperti in qualsiasi fase del procedimento, solo in circostanze in cui il chiarimento della questione è essenziale per decidere il caso ed è impossibile prendere una decisione senza di essa. In tali casi, un tribunale emette una decisione motivata. "
31. L'articolo 172 del CPC prevedeva che il parere di un esperto non fosse vincolante per un tribunale, il quale effettuava la sua valutazione in conformità dell'articolo 105 del codice, ma il rifiuto di ammettere una perizia doveva essere debitamente motivato.
32. L'articolo 173 del CPC prevedeva quanto segue:
“1. Se un parere di un esperto è incompleto o poco chiaro, un tribunale può, d'ufficio, commissionare un esame di esperti aggiuntivo, se sussistono le condizioni di cui all'articolo 162 § 1.
2. Se un tribunale non concorda con le conclusioni di un esperto sulla base del fatto che non è motivato, [o]
se più perizie sono in contraddizione tra loro, il tribunale può, di propria iniziativa, commissionare un'altra perizia e ordinare ad un altro o ad altri periti di effettuare la perizia, se sussistono le condizioni previste dall'articolo 162 § 1".
33. L'articolo 423, paragrafo 1, lettera g), del CPC prevede il diritto di chiedere la riapertura di procedimenti civili basati su circostanze recentemente scoperte se "esiste una sentenza (decisione) definitiva della Corte europea dei diritti dell'uomo che constata una violazione della Convenzione per la protezione dei diritti umani e delle libertà fondamentali e / o dei suoi protocolli in relazione a quel caso, e la violazione accertata [dalla Corte Europea] proviene dalla sentenza da rivedere. "
LA LEGGE
QUESTIONE PRELIMINARE
34. La Corte nota all'inizio che la prima ricorrente, la sig.ra Lali Khizanishvili, è deceduta dopo aver presentato la domanda il 20 aprile 2012 e che sua madre, la sig.ra Luba Khizanishvili, ha espresso il desiderio di proseguire il procedimento dinanzi alla Corte (cfr. Paragrafo 5 sopra). Il governo non ha contestato il fatto che la sig.ra Luba Khizanishvili aveva intenzione di perseguire la domanda al posto della prima ricorrente.
35. La Corte ribadisce che nei casi in cui un richiedente è morto nel corso del procedimento, in precedenza ha preso in considerazione le dichiarazioni degli eredi o dei familiari stretti del richiedente che esprimono il desiderio di perseguire il procedimento dinanzi alla Corte (vedi Center for Risorse legali per conto di Valentin Câmpeanu v. Romania [GC], n. 47848/08, § 97, CEDU 2014; Fartushin v. Russia, n. 38887/09, §§ 31-34, 8 ottobre 2015; e Paposhvili v Belgio [GC], n. 41738/10, § 126, CEDU 2016). Alla luce di quanto precede e tenendo conto delle circostanze della presente causa, la Corte accetta che la madre della prima ricorrente abbia un interesse legittimo a perseguire la domanda, nella misura in cui è stata presentata dalla prima ricorrente. Tuttavia, per motivi di convenienza, il testo di questa sentenza continuerà a fare riferimento alla sig.ra Lali Khizanishvili come "la prima richiedente", sebbene oggi sua madre debba essere considerata con questo status.
VIOLAZIONE ADDOTTA DELL 'ARTICOLO 1 DEL PROTOCOLLO N. 1 ALLA CONVENZIONE
36. I richiedenti si lamentarono che i tribunali nazionali non erano riusciti a offrire loro un risarcimento adeguato per la demolizione illegale della loro proprietà, in violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione, che recita come segue:
“Ogni persona fisica o giuridica ha diritto al godimento pacifico dei suoi beni. Nessuno può essere privato dei suoi beni se non nell'interesse pubblico e soggetto alle condizioni previste dalla legge e dai principi generali del diritto internazionale.

Tuttavia, le disposizioni precedenti non pregiudicano in alcun modo il diritto di uno Stato di far rispettare le leggi che ritiene necessarie per controllare l'uso della proprietà in conformità con l'interesse generale o per garantire il pagamento di imposte o altri contributi o sanzioni. ”
37. Il Governo contestò tale argomento.
Le osservazioni delle parti
1.Il governo
38. Il Governo chiese alla Corte di cancellare la domanda dall'elenco dei casi, poiché i richiedenti avevano perso il loro status di vittima dopo che i tribunali nazionali avevano scoperto che il loro diritto di proprietà era stato violato e concesso loro un risarcimento per danni pecuniari, fornendo così un risarcimento adeguato per la violazione della Convenzione. Secondo il governo, il risarcimento concesso ai richiedenti era stato il risultato dei tribunali nazionali che hanno esaminato in dettaglio le varie relazioni ottenute nel procedimento, al fine di determinare l'entità delle perdite subite dai ricorrenti. Secondo il governo, era a discrezione dei tribunali nazionali valutare le prove davanti a loro. Per quanto riguarda l'importo del risarcimento concesso, il governo ha sostenuto che la giurisprudenza della Corte non prevedeva un risarcimento completo in tutti i casi. Tuttavia, il risarcimento concesso ai ricorrenti era stato adeguato rispetto al danno subito. Il Governo ha anche sostenuto che la mancata richiesta di risarcimento dei ricorrenti per i danni pecuniari dinanzi alla Corte per quanto riguarda il presunto inadeguato risarcimento concesso in relazione alla demolizione dell'edificio ha ulteriormente indicato che i ricorrenti hanno perso il loro status di vittime.
39. Il Governo sostenne inoltre che i richiedenti non avevano subito uno svantaggio significativo, a causa del fatto che avevano mantenuto la proprietà del terreno su cui era stato localizzato l'edificio demolito. Inoltre, il primo richiedente e il secondo richiedente avevano pagato GEL 12.500 (circa 5.500 EUR) e 12.000 GEL (circa 5.300 EUR) rispettivamente per le loro quote nei locali commerciali e il lotto di terra su cui era stato situato. Tali somme erano considerevolmente inferiori alle somme che i richiedenti avevano chiesto per i danni dinanzi ai giudici nazionali. Di conseguenza, la sentenza emessa dai tribunali nazionali (v. Supra, punto 24) era stata sufficiente e non aveva comportato uno svantaggio significativo per i richiedenti.
2.I richiedenti
40. I richiedenti presentarono che non avevano ricevuto il risarcimento adeguato per la demolizione illegale della loro proprietà. A tale proposito, hanno sostenuto che le conclusioni dei tribunali nazionali, in particolare quelle della corte d'appello, non erano state sufficientemente motivate. Sostennero che la corte d'appello non era riuscita, tra l'altro, a tenere debitamente conto dei risultati dell'esame di esperti linguistici prodotto dai richiedenti in base al quale il terzo rapporto NFB aveva semplicemente stabilito il valore dei materiali da costruzione demoliti piuttosto che il valore dell'edificio demolito. Pertanto, la concessione di un risarcimento non corrispondeva alle perdite reali subite dalle ricorrenti a seguito della demolizione illegale delle loro proprietà. In tali circostanze, l'importo del risarcimento era stato insufficiente e non li aveva privati del loro status di vittima, né lo svantaggio che avevano subito era insignificante. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre sostenuto che il premio non era stato eseguito.
41. Inoltre, basandosi sulla lettera indirizzata loro da un procuratore in merito al fatto che nell'aprile 2015 erano ancora in corso indagini penali sulla distruzione illecita delle loro proprietà, le ricorrenti hanno inoltre lamentato che tale indagine era stata inefficace.
B. La valutazione della Corte
1.Portata del reclamo
42. La Corte osserva che nelle loro osservazioni presentate alla Corte dopo che la notifica della domanda era stata data al Governo, i richiedenti dichiararono che la sentenza fatta dai tribunali nazionali non era stata eseguita, senza elaborare o fornire alcuna prova o informazione come ai passi compiuti al riguardo. Allo stesso modo, senza fornire una spiegazione dettagliata del loro risentimento, hanno anche sostenuto che un'indagine penale sulla demolizione illegale della loro proprietà era stata inefficace. Tuttavia, a causa della mancanza di informazioni e dell'assenza di prove a tale proposito (cfr. Paragrafo 40 sopra) e del fatto che tali questioni non facevano parte della denuncia di cui il governo è stato informato il 20 settembre 2017 (cfr. Paragrafo 4 sopra), la Corte limiterà la sua considerazione alla denuncia iniziale dei richiedenti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 alla Convenzione, vale a dire la presunta inadeguatezza del risarcimento concesso per la demolizione illegale della loro proprietà.
2.ammissibilità
43. La Corte ribadisce che, conformemente alla sua costante giurisprudenza, in cui le autorità nazionali hanno constatato una violazione e la loro decisione costituisce un ricorso adeguato e sufficiente, l'interessato non può più pretendere di essere vittima ai sensi dell'articolo 34 della Convenzione (cfr., tra le altre autorità, Scordino c. Italia (n. 1) [GC], n. 36813/97, § 181, CEDU 2006-V).
44. Passando alle circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte osserva che le parti in causa non hanno contestato il fatto che i tribunali nazionali abbiano espressamente riconosciuto una violazione del diritto di proprietà dei ricorrenti. Tuttavia, i ricorrenti e il governo non sono d'accordo sul fatto che ai ricorrenti sia stato concesso un adeguato e sufficiente risarcimento a tale riguardo. La Corte ritiene che, nelle particolari circostanze del caso, l'obiezione del Governo è così strettamente connessa al merito della denuncia dei ricorrenti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione che dovrebbe essere unita al merito.
45. Per quanto riguarda l'obiezione del governo riguardo ai richiedenti che non hanno subito uno svantaggio significativo, è parimenti intrinsecamente legata ai meriti della denuncia dei ricorrenti. Di conseguenza, deve anche essere unito ai meriti.
46. La Corte rileva inoltre che il ricorso non è manifestamente infondato ai sensi dell'articolo 35, paragrafo 3, lettera a), della Convenzione, né inammissibile per altri motivi. Essa deve pertanto essere dichiarata ammissibile.
3.Meriti
(a) Principi generali
47.Come la Corte ha più volte affermato, l'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 comprende tre norme distinte: la prima norma, contenuta nel primo periodo del primo comma, ha carattere generale ed enuncia il principio del pacifico godimento dei beni; la seconda norma, contenuta nel secondo periodo del primo comma, riguarda la privazione del possesso e la sottopone a determinate condizioni; la terza norma, contenuta nel secondo comma, riconosce agli Stati contraenti il diritto, tra l'altro, di controllare l'uso dei beni in conformità all'interesse generale. Le tre regole non sono, tuttavia, distinte nel senso di non essere collegate tra loro. La seconda e la terza regola riguardano casi particolari di interferenza con il diritto al pacifico godimento della proprietà e devono quindi essere interpretate alla luce del principio generale enunciato nella prima regola (cfr., tra le altre autorità, James e altri c. Regno Unito, 21 febbraio 1986, § 37, serie A n. 98, e Beyeler c. Italia [GC], no. 33202/96, § 98, ECHR 2000-I).
48. Per determinare se vi sia stata una privazione di beni ai sensi della seconda regola, la Corte non deve limitarsi ad esaminare se vi sia stata espropriazione o espropriazione formale, ma deve guardare dietro le apparenze e indagare sulla realtà della situazione lamentata. Poiché la Convenzione ha lo scopo di garantire diritti "pratici ed effettivi", si deve accertare se tale situazione equivale ad un esproprio di fatto (cfr., tra le altre autorità, Sporrong e Lönnroth c. Svezia, sentenza del 23 settembre 1982, serie A n. 52, pp. 24-25, § 63, e Vasilescu c. Romania, sentenza del 22 maggio 1998, Raccolta delle sentenze e decisioni 1998-III, p. 1078, § 51).
49. Tuttavia, i principi applicabili sono simili, vale a dire che, oltre ad essere legittimi, una privazione di beni o un'ingerenza come il controllo dell'uso della proprietà deve anche servire un legittimo interesse pubblico (o generale) e soddisfare il requisito della proporzionalità (si veda, tra le altre autorità, Béláné Nagy c. Ungheria [GC], no. 53080/13, §§ 112-13, 13 dicembre 2016). Come la Corte ha ripetutamente affermato, occorre trovare un giusto equilibrio tra le esigenze dell'interesse generale della collettività e quelle della tutela dei diritti fondamentali dell'individuo, essendo la ricerca di tale giusto equilibrio insita nell'intera Convenzione. L'equilibrio necessario non sarà raggiunto quando la persona interessata sopporta un onere individuale ed eccessivo (cfr. Sporrong e Lönnroth, sopra citati, §§ 69-74, e Brum?rescu c. Romania [GC], n. 28342/95, § 78, CEDU 1999-VII).
50. L'acquisizione di un bene senza il pagamento di un importo ragionevolmente correlato al suo valore costituirà di norma un'interferenza sproporzionata che non può essere giustificata ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1. Questa disposizione, tuttavia, non garantisce il diritto ad un pieno risarcimento in tutte le circostanze, poiché obiettivi legittimi di "interesse pubblico" possono richiedere meno del rimborso dell'intero valore di mercato (si veda, tra le altre autorità, The Holy Monasteries v. Greece, 9 dicembre 1994, §§ 70-71, Serie A n. 301-A; Papachelas v. Greece [GC], no. 31423/96, § 48, CEDU 1999-II; e Urbárska Obec Tren?ianske Biskupice c. Slovacchia, n. 74258/01, § 115, CEDU 2007-XIII).
b) Applicazione dei principi di cui sopra al caso di specie
51. Per quanto riguarda le circostanze del caso di specie, la Corte rileva che i ricorrenti non sono stati privati del loro titolo di proprietà sul terreno su cui si trovava l'edificio demolito. Tuttavia, essa ritiene che, demolendo l'edificio, che funzionava come centro commerciale e parti del quale erano legittimamente di proprietà dei ricorrenti (cfr. paragrafo 7), le autorità amministrative hanno interferito con il diritto dei ricorrenti al pacifico godimento dei loro beni. La Corte ritiene che tale demolizione equivaleva ad un esproprio di fatto dell'edificio eretto sul relativo appezzamento di terreno (cfr. Zammit e Vassallo v. Malta, n. 43675/16, § 54, 28 maggio 2019).
52. La Corte osserva che né la proprietà dell'immobile da parte dei ricorrenti (cfr. paragrafo 7) né la questione se l'edificio fosse stato costruito legalmente (cfr. paragrafo 9) sono mai state contestate a livello nazionale. Inoltre, ai richiedenti non è stata ufficialmente notificata la demolizione (cfr. paragrafi 10-11). A questo proposito, la Corte sottolinea l'inequivocabile constatazione dei tribunali nazionali che la demolizione della proprietà dei richiedenti era priva di qualsiasi fondamento giuridico e che il Municipio non aveva fornito ai richiedenti o ai tribunali nazionali alcun documento relativo al procedimento di demolizione (cfr. paragrafi 15 e 24). Alla luce di tali conclusioni, che non sono state contestate dalle parti nel procedimento dinanzi ad esso pendente, la Corte ritiene che l'interferenza con il diritto di proprietà dei ricorrenti non fosse legittima e non perseguisse alcun interesse pubblico, in quanto tale interesse non è stato sostenuto né a livello nazionale né dinanzi alla Corte.
53. Il Tribunale considererà pertanto la questione al centro della denuncia presentata dai ricorrenti dinanzi ad esso, vale a dire se il risarcimento loro concesso fosse adeguato. Mentre i tribunali nazionali sono normalmente in una posizione migliore per determinare l'esistenza e la quantificazione del danno pecuniario (cfr. Scordino, sopra citato, § 203), la Corte è competente a valutare se il risarcimento era adeguato e sufficiente ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
54. In questo contesto, considerando quella che sembra essere stata una flagrante inosservanza dei diritti di proprietà dei ricorrenti (si veda il precedente paragrafo 52), la Corte ribadisce che non si applicano considerazioni di "interesse pubblico" nel caso in questione. Pertanto, non era irragionevole che i ricorrenti si aspettassero un pieno risarcimento dei danni risultanti. A questo proposito, la Corte si trova di fronte a una situazione in cui il materiale del fascicolo contiene tre diversi calcoli effettuati da esperti statali in relazione al valore dei beni demoliti. Tuttavia, non spetta alla Corte individuare quale metodo di calcolo dei danni pecuniari risultanti dalla demolizione sarebbe stato più appropriato o quale perizia disponibile nel materiale del fascicolo fosse più convincente. Il suo ruolo è limitato all'accertamento di due questioni principali: se, nell'effettuare i rispettivi premi, i giudici nazionali abbiano spiegato in modo soddisfacente il loro approccio nel determinare il valore dei beni demoliti e quindi l'ammontare del risarcimento dovuto a fronte di fattori e argomenti divergenti; e se abbiano ritenuto equo e sufficiente il conseguente premio, considerando l'illegittimità delle azioni del Comune.
55. A tale riguardo, la Corte rileva che la Corte d'Appello di Tbilisi, nell'effettuare i rispettivi riconoscimenti di circa 1.164 euro e 617 euro (v. supra, punto 24), ha annullato i riconoscimenti effettuati dal tribunale di primo grado, in quanto la perizia su cui si era basato il tribunale di primo grado non era stata sufficientemente motivata per quanto riguarda il metodo di calcolo del danno. La corte d'appello si è invece basata sulla terza perizia NFB emessa da una commissione di esperti e commissionata dal Comune con la sua approvazione (cfr. paragrafi 18-19 e 24), rilevando che la perizia in questione aveva integrato le perizie precedenti. In realtà, tuttavia, la terza relazione della NFB si riferiva solo alla descrizione di vari aspetti tecnici dell'edificio demolito contenuta nella seconda relazione della NFB (cfr. paragrafo 22), piuttosto che ai suoi risultati sostanziali.
56. Inoltre, e cosa ancora più importante, la Corte osserva che il municipio aveva chiesto al gruppo di esperti di determinare il valore dell'edificio demolito (cfr. paragrafi 18-19). Per contro, la terza relazione della NFB che ne è risultata si riferiva solo al valore del materiale da costruzione ottenuto a seguito della demolizione (cfr. paragrafi 20-22). A questo proposito, un parere di un esperto di filologia, ottenuto dai richiedenti, indicava che il terzo rapporto NFB aveva sostanzialmente lasciato senza risposta la questione del valore dell'edificio demolito (cfr. paragrafo 23). In questo contesto, la posizione della corte d'appello, secondo cui era evidente dal contesto generale della questione che la relazione aveva determinato il valore dell'edificio piuttosto che il valore del materiale da costruzione (cfr. il precedente paragrafo 25), non è convincente.
57. La Corte non perde di vista il fatto che nella terza relazione della NFB non è stata fornita alcuna spiegazione per giustificare o spiegare come il valore del materiale rimasto dopo la demolizione potesse essere equiparato al valore dell'edificio prima della sua demolizione. La spiegazione della corte d'appello - che il calcolo del danno pecuniario era coerente con il modo in cui il valore dei beni è stato regolarmente calcolato in casi simili (cfr. il precedente paragrafo 24, in fine), senza un riferimento esplicito a tali altri casi o, cosa più importante, una spiegazione di quanto fossero comparabili tali casi - non può essere considerata sufficiente nelle circostanze del presente caso. Di fronte a queste incertezze, la Corte rileva in particolare che la corte d'appello non ha ritenuto necessario esercitare il suo diritto statutario di commissionare un altro esame di perizia per chiarire la questione (cfr. paragrafi 24 e 32).
58. Inoltre, la corte d'appello ha proceduto ad effettuare i rispettivi premi (si veda il precedente paragrafo 24) senza considerare se tale metodo di calcolo e, cosa ancora più importante, i premi risultanti fossero equi e sufficienti in considerazione dell'evidente differenza tra il valore di un edificio funzionale e il valore dei materiali da costruzione rimasti dopo la demolizione di tale edificio. Come risultato di tale approccio, ai ricorrenti non è stato concesso un risarcimento completo per l'illegittima demolizione dei loro beni. Non è stata fornita alcuna spiegazione soddisfacente per l'approccio seguito o per il livello di compensazione raggiunto. Contrariamente a quanto sostenuto dal Governo, una tale grave omissione non può essere compensata né confrontando i rispettivi premi finali e il prezzo iniziale pagato dai ricorrenti per le loro quote nell'edificio e nel terreno sul quale l'edificio era situato (confrontare i paragrafi 39, 8 e 24 di cui sopra), né considerando che i ricorrenti hanno mantenuto il loro titolo di proprietà sul terreno (di 154 mq.) sul quale l'edificio era stato situato. La Corte rileva in particolare che la possibilità di un ulteriore utilizzo di quel terreno sembra essere stata in qualche modo limitata, in base alla spiegazione fornita dal Servizio di Architettura del Municipio che solo il lato sotterraneo poteva essere utilizzato (si veda il precedente paragrafo 22). Inoltre, l'importanza, o addirittura il significato, di tale fatto non sembra essere stato preso in considerazione in modo significativo, se non per il semplice fatto di averlo notato.
59. Alla luce delle considerazioni che precedono, la Corte conclude che ai ricorrenti non è stato concesso un risarcimento completo per l'illegittima demolizione dei loro beni. La Corte respinge pertanto l'obiezione del Governo relativa allo status di vittima. Alla luce delle conclusioni della Corte e del segnalato significativo aumento del valore degli immobili a Tbilisi tra il 2003 e il 2007 (si veda il precedente paragrafo 8), deve essere respinta anche l'obiezione del Governo secondo cui i ricorrenti non hanno subito uno svantaggio significativo.
Di conseguenza, vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione.
APPLICAZIONE DELL'ARTICOLO 41 DELLA CONVENZIONE
60. L'articolo 41 della Convenzione prevede:
"Se il Tribunale constata una violazione della Convenzione o dei suoi protocolli, e se il diritto interno dell'Alta Parte contraente interessata consente un risarcimento solo parziale, il Tribunale, se necessario, dà giusta soddisfazione alla parte lesa".
A. Danni
61. Nelle loro osservazioni ai sensi dell'art. 41 della Convenzione, il primo e il secondo ricorrente hanno chiesto 136.800 euro (EUR) ciascuno per l'asserita perdita di reddito, in relazione all'affitto che avrebbero ricevuto affittando la loro proprietà. Hanno inoltre chiesto rispettivamente EUR 200.000 e EUR 143.000 per danni non patrimoniali.
62. Il governo ha sostenuto che qualsiasi aggiudicazione doveva avere un nesso causale con la violazione stabilita dalla Corte. Inoltre, le affermazioni dei ricorrenti in merito ai danni pecuniari erano altamente speculative e non corroborate da prove. Inoltre, i tribunali nazionali avevano valutato le loro richieste relative al reddito futuro e, sulla base dei documenti presentati davanti a loro, avevano concesso solo la seconda richiesta del ricorrente. Per quanto riguarda le richieste delle ricorrenti relative ai danni non pecuniari, il governo ha sostenuto che esse erano esagerate.
63. La Corte rileva che la denuncia iniziale dei ricorrenti ai sensi dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 riguardava solo il risarcimento del valore dell'edificio illegittimamente demolito, piuttosto che la perdita di reddito richiesta ai sensi dell'articolo 41 della Convenzione (confrontare i precedenti paragrafi 40 e 61). Pertanto, la Corte non ravvisa un nesso causale tra la violazione riscontrata e il danno patrimoniale richiesto in relazione alla perdita di reddito. Per contro, la Corte rileva che la constatazione di una violazione della convenzione o dei suoi protocolli da parte della Corte costituisce un motivo di riapertura del procedimento civile e di riesame delle sentenze interne alla luce dei principi della convenzione stabiliti dalla Corte, come previsto dal codice di procedura civile georgiano (cfr. il precedente paragrafo 33). La Corte ritiene che la riapertura del procedimento civile e il riesame della questione alla luce dei principi che ha individuato in questa sentenza sarebbero il mezzo più appropriato per offrire un risarcimento ai ricorrenti (cfr. Vulakh e altri contro la Russia, no. 33468/03, § 54, 10 gennaio 2012, e Gu?? Tudor Teodorescu c. Romania, n. 33751/05, § 57, 5 aprile 2016) nelle particolari circostanze del caso in cui vi è una discrepanza tra ciò che i richiedenti hanno sostenuto dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e dinanzi a questa Corte e, inoltre, data l'insufficienza delle informazioni a disposizione della Corte. Di conseguenza, la Corte respinge, in questa fase, la richiesta dei ricorrenti relativa ai danni pecuniari.
64. Per quanto riguarda le richieste delle ricorrenti in relazione ai danni non pecuniari, tenuto conto di tutte le circostanze del presente caso, la Corte accetta che le ricorrenti hanno subito danni non pecuniari che non possono essere risarciti solo con la constatazione di una violazione. Effettuando la sua valutazione su una base equa, la Corte concede alle ricorrenti EUR 3.000 ciascuna per i danni non pecuniari, più le imposte che possono essere loro addebitate.
B. Costi e spese
65. Le ricorrenti hanno inoltre chiesto EUR 2.700 per le spese e i costi sostenuti dinanzi ai tribunali nazionali e EUR 948 per quelli sostenuti dinanzi al Tribunale.

66. Il governo ha contestato la richiesta in quanto infondata.
67. Secondo la giurisprudenza della Corte, un richiedente ha diritto al rimborso delle spese e dei costi solo nella misura in cui sia stato dimostrato che questi sono stati effettivamente e necessariamente sostenuti e che sono ragionevoli in termini quantitativi. Nel caso di specie, tenuto conto dell'assenza di documenti a sostegno delle domande delle ricorrenti e dei criteri di cui sopra, il Tribunale respinge la domanda di rimborso delle spese.
C. Interessi di mora
68. La Corte ritiene opportuno che il tasso di interesse di mora sia basato sul tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca centrale europea, al quale vanno aggiunti tre punti percentuali.

PER QUESTI MOTIVI, LA CORTE, ALL'UNANIMITÀ,
1.Sostiene che la madre della prima ricorrente, la sig.ra Luba Khizanishvili, è legittimata a presentare la domanda al posto della figlia;
2.Si unisce al merito delle obiezioni del Governo sulla perdita dello status di vittima e sulla presunta mancanza di un significativo svantaggio, e le respinge;
3.Dichiara il ricorso ammissibile;
4.Dichiara che vi è stata una violazione dell'articolo 1 del Protocollo n. 1 della Convenzione;
5. Detenuto
(a) che lo Stato convenuto deve pagare ai ricorrenti, entro tre mesi dalla data in cui la sentenza diventa definitiva ai sensi dell'articolo 44 § 2 della Convenzione, 3.000 euro (tremila euro) ciascuno, oltre alle imposte che possono essere applicate, per danni non pecuniari, da convertire nella valuta dello Stato convenuto al tasso applicabile alla data del regolamento;
(b) che a partire dalla scadenza dei tre mesi sopra indicati fino al regolamento saranno dovuti interessi semplici sugli importi di cui sopra ad un tasso pari al tasso sulle operazioni di rifinanziamento marginale della Banca Centrale Europea durante il periodo di inadempienza, maggiorato di tre punti percentuali;
6) Il resto del credito delle ricorrenti è respinto per giusta soddisfazione.
Fatto in inglese, e notificato per iscritto il 17 dicembre 2019, ai sensi dell'articolo 77 §§ 2 e 3 del Regolamento della Corte. (a) Principi generali
Milan Blasko
Vice cancelliere
Angelika Nußberger
Presidente


DATA DI VALIDITÀ: La data dell'ultimo controllo di validità dei testi è martedì 27/07/2021.